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of the First Artillery Regiment, located in Sacramento, are well
drilled and fairly disciplined. Some of these companies are far below
the requisite strength, and the attendance at drill much below the
average. The difficulty of keeping so many companies up to the
minimum, in so small a city, is apparent, and it can only be done
by constant exertion of their officers. Changes have recently been
made which I have confidence will infuse new life, increase their
strength, and save me from the necessity of recommending that the
number be diminished by consolidation or disbandment. Companies



11

C and F, of this regiment, have not as yet been inspected, but I have
reason to expect to find their condition good. This is also applicable
to the Eureka Guard, which is yet to be inspected. Light Battery,
Company B, of the Second Regiment of Artillery, under command of
Captain W. B. Collier, a competent and experienced officer, is well
drilled in the service of the piece and in the theory of field maneuvers,
by using miniature guns and caissons in the armory, but of necessity
almost entirely deficient in field practice, as it has neither trained
drivers nor horses. The amount allowed by law is entirely too small
to hire even untrained horses, except on isolated cases of parade.
The Parrott guns now in the hands of this battery are entirely too
heavy and otherwise unfit for our service. I have before referred to
my, as yet, unsuccessful efforts to exchange them for lighter guns
adapted to our wants: Light Battery, Company B, of the First Artil-
lery Regiment, is supplied with brass pieces lighter, but almost
equally unsuitable with those of first named battery. The guns of
this battery have not been out of its armory for two years, the cost of
hiring horses being too great and the guns too heavy to be drawn by
hand. The so called Gatling Battery consists of four of these guns,
manned by a detail from Company A, Second Artillery, to w^hich
company it is attached.

Such a thing as a battery of Gatling or other machine guns is
unknown in the regular service, or in the National Guard of any
State except this. I am of the opinion that these guns should not be
grouped in a battery, or if so grouped, be assigned as part of a regu-
larly drilled battery and a detail of experienced artillerists, sent with
a gun and temporarily attached to infantry support to the point where
needed. These guns have never, during my term of othce, been upon
the street, save on the single occasion of one riot drill, when they
were placed in charge of a detachment from the Light Battery, Com-
pany A, by reason of having these guns assigned to it, has been
receiving $200 per month for a long period; the company expenses of
armory rent, etc., have perhaps not averaged as much as the other
infantry companies. This was evidently unjust discrimination. At
the earnest solicitation of the officer in command of it and other par-
ties, the Board of Location, when this matter was considered, deter-
mined, in view of a promised improvement as to drill attendance,
etc., as M^ell as a change in location of the armory, to allow it to retain
its guns, but after a certain time to reduce its allowance to the same
as other companies. This change of location has not as yet been
made, nor the failure explained. The Oakland Light Cavalry and
the San Francisco Hussars are in good condition as to discipline and
dismounted drill; their officers deserve especial credit, as they do
not own their horses; their allowance is the same as that of the infan-
try, and expense of a mount for drill or parade is very heavy, and
must be paid by the individual members. It is advisable that the legal
allowance should be increased. The cadet company attached to the
Second Regiment of Artillery, under the personal care and instruction
of Colonel Smedberg, has a large membership, and is thoroughly in-
structed in company and battalion drill; it is an admirable body of
youths, belonging to the most respectable families of the city. The
cadet company attached to the Third Regiment has but lately been
recruited, but is being rapidly advanced. As regards drill, the cadet
company attached to the First Regiment is excellent, but its mem-



12

bership ver)'^ small. Captain Plant, who has lately been appointed
its Captain, is exerting himself to secure suitable recruits, and it is
hoped he will be successful in tliat direction, and in advancing it to
the proper standard. These cadet companies, under the personal
supervision of the Colonels, should be admirable schools for element-
ary military instruction, and afford a supply of well trained and
instructed soldiers to fill vacancies occurring among the officers and
non-commissioned officers of the older companies.

CHANGES IX THE NATIONAL GUARD.

