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$19,181 72

1,021 78

26,867 50

114 00



30,613 36

4,500 00

3,000 00

120 00

375 00

131 72

6,000 00



891,925 08



77

FUNDS, AND STATE APPROPRIATIONS, FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1884.



DISBURSKMEXTS.

United States Endowment :

Purchase of Tehama County Bonds, par value $37,000

Purchase of Kern County Bonds, par value 15,000

Bacon Library and Art Gallery Building, furniture

Excess payments.l

State fees, ]iaid Sepretary of State for alBxing State seal to patents

Mechanical and Mining Departments

Agricultural Department

Agricultural Laboratory .*

M. Reese Library Fund, interest, purchase of books

State Geological Survey, insurance on material in New York City

Mineralogical Department

Physical Laboratory

Viticultural Fund

University site improvements

Equipment and repairs

Union Savings Bank, deposit, Brayton Pro|ierty Fund

Security Savings Bank, deposit, Brayton Property Fund

San Francisco Savings Union, deposit, Brayton Property Fund

Total



$52,000 GO

3,859 32

3,796 86

55 00

2,140 65
7,362 98

825 00
5,278 19

111 50

86 30

2,539 24

866 15
9,468 44
1,531 56

8.955 50

8.956 50
8,955 50

$116,788 69



78

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FROM INCOME AVAILABLE FOR



Interest and discount — Interest on Bray ton property, mortgage notes .

Interest from Brayton Real Estate Fund, investment in bonds

Interest from balance of unpaid principal, due agricultural grant

Interest from United States Endowment, investment in bonds

Interest from Seminary Land Investment Fuud, invested in bonds

Interest from State Endowment Fund, from sales of tide lands

Interest frojn Diverted Funds ,

Interest from Land Administration Fund, investment in bonds

Interest from Land Administration Fund, on Marin County Bonds

Interest from Special Investment Fund •_-

Land Administration, fees returned

University Site Improvements, rent of mountain land

Agricultural Department, sale of fruit

Physical Laboