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Appendix to the Journals of the Senate and Assembly of the ... session of the Legislature of the State of California (Volume 1885v.1) online

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of the Atlantic States.

(2) Those who wish to equip themselves as teachers of mathematics.

(3) Those who, intending to make physical research (theoretical or
practical) their chief occupation, wish a thorough mathematical prep-
aration.



21

(4) Those who, intending to become mechanical, mining civil or
manne engineers, wish a more thorough mathematical training than
IS possible 111 the short time allotted to mathematical study in the
regular undergraduate courses in the engineering departments

It IS proposed to make the course sufficiently thorough to enable
the student, without further preparation, to attend with profit such
lecture courses as are now offered at Baltimore, or any of the European
Universities. ^

The following is an outline of the studies which it would be possi-
ble, with our present resources, to incorporate into such a course:

Prescribed Mathematical Studies.

1. Differential and Integral Calculus, four exercises a week, two terms.
■ 2. Analytical Geometr3', one exercise a week, four terms.

3. Determinants and Theory of Equations, two exercises a week, two terms.

4. Differential Equations, three exercises a week, one term.

5. Analytical Geometry of Space, or ) ,,

6. Functions of Complex Variables, j '■'"■ee exercises a week, one term.

7. Analytical Mechanics, four exercises a week, two terms.

8. Physics, three exercises a week, two terms.

9. Physical Laboratory, three exercises a week, three terms.

Other Prescribed Studies.

3. English, four exercises a week, two terms.

2. Twenty themes.

3. German or French, four exercises a week, four terms.

Of Mathematical Elective Work.

Six exercises a week during the first term, and three during the second term of the third
fubjecte "'^ ""'"^ ' ^^'"'"' "^ ^^^^ '"'"'"■^^ ^''''^'■' ^""^ choice to be made from the following

GEOMKTRY.

1. Modern Synthetic Geometry.

2. Analytical Geometry of Space.

3. Higher Plane Curves.

4. Non Euclidean Geometry.

5. Quaternions.

ALGEBRA AND ANALYSIS.

6. Modern Higher Algebra (Homogeneous Forms, Invariants, Covariants, etc.)

7. Ineory of Substitutions and of Algebraic Equations.

8. Applications of Calculus to the Geometry of Curves and Surfaces

9. Functions of Complex Variables.

10. Theory of Elliptic Functions. ■

11. Riemann's Theory.

12. Calculus of Variations.

13. Partial Differential Equations.

14. Theory of Quaternion Functions.

15. Theory of Numbers.

Of other Elective Work.

Four exercises a week during the first year, three during the second, and six during the
Berkele " •^''''"'^' ""^ *° ^"^ '"^""^^ '^ ''"^' °^ *''" ^''"^'^^ *^^"Slit in the coIle|es at

With our present teaching force, the full number of exercises per
week here indicated could not be provided for, but the mathematical
work of the feenior year will be conducted mainly without recitations
or lectures. Ihe student will be required to master certain assigned
subjects and will be directed to the original sources for his info?ma-
tion and his progress will from time to time be tested by examination

btudents who complete the course by electing the Latin and Greek
prescribed in the first two years of the classical course, would be eli-



22

gible to the degree of Baclielor of Arts; other graduates of the course
would naturally receive the degree of Bachelor of Science.

The course is in the line of University development, and, if adopted
by the Academic Senate, will deserve every encouragement at the
hands of the Board of Regents.

English.

It is not necessary that I should speak in detail of the work of the
different Chairs in the University, but I conceive the work in Eng-
lish to be so important as to warrant some special mention. I am free
to say, that I consider the study of English to be the most important
study, not only in our secondary schools, but in the University. 1
am, therefore, glad to feel that Ave may fairly claim to be giving to
the subject its proper recognition, and that we may willingly invite
attention to the course of study offered.

The requirements of the department have, indeed, at times severely
taxed the students, and have sometimes been thought too severe. The
work has, however, been reasonably well done, and the results that
have followed have been highly satisfactory.

It is believed, that with the better preparation that has already
begun to appear in the preparatory schools, the work required at the
University will not be found too difficult.

But whether too difficult under present conditions or not, it is
certainly not more than should be comprised in a properly' devised
college course. If, however, the work has taxed the students, it has
yet more taxed the instructors. The class-room work is but a small
fraction of the work to be done in this department, and it is altogether
the least laborious^ and wearing. Work in English cannot be satis-
factorily done witliout much and careful theme work, and no one
who has not had experience can know how exhausting it is to correct,,
day after day and week after week, even the most carefully prepared
papers.