The following changes among general officers have taken place:
January 25, 1883, Walter Turnbull was appointed Major-General to
command division, vice W. H. L. Barnes, resigned ; John T. Carey,
Brigadier-General, vice L. Tozer, commanding Fourth Brigade, not
confirmed. On February 8, 1883, W. W. Smith, appointed Briga-
dier-General to command First Brigade, vice C. W. C. Rowell, term
expired ; and on August 18, 1884, E. E. Hewitt was appointed Brigadier-
General First Brigade, vice Smith, resigned. On April 2, 1883, six
companies were mustered into the service and organized as the Third
Regiment of Infantry. This regiment elected Robert Tobin, of San
Francisco, as Colonel. This officer, by earnest application and study
of his military duties, has fully supplied any previous lack of expe-
rience; the excellent condition and rapid improvement of his com-
mand bear testimony to his untiring efforts in its behalf. The
percentage of attendance of this regiment at. drills and parades has
been much above the average, and fully merits the recognition here
extended to it. On April 2, 1884, the San Bernardino Cavalry, for
good and sufficient reasons as set forth in the general order of that date,
was mustered out of the service. November 9, 1883, at the request
of Captain Brown, one of the oldest and most zealous officers of the
National Guard, Company E, of the First Regiment of Artillery,
located at Camptonville, was disbanded. The reason assigned for the
request was that, owing to a loss of members by removal and general
depression in that section at that time, it was impossible to maintain
the company at a respectable strength. On the same date authority
was granted Colonel Sheehan to muster a company into his regiment
in lieu cf Company E, disbanded. On May 21, 1884, the Emmet
Guard, of Stockton, which had existed as an independent company
for a long time, was mustered into the service. As now organized,
the National Guard of California consists of two batteries of artillery,
two cavalry companies, thirty-six companies of infantry, and three
cadet companies — making a grand total of three thousand and eighty-
one officers and enlisted men.

During this administration, but one demand has been made by the
civil authorities for assistance to enforce the law. This was on July
7, 1884, when Sheriff Cunningham, of San Joaquin County, with a
posse of his subordinate officers, was resisted in the execution of a
writ of attachment, by a large body of well-armed and apparently
determined settlers upon the Moquelumnes Grant. The Sheriff made
an official demand upon Brigadier-General J. A. Shepherd, com-
manding the militia of that district, for the assistance of his com-
mand, stating that tlie number and character of those defying the
law rendered the civil authority unable to enforce it, and that the



13

emergency was immediate and pressing. General Shepherd tele-
graphed to your Excellency for instructions; this telegram was not
delivered as promised to him it should be, but on the day after trans-
mittal. Receiving no reply to his message, and being incorrectly
informed that you were absent, he deemed the emergency such as to
demand and justify his exercising the authority granted him by
Section 2040 of the Codes relative to the militia. He therefore or-
dered out the Stockton and Emmet Guards, and placed both under
command of the senior officer,. Captain Eugene Lehe. Upon receipt
of the telegram, and still being unaware of the merits of the case, you
directed me to go at once to Stockton, and ascertain the facts; but to
hold the companies in their armories until the civil authorities had
exhausted every reasonable effort to enforce the law without their aid.
Upon my arrival at Stockton by the first train after receiving your
order, I found that the two companies had marched to the scene of
trouble, some fifteen miles distant, at 4 a. m. Upon my arrival at
the camp everything was found quiet, the settlers having disbanded
upon the appearance of the troops, but threatening to return. To
withdraw the companies from the ground would invite a renewal of
the trouble, encourage those resisting the law, and, in the opinion of
prominent officers and citizens, result in a bloody riot. General
Shepherd was therefore ordered to retain the troops under arms and
await your instructions. They were withdrawn as soon as the several
writs were served. The Emmet Guard, Captain Nunan, and the
Stockton Guard, Captain Eugene Lehe, turned out ninety-eight men
at very short notice, for what was fully anticipated would be serious
work. Their prompt response to the call, cool and soldierly bearing,
and excellent conduct while in camp, deserve great praise, and evi-
dence their alacrity to do their duty as soldiers, however repugnant
that duty might be to them as citizens. While it is a source of sin-
cere gratification that their mere appearance sufficed to enforce the
law, the conduct of these companies manifest the spirit and discipline
pervading the National Guard of California.

ENCAMPMENTS.

