Calif.) KPFK (Radio station : Los Angeles.

KPFK folio (Volume July 5-Aug 1 1965) online

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are th^TTT^^ -""^-^^^^iH^'^a^^eTi. 3.




Fvrd, Fancies,




sprottle (sprot'l), v. i. A provincial English
torm of sprattle.



t^r.



tH.



supportfult (su-port'fTil), a. [< support + -ful.'\
Abounding with support ; affording support.
[Rare.]



3. To uphold "by aid, encouragement, or coun-
tenance: keep from shrinking, sinking, fail-
ing, or fainting : as, to support the courage or
spirits.

support (su-porf), V. [< ME. supporten, < OF.
supporter, F. supporter = Sp. suportar = Pg. sitp-
portar = It. supportare, sopportare, < L. snppor-
■tare, subportare, carry, bring, convey, < sub, un-
der, + portare, bear or carry along, < •/ 2for,
go: seeport^.'] I. trans. 1. To bear; prop up;
bear the weight of ; uphold ; sustain ; keep from
falling or sinking.




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KPFK 90.7



FOLIO



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j^PI^Program Folio



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3729 Cahuenga Boulevard, North Hollywood. TR 7-5583, 984-2420. Mailing address: KPFK, Los Angeles 38.

The Program Folio is published bi-weekly by KPFK as a service to those listeners who support KPFK's free and
unique programming by voluntary subscriptions. The basic annual subscription is $15.00. Contri-

butions are tax-deductible. Subscriptions are transferable to KPFA and WBAI.

KPFK is a non-commercial station owned by Pacifica, a non-profit educational foundation. Other Pacifica stations are
KPFA in Northern California and WBAI in New York City.

KPFK transmits from Mt. Wilson with 110,000 watts, e.r.p. Normal broadcast hours are 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight
weekdays, and 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight weekends. Dates after listings refer to past or future duplicate broadcasts.
Numbers in parentheses following concerts refer to playing time in minutes.

Robert Adler is Manager and Program Director.



Editorial — Robert Adler, Station Manager
Cover Montage: Liza Williams

We hope the Folio cover gave you a chuckle. We've always tended to take
money seriously at KPFK. There are still hundreds of contribution envelopes in
the hands of our subscribers as a result of our special station stability drive. There's
one way to turn the question of money, if not into a laughing matter, at least
into a happy chuckle, and that is to use these envelopes. A gift now will have a
special joyful purpose. It will help us celebrate our sixth birthday. Yes, on July
26th, KPFK will be six years old, and the staff wishes you, the listener-subscriber,
many happy returns of the day.

Remember we were reaching for $44,000. (the money to come from the Faire,
new subscriptions, and special gifts). This month-long Folio, went to press on
June 1 1th, which makes it impossible to give you a current fund goal report.

Thanks to all of you for being our sponsors and sustainers, and a special thanks
to all of you subscriber-volunteers who worked so hard on our Spring Subscrip-
tion and Fund Drives. Thanks, too, to the subscriber who wrote us as follows:

"Recently a subscriber felt moved to express his appreciation of a program
he found particularly interesting by a contribution. This seems like a good idea
to me and if it caught on might help the financial situation until a better base of
subscribers can be acquired. I would like to thank you for three recent groups
of ideas and am enclosing three dollars as a solid expression of my feelings."

Folio readers, please copy.

At the present moment, evaluations and critiques are being written by the vari-
ous chairmen who helped develop and direct our subscription and growth efforts.
Preliminary notes all agree that we should ask for pledges of time to help us with
the improved subscription promotion we are planning for the fall. We will supply
leads and simple assignments which our recent efforts have demonstrated to be the
most effective source of new subscribers. We've made it really convenient for you
—just tear off or copy the coupon below and mail it to the station.



I want to volunteer five hours of time to the Fall Subscription Drive

NAME

ADDRESS ....CITY& ZIP NO

PHONE (day) (evening)



Page 2



What's Doing For Young People?

