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Amendments to the Constitution and proposed statutes : with arguments ... online

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revenues of the state as shall be required to pay the iHlncipij
and hiterest on said bonds maturing in said year, and it I
hereby made the duly of all officers charged by law with am
duty in regard to the levy and collection of said revenue to *
and perform each and every act which shall be necessary t(
collect such additional sum.

There is hereby created In the state treasury a fund
known and designated as the "interest and sinking fund of
University of California building bonds." The state trea^urq
shall, on the first day of July, 1915, and on the first day ol
each January and the first day of each July thereafter, transfd
from the general fund of this state treasury to said "interesi
and sinking fund of the University of California building bonds'
such an amount of money as shall be requh-ed to pay the iDtere^
maturing at the next interest payment date on the amount^
said bonds sold and outstanding; and shall likewise, on the fid
day of January of the year 1921, and the first day of Januu]
of each year Uio'eafter in which any of said bonds sold and ooti
standing mature, transfer from the general fund of the stalj
treasury to said "interest and sinlung fund of the University i
California building bonds" such an amount of money as may ti*
required to pay the principal of such of said bonds sold anj
outstandhig as mature in such year. J

Sec. 5. The prhicipal and interest of all of said hoads vbic^
may be sold shall be paid at the thne the same become dn
from said "interest and sinking fund of the University of Call
fomia building bonds." and the faith of the State of CalifomiJ
is hereby pledged for the payment in full of the principal anj
interest of said bonds so sold as the same mature. Both priiv
cipal and interest shall be so paid upon presentation to tbi
state treasurer on or after the day of the maturity of the same ot
the bond or coupon so maturing, and the state treasurer is bereb]
authwized and required to make such payment. Warrants Id
such payments shall be duly drawn by the state controller upfl^
the request of the state treasurer. J

Sec 6. There shall be provided in the general appropriatioj
bill to be passed at the next regular session of the legislatift
sufficient money to defray all expenses that shall be incurred 4
the state treasurer in the preparation of said bonds and in ol
advertising of the sale thereof u in this act provided.

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Sec. 7. Hie state controller and state treasurer sbal] leep
tan and particular account and record of all their proceedings
Bder this act, and they shall transmit to the governor, in
triplicate, an abstract of all such proceedings thereunder, with
ID annual report, in triplicate, one copy of each to be by the
ffnmar laid before each house of the legislature bi-annuaUy.
Ibe books and papers pertaining to the matters provided for In
this act shall at all times be open to the inspection of any
^ies interested, or of the governor, the attorney general, or
^ legislature, or of any citizen of the state.

Sec 8. This act shall be known and may be dted as the
Tniverslty of California building bond act," and, after any
i the bonds herein provided for have been sold, shall be Irre-
letlable mtil the principal and interest of all bonds sold shall
tne been paid and discharged in full, but the legislature may
■end this act at any time in furtherance of its purpose, and
by also repeal this act at any time after its adoption, provided
hat there are at the time no bonds which have been sold there-
Rider outstanding and unpaid in full as to both principal and
Merest.

Argument in favor of university of

CALIFORNIA BUILDING BOND ACT.
The $1,800,000 bond issue for the University of
Blalifomia is for permanent buildings for the
miversity at Berkeley. The graduates of the
diversity, of whom there are now about 10,000
hi California, are bringing this bond Issue to the
tttention of the people of the state. It is pro-
ceed to erect a number of buildings to meet the
irowded conditions now existing. A building or
talldings must be provided for the college of
agriculture, which is growing rapidly in all Its
inches, and which under the new organization
li doing a tremendous service to the entire state ;
tor completing the university library, which is
llready overcrowded in every way; a chemical
hboratory for the chemistry department, whose
^boratories were built to take care of 300 and
Ire now being used to teach more than 2,000
ludents ; and, most important of all, to construct
t large recitation and class room building in
8aee of North Hall, which is daily a menace to
Ife and property and overcrowded almost beyond
bdurance.

