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KPFK ■ 9Q7 FVI ■ September 1972



PACIFICA RADIO LOS ANGELES



LOOK WHAT'S COMING IN OCTOBER;



PHILIP ROTH: "Nothing so comically
grotesque as Nixon's transformation into a
President has happened since Kafka's hero
turned into a cockroach; MILLHOUSE
faithfully records that horrible American
metamorphosis!"

JERRY PARKER, NEWSDAY: "...howlingly funny
...a film to make you wish we didn't have Nixon to
kick around any more. "

ALBERT GOLDMAN: "'Millhouse' is funnier
than any current comedy. The only sad thing
is its truth!"

KEVIN SANDERS, WABC TV: "It s probably the
most devastating attack on one man ever put
together on film!"

JULES FEIFFER: "A zapped portrait of Nixon
from Voorhis to Vietnam: part camp, part
Horatio Alger run amuck-the dark side of
the American dream."

ANDY WARHOL: "Tell de Antonio to say what-
ever he likes about the picture, it's great!"




EMILE de ANTONIO S

iilLLHOUSE



Beverly Canon New Vagabond Corbin

205 N. CANON DR., B.H. 275-5244 2509WIUSHIRE • 387-2171 TARZANA • 345-2226




ry something
different
for once



Subscribe!



Ihe/TflFF

6472 Santa Monica Blvd. (213) 469-3191
Hollywood. Calif. 90038



S5.00 16 months! 24 issues

$10.00 (1 year) 52 issues

This is a renewal.



NAME



ADDRESS.
CITY



STATE.



.ZIP CODE.



For subscriptions to Canada and Latin
America, please add S3.00 per year for
postage; rest of the world, add $5.00.
Always send U. S. currency.



Although one listener-subscriber did give us his
blood-bank check during the March Marathon, it is
also true that there are numerous painless, and even
enjoyable ways in which you can help give your
station a transfusion of badly needed listener sup-
port. Herewith, some types:

1. Get a friend to subscribe! No luck thus far?
Then take the herd by the horns and get a roomful
of friends to subscribe— throw a KPFK party, pic-
nic, sewing bee, or whatever. It's a nice excuse for
a get-together, and past experience shows that the
technique is quite successful. Whenever possible,
we'll provide you with KPFK staffers or program
volunteers to fascinate and beguile your crowd.

2. Find a home for a tin cup! We are in the process
of installing collection jars in likely stores through-
out our listening area (those nickels and dimes

add up). If you know of merchants who are, or
could be friendly to Pacifica, you might ask them
if they'd display our piggy bank. If you're shy,
pass their names on to us.

3. Design a tin cup! We are currently working with
16 oz. beer cans and hand-lettered labels. Come up
with a devilishly clever alternative, or an irresistible
label suitable for reproduction.

4. Turn your organization on to KPFK! "Culture"
and free communication on the vital issues of to-
day affect everyone from aviators to zoologists.
Invite a KPFK staffer or programmer to address a
meeting of your group.

5. Turn your school on to KPFK! "Friends of
KPFK" clubs are being formed on college and high
school campuses. Be a leader at yours.

6. Sell Folio ads! More ads would make possible

a fatter, more interesting Folio. Payroll limitations
have precluded a staff advertising position. Free-
lancers earn a 1 5% commission. You may already
know someone who would advertise in the Folio,
or become a 3729 Club merchant, if asked.

7. Give us your promotion ideas! Put them in
writing so they won't get lost in the shuffle.

If you'd like to help in any way, please drop me a
line or give me a call. The health of a community
station like KPFK depends on the active involve-
ment of listeners in every area of its activity.

— Barbara Spark
Promotion Director



THE

FESTIVAL
PLAYERS OF
CALIFORNIA

Dorye Roettger, director,
will present a new series of
chamber music concerts live
in the auditorium at KPFK
the first Wednesday of each
month, beginning in October.



October 4


February 7


November 1


March 7


December 6


April 4


January 3


May 2



No admission charge.
Bring a pillow to sit on.
Concerts begin at 8 p.m.

