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reservoir for fire protection; another for the improvement of the
grounds, and still another for fencing the land belonging to the State.



17

Most of these improvements of the grounds have been completed,
and the others are in process of construction and nearing completion.

Among other appropriations asked of the last Legislature, was one
of one thousand dollars ($1,000) for the construction of a wharf on the
river, upon which the coal for the use of the asylum might be deliv-
ered, and indeed, any other article when desired; and one of five
thousand dollars (|5,000) for the construction of a stable and barn.

By invitation of the joint committee of the Senate and Assembly, I
attended one of their meetings in the Senate Chamber, and finding
them imbued with a laudable desire to make an economical record,
I consented, so far as I had the power to consent, not to press our
request for an appropriation for the infirmaries and the residences
of the officers of this asylum, but urged those for the wharf and the
stable and barn. Suffice it to say, that these two appropriations were
cut down one half, with the understanding that Senator Spencer's
contingent fund bill would become a law, and that the Board of Trus-
tees could, if deemed for the best interest of the asylum, use a portion
of that fund for the completion of these structures.

I am happy to say by this means the Board of Trustees have been
enabled to complete these structures in accordance with the original
designs — the wharf at a cost of $807 52, and the stable and barn,
50x88 feet, two stories, built of stone and covered with slate, at a cost
of $6,503 60.

An admirable road has been constructed by the patients across the
reclaimed tule land from the high land to the river, over which we
have hauled 1,500 tons of coal, at a saving of 50 cents per ton — $750 —
very nearly the cost of the wharf, in nine months. It is therefore
safe to say it will more than pay for itself every year while the asy-
lum stands.

The stable and barn are in keeping with the asylum, so far as
durability is concerned, and I congratulate the Board on its wise
determination to construct it of durable and imperishable material.
It is another improvement in the construction of which the labor of
patients largely contributed.

LAKE CAMILLA.

Another important improvement, made almost exclusively by the
labor of the patients during the last year, is the beautiful lake on*
the Coombs' tract, about 3,000 feet distant in the rear of the asylum,
and at an elevation of about thirty feet above the grounds on which
the asylum is located. It contains about 5,000,000 gallons of water
at the present time, and when completed, this year, its capacity will
be 10,000,000 gallons. It will not only be an important addition to
our present supply for irrigating purposes, but is an ornament to the
place, a convenient watering place for the stock, and will in time be
stocked with fish. The pipe has been laid and the connections made
with the present system on the grounds. It will also afford an
abundant supply for sprinkling the avenue and other driveways on
the grounds and around the building.

I have given it the name of "Camilla," in honor of my wife. It
has been constructed at but small cost to the State and is a most im-
portant addition to the water supply.

2"



18

THE RESERVOIR FOR FIRE PROTECTION.

The appropriation made for the purpose of constructing a more
perfect sj'-stem of protection against fire for this asylum, is, perhaps,
the most important of any that has been made for this asylum since
its establishment.

The work is now rapidly approaching completion; and when fin-
ished, this asylum will be as thoroughly and completely protected
as an abundance of water at eveiy point where it can possibly be
needed can make it.

Feeling the necessity of a more perfect system of protection against
fire than that at present existing, and dreading the appalling calam-
ity that would ensue should a fire occur in this building, your atten-
tion was called to our almost helpless condition in the event of a
conflagration. You at once invited the Chiefs of the Fire Depart-
ments of the Cities of San Francisco and Oakland to visit the asylum
and give us the benefit of their experience. These gentlemen,
together with P. J. O'Connor, the accomplished architect of the Fire
Department of San Francisco, and other gentlemen experienced in
this department, promptly complied with your request, generously
pointed out the weak points of our system, and suggested in writing
wdiat should be done to protect it. Acting upon this report, Mr.
O'Connor brought the matter before the Committees of the two Houses
on Public Buildings and Grounds, and through his representations
the api)ropriation of $7,500 was made.