The University of California is in point of num-
bers the largest state university in the United



States, the second largest of all universities in
the country, and the eighth largest of all in the
world. It has grown from 2,500 students in 1899
to over 7,000 students in 1914, while its class
rooms in the same time have increased from 54
to only 68. Several classes now number 600
students and lectures are held temporarily in the
gymnasium. Through its agricultural depart-
ment, its agricultural train and county advisers,
its university extension, its correspondence
courses, and its stations in southern California,
Fresno, and at Davis, the university reaches and
benefits over 250,000 persons annually. With
the large number of students, many departments
of the university are housed imder pitiful con-
ditions at Berkeley.

Private benefaction has recognized the Uni-
versity of California by building the following
permanent structures on the campus: The Uni-
versity Library, the Hearst Memorial Mining
Building, the Boalt HaU of Law, the Hearst
Greek Theater, the Sather Gate, and the Sather
Campanile, at a total cost of approximately
$2,000,000, besides a $600,000 hospital for the
medical school; while the state has built Cali-
fornia Hall and the first agricultural building at
a total cost of $500,000.

The Alumni Association believes that while the
state has been liberal in its support and mainte-
nance of the University of California," yet it is
absolutely necessary at this time to make the
people of California realize the grievous inade-
quacy of the present building equipment of the
university and to make it clear that without this
bond issue the state cannot supply these build-
ings. In collecting the signatures to place this
measure on the ballot, no opposition has been
met The work of getting signatures was largely
voluntary, and support was given the measure
in every county of the state. The benefits which
the university gives to the state are unquestioned ;
therefore it is felt that it is proper and right to
place before the people of California the oppor-
tunity of endorsing and properly providing for
the work of their state university.

Allen L. Chickerino,
President Alumni Association.



PROHIBITION ELECTIONS.

Initiative amendment adding section IJ to article IV of constitution. Prohibits, for eight
[ears after this election, state election on question of prohibiting or permitting transportation of
itoxicating liquors and any election on question of prohibiting or permitting the manufacture or
We thereof ; prohibits state election or election under local option law or charter upon latter ques-
ion within eight years of like election thereon ; declares majority vote in each municipality or dis-
rict at this election upon prohibition amendment to article I of constitution, and at any statewide
frohibition election hereafter, makes same license or non-license territory.

The electors of the State of California present a new section to follow section 1 and to be num-



i the secretary of state this petition and request
liat a proposed amendment to the Constitution
f the State of California, by adding to article
V thereof, after section 1 of said article, a new
ection to be numbered and known as section li,
e submitted to the people of the State of Call-
Jmia for their approval or rejection at the next
nsuing general election or as provided by law.
he proposed amendment is entitled as follows:

onendment to the Constitution of the State of
California by adding to article IV thereof
after section 1 of said article IV a new sec-
tion numbered section 15 limiting the times
and periods at which elections may be held
on questions or propositions as to the pro-
hibition or licensing of the manufacture, sale
or transportation of intoxicating liquors and
declaring the effect of such electiona

he people of the State of California do enact

as follows:
Article IV of the Constitution of the State of

alifomia Is hereby amended by adding thereto



bered section li, in the following words;

Section li. Subdivision first: From and after
the general election in the year 1914 (at which
there is submitted to the people of the State
of California for their approval or rejection a
certain proposed amendment to the constitution
proposing to add to article I thereof, sections 26
and 27 relating to intoxicating liquors), and for
a period of eight years thereafter, no other or
further election upon the question of prohibiting
or permitting the manufacture or the sale or the
transportation in or to the state, of intoxicating
liquors shall be held in the state at large whether
by way of proposed amendment to the constitu-
tion or by way of legislation, either as an initia-
tive or as a referendum measure, or in pursuance
of any existing law, or of any law that may be
enacted hereafter; nor during the said period of
eight years from and after said election shall
there be submitted to the votes of the electors
Of any incorporated city or town, or supervisorial



district, not Included within the boundaries of
any incorporated city or town, or of the electors
of any portion of a supervisorial district not in-
cluded within the boundaries of any incorporated
city or town, any question or proposition as to
the prohibition or permitting of the manufacture
or the sale or the licensing or non-licensing of
the sale of intoxicating liquors in any such in-
corporated city or town or supervisorial district,
or portion of a supervisorial district. And when-
ever any election shall be hereafter held in the
state at large at which there shall be submitted
to the votes of the electors any such question or
proposition as last mentioned, no other or further
election upon any such question or proposition
shall be held for a period of eight years after
such last mentioned election.