KPFK's studios,

3729 Cahuenga Blvd. W.

in North Hollywood




LAEMMLE FINE ARTS THEATRES |


LOSFELIZ
NO 4 2169


JANUS FILM CLASSICS FESTIVAL


ESQUIRE
Pasadena
SY 3-6149
MU 4-1774


Sept. 6

■GARDEN OF THE

FINZI CONTINIS"


PLAZA
Westwood
TR 9-9077
GR 7-0097


Call theatre for program


REGENT
Westwood
BR 2-0501
477-0059


Call theatre for program


THE ROYAL
West L. A.
473-1636
270-4110


Aug. 30

"GARDEN OF THE
FINZI CONTINIS"


MONICA TWIN THEATRES

Always a choice of two outstanding programs


MONICA 1
451-8686


Sept. 6-26

BUSTER KEATON FESTIVAL

Sept. 27

"A CLOCKWORK ORANGE"


MONICA II

451-8686

451-8688



^ KPFK 9tt.7 F/VI

.^^ PACIFICA RADIO LOS ANGELES



Cover: the 1972 Cfaremont Music Festival (seepage 7).



THE VOLUNTEERS

are all those people who donate their time and energy to keep this place
going. They produce programs, review Los Angeles cultural events, edit tapes,
gather news, type, file, answer phones— in short, without theni we wouldn't
be here. Thanks.

Joe Adams, David Ainsworth. Kathy Alef. David Arias, Decia Baker, Jeff
Baker. Ruth Buell, Alvaro CardonaHine, Dawn Chatty, Ridgely
Cummings, Dave Curry, Judith Dancoff, Madeleine Deutsch, Mark
Ellenbogen. Michael Elliott, Paul Faulkner, Gil Ferrer, Sand ford Fidell.
Steve Futterman. Cy dus. Bob Gowa. Georg Gugelberger, Tom Halle,
Ethlie Herman. Dons Herrscher, Peggy Holter, Barbara Kraft, Alma
Landsberger, Maggie Landsberger. Francine Lipsker. Stephen Mamber,
Barba Margolis. Bill Margolis. Sue Marshall, Dave McDonald, Dave
McGregor. Maureen Mcllroy, Mike Moberly. Charles Morgan, Buffo
Necraflora, Richard Nielsen, Robin O'Brian, Earl Qfari, Constance
Pfeifer. Ron Ridenour. Brian Rosenberg, A. P. Russo, Cynthia Sears. Dave
Simpson, Mark Smith, William Strother, Richard Toscan, Joe Tnscari,
Phil Turtle, Paul Vangelisti, Bill Vestal, Paul Vorwerk, Brian Walker



THE STAFF

General Manager: Will Lewis: Program Director: Ruth H\rschman. Public
Affairs: Mike Model, Director; Mary Bess, News: Miriam Bjerre; Barbara
Cady; Andres Chavez; Dennrs Levitt; Don Roeck; Steven Tyler; Music:
David Cloud. Director; Kathenne Calkin; Drama & Literature: Everett
Frost, Director; Clare Loeb; Production: Rick Bralver, Acting Director;
Jay Jenssen, Traffic; Mitchell Harding, Rachel Kurn; Engineering: Don
Wilson, Chief Engineer; Tom Sandford; Promotion Director: Barbara
Spark; Folio: Susan Bechaud; -4ccot/nfanf; Harold Hodge

PACIFICA BOARD

National R, Gordon Agnew (KPFA). Jody Blazek (KPFT); Henry M.
Elson (KPFA), George Fox (WBAI), Carolyn Goodman (President of
Pacifica). Hallock Hoffman (KPFK). Rudy Hurwich (KPFA); Hannah
Levin (WBAIl. David Lopez (KPFT); Thelma Meltzer (KPFT), Max
Palevsky (KPFK); Robert Powsner (KPFK); Jonas Rosenfield Jr. (KPFK),
Albert Ruben (WBAI); Frank Wyle (KPFK)

Local: Mae Churchill; Leonard Goldman; Stanley Gortikov; Richard
Gunther; Brownlee Haydon; Hallock Hoffman; Celes King III; Robert
Klein; Louis Licht; Ronald M. Loeb'; Brian G, Manion; Frederick Nicholas;
Max Palevsky. Robert Powsner; Jonas Rosenfield Jr.; Haskell Wexler;
Frank Wyle*; Floyd Yudelson

The KPFK Folio is not sold; it is sent free to each subscriber supporting our
non-profit, non-commercial, educational station, and contains the most
accurate possible listing of the programs broadcast.

Our transmitter ts on Mount Wilson. We broadcast in stereo multiplex with
an effective radiated power of 1 12.000 Watts, Our studios and offices are at
3729 Cahuenga Blvd. W. in N. Hollywood. Mailing address is KPFK. Los
Angeles 90038. Phone is 877-2711 from Los Angeles, or 984-271 1 from
the San Fernando Valley and beach cities.