In due time I was directed to prepare plans and specifications for
the important work we were preparing to put in execution ; but I
soon found more had been asked of me than my knowledge of such
matters would warrant me in attempting. The Hon. W. H. Hall,
the State Engineer, was then requested to visit the asylum and give
us the benefit of his large and valuable experience, in suggesting
and drawing up suitable plans and specifications.

He kindly responded to your request, and after reading the report
of the Chiefs of the Fire Departments above mentioned, and spending
a day in reviewing the premises in all its bearings, he suggested the
construction of a reservoir half a mile distant from the asylum, and
at an elevation of 150 feet, of a capacity of not less than 600,000 gal-
lons, to be kept always in reserve and used only in the event of fire.
The site of the reservoir and the location of the dam were selected bj'
him, as were also the size and location of the pipe and position of the
risers, fire hydrants, etc.

The plans and specifications were also drawn by him, adopted by the
Board of Trustees of this asylum, and approved by the honorable
Board of State Capitol Commissioners. The excavations for the
reservoir and construction of the dam, are nearing their completion;
the eight-inch cast-iron pipes and a portion of the six and four-inch
yjipe have been received and will soon be laid, when the reservoir can
be filled from one of the sources of our present supply, the pipe having
already been laid for that purpose. With this system completed I
cannot see how the asylum can be more perfectly protected against
this terrible and devouring element. Most of this work too has been
done by the patients.

It must be borne in mind that the plans and specifications contem-
plated a complete system of pipes and fire hydrants, around the entire
building, but the estimates demonstrated the fact that the amount



19

appropriated would only complete the system in the yards and rear
of the building. In order to perfect it according to the plans, it will
therefore be necessary to draw upon the Contingent Fund to a limited
extent to supply the deficiency.

WROUGHT-IRON PIPE GIVING OUT.

I regret to say that the six-inch wrought-iron pipe laid from Spencer
Creek to the asylum is rusting, and in some places giving out; a
portion of this has already been replaced with cast-iron pipe, and
more or less will have to be replaced till the entire line has been laid
in cast-iron pipe, the only kind that should ever be used in any per-
manent improvement.

SEWER PIPE.

I deem it of special sanitary importance that a large pipe should
be laid from the end of the main sewer to the canal between the
county road and the river. The present pipe being too small, the
surplus sewerage has to be conducted in ditches, thereby causing
unhealthy and offensive odors.

ADDITIOXAL ROOM FOR THE LAUNDRY.

It will be necessary to construct another room in connection with
the laundry, as many of the clothes that should be ironed have to
be sent to the wards in a rough state. An additional room and a
mangle would enable us to do the work required in a much more
satisfactory manner.

cow HOUSE.

Now that we have a fine stable and barn, it makes more apparent
than ever the necessity of a shelter for the dairy cows. We have now
some fine stock, which is improving from year to year, and I regard
their comfort and protection of the greatest importance. Many of
these improvements cannot be made, I know, till the money in the
Contingent Fund will justify the expenditure. Yet, I deem it my
duty to call your attention to them on this occasion.

THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE GROUNDS.

The green lawns, beautiful shrubs, variety and abundance of flow-
ers, to say nothing of sprinkled driveways and well-flushed sewers,
attest the blessings of an abundant water supply, without which no
institution is complete.

FRUIT.

The thirteen hundred fruit trees and five thousand grapevines
planted during the last two years, gives us a total of one thousand
five hundred trees and thirteen thousand vines. All are growing
finely, and will in time give our people all the fruit they can con-
sume.



20

APPROPRIATIONS NEEDED.



For maintaining 1,400 patients during the thirty-seventh fiscal year, at 40 cents

per capita per day $204,400 00

For maintaining 1,400 patient,^ during the thirty-eigiith fiscal year, at 40 cents
per capita per day 204,400 00

Total for two years j $408,800 00

For two infirmaries i $40,000 00

As more than fourteen hundred patients cannot be accommodated
in this asylum, it is useless to make an estimate for a greater number.

OBLIGATIONS.

We are under renewed obligations to Rev. W. Leacock, who has
favored us with religious service at stated times. Also to Rev. Father
Slatteiy, for his continued interest in those committed to our care.