Subdivision second: If, at the said general
election held in the year 1914, a majority of the
votes cast shall be or were against the proposed
amendment so submitted, each and every incor-
porated city and town and each and every super-
visorial district not included within the boun-
daries of any incorporated city or town, and
each and every portion of a supervisorial district
not Included within the boundaries of any incor-
porated city or town, in which incorporated
city or town or supervisorial district, or portion
of a supervisorial district, a majority of the
votes cast shall be found upon a canvass thereof
to have been against the said proposed amend-
ment, shall be deemed and considered and held
to be "license territory" (meaning by the words
"license territory" territory within which licenses
for the sale of intoxicating liquors may be
granted or the granting of licenses therefor may
be authorized by the governing or legislative
body having legislative authority or Jurisdiction
in or over such Incorporated city or town or
supervisorial district, or portion of a supervi-
sorial district), and each and every incorporated
city and town and each and every supervisorial
district or portion of a supervisorial district not
included within the boundaries of any incorpor-
ated city or town, in which incorporated city or
town or supervisorial district, or portion of a
supervisorial district, a majority of the votes
cast shall be found upon a canvass thereof to
have been in favor of the said proposed amend-
ment, shall be deemed and considered and held
to be "non-license territory," and no license
for the sa^e or authorizing the sale of intoxi-
cating liquors within such non-license territory
shall be granted or authorized.

Subdivision third : Whenever any election shall
be held hereafter throughout the state at large at
which there shall be submitted to the votes of the
electors any question or proposition as to whether
the manufacture and sale (or either), of intoxi-
cating liquors shall be prohibited throughout the
state, or whether the same shall be licensed or
shall not be licensed, and a majority of the votes
cast at such election shall be against the pro-
hibition thereof, or in favor of the licensing
thereof, each and every incorporated city and
town and each and every supervisorial district
not included within the boundaries of any incor-
porated city or town, and each and every portion
of a supervisorial district not Included within
the boundaries of any incorporated city or town,
in which incorporated city or town or supervi-
sorial district, or portion of a supervisorial dis-
trict, a majority of the votes cast shall be found
upon a canvass thereof to have been against
such prohibition, or in favor of the licensing of
such manufacture or sale of intoxicating liquors,
shall be deemed and held and considered to be



9eTenty-six



license territory, as defined in subdivision secom
of this section 15. and each and every incorpor
ated city and town and each and every super
visorlal district, or portion of a supervisoria
district not Included within the boundaries o
any Incorporated city or town, in which incor
porated city or toim, or supervisorial district, o
portion of a supervisorial district, a majority o
the votes cast shall be found upon a canvas
thereof to have been In favor of the prohlbltioi
of such manufacture and sale of Intoxlcatlni
liquors, and against the licensing thereof, shal
be deemed and considered and shall be held t
be "non-license territory," and no license for th
sale or authorizing the sale of intoxicating liquor
within such non-license territory shall be grant©
or authorized.