KPFK IS owned and operated by the Pacifica Foundation, a non-profit
institution. Other Pacifica stations are KPFA, Berkeley, CA 94704. WBAI,
New York, N.Y. 10021; and KPFT, Houston. TX 77002. An application for
a fifth station is pending m Washington, D.C, Subscriptions are transferable



Subscribe

The cost of freedom must be sfiared
by those who would enjoy it: for
September we need 824,500 — 500
new subscriptions, 494 renewals.

Without listener support, this voice
cannot speak. If you are not already
a KPFK subscriber, won't you
join us?



Address



City Zip

Student/retired/

unemployed ( 1 S12/year I 1 S6/6 months

Regular [ 1 S24/year [ )S12/6months

Family [ ] S36/year

3729 Club t lS5/month or S60/year

(see page 31 )

Make checks payable to Pacifica- KPFK

and mail to

KPFK, Los Angeles, California 90038



/MoNing?

If you change your address,
please let us know.

OLD:



Name



Address

NEW (effective as o* -



Zip



Name



Address



v^



Zip



A Message
from the KPFK
Board of Directors



For thirteen years, Southern California has wit-
nessed the struggles of KPFK-Pacifica, listener -
supported First Amendment radio, a crucial exper-
iment in radio free speech. Unbeholden to interest
groups, the station has frequently been alone in
exploring controversial public issues and spotlight-
ing hidden points of public concern, and has been
an oasis of unique programming in music, drama,
literature, and criticism in the arts.



'V






But being responsible only to authenticity and
the untrammeled truth does not guarantee survival
in a commercially oriented society. The simple fact
is that KPFK is a community station which, unlike
its sister Pacifica stations (Berkeley, New York,
Houston), exists in a community which lacks co-
hesiveness. As a result, it has been difficult to make
large segments of the Southern California popula-
tion aware of how they can benefit from and con-
tribute to KPFK's role as an instrumentality for
truth and constructive social change.

Now, in order to spread the roots of community
support and tap new sources of inspiration,
nourishment and funding, a new interface between
the station and the Southern California community
is being formed. To accomplish this, it has been
decided to substantially expand the local Board of
Directors of KPFK-Pacifica to involve people who
are In touch with the varied constituencies in the
area. Other plans are being made for more involve-
ment of listener-sponsors and other community
groups with the station. We hope that these steps
will vitalize the station, the board, and the
listener-sponsors, and help put the station on a
secure financial basis.



The time has come for us and our community—
by its support of KPFK— to declare that free
speech is too precious to be considered an experi-
ment. The inexpensive medium of radio may be
the only one which can be totally democratic. In
any case, KPFK will be an exciting and important
vehicle for everyone involved in it.



Chilean workers demonstrate in Santiago, Mayday 1971.

Chile Toda/

The victory of the Socialist-coahtion Unidad Popular in the
Chilean elections of 1970, and its continuing successes, pre-
sent an unparalleled challenge to U.S. hegemony in Latin
America. Long accustomed to dictating the terms of its di-
plomacy with Latin America, the United States has been
placed on the defensive by the uniqueness of this socialist
challenge from Chile.

As such, the Unidad Popular victory represents the most
crucial development in the relations of Latin America to
the United States since the Cuban revolution of 1959.

The Unidad Popular coalition has its roots in Chilean tra-
dition and history. It was by no means a sudden nasty de-
velopment, as the State Department would have us believe.
Then there are all those rumors of dissent and imminent
counterrevolution that have filtered back up here. Does
Allende have the support of Chileans two years after com-
ing to power? What kind of government is a Socialist co-
alition operating under a constitutional democracy? And
above all-is Chile socialist' Is there really a revolution
going on there?

Throughout the month of September, KPFK presents a
series of five programs centered on Chile, beginning with
her cultural heritage and the roots of her leftist mood,
going through the present-day scene; women and their sta-
tus under Allende; government efforts (or their absence)
toward mass mobilization; the role and importance of
Christianity in building a socialist society in Latin America;
and a panel discussion attempting to answer the question
as to whether there is a revolution going on in Chile.

The first four programs air Saturdays at 3:30 p.m., rebroad-
casting Tuesdays at 10 p.m. The final program will be
heard on Thursday the 28th at 10 p.m., rebroadcasting on
Saturday the 30th at 3:30 p.m. All were produced by Teri
Friedrichs, a member of the Los Angeles Group for Latin
American Solidarity, a movement research/education/action
group.



6



HIGHUGHTS



La Raza: Then and Non/

Chicano programming in. September revolves around two
poles; one traditional and one contemporary.