In October, 1962, after months of research and planning. Instruction in Spanish
for children was begun on Programs for Young People. The lessons, given by
Mrs. Clara OuroussoflF (now Allen) were taped live with a group of 5 year-olds in
their own classroom during their regular class sessions at the Oakwood School in
North Hollywood. For as long as a year after the lessons were over, requests for
rebroadcast were being received at the station. Now, in this Archive Folio it is
fitting that we fulfill these requests for a new crop of linguists; and we are pleased
to announce that Hable Espanol will be broadcast daily, Monday through Friday,
at 5:15 P.M. beginning Monday, July 5.

We also have on hand a limited number of copies of the vocabulary and bibli-
ography lists that were used in conjunction with the lessons. Parents are urged
to send for their copies (50 cents, tax included), and to participate with their
children in these sessions. Gracias.



Monday, July 5



7:00 A. M. CLASSICAL JAZZ

STRAVINSKY Ragtime for 2 Instruments (Col

ML 5772) (5)
MILHAUD Le creation du monde (Van VRS

1090) (16)
HINDEMITH Shimmy and Rag (Dot DLP 3111)

(6)
RAVEL Sonata for Violin and Piano (Mer MG

50089) (17)
H. BRUBECK Dialogues (Col CL 1466) (23)
COPLAND 4 Piano Blues (Dot DLP 3111) (8)
TANSMAN Spiritual and Blues (Dot 3111) (5)
MILHAUD 3 Rag Caprices (Dot 3111) (7)

8:45 FOR VERY YOUNG PEOPLE: Songs,
rhymes, and stories for two— to— five— year— olds
especially created by and with Ivie Stevenson.

9:00 FREEDOM PROJECT 1965 (Jul 2)

9:15 OPINION: Sir Stephen King-Hall (Jul 4)

9:30 THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY XI:
Michael Fox's reading of the Oscar Wilde
novel continues.
10:00 EARLY MAHLER RECORDINGS I: Collector
David Howell prepared this program of ex-
tremely rare recordings of operatic personalities
given their start at the Vienna Court Opera
by Gustav Mahler in the early 1900's. (Ar-
chive)
11:30 THE PROSPECT OF IM3I0RTALITY: Robert
Ettinger, Michigan professor and physicist,
discusses the possibility of freezing people
who die for possible restoration to life and
youthful health. (Jul 2)
12:00 THE DISCOVERY OF BRAZIL: Heitor Villa-
Lobos conducts his Choros No 10 and his
Descobrimento do Brasil. (Pathe FCX 602/3)
(84)

1:.30 THE SOUTHERN MODERATE: A CBC docu-
mentary on white attitudes about civil rights,
narrated by John David Hamilton. (Jul 4)

2:30 THE CYCLE CYCLE REVISITED

MOZART Sonata No 9. K 311 (Ang 35072) (16)
BEETHOVEN Cello Sonata Op 102 No 2 (VBX

8) (18)
DVORAK Quartet Op 51 (VBX 49 (31) (Jan 17)

3:40 AVORKS IN PROGRESS: Leon Surmeliaii. He
discusses his recent book. Daredevils of Sas—
soun, a first telling in English of the na-
tional epic of Armenia. Jul 4)

4:30 PURCELL SUITES: Fritz Mahler conducts
suites from .\bdelzer and The Gordian Knot
Untied, (Van SRV 155) (24)

5:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 14



(5:00 GUNFIRE IN THE STREETS OF SAIGON:

Actuality recordings and an interview with a
returned member of the 39th Signal Battalion
stationed in Saigon. (JUL 6)

(5:L5 NEWS

«:30 OPINION: Paul Dallas (JUL 6)

6:45 To Be Announced

7:00 MUSIC BY BRITISH COMPOSERS I: The
first of a series of BBC transcriptions of sig-
nificant works which have hitherto been un-
• available as commercial recordings. In this
program, Stanley Pope conducts the London
Philharmonic Orchestra in performances of
Robert Simpson's Symphony No 1 (1951) and
Havergal Brian's Symphony No 10 (1954) (BBC)
JUL 14)