We are also under obligations to the following persons for dona-
tions of books, papers, etc., viz.: Dr. B. Shurtleff, Mrs. S. E. Holden,
Mrs. C. Hartson, Mrs. J. B. Stevens, R. C. DeBoom, Mrs. C. R. Grit-
man, Henry Brown, Thos. Kane, E. Biggs, L. S. Paccand, J. W. Wil-
cox, Hattie Neilsen, B. Dennison, T. N. Mount, H. C. Gesford, A. W.
Norton, R. H. Sterling, Capt. S. Wing, R. W. Bell, Mrs. J. A. McClel-
land, and Carrie Christiansen, of Napa; Rev. John Thompson, T. F.
Brady, and C. M. Troppman, of San Francisco.

We have received regularly through the mail the following news-
papers for distribution among the patients, for which the publishers
will accept our thanks, viz.: Commercial Herald, Woman's Herald of
Industry, Grocer and Country Merchant, Monitor, The Occident, Cali-
fornia Staats Zeitung, New Age, Hebrew Observer, California Chris-
tian Advocate, Mining and Scientific Press, Pacific Rural Press,
German Post, Mining News, Virginia Chronicle; Advance and En-
terprise, Hollister; Republican, Suisun ; Press and Horticulturist,
Riverside; Amador Dispatch and Amador Sentinel, Jackson; Union-
Democrat, Colusa Sun, Martinez Gazette; Herald, San Jose; Record-
Union, Daily Bee, Sacramento; Petaluma Argus, Sonoma Democrat;
Reporter and Register, Napa; Calistogian; Journal, San Rafael; Peo-
ple's Cause, Ukiah Press, Petaluma Courier, Russian River Flag, Val-
lejo Chronicle, Dixon Tribune, New Era; Tribune, San Luis Obispo;
also several German, French, Italian, and Spanish publications.

With entire confidence in the ability and fidelity of my assistants
I have been relieved of much of the anxiety and responsibility that
would otherwise have devolved upon me. They have been ever
ready to obey every call made upon them to relieve the suffering of
our people by night or day. Indeed, I am happy to say that the offi-
cers, employes, and attendants, male and female, have performed
their duties in a most satisfactory manner; the comparatively few
exceptions to this general rule having been promptly dealt with by
me, or reported to the Board for advice or action.

In conclusion I desire to say that the entire confidence and gener-
ous support of your honorable Board has been my greatest comfort
and pleasure, and for your kindly suggestions on many occasions I
shall ever feel grateful.

Very respectfully,

E. T. WILKINS, Resident Physician.



APPENDIX.



APPENDICES.



NUMBER OF ADMISSIONS, RECOVERIES, DEATHS, ETC.

The following table exhibits the number of admissions, recoveries,
discharges, deaths, elopements, number resident at the close of each
year, the increase for each year, whole number treated each year, and
in the aggregate; also, the ratio of recoveries and deaths each year,
and for the whole time, from November 15, 1875, to July 1, 1884.



B ■



? ■






November 15, 1875, to i

July 1, 1876 ' 321

July 1, 1876, to July 1, ]

1877 I 451

July 1, 1877, to July 1,

1878 - ! 433

Julv 1, 1878, to July 1, j

1879 ' 615

July 1, 1879, to July 1,

1880 572

July 1, 1880, to July 1,

1881 563

July 1. 1881, to July 1, j

1882 I 543

July 1, 1882, to July 1,

1883 ( 463

July 1, 1883, to Julv 1, \

1884 J 500



69
140
148
184
189
133
125
127
130



20


20


71


49


71


70


133


104


163


91


122


124


161


107


174


112


177


90



208

395

528

714

839

1,021

1,172

1,219

1,319



208
187
133
186
125
182
151
47
100



321
659
828
1,143
1,286
1,402
1,564
1,635
1,719



21.49
31.04
34.11
29.91
31.29
23.62
23.02
27.43
26.00



6.23
7.43
8.45
8.22
7.08
8.84
6.84
6.85
5.24



24



APPENDIX A.