September 1-4 are the dates set for the first national con-
vention of El Partido de la Raza Unida in El Paso, Texas.
El Partido's formation marked a new chapter in Chicano
political history. From its birth in Texas five years ago, to
last year's 48th Assembly District race here. La Raza Unida
Party has embodied Chicanes' discontent with the political
system, as well as people's attempts at self-determination.

While Chicanos in the U.S. have struggled for their rights
since the conquest in 1848 (stereotypes about Chicano
"passivity" notwithstanding). El Partido is the first attempt
at forming a Chicano political party. In an election year
which has had a number of surprises already, the formation
of a strong national Chicano party is appropriate.

KPFK's coverage of the La Raza Unida convention includes
daily reports on the evening news. Life on Earth, at 6 p.m.
On Sunday, September 3rd, at 6:30 p.m., a history of La
Raza Unida Party will be aired. At 7 p.m. on Thursday and
Friday, the 21st and 22nd, a two-part convention special
will detail what happened in El Paso.

The 16th of September is traditionally celebrated as Mexi-
can Independence Day. In East Los Angeles, September 16th
is the occasion of the third-largest annual parade in the U.S.
You'll hear it live on KPFK on Saturday the 16th, from
4;30 to 6:30 p.m. And at 7:30 p.m., KPFK and KCET pre-
sent a special half-hour simulcast of Music for Mexican In-
dependence Day, with Channel 28 providing the video and
KPFK the audio (in stereo).

In the week prior to the parade, you'll hear two programs
on Mexico's struggle for independence. The historical as-
pects of the 16th of September will be reviewed at 7 p.m.




Farmworkers in Delano, California, 1970.

on Thursday the 14th. This will be followed by an hour of
the poetry and music of the independence struggle, with
the concluding half hour a simulcast with KCET.

KPFK's Chicano programs attempt to give a sense of the
Chicano community. We hope they will help you under-
stand what's special about this month.

-Andres Chavez



1972 Claremont /Music Festii/al




Glora Bernstein, director of the Claremont Music Festival.



This month KPFK presents nine two-hour concerts recorded
live and in stereo at the 1972 Claremont Music Festival,
held at Pomona College in July.

Twice a week, through smog, heat and freeway traffic, half
of KPFK's Music Department (David Cloud) and half of the
Engineering Department (Don Wilson), assisted by volunteer
programmer and engineer Mark Ellenbogen, carted a ton or
so of recording equipment out to Claremont to record the
Festival.

We think you'll be glad they did when you hear the pro-
grams, which include the world premiere of Kohn's Trio
for Violin, Horn and Piano (Tuesday the 12th), and the
first West Coast performances of Chihara's Grass—Concerto
for Amplified Double Bass and Orchestra (Thursday the
14th), and Gliere's Horn Concerto (Thursday the 21st).

The first Festival program airs Friday the 1st at 8 p.m.;
the remaining eight are set for Tuesdays and Thursdays at

8 p.m., except on Thursday the 14th, when the time is

9 p.m.



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From London jet to Moscow & Leningrad 8 days
hotel, all meals, sightseeing, theatre tickets $260.
Securing USSR visa S5. All USSR travel (rom
London lowest rates.

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From London or Frankfurt jel to Nairobi 15 days
hotel, breakfast S40S, With all meals. 15 day
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Community Arts: a new series, at 11:30 a.m



1 rriday



F




6:00 EXPANSION

Serious music; comment by your host, Mitchell
Harding; Jay Jenssen's Morning Information Service.

9:30 THE MORNING READING

Virginia Wooif: "Lappin and Lappinova." Maureen
Mcllroy reads this short piece by the early 20th century
Bloomsbury feminist.



10:00



ETHNIC MUSIC

With Mario Casetta.



7:00 1972 CLAREMONT MUSIC FESTIVAL-I

Recorded live and in stereo at Bridges Hall of Music
at Pomona College in Claremont on June 30, 1972. Bach:
Brandenburg Concerto No. 2. Hindemith: Der Schwanen-
dreher; Raphael Hillyer, viola. Colgrass: As Quiet As . . .
Brahms: Variations on a Theme of Haydn. Giora Bernstein
conducts the Festival Orchestra. Recording engineers: Don
Wilson, Mark Ellenbogen and David Cloud. Produced and
hosted by David Cloud.



9:00



MUNDOCHICANO

With Antonio Salazar.



11:00 HOUR 25: sf

With John Henry Thong, Kathy Calkin, Mike
Hodel and the Young Radishes.



2:00



NIGHTANGELS

Jay Lacey with old radio, blues and jazz.



11:00



WOMEN FOR LEGISLATIVE ACTION

With Dorothy Eletz.