8:00 FROM THE CENTER: An Anatomy of Peace.
A synthesis of the March Pacem In Terris
proceedings, taken from addresses during the
three and a half day Convocation. (JUL 9)

9:00 "THE LIE THAT ALWAYS TOLD THE
TRUTH": The memorial for Jean Cocteau.
written, produced and directed by David
Ossman on the day of Cocteau's death in
1963. Rebroadcast here in celebration of Coc-
teau's 74th birthday anniversary. (Archive)
10:00 THE OPEN HOUR: Including "The Region"

with Pat Smith.
11:00 THE MENGELBERG ERA V: William Mal-
loch presents a ca. 1939 live performance
recording of Mengelberg and the Concertgebouw
playing Beethoven's Pastorale Symphony.



Tuesday, July 6



7:00 A.M. PULITZER PRIZE WINNERS

HANSON Symphony No 4 (1944) (Mer MG

50077) (22)
PISTON Symphony No 3 (1948) Mpt MO

50083) (35)
TOCH Symphony No 3 (1956) (Cap P 8364 1 (27)
DELLO-JOIO Meditations on p]cclesiastes
9:00 GUNFIRE IN THE .STREETS OF SAIGON

(Jul 5)
9:L5 OPINION: Paul Dallas (Jul 5)
9:30 THE PICTl RE OF DORI.AN GR.AY XII
10:10 OTTO KLEMPKRER'S RECOLLECTIONS OF
GISTAV .M.VHLER: Werner Klemperer, son of
the great conductor, reads Otto's .>Iemories of
Gustav Mahler, followed by a performance of
Mahler's Symphony No 2 in C minor, the
"Resurrection" Symphony, with the Philhar-
monia Chorus and Orchestra and soloists Elisa-
beth Schwarzkopf ;ind Hilde Ftoe.'^sl-Majilen
conducted by Otto Klemperer. (Archive)



Page 3



12:00 THE BI.OOMINC.TON SUBVERSION CASE:

Ralph Levitt of the University of Indiana is
interviewed. (Jul 2)
12:30 TE DEUM LAUDAMUS: Tvvo choral works
from France: Te Deiim by Jean Gilles (1668-
1705) and Te Deum by Esprit Blanchard (1696-
1775). (MHS 554:540) (44;43)

2:00 THE GREATEST ADVENTURE: With Mit-
chell Harding. (Jul 3)

2:30 KRENEK: Robert Whitney conducts Krenek's
Eleven Transparencies. (Lou 56-3) (17)

2:60 VARIETY & STANDARDIZATION IN HIGH-
ER EDUCATION: The potentials and problems
in diversified and specialized curricula.

3:20 GRAND PRIX DU DISQUE: Herbert von
Karajan conducts a new recording of Brahms'
Variations on a Theme by Haydn and German
Requiem. (DGG LPM 18928/9) (94)

5:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 14

6:00 URBAN LEAGUE X: Benjamin F. Handy.
Jr., of the Los Angeles Urban League board
discusses the League's work with Tiger Slavik.
(JUL 7)

6:15 NEWS

6:30 OPINION: Theodore Edwards (JUL 7)

6:45 CALENDAR OF EVENTS: Clair Brush

7:00 GOLDEN VOICES: With Anthony Boucher
(JUL 8)

7:30 THE MIND OF JEFFERSON XII: Maureen
Mcllroy joins David Ossman in re - creating the
charming trans-Atlantic correspondence of
Maria Cosway and Thomas Jefferson, with
further narrative by Clair Brush and Judith
Kory (JUL 7)

8:30 MUSIC FOR FRANKLIN'S GLASSES: Com-
positions by Johann Gottlieb Naumann for
Benjamin Franklin's invention, the Glass Har-
monica. (Arc 3111) (23) (JUL 7)

9:00 REAPPORTIONMENT AND CALIFORNIA:
A speech by Senator Albert Rodda (D-Sacra-
mento) delivered at the recent annual meeting
of the Northern California-Western Nevada
Japanese-American League. (JUL 8)

9:30 MUSIC FROM LOUISVILLE: Crestons In-
vocation and Dance and Ibert's A Louisville
Concerto. (Col KL 5039) (24) (JUL 9)
10:00 THE OPEN HOUR