RESIDENT PHYSICIAN'S REPORT.



To the Board of Trustees of the Napa State Asylum for the Insane:

Gentlemen: I herewith submit to you my annual report for the
year ending with June 30, 1883.

ANNUAL SUMMARY.



The following summary exhibits the number of ])atients in the
asylum June 30, 1882, number admitted, number under care and
treatment, number discharged, eloped, and died during the year, and
the number remaining in the asylum June 30, 1883:



From June 30, 1882, to June 30, 1883.



Number of patients June 30, 1882.
Number admitted during the year-



Number under care and treatment

Number discharged, recovered

Number discharged, improved

Number discharged, unimproved

Number discharged, not insane

Number died

Number eloped



Discharged, died, and eloped

Number remaining June 30, 1883



734


438


1,172


292


171


463


1,026


609


1,635


86


41


127


79


70


149


10


11


21


4




4


89


23


112


3




3


271


145


416



755



464



1,219



25



TABLE I.



Shovjiitg the counties from which four hundred and sixty-three patients were admitted, from July

1, 1882, ^o<7m/3^ 1, 1883.



COtTNTIES.


Males.


Females.


Total.




13

1
3
1
9
5
]
2
2
3
9


13

..

1
..

1
..

1
2

6
2
1
108
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
5
11


26




1


Butte - - - -


3


Colusa


1


Contra Costa :


12


Humboldt . . -.


6


Kern _ -_ - .


1


Marin . . ._ _. _ .


3


Mendocino ._


3




3




16




1


Placer


6

1

21

1

7

145

3

5

6

1

2

2

5

16

13

2

4

2

1


8


Plumas -


1


Sacramento _ . -. _ _ _


27


San Benito .. _._ __.


3


San Diego . __


8


San Francisco .


253


San Luis Obispo . . _


4


San Mateo


6


Santa Barbara


7


Santa Clara


2


Santa Cruz


4


Shasta


4




6


Solano ._


21


Sonoma .


24


Trinity


2


Ventura . _


4


Yolo


2


Yuba


1






Totals -.


292


171


463







26



TABLE II.

Showing the nativity of four hundred and sixty-three patients admitted from Julyl, 1882, to

July 1, 1883.



Nativity.



Females. Total.




United States.



Alabama

Arkansas ...
California - .
Connecticut

Florida

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kentucky...
Louisiana -
Maine



Maryland

Mississippi

Massachusetts .

Michigan

Missouri



Nevada

New Jersey

New Hampshire.

New York

Ohio



Oregon

Pennsylvania ..
South Carolina -

Tennessee

Texas



United States.

Vermont

Virginia

Wisconsin



Totals



Australia
Austria .-



Foreign Countries.



Azores Islands .
Bavaria

Belgium

Bohemia

Born at sea

Brazil



Canada

Central America.

Chili

China



Costa Rica

Denmark

England

Finland

Flores Islands.

France

Germany .

Greece

Holland

Hungary

Ireland

Italy

Mexico



20


24


.3


2


1




3


4


2




1




1


3


3


1


4


5


5




1




7


4


2




4


3




1
3





1

16
5
1

13



110



1
6
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

12

• 1

1

13
3
1
4



2


1


6


2


1


1


3




1


i



67



1 I
1 .



Amount carried forward.



26


14


1




1




1




51


51


6


2


1


2


139


84



1

2

44
5
1
7
2
1
4
4
9
&
1

11
2
7
1
3
1

23
7
1

15
1
1
3
8
2
3
2



177



3
6
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2

13
1
1

17
4
1
8

40
1
1
1
102
8
3



223



27

Tablk II — Continued.



Nativity.



Males.



Females.



Amount brought forward

New Brunswick

Norway

Nova Scotia

Peru

Portugal

Prince Edward's Island

Prussia

Russia

Sandwich Islands

Santa Cruz Island

Scotland

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Turkey

Unknown

Wales



139
3
2



Totals



180



1
1

103



223
5
3
2
1
6
1
3
1
1
1
8
1
9
5
1
11
1

283



Tei-ritories.