Subdivision fourth : Whenever pursuant to an;
law now existing or hereafter enacted, relatlni
to local option, or pursuant to the provisions o
the charter of any county, city and county, citj
or town, any election shall hereafter be held L
any county, city and county, city or town, o
supervisorial district not Included within th
boundaries of any incorporated city or town, o
portion of a supervisorial district not include*
within the boundaries of any Incorporated cit]
or town, upon the question of prohibiting or per
mitting the manufacture or the sale or the llcens
Ing or non-licensing of the manufacture an*
sale (or either), of intoxicating liquors therein
no other or further election shall be held upoi
such question In such county, city and countj
city or town, supervisorial district or portion q
supervisorial district, for a period of eight yeai]
thereafter, and whenever any such election as li
this subdivision mentioned shall be held her^
after, each county, city and county, city or towii
supervisorial district or portion of supervisoria
district, in which upon a canvass of the vote
It shall be found that a majority of the vote
cast shall be or shall have been against sucl
prohibition or In favor of the licensing of thi
manufacture or sale of Intoxicating liquors, shal
be deemed and held and considered to be "licena
territory" within which licenses for the sale (^
intoxicating liquors may be granted or the grant
Ing of licenses therefor may be authorized by thi
governing or legislative body having legislativi
authority or jurisdiction In or over such territon]
and each and every county, city and county, or ip
corporated city or town, or supervisorial distrid
not Included within the boundaries of any incoi^
porated city or town, or portion of a super
visorlal district not included within the boun
daries of any Incorporated city or town, in which
upon a canvass of the votes, it shall be foun<
that a majority of the votes cast shall be o
shall have been in favor of prohibiting the manu
facture or sale of intoxicating liquors or agains
the licensing thereof, shall be deemed and hel<
and considered to be "non-license territory," an<
no license for the sale, or authorizing the sale
of intoxicating liquors within such non-licens
territory, shall be grranted or authorized.

Subdivision fifth: The proper governing o\
legislative body having legislative authority ot
jurisdiction over any county, city and county
incorporated city or town, or supervisorial di^
trict or portion of a supervisorial district, as th*
case may be, shall have authority to enforce b;
laws or ordinances and penalties for the viola
tion thereof, the prohibition of the manufacture
sale, or giving away of intoxicating liquors ii
non-license territory, and shall also have au
thority to regulate the manufacture and sale o
intoxicating liquors in license territory and th
granting and issuance of licenses therein.



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ARGUMENT IN ^AV6(^ 6P AMENDMENT
REGULATING PROHIBITION ELECTIONS.

I This amendment is of vital Interest to every
voter, and especially every taxpayer, whether
"wet" or "dry."

Without stopping, or hindering, any real tem-
perance or anti-saloon work, this amendment will
regulate the holding of liquor elections so that
the same results may be accomplished, but with-
oat continually engendering strife and bitter feel-
ing in peaceful communities, without demoralizing
other business interests, and without imposing the
grievous burden on taxpayers inflicted by the
present system.

First — The amendment provides that, begin-
Bing with the election to be held on Novem-
W 3; 1914, the period between liquor elections
of any kind shall be eight years. The taxpayers
have paid for three hundred liquor elections in
flie last three years. This amendment will give
tlie state a chance to adjust itself and will
^lieve the taxpayers of any more such expense
for eight years.

Second — It restores local authority to com-
munities where it has been taken away; that
to, any city, or supervisorial district outside of
an incorporated city, which votes against state-
wide prohibition in November, will thereby re-
gain the right to handle its own liquor question
as it pleases without holding an election.

Third — It provides that any city, or super-
visorial district outside of an incorporated city,
which votes in favor of state-wide prohibition
will thereby become "no-license" territory for
eight years.

The amendment does not take away, nor
interfere with, any of the police powers dele-
gated by the state constitution to the governing
or licensing body of any political subdivision of
the state.

It does not take the control of the liquor
traffic out of the hands of the people. The
power of the city or county authorities, or of
the state legislature, to regulate the sale of
liquor where licensed, or to abolish it entirely
at any time, is not affected in any way what-
ever.

It does not hinder the work of any temperance
organization but merely regulates their work
BO that taxpayers will have to pay for liquor
elections only at reasonable Intervals. .

It does not make any new wet territory.

It does not prevent any wet territory from
going dry.

It does not repeal, or compel the repeal, of
my dry ordinance of any kind whatever.

It does not compel any one to vote for state-
wide prohibition to keep saloons out of the local
community. Every voter may vote against
ttate-wide prohibition without making one change
in the present wet or dry territory.

Every voter, whether "wet" or "dry," should
rote for this amendment because it is in line
(Pith the rising sentiment of the people against
wntinual agitation of any kind that demoralizes
business conditions and causes hard times.