11:00 MEET YOU AT THE STATION: Folk music
presented by Alan Hjerpe. (JUL 14)

Wednesday, July 7

7:00 A.M. PRIX DE ROME

MASSENET Concerto for Piano and Orchestra

(MGM E 3178) (30)
DEBUSSY Petite Suite (Epic LC 3165) (14)
IBERT Louisville Concerto (Lou 545-5) (12)
DUTILLEUX Symphony 1950-51 (West XWN

18539) (31)
DUPRE Cortege et Litanie

Variations sur un Noel (Mer MG 50229) (20)
9:00 URBAN LEAGUE X (JUL 6)
9:15 OPINION: Theodore Edwards (Jul 6)
9:30 THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY XIII
10:00 TVVO WALTER MAHLER NINTHS: William
Malloch introduces Columbia's John McClure,
who talks about and gives us samples of
Bruno Walter's rehearsals of Mahler's Ninth
he recorded in Los Angeles with the Columbia
Symphony shortly before his death. The com-
plete recording is played. The first two move-
ments are preceded by rehearsal extracts. Then
William Malloch introduces and talks about
the older recording Walter made of the same
work with the Vienna Philharmonic at a 1938
live performance, and shows in what ways the
conductor's approach had undergone considera-
ble transformations by the time he made the
later recording. Presented today in honor of

Page 4



Mahler's birthday anniversary. (Archive)
1:45 MY SON AFRICA: Author Froma Sand is
interviewed by Liza Williams on her experi-
ences in South Africa and her adoption of a
Negro child. (Jul 4)
2:30 AN HOUR OF FOLK MUSIC: Hosted by

Lee Whiting.
3:30 THE MIND OF JEFFERSON XII: The cor-
respondence of Jefferson and Maria Cosway
(Jul 6)
4:30 MUSIC FOR FRANKLIN'S GLASSES (Jul 6)
5:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 14
6:00 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE U.N. Betty

Pilkington. (JUL 8)
6:15 NEWS

6:30 OPINION: Phil Kerby (JUL 8)
6:45 CALENDAR OF EVENTS: Clair Brush
7:00 THE SURPLUS MAN? "Surplussed" is the
jargon for men caught by cut-backs and shifts
in the aerospace industry, the largest employer
in U. S. manufacturing. This discussion of
the problem was produced by Trevor Thomas
from interviews with residents in "the valley
that aerospace built," Santa Clara County.
(JUL 8)
7:45 I REMEMBER MAHLER: A compendium of
quotes about the man, the composer, and the
conductor, by Alfred Sendrey, Richard Lert,
Victor Fuchs, Klaus Pringsheim, Herman Mar-
tonne, Max Steiner, Sophia Edinger. Frank
Kuchynka, Alois Reiser, Herbert Borodkin,
Nathan Liebenbaum, Benjamin Kohon and
Anna Mahler. Produced by William Malloch.
Presented today in honor of Mahler's birthday
anniversary. (Archive)
10:00 THE OPEN HOUR: Including the "Anglo-
Klaxon" with Michael Allen.
11:00 EINE GROSSE NACHTMUSIK

Thursday, July 8

7:00 A.M. DANCE MUSIC

17 dances of the 13th and 14th centuries (Arc

3002) (19)
SUSATO Suite of Dances (Dec DL 9419) (15)
PRAETORIUS Dances from "Terpsichore"

(Arc 3153) (15)
WIDMANN Dances and Galliards (Arc 3153)

(9)
SCHEIN Three Suites from "Banchetto Musi-

cale" (Arc 3153) (23)
PICCHI Balli d'arpicordo (Mer MG 50259)
(23)
8:45 FOR VERY YOUNG PEOPLE: More with