It is quite impossible for a professor and one instructor to do the
work laid out in this department. For the last two years, the partial
service of an assistant in English has been secured in correcting
themes. This should be made a permanent position, and should be
advanced to that of a full instructorship. I am confident that it
cannot be necessary to urge the importance of strengthening this
department at the earliest possible moment that our finances will
permit.

Germmi.

The professor of German has a larger attendance upon his exercises
than any other instructor in the University, with the exception of the
Professor of Military Science. In order to give to his several classes
the time that is allotted to them in the several colleges and courses, he
is compelled to make larger divisions than are felt to be advantage-
ous. Many of them should be halved. This, however, cannot be
done without the assistance of an instructor.

Botany.

The importance of providing instruction in Botany is known to the
Board and fully appreciated by it, but want of means makes the
appointment of an instructor at present out of the question.



23

Drawing.

So also the importance of strengthening the department of drawing
so that all students who choose may leave the University with suffi-
cient skill to fit them to take employment at once in the draughting
room, has been carefully considered, and is fully recognized in a
resolution of the Board authorizing the employment of suitable
assistance, but here again the Board was compelled to defer action for
the want of funds.

Pedagogics.

The importance of Pedagogics as a department of University work
is tardily receiving proper recognition in some of the best Univer-
sities in the East. I regret that the University of California cannot
be among the first to undertake this important work. I can only
hope, by now drawing attention to the subject, to bespeak for it proper
recognition as soon as the finances of the Board will permit.

Entomology.

There is probably no subject in which expert knowledge and expert
teaching are more needed in the State than in entomology. Indeed,
its importance is such that the State may confidently be expected to
make proper provision for a Chair of Entomology in the University.

Library and Art Gallery.

There were twenty-five thousand nine hundred and seven bound
volumes and five thousand two hundred pamphlets in the library
August 1, 1884. Four thousand three hundred and twenty-six volumes
have been added to the library during the two last years, mostly, as
heretofore, books of reference. There were also added eleven hun-
dred and ninety-eight pamphlets. The income from the Reese Fund,
amounting still to $3,000 a year, is the only income upon which the
library may depend. This is hardly more than enough to supply its
barest needs. Up to this time there has been no Chair of Philosophy in
the Universitj^ and as a consequence, the Department of Philosophy
has received little attention in library purchases. The filling of the
Mills' Chair of Philosoph}', therefore, makes necessary a special
appropriation from the library fund, and so far limits the usual range
of purchases in other departments. This fact, and the importance of
adding to the library more rapidlj' than is possible with the current
income, are certainly sufficient grounds for the recommendation on
the part of the Library Committee and the Board of a special appro-
priation of $10,000 for library purposes.

The Art Gallery is indebted to Mr. Charles Mayne for two very
beautiful and very valuable oil paintings — the joint ,work of J. B.
Klombeck and Eugene Verbockhoven.

Admission Examinations.

The requirements for admission to the several colleges have not
been materially' altered during the period covered by this report.
They are essentially the same as those of the best colleges in the East.
The following table contains a comparative statement of the require-
ments for admission in 1875, 1880, and 1884, compiled from the three
Registers of those years. The more detailed statements were in some



24

cases inserted in the last Register for the benefit of teachers and
school boards contemplating the establishment of schools, and of
courses directh' preparatory to the University, and in order that no
ambiguity might arise concerning what is expected of candidates
who present themselves for examination:

KKQUIREMEN'TS FOR ADMISSION* TO AXV iiXE nV THE COLLEGES OF SCIEXCE.



English Gbammae.



English Grammar.



1. English. Caudidates will be required to write a short
composition, correct in spelling, punctuation, gi'ammar,
and division into paragraphs, upon a subject announced at
the time of the examination. They will also be required
to analyze sentences from the works used in preparation,
and to i)a.ss an examination on Kellogg's Text-Book on
Bhetoric as far as Lesson "i'l.

For 1884 and 1885 the sulijects will be taken from the
following works: Tom Brown's School Days at Eugby;
Irving'S Sketch Book ; Dickens' Christmaa Stories; Scott's
Lady of the Lake and Kenilworth ; Shakespeare's Mer-
chant of Venice and Julius Ci^sar.