The First Regiment of Infantry encamped for eight days in 1883 at
Santa Cruz, under command of Colonel J. H. Dickinson, and for the
same time in September last at Santa Rosa. The Third Regiment,
under command of Colonel Tobin, encamped August 28, 1884, for
three days at Monterey. Company " G," Second Artillery, marched to
Yosemite and encamped for a few days, and the Stockton Guard in
Stanislaus County. These encampments were well conducted and of
great benefit to the commands participating. The expense was borne
entirely by the regiments and companies. They received no State
aid whatever, unless the loan of tents may be deemed such. They
were even compelled to supply themselves with all other camp
equipage used by them, as the State has none on hand.

RECOMMENDATIONS.

I earnestly renew the request of my predecessors, that the Legisla-
ture make an appropriation sufficient to defray the expense of copy-
1'



14

ing the records of the California volunteers. Daily applications are
made to this office for certificates of discharge and other data con-
tained therein by those who served in the war. These papers are
essential to them as certificates of service, in land matters, in securing
pensions, and in securing admittance to the soldiers' homes. More
than seven hundred such certificates have been made from the rec-
ords within the last two years. The constant daily handling of these
papers has so torn and otherwise mutilated them that with the most
careful use, unless copies are made for daily reference, the originals
will be destroyed, and there is no data to replace them.

I would also most earnestly urge that the Legislature make an
especial appropriation, sufficient to cover in part, at least, the expense
of a State or division encampment. The great improvement such a
general encampment would be to the entire National Guard of this
State has been proved by the result in some of the Eastern States of
similar encampments. In New York, land sufficient for a camp of
instruction has been leased and improved at the expense of the State.
The cost of transportation and subsistence, and, in addition, a per
diem to those attending, is paid by it. Similar liberal allowances are
made by Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania. The same
generous spirit is manifested in the treatment of their citizen soldiery
by most of the Eastern States. In those States mentioned the militia
is compelled by law to encamp for a certain number of days annually.
Strict military discipline is exacted, and careful instruction given in
the practical field duties and drill of the soldier. All reports and
criticisms on such camps have admitted their great and practical
benefit, and the money for such purposes well expended. New York,
in 1883, expended for encampment for her militia a sum twelve per
cent more than the entire annual appropriation for the National
Guard of California. A State encampment would bring all our com-
panies together for the first time; would encourage a spirit of emula-
tion among them; enable them to acquire a personal knowledge of
each other; promote a large enlistment, and increase their esprit de
corps. Such a camp aff'ords the only means of instructing officers
and men in field evolutions, battalion and companj^ drill, and in the
general field duties of a soldier; and Avould enable our citizens to see
tlie entire force, and appreciate the splendid body of well organized
National Guardsmen in its service.

TARGET PRACTICE.

Greatly increased interest is noticeable in this essential branch of
military instruction in the regular army and in the militia of the
several States. Great efforts have been made, by'the offer of valuable
prizes and liberal expenditures for targets and ammunition, to incite
an interest in the competitions and promote efficienc\' in the use of
the rifle. An active interest has been taken in the competitions
between a number of officers and men of the National Guard, who
have in their ranks some of the finest shots in America. This inter-
est could have been developed to include the mass, had I not been so
cramped as to be unable to afford financial assistance. In the annexed
report of Colonel Sonntag, Inspector of Rifle Practice, will be found
a detailed statement as to such practice in the last two years, and I
concur in his suggestions as to the wants of this branch of the service.



15

I make no further special recommendations, as a convention of
officers has been called to meet prior to the meeting of the Legis-
lature, for free consultation upon the existing laws relative to the
militia, and to formulate a bill to be submitted to the Legislature,
embracing such amendments as may be agreed upon as being needed
to promote the efficiency of the National Guard.