Ivie Stevenson.
9:00 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE U.N. (Jul. 7)
9:15 OPINION: Phil Kerby (Jul 7)
9:30 THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRulY XIV:
Concluding this reading by Michael Fox of
Oscar Wilde's novel.
10:00 KLAUS PRINGSHEIM SR. RECOLLECTS
MAHLER: He talks to William Malloch about
Mahler's inclination as a composer and the
kinds of things he strove for as a conductor.
At the end he hears for the first time a
recording of Mahler playing the finale of
his Fourth Symphony, and gives his impres-
sions of in what ways this recording does and
does not represent Mahler as pianist and
conductor. (Archive)
11:30 REAPPORTIONMENT AND CALIFORNIA:

Senator Albert Rodda. (Jul 6)
12:00 MAHLER'S EIGHTH: This is the work the
composer premiered with at least 800 per-
formers in Munich in 1910 before thousands.
On this Vanguard release, Maurice Abravanel
conducts. After the performance. Mayor Fiorello
LaGuardia enthuses about the Eighth and
Mahler in general. (Archive)



1:20 ANNA MAHLER ON GUSTAV MAHLER:

Anna Mahler was 7 years old when Gustav

Mahler died. Most of what real memories she

has of her father have to do with the 1910-11

period when they lived in ,New York's old

Savoy Hotel. She tells William Malloch about

the impressions that remain from that time.

(Archive)

1:45 THE SURPLUS MAN? Men caught by shifts

and cut— backs in the aerospace industry. (Jul 7)

2:30 GOLDEN VOICES: Anthony Boucher (Jul 6)

3:00 SCIENCE AND GOVERNMENT XIII: The

conclusion of this series by Dr. Carroll F.

Myles, professor of government at Simmons

College. (Jul 4)

4:00 THE HEBREW PROGRAM: News and other

features from Israel, in Hebrew and English.

5:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 14

6:00 REPORT FROM KENYA: Sally Shapiro' s

report is read by Liza Williams. (JUL 9)
6:15 NEWS

6:30 OPINION: Don Smith (JUL 9)
6:45 CALENDAR OF EVENTS: Clair Brush
7:00 JAZZ ARCHIVES: With Phil Elwood (JUL 9)
7:30 WO.MEN AND CHILDREN IN SOVIET SO-
CIETY I: Beth Zifferstein, an experienced
teacher, describes her visit to the USSR and
her impressions of women and children there,
particularly of the collective nursery schools.
(JUL 9)
8:15 A PROGRAM OF BACH FUGUES

Chromatic Fantasy & Fugue (Col ML 5916) (12)
Six-part Ricecare from "The Musical Offering"

(Ang 35731) (7)
Contrapunctus XV from "The Art of the
Fugue" (Dec 10012) (5) (JUL 14)
8:45 WOMEN AND CHILDREN IN SOVIET SO-
CIETY II: Beth Zifferstein answers questions
about her first-hand knowledge of primary and
earlier education in the USSR. (JUL 9)
9:30 VARIATIONS ON A THEME: Corelli s varia-
tions on "La Follia" and Rachmaninoff's
Variations on a Theme of Corelli. (Vic LM
1880; Pye CCL 30138) (30)
10:00 THE OPEN HOUR

11:00 NEGRO MUSIC: Charles Hobson presents
The Gospelaires and Little Willie John. (JUL 13)
12:00 THE CONTINUING CARROT: With Mitchell
Harding.

Friday, July 9

7:00 A.M. THE POWER OF MUSIC ... or,
Alexander's Feast, written in honour of St.
Cecilia by Mr. Dryden and set to musick by
Mr. Handel. (Bach BG 666/7) (109)
9:00 REPORT FROM KENYA (Jul 8))
9:15 OPINION: Don Smith (Jul 8)
9:30 THE AMERICANS: Bernard Mayes reads,
in five parts, the book by Geofrey Gorer. Today,
"Europe and the Rejected Father."
10:00 MUSIC FROM LOUISVILLE: Works by Cres-

ton and Ibert. (Jul 6)
10:30 FROM THE CENTER: An Anatomy of
Peace. A sj'nthesis of the March Pacem In
Terris conference. (Jul 5 )
11:30 LOTTE LEHMANN: Accompanied by Paul
Ulanowsky, the famous soprano sings Schubert's
Die Schoene Muellerin. (Col ML 5996) (56)
12:30 WOMEN AND CHILDREN IN SOVIET SO-
CIETY I: Beth Zifferstein describes her im-
pressions. (Jul 8)
1:15 DITTERSDORF: Erich Kloss conducts Carl
Ditters von Dittersdorf's Symphony in a. (Lyr
LL 26) (23)
1:45 WOMEN AND CHILDREN IN SOVIET SO-
CIETY II: Beth Zifferstein answers questions.
Jul 8)
2:30 JAZZ ARCHIVES: Phil Elwood (Jul 8)