14. English. The examination in English will presup-
pose thorough study of the selections named below. The
candi<late should be prepared to elucidate in full the mean-
ing of any passage in the works assigned ; to paraphrase
such a pajKsage ; to point out the rhetorical figures in it ; to
answer questions concerning the lives of the authors, and
the suliject-matterand structure of the works studied. The
history of words should also receive attention ; Skeat's
Etymological Dictiouarj' being taken as the authority. For
the jiresent. the examination in word-ilerivation wiU be
limited to Sjienser's Prothalamion.

The examination will extend over two periods of an hour
and a half each. Signal failure in this examination alone
will subject the applicant to exclusion from the Course in
Letters and Political Science.

The examination in 1884 will be upon the following
selections: American Prose ; American Poems; Sir Roger
deCoverley; Milton's L'Allegro and 111 Penseroso; Byron's
Prisoner of Chillou; Goldsmith's Deserted Village and
Traveler : Burns' Cotter's Saturday Night : Scott's Lay of
the Last Minstrel; Bacon's Essays of Truth, of Revenge,
of Envy, of Boldness, of Ti-avel, of Kiches, and of Studies;
and Macaulay's Essay on the Pilgrim's Progress.



Arithmetic. Higher
Arithmetic in all its
branches, including ex-
traction of square and
cube roots, and the met-
ric system of weights
and measures.



Algebra. To Quad-
ratic Equations.



Arithmetic. Higher
.Arithmetic in all its
branches, including ex-
traction of s<iuare aud
cube roots, and the met-
ric system of weights
and measures.



Algebra. Through
Quadratic Equations.



2. Arithmetic. Prime and composite numbers; divisi-
bilitj- of numbers; factors, multiplication aud division by
factors; common divisors, multiples; fractions; decimals,
including percentage, simple and compound interest, and
discount ; comi>oun<l numbers and the metric system ;
involution, square root. The technical parts of Commer-
cial Arithmetic— such as banking, profit and loss, commis-
sion, taxes, duties, stocks, insurance, exchange, average of
paj'uients — maj' be omitted.



3. Algebra (a). The definitions aud explanations of the
laws of -signs in the four fundamental operations; theory
of division of polynomials; factoring; highest common
factor and lowest common multiple; fractions; simple and
fractional equations; definitiop of the roots of an equa-
tion; simultaneous eijuations of the firet degree; elimina-
tion by comparison, by substitution, and by addition or
subtraction; inequalities; involution and evolution; frac-
tional and negative exponents; radical expressions and
surds; reduction and i-ationalization of surds.

(b). The theory and solution of quadratic equations;
solution of equations which may be reduced to the quad-
ratic form; resolution of quadratic equations by inspection
and by factoring; foi-mation of equations having given
roots ; character of imaginary roots of an equation ; reduc-
tion of irrational equations to the normal quadi-atic form ;
solution of simultaneous quadratic equations; problems.



25



Kequirements for Admission to any One of the Collixjes of Science — Coutiuued.



Geometry. First four
books.



Geometry. Ninebooks
of Davies' Lfigeiuire.



4. Plane Geometry (a). Logical basis of geometry iu its
axioms and definitions ; relations of angles and of triangles ;
e(iual figures; jjarallels and parallelograms; properties of
polygons; properties of the circle; inscribed and circum-
scribed figures; areas of rectangles and of piano figures;
ratio and proportion ; linear proportion, and proportion of
I areas; similar figures.

(6). Properties of inscribed and circumscribed regular
polygons; construction of regular polygons; perimetere
and areas of regular i)olygons ; circumference and area of
the circle ; methods of the determination of YT i problems.
The subject of isoperimetrical polygons may be omitted.



Geography.



History of United
States.



Geography.



History

States.



The general facts of Physical and Political Geog-
raphy.



History of the United St.\.tes; History of England.



The following sugges-
tions are made for the
guidance of those who
are able to do more than
master the requisites
above stated :

Although no require-
ments iu Natural Science
are specified, the study
of Local Botany, Miner-
alogy, and Natural His-
tory is earnestly recom-
mended, both because of
the knowledge which
may be acquired, and be-
cause of the habits of
accurate observation of
nature which may thus
be formed in early youth.

Students are advised to
devote at least one year
to the study of Latin be-
fore entering this depart-
ment. It will greatly
help their acquisition of
Modern Languages, and
will be useful in their
study of science. Allen
& Greenough's Grammar
and Reader are especially
commended as good man-
uals for this purpose.

Proficiency in some one
or more of the Modern
Languages is also very
desirable.