The necessity of a volunteer militia has been fully recognized since
the earliest history of the United States. From its formation to the
present time our ablest statesmen and most distinguished officers
have been convinced that the perpetuity of a republican form of gov-
ernment depended upon maintaining a well regulated militia. Thej^
have devised plans and strongly and continuously urged that a vol-
unteer militia be organized and fully armed, uniformed, and equipped
at the expense of the government. Statesmen and soldiers have alike
been fully impressed with the vital importance of having such a body
of well equipped, disciplined citizen soldiery, ready at a moment's
notice to meet foreign attack, or protect life and property and uphold
the law when threatened from within. The indifference resulting
from long periods of profound peace, or the necessity for immedi-
ately placing an army in the field, has prevented the adoption by the
general government of any of the well devised plans for raising and
maintaining such bodies of militia. The several States, recognizing
the necessity, have organized and partially maintained such a force
each within its own limits, and with but a meager assistance from the
general government. The aggregate of these State forces now reaches
a fairly organized volunteer militia, numbering nearly one hundred
thousand. New interest has lately been generally aroused in this
matter, and it is hoped that it will crystallize in some general and
uniform system with a much more liberal Federal support than has
heretofore been granted, and this supplemented by State assistance
as heretofore will secure a splendid body of citizen soldiery, in whom
full confidence may be placed to meet any emergency. California
has over three thousand National Guardsmen, standing seventh
among the States as regards number. Of this body of men she may
be justly proud. It is mostly composed of young men, the peers of
any in the State, morally, physically, and mentally. They have vol-
untarily accepted under oath the obligations imposed by it, and
devote much of the time not demanded of them by their daily busi-
ness, learning their military duties. These men certainly have the
right to ask and to expect a fairly generous financial assistance to
reach the standard of efficiency at which they aim, and which I trust
will be granted them.

Such general and special orders issued from these headquarters, as
relate to changes among the commissioned officers of the National
Guard of California, under the headings: (1), "Commissions Issued;"
(2), "Resignations Accepted;" (3), "Officers placed upon the Retired
List;" and (4), "Pardons Granted," are omitted from the series of
orders in this report. I consider their publication unnecessary and
superfluous, as all particulars relating to such changes can be found
more readily and concisely in tables hereto annexed.

In conclusion, permit me to thank your Excellency for the interest
you have shown in the welfare of the National Guard, and for the



16

valuable advice and assistance you have rendered me in the discharge
of my duties.

I desire, also, to acknowledge with much pleasure the uniform cour-
tesy and assistance extended to myself by the officers and men of the
National Guard, and to express my appreciation of their individual
efforts to advance the interests of their commands.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. COSBY,
Adjutant-General California.



17



TABLE "A."
Appropriations and Expenditurks — Thirty-Fourth Fiscal Year.



Salary of Adjutant- Gaieral.
Julv 1, 1882 — Amount of appropriation -




$3,000 00


Certified to John F. Sheehan _. __ -


$1,580 65
1,419 35












$3,000 00


$3,000 00


Salary of Assiatant Adjutant- General.
July 1, 1882 — Amount of appropriation ._ __ - -




$1,800 00


Certified to William B. Burtis


$1,050 00
750 00




Certified to J. J. Tobin _.-










$1,800 00


$1,800 00


Pay of Porter.
July 1, 1882 — Amount of appropriation . ._




$300 00




$125 00

50 00

125 00




Certified to Eua;eiie Danforth




Certified to 8. P. Maslin










$300 00


$300 00


Postage and E.cjrressage.
July 1,1882 — Amount of appropriation . _ ..




$200 00


October 16, 1882— Certified to Wells, Fareo and Co. ..


.^8 45


November 6, 1882— Certified to John F. Sheehan

December 18, 1882— Certified to John F. Sheehan

January 8, 1883— Certified to Wells. Fars;o & Co.. „.


20 00
20 00
15 00
30 55
43 15
2 55
26 00
34 30




March 22, 1883— Certified to George B. Cosby




April 4, 1883— Certified to Cxeorcje B. Cosby. _-. . ..




May 4, 1883— Certified to George B. Cosbv .-




June 13, 1883— Certified to George B. Cosby

June 30, 1883— Certified to George B. Cosby






$200 00


$200 00


Cleaning and transportation of arms, traveling and contingent expenses
of Adjutant- General, thirty-fourth fiscal year.

July 1, 1882 — Amount of appropriation _.




$750 00


August 7, 1882— Certified to John F. Sheehan

September, 18S2— Certified to John F. Sheehan ._. _ . ..


$75 90
43 05
40 00
15 70
18 37
61 00
25 00
54 95
35 15
28 15
4 75
25 00
12 50
35 75
32 40

116 90
20 00
40 00
48 50
15 28
1 65




October 2, 18S2— Certified to John F. Sheehan . .. ...




October 10, 1882— Certified to John F. Sheehan .