11:30 COMMUNITY ARTS

Decia Baker talks with different groups in Los
Angeles involved with community arts as an expression of
ethnic and cultural survival.



2 cciturday



s



8:00 EARLY MORNING RAGAS



12:00 NOON CONCERT

Music of Darius Milhaud (1892- ). In honor of the
80th birthday of the French master, a two-hour retrospective
of his long and prolific musical career. Saudades de Brazil;
Jacques Fevrier, piano; Ducretet-Thomson SDVC 505. La
Creation du Monde; Phillipe Entremont, piano; Trio
a Cordes Francais; Columbia MS 7432. Little Sympliony
No. 5; Radio Luxemburg Orchestra, Darius Milhaud con-
ducting; Candide 31008. Concerto for Percussion and Small
Orchestra; Radio Luxemburg Orchestra, Darius Milhaud
conducting; Candide 31013. L'Homme et son Desir; Utah
Symphony, Maurice Abravanel conducting; Vanguard
S-274. Symphony No. 8; French National Radio and Tele-
vision Orchestra, Darius Milhaud conducting; Erato STU
70452. David Cloud hosts. Stereo.



2:00



2:30



CRITIQUE

A look at current books, film, music, theatre.



WRITE ONI

A weekly program devoted to matters of interest
in the contemporary literary scene. Variously hosted and
produced by A. P. Russo, Paul Vangelisti, Alvaro Cardona-
Hine and Everett Frost.



3:30



5:00



IMPRESSIONS

Ed Hamilton, with a program of jazz.



DEALING

Music for the body, field reports, editorial con-
trasts and commentary from Richard Gollance of the Gay
Community Service Center. Produced by Barbara Cady.

6:00 LIFE ON EARTH: The Evening News

6:45 FOREIGN PRESS REPORT: Israel

With Oded E'Dan.

6:55 REPORT TO THE LISTENER

From Will Lewis.



8:30 KRISHNAMURTI

The renowned spiritual leader in a series of talks
given this year in New York and made available through the
Krishnamurti Foundation.

9:00 HALFWAY DOWN THE STAIRS

For and with young people, hosted by Ruth Buell.

10:30 FOLK MUSIC

With John Davis.

12:30 TRANS

This series exploring current work toward a new
civilization moves to a new time this month. The programs
are coordinated by Amanda Foulger, with assistance from
James and Debra Farrell and Carl Heussenstam.



1:30



2:00



3:30



STUDENT MOBILIZATION COMMITTEE

A look at the antiwar movement.

NOMMO

With Ron Dhanifu.



CHILE: Cultural Roots of Socialism

Chile's culture, history and politics have been per-
meated with leftist and socialist views for many decades.
The 1970 election of a Marxist to the presidency comes di-
rectly out of that background. This program looks at Chilean
leftist poetry, folk music and theatre-including the poetry
of Neruda, the music of Violetta, and many others. Produced
by Teri Friedrichs, with technical assistance by Dennis
Levitt. (To be rebroadcast Tuesday the 5th, 10 p.m.)

4:30 DOROTHY HEALEY

5:30 STUDENT UNION FOR PEACE AND JUSTICE

6:00 THE SATURDAY NEWS

6:30 FRANK GREENWOOD



7:30 PREACHIIM' THE BLUES

Frank Scott, with music both live and recorded.

9:00 ZYMURGY

"Zymurgv: the art and science of fermentation."
This is not a program about wine-making. It is, however,
intoxicating. Produced by David Cloud and Everett Frost.

11:00 THE BIG BROADCAST

Duffy's Tavern: "Father's Day," with Ed Gardner
as Archie. Suspense: "Leinegen vs. the Ants," with
William Conrad.

12:00 NIGHTANGELS

Jason B. Goode and the Heavenly Miracle Air
Experiment.



8:30 CONTEMPORARY WRITING

This evening's program is divided between the work
of two women poets. First Marge Piercy, author of Breaking
Camp and Hard Loving (Wesleyan University Press) reads a
sequence of poems based on the Tarot, "Laying Down the
Tower." Then Alvaro Cardona-Hine introduces Los Angeles
poet Josephine Ain. (To be rebroadcast Wednesday the 6th
at 2 p.m.)

9:30 FOLK SCENE

A program of traditional and contemporary folk
music, often with guests. Howard and Roz Larman host.



12:00



NIGHTANGELS

Ethlie Ann with a rock catharsis.



El Parttdo de ia Raza Unida,
6:30 p.m.



3 ounday



s




8:00 THE MUSIC OF JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH

The Passion According to St. Marl


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