The following sugges-
tions are made for the
guidance of those who
are able to do more than
master the reciuisites
above stated:

Although no require-
ments iu Natural Science
are specified, the study
of Local Botany, Miner-
alogy, and Natural His-
tory is earn(!stly recom-
mended, both because of
the knowledge which
may be acquired, and be-
cause of the habits of
accurate observation of
nature Avhicli may thus
be foitaed in early youth.

Students are advised to
devote at least one year
to the study of Latin be-
fore entering this depart-
ment. It will greatly
help their acquisition of
Modern Languages, and
will be useful in their
study of science. Allen
& Greenough's Grammar
and Reader are especially
commended as good man-
uals for this purpose.

Proficiency in some one
or more of the Modern
Languages is also very
desirable.



Any two of the following subjects:

(1) Physics. The elements of Physics (Avery's Natural
Philosophy, Peck's Ganot's Introductory Course of Natural
Philosophy, or an equivalent).

(2) Chemistiy. The elements of Chemistry (Eliot and
Storer's Chemistry, Avery's Elementary Chemistry, or a
thorough acquaintance with Mead's Chemical Primer). An
examination on the more advanced chemistry will be offered
to any who wish it. A successful completion of this exam-
ination will give the student admission to the chemical
laboratory.

Applicants who pass with honors in Chemistry will be
put iu an advanced division.

{?>) Botany. The elements of Botany. An accurate
knowledge of Part I of Gray's How Plants Grow, together
with an acquaintance witli the moi-e prominent native or
cultivated plants, tlieir structure and botanical affinities.

(4) Physiology. The elements of Physiology (Hutchin-
son's, or an equivalent).

(5) Free-liand Drawing. Line drawing from models,
copying of patterns, etc. Particular attention is given to
correctness of form and smoothness of outline. The en-
deavor will be to test the applicant in that free-hand use of
the pencil which will be of most immediate value to him
in pursuing the subject of mechanical draw-ing and map-
ping.

(0) Mineralogy. The elements of Mineralogy. A good
knowledge of the physical properties of minerals in gen-
eral. Al)ility to determine by tlieir physical properties
alone tweuty-five of the commonest minerals, and to give
reasons for determination. First seventy-two pages of
Nicol's Manual of Mineralogy, or first seventy-five pages of
Dana's, third edition.

(7) Plane Trigonometry. The development of the gen-
eral formulae of plane trigonometry, solution of plane
triangles, and practice in tlie use of logarithmic tables.
Four-place logarithmic tables are furnisheil for use in the
examination.



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE CLASSICAL COURSE.



Arithmetic. Higher
Arithmetic in all its
branches, including the
extraction of square and
cube roots, and the met-
ric system of weights
and measures.



Arithmetic. Higher
Arithmetic in all its
branches, including the
extraction of square and
cube roots, and the metric
system of weights and
measures.



Arithmetic. Prime and composite numbers ; divisibility
of numbers ; factors, multiplication and division by factors ;
common divisors, multiples; fractions; decimals, including
percentage, simple and compound interest, and discount ;
compound numbers and the metric system; involution,
square root. Tlie teclinical parts of Commercial Arith-
metic — such as banking, profit and loss, commission, taxes,
duties, stocks, insurance, exchange, average of payments —
may be omitted.



26



Rkquirkmkxts fou Admission to the Classicai, Course — Coutinued.



Algebra. To Quad-
ratics.



Ai.fiEiiRA. To Quad- Algebr.v. The definitions and explanations of the laws
ratios. | of signs in the four fundanientiil operations ; theory of

division of polynomials; factoring ; highest coinnion factor
and lowest common multiple; fractions; simple and frac-
tional equations ; definition of the roots of an equation ;
simultaneous equations of the first degree ; elimination by
comparison, by substitution, and by addition or subtraction ;
inequalities; involution and evolution; fractional and neg-
ative exponents; radical expressions and surds; reduction
and rationalization of surds.



Geohetky. Foui- Books.



Geometry. Four Books. Geometry. Logical basis of geometry in its axioms and
definitions ; relations of angles and of triangles ; equal fig-
ures; parallels and parallelograms; properties of polj'gons;
properties of tlie circle ; inscribed and circumscribed figures;
areas of rectangles and of plane figures; ratio and propor-
tion ; linear proportion, and proportion of areas ; similar
figures.



Geogbapuy. The general facts of Physical and Political
Geography ; Ancient Geography.



History or United
States.