November 6, 1882 — Certified to John F. Sheehan




November 6, 1882— Certified to W. I. Wallace

December 4, 1882— Certified to John F. Sheehan

December 18, 1882 — Certified to John F. Sheehan . ..




December 29, 1882— Certified to John F. Sheehan

January 8, 1883— Certified to John F. Sheehan ._ .. .




January 25, 1883 — Certified to W. I. Wallace . . _.




February 17, 1883— Certified to W. B. Burtis .




February 17, 1883- Certified to George B. Cosbv

March 22, 1883— Certified to George B. Cosbv I




April 4, 1883— Certified to George "B. Cosbv " -




May 4, 1883— Certified to George B. Cosbv. .. _.




Mav 4, 1883— Certified to J. J. Tobin "-_. ..




Mav 4, 1883- Certified toS. P. Maslin . .:... . .




May 4, 1883— Certified to 0. E. Hushes




June 13, 1883— Certified to George B. Cosby „. _..




To balance










$750 00


$750 00









18



Table A — Continued.



Amount allorved for Armory Rents and other expenses of the National
Guard of California, thirty-fourth fuical year, 18S2-1S83.

July 1, 1882 — Amount of appropriation

To Division Headquarters

To First Brigade Headquarters

To Second Brigade Headquarters

To Tliird Brigade Headquarters

To Fourtli Brigade Headquarters

To Fifth Brigade Headquarters

To Sixth Brigade Headquarters

To First Infantry Regiment Headquarters

To Second Artillery Regiment Headquarters

To Fifth Infantry Battalion Headquarters

To First Artillery Regiment Headquarters .

To San Bernardino Cavalry, First Brigade

To Eagle Corps, Los Angeles, First Brigade

To San Diego City Guard, First Brigade

To Company "A," First Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company " B," First Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company " C," First Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company '' D," First Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company " E," First Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company "F," First Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company "G," First Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company "H," First Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company "A," Second Artillery Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company " B," Second Artillery Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company " C," Second Artillery Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company " D," Second Artillery Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company " E," Second Artillery Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company " F," Second Artillery Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company " G," Second' Artillery Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company "H," Second Artillery Regiment, Second Brigade..

To Cadets, Second Artillery Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company "A," Third Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company " B," Third Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company " C," Third Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company " D," Third Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company "E," Third Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company " F," Third Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade

To Company "A," Fifth Infantry Battalion, Second Brigade

To Company •' B," Fifth Infantry Battalion, Second Brigade

To Company " C," Fifth Infantry Battalion, Second Brigade

To Company " D," Fifth Infantry Battalion, Second Brigade

To San Francisco Hussars, unattached. Second Brigade

To Oakland Light Cavalry, unattached. Second Brigade

To Stockton Guard, unattached, Third Brigade

To Company "A," First Artillery Regiment, Fourth Brigade

To Company " B," First Artillery Regiment, Fourth Brigade

To Company "C," First Artillery Regiment, Fourth Brigade

To Company " E," First Artillery Regiment, Fourth Brigade

To Company '• F," First Artillery Regiment, Fourth Brigade

To Company " G," First Artillery Regiment, Fourth Brigade

To Cadets, First Artillery Regiment, Fourth Brigade

To Chico Guard, unattached. Fifth Brigade

To Eureka Guard, unattached. Sixth Brigade

To First Infantry Regiment, encampment

To First Artillery Regiment, encampment

To Harry D. Gamble, filling commissions

To P. W. Sheehan, drayage

To J. Long, repairing tents

To W. I. Wallace, repairs to tents

To N. L. Drew k Co., tent pins

To Colonel W. B. Burtis, A. A.G., special duty

To Major-General John F. Sheehan, traveling expenses

To Major P. J. Harney, special duty

To Colonel J. J. Tobin, specialduty

To Major L. S. Butler, special duty



Amounts carried forward $67,167 98 | $67,500 00



$600 00

165 00

1,305 00

60 00

360 00

60 00

60 00

780 00

780 00

240 00

660 00

900 00

1,450 00

1,450 00

1,450 00

1,450 00

1,450 00

1,450 00

1,450 00

1,450 00



Online LibraryCalifornia. LegislatureAppendix to the Journals of the Senate and Assembly of the ... session of the Legislature of the State of California (Volume 1885v.1) → online text (page 25 of 83)