Utah Territory

Washington Territory.

Totals



Ekcapitulation.



Nativity.


Males.


Females.


Total.


United States


110

170

2

10

292


67

102

1

1

171


177


Foreign countries _ _ _ _


272


Territories


3


Unknown .


11


Totals


463







TABLE III.

Shotving the ages of four hundred and sixty-three patients at the time of their admission in the
asylum, from July 1, 1882, to July 1, 1883.



Females. ' Total.



Between 1 and 20 years
Between 20 and 30 years
Between 30 and 40 years
Between 40 and 50 years
Between 50 and 60 years
Between 60 and 70 years
Between 70 and 80 years
Unknown

Totals



10


11


57


35


82


51


64


40


49


26


13


2


2


3


15


3


292


171



21

92

133

104

75

15

5

18



463



28



TABLE IV.

Shmmng the supposed cause of insanity tjifour hundred and sixty-three patienU, as stated in com-
mitmeyits, from July 1, 1882, to July 1, 1883.



Supposed Causes.



Males. Females. Total.



Buggery

Business troubles

Change of life

Child-birth

Death of children

Death of friend

Death of husband

Death of wife

Disappointment in love .
Disordered menstruation.

Domestic trouble

Epilepsy

Fright

Grief

Hereditar}'

111 health

Idiocv



Injur}' to head-.
Intemperance-..
Loss of property

Masturbation

Old



age.



Overwork

Parah'sis

Pregnancy

Puerperal condition.
Reli



igion



Spiritualism

Sunstroke

Syphilis

Unknown

Uterine trouble.



Totals.



3
10



1
2

2
166



292



8


8


3


3


3


3


1


1


2


2




2


2


3


8


8


12


15


8


18


2


2


4


4


10


23


8


10




1


2


17




27


3


5




27


2


2


1


2




2


2


2


1


1


5


13


2


3




2




2


78


244


4


4



171



463



TABLE V.

Showing the class of insanity of four hundred and sixty-three patients, at the time of admission,
as stated in commitments, from July 1, 1882, to July 1, 1883.





Class.


Hales.


Females.


Total.


Dementia




*37

2

3

1

171

22

29


14

109'

15

15
3
2

13


51


Dipsomania




2


Idiocy




3


Imbecility




1


Mania




280


Melancholia




37


Monomania .




44


Puerperal mania




3


Senile dementia _ __


2


Unknown




27


40








Totals


292


171


463









29



TABLE VI.

Showing the civil condition of four hundred and sixty-three patients, admitted from July 1, 1882,

toJuly\,\8S,Z.





Civil Condition.


Hales.


Females.


Total.


Divorced






4

96

49

I

21


4






79

184

19


175


Single .




233






20


Widows




21


Widowers




10


10








Totals


292


171


463







TABLE VIL

Showing the occupation of four hundred and sixty-three patients, admitted from July \, 1882,

to July 1, 1883.



Domestics

Dressmakers

Druggists

Engineers

Farmers

Fishermen

Gardeners

Gasfitters

Harness makers

Housewives

Iron molders

Jewelers

Laborers

Laundresses

Laundrymen

Lawyers

Locksmiths

Lumbermen

Machinists

Merchants

Millers

Millwrights





Occupation.


1 Males.

1


Females.

4


Total.






5




5


Bakers




. ., 2


3


Barbers .




_.; 1


1


Barkeepers. _ -




i 1


1


Blacksmiths




., ! 5


5


Boiler makers




.... 1


i






! 1


1






2


2


Carpenters




_- - . .1 7


7


Cigarmakers




: 2


2


Civil engineers .




: 1


1


Clerks




8


8


Convicts




2


2


Cooks..




3


6






1


1


Dairymen




1


1


Dishwashers




1 1


1



22



84



22
5
2
3

26
1
3
1
1

84
2
3

85
1
2
1
1
2
1
d
1
1



Amount carried forward.