While still retaining the power, through your
legislative body, to establish license fees and
regulations for the sale of liquor where per-
OQitted by law, or to abolish it entirely, you, Mr.
V^oter, and you, Mr. Taxpayer, now have an
opportunity to secure a breathing spell and to
belp to restore peace and prosperity.

Vote "Yes." Frank G. Ronby,

Srand Recorder, Grand Lodge Knights of the
Royal Arch.



ARClUMEKir AGAINST AMENDMENT REClU-
LATINQ PROHIBITION ELECTIONS.

This amendment is unfair and misleading. It
seeks to disfranchise the people by making a
vote on one issue settle an entirely different
matter. There are voters who favor local pro-
hibition, but who are opposed to state-wide
prohibition. Under this amendment they could
not choose between the two. To preserve or
obtain local prohibition they would have to vote
for state-wide prohibition. Then there are
voters opposed to saloons, and yet not In favor
of absolute prohibition, either local or state-
wide. Under this amendment they could not
vote for anything except absolute prohibition.

Under the pretense of preventing frequent
elections, this amendment would repeal all
existing laws and ordinances touching the liquor
question. If It were adopted, the state legis-
lature would have no power to either prohibit
or regulate the liquor traffic. Subdivision 5
puts such power exclusively In the hands of
local legislative bodies; and even they could
not prohibit the traffic In "license territory";
they could only "regulate" It. This would mean
that liquor could be sold on election days, and
to Indians, minors and drunkards, unless pro-
hibited by local ordinance; also that saloons
could be established as close to universities,
prisons, soldiers' homes, and other state Insti-
tutions as local governing bodies would permit.
Under this amendment "license territory"
would mean every city or supervisorial district
which gives a majority against state-wide pro-
hibition on November 3d. Such a vote would
repeal all existing charter provisions and ordi-
nances touching the liquor traffic, would forbid
the people or their representatives from prohibit-
ing that traffic for eight years thereafter, and
would make mandatory a policy of "regulation."
Not only would this be an unwarranted Inter-
ference with the long established rights of
California cities, but It would be an Interference
based on deception, as the amendment does not
show on Its face what Is concealed beneath Its
legal verbiage.

• This amendment is vicious because while pre-
tending to give the people power to adopt local
prohibition. It really takes that power from
them. It provides that no license or authority
to sell Intoxicating liquors shall be granted in
"non-license territory," but it does not prohibit
or make unlawful the selling of such liquors
therein. Ohio has had experience with this
kind of constitutional provision. The supreme
court there held that prohibiting licenses does
not prohibit the sale of liquor. (Adler vs. Whit-
heck, 44 Ohio St. 539.) Hence saloons flourished
legally, though without licenses, in Ohio. They
could do the same in California. Under this
amendment, the people's vote against license
would not Insure prohibition of the traffic, but
would leave that wholly with the local officials.
They might either prohibit or permit the sale
of liquor in territory which had voted dry. On
the other hand, if a majority voted for license
this vote would be mandatory, and neither the
people nor their local officials could banish
saloons from that territory for eight years there-
after. This is grossly one-sided and would be
an Intolerable Interference with local rights.

Vote "No." D. M. Gandier,

State Superintendent Central and Northern Cali-
fornia Anti-Saloon League.



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REGULATING INVESTMENT COMPANIES.

Initiative act authorizing governer to appoint auditor of investments empowered to employ
deputies and fix their compensation, defining investment companies, authorizing examination thereof
by auditor and judicial investigation of their practices, defining securities and prohibiting sale
thereof to public, or taking subscriptions therefor, by such companies before filing with auditor
their financial statement and description of security, excepting from act certain companies and
individuals, securities thereof and certain Installment securities, regulating advertisements and
circulars regarding securities, creating fund from official fees for salaries and expenses under act ;



Online LibraryCalifornia Legislative Counsel Bureau California. Secretary of StateAmendments to the Constitution and proposed statutes : with arguments ... → online text (page 25 of 36)