History of United
States; Greek and Ro-
man History.



History of United Stater. Greek History to the death
of Alexander ; Roman History to the death of Gommodus.



English Grammar.



English
Rhetoric.



Grammar ;



English. Candidates will be required to write a short
composition, correct in spelling, i)unctuation, grammar, and
division into paragraphs, upon a subject announced at the
time of the examination. They Avill also be required to
analyze sentences from the works used in preparation, and
to pass an examination on Kellogg's Text-Book on Rhetoric
as far as Lesson 72.

For 1884 and 1885 the subjects will be taken from the fol-
lowing works: Tom Brown's School Days at Rugby;
Irving's Sketch Book ; Dickens' Christmas Stories ; Scott's
Lady of the Lake and Kenilworth ; Shakespeare's Merchant
of Venice and Julius Caesar.



•L.\TIN. Ca?8ar; four
books of the Gallic War.



Latin. Cwsar ; four
books of the Gallic War.



Latin. Ca'sar; four books of the Gallic War, or two
books of the Civil War.



Cicero ; six orations.



Cicero ; six orations.



Cicero ; six orations.



Vergil, Eclogues, six
books of the .Slneid.



Vergil, Eclogues,

Georgics, and six books
of the jEueid.



Vergil ; six books of the .?5neid.



Latin Grammar,
eluding Prosody.



Latin Grammar, in-
cluding Prosody.



Questions on the subject-matter, on construction, on
grammatical forms, and on Prosody, will form a part of the
examination in Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil.




Translation into Latin of simple English sentences, suit'
able to those who have taken Jones' Latin Comjiosition.



Translation at sight of easy Latin Prose (with reasonable
help in vccabulary and notes).



Greek. Xenophon's
Anabasis, three books.

Homer's Iliad, two 1
books (omitting cata- |
logue of shipsj.



Greek. Xenophon's
Anabivsis, four books.

Homer's Iliad, two
books (omitting catalogue
of sliip.s).



Greek. Xenophon's Anabasis, four books, or the first
111 pages of Goodwin's Greek Reader.

Homer's Iliad, two books (omitting catalogue of ships).



I Jones' Greek Composi-
i tion.



Translation into Greek of simple sentences suited to the
proficiency of those who have completed Jones' Greek
Prose Composition.



27



Beqi'IHEments ron Apmission to thk Ci„\ssh.'AI. Coursk — Continued.



Greek Grammar, in- ; Greek Grammar, iu- j Questions on the subject-matter, on construction, on
eluding Prosody. j cludin;;; Prosody. grammatical forms, and on Prosody, will form a part of tlie

examinations in the Anabasis and Homer.



Translation at sight of easy Greek Prose (with reasona-
ble help in vocabulary and notes).



REQUIREMENTS FOR AB3IISSI0N TO LITERARY COURSE.



Sequirements the same
as for Colleges of Science.

Proficiency in some
language besides English
expected.



liequirements the same
as for Colleges of Science,
with the addition of
Latin Grammar and
Reader; Cwsar, four
books; Greek and Ro-
man History.

Elementaiy acquaint-
ance with some modern
language recommended.



Requirements tlie same as for Classical Course, except
that two Natural Sciences are substituted for Greek.



Age of students Admitted.

The average age of students admitted to the Freshman Class in
1882 was 18 years 1 month; in 1883 it was 18 years 5.9 months; and
in 1884 it was 18 years 6.5 months, showing that our requirements for
admission continue to secure students of good maturity. A standard
that secures students of this mature age is of course maintained at a
sacrifice in the number of students; but it does not, I trust, admit of
question that such a standard should be maintained, and that the
lower grade of instruction, vastly important though it is, should be
left to other schools.

Percentage of Students Conditioned.

In the following table will be found the number of students admit-
ted from diploma schools — that is, schools whose graduates, upon the
personal recommendation of the Principal, are admitted without
examination — and of those that were examined, the percentage admit-
ted without conditions, the percentage admitted with conditions, and
the percentage rejected; also, the percentage conditioned in the sev-
eral subjects of the admission examinations. In 1882, United States
history and geography were counted as a single subject, as were also
Caisar, Latin at sight, and Latin composition. The blanks in the
ta*ble indicate this fact with respect to these and the other subjects



Online LibraryCalifornia. LegislatureAppendix to the Journals of the Senate and Assembly of the ... session of the Legislature of the State of California (Volume 1885v.1) → online text (page 69 of 83)