185



116



^01



30

Table VII — Continued.



Occupation.



Males. Females. Total



Amount brought forward.

Minors

Ministers

Music teachers

No occupation

Painters

Peddlers

Physicians

Plasterers

Printers

Sailors

Salesmen

Saloon keepers

Seamstresses

Servants

Sheep herders

Ship carpenters

Ship ealkers

Shoemakers

Soldiers

Stone masons

Students

Teachers

Tinsmiths

Unknown

Upholsterers

AVaiters

Wheelwrights



185

20

2



Totals



292



116



171



301

20
2
3

59
6
1
1
1
2

12
2
2
6
5
3
2
2
4
4
1
2
1
2

14
1
3
1

463



31



TABLE VIII.
Showing the cause of death of oive. hundred and twelve patients from July 1, 1882, to July 1, 1883.




July, 1882

July, 1882

July, 1882

July, 1882

July, 1882

July, 1882

July, 1882

July, 1882

August, 1882

August, 1882

August, 1882

August, 1882

August, 1882

August, 1882

August, 1882

August, 1882

August, 1882

September, 1882.
September, 1882.
September, 1S82_
September, 1882_
September, 1882.
September, 1882.
September, 1S82_
September, 1882.

October, 1882

October, 1882

October, 18S2

October, 1882

October, 1882

October, 1882

October, 1882

October, 1882

November, 1882.
November, 1882.
November, 1882.
November, 1882.
November, 1882.
December, 1882 .
December, 1882 .
December, 1882 .
December, ISS2 .
December, 1882 _
December, 1882 .
December, 1882 .
December, 1882 .
January, 1883.—
January, 1883.. .
January, 1883...
January, 1883 — J
January, 1883. — !
January, 1883.-.
January, 1883-..

January, 1883

January, 1883...

Januarv, 1883

January, 1883...!
Januarv, 1883...'
January, 1883.—
February, 1883..
February, 1883..



Organic disease of brain , Ireland

Exhaustion New Hampshire

Organic disease of brain Sweden

Paralysis Massachusetts

Epilepsy California.-

Cerebral hemorrhage China

Consumption Ciermauy

Epilepsy • Germany

Organic disease of brain Missouri

Inanition ' Missouri

Cancer of breast New Hampshire

Organic disease of brain Kentucky

General paresis Michigan

Consumption Ireland

Suicide Scotland

Organic disease of brain Ireland

General paresis Connecticut

Suicide Ireland

Old age Pennsylvania

Apoplexy England

Paral^ysis . Holland

Suicide Germany

Congestion of lungs France

Exhaustion Ireland

Maniacal exhaustion United States

Paralysis Ohio

General paresis I Ireland

Organic disease of brain ' New York

Apoplexy United States

Organic disease of brain Switzerland

Organic disease of brain ; Unknown

Organic disease of brain ; Switzerland

Dropsy j Ohio -

Exhaustion Scotland

Exhaustion California

Paralysis Ireland

Consumption California

Consumption California

Paralysis , Ireland

Exhaustion ' New York

Congestion of lungs Ireland

Organic disease of brain i Ireland

Paralysis I Pennsylvania

Organic disease of brain Ireland

Exhaustion Massachusetts

Exhaustion I New York

Consumption California

Organic disease of brain Switzerland

Paralysis Louisiana

Epilepsy ' California

Paral3'sis Portugal

Consumption •. Kentucky

Exhaustion New York

Exhaustion ; Tennessee

Organic disease of brain Ireland

Exhaustion i Ireland

Exhaustion [ Scotland

Consumption California

Epilepsy Maryland

Exhaustion Missouri

Heart disease ' Azores Islands



35
40
36
20
43
30
53
23
18
34
47
39
26
64
58
40
40
23
25
57
17
35
41



32



Table VIII— Continued.



Cause of Death.



Online LibraryCalifornia. LegislatureAppendix to the Journals of the Senate and Assembly of the ... session of the Legislature of the State of California (Volume 1885v.1) → online text (page 49 of 83)