3:00 THE JUDY COLLINS SHOW: With Dick
and Mimi Farina. (Jul 1)

4:00 INSTANT THEATER: Rachel Rosenthal and
King Moody, co-directors of this unique Los
.\ngeles theater form, and Bill Neblett, a for-
mer member of the troup, discuss what Instant
Theater is and something about its methods
in a conversation with Dave Ossman.

5:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 14

6:00 FREEDO.M PROJECT 1965: Student Co-
ordinating Committee of Los Angeles. (JUL 12)

6:15 NEWS

6:30 FROM THE M.\N.\GER: KPFK's Robert Ad-
ler talks to subscribers and listeners. (JUL 11)

6:45 CALENDAR OF EVENTS: Clair Brush

7:00 A FARCE IN ONE ACT: Rossini's L'Ocoa-
sione fa il ladro. (Dover HCR 5219) (54)

8:00 CO.MMUNITY DISCUSSION PROJECT:

America's Untouchables. The USC Medical
Student Forum, moderated by Bill Bronston,
discusses medicine and poverty with Michael
Harrington, author of The Other America, and
Dr. Paul O'Rourke, widely known for his
work among migrant laborers. (JUL 13)

9:00 MUSIC NOT FOR EXPORT: Joe Cooper con-
tinues his series of record concerts using discs
not available in this country, after a European
vacation and record hunt.
10:00 THE OPEN HOUR
11:00 JAZZ — LOS ANGELES

Saturday, July 10

8:00 A.M. WATER MUSIC

TELEMAXX Hamburg's Tides (Arc 3198) (25)
SCHUBERT Auf dem Wasser zu singen (Ang

35022) (3)
DEBUSSY La mer (Vic LM 2111) (23)
RAVEL Jeux d'Eau (Col ML 4519 (5)
SIBELIUS Oceanides, Op 73 (Ang 35458) (11)
VILLA-LOBOS Origin of the Amazon River

(Col ML 4615) (16)
HANDEL Water Music— Suite (Count CTP 606)

(26)

a FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 14
INQUISITION IN EDEN: Alvah Bessie, one
' ten writers and directors who refused to
co-operate with the HUAC during the 1947
investigation of the film industry, talks with
Jack Nessel about blacklisting, politics in
Hollywood, and the reasons for his stand be-
fore the Committee. (JUL 12)
12:15 THE RAKE'S PROGRESS: Stravinsky's
opera is performed with Judith Raskin, Alex-
ander Young, John Reardon, and Regina Sar-
faty in the roles of Anne Truelove, Tom
Rakewell, Nick Shadow, and Baba the Turk
respectively. The composer conducts. (Col
M3L-310) (142)
2:45 THE SHAKESPEARE CYCLE: Troylus and
Cressida. Jeremy Britt, Max Adrian, Cyril
Cusaek and Diane Cilente star in this Shake-
speare Recording Society production. (Caedmon
SRS 234)
5:45 MISCELLANY
6:00 LETTERS FROM LISTENERS
6:15 NEWS
^.&i^a OPINION: Eric Haas (JUL 11)
'V4LLtS - CNC0MM0N SENSE: Steve Kandel
7:00 MUSIC FROM GERMANY: Operetta music
by Franz von Suppe and Oskar Strauss will

^ Jje played by the Hamburg Radio Orchestra.



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Online LibraryCalif.) KPFK (Radio station : Los AngelesKPFK folio (Volume July 5-Aug 1 1965) → online text (page 1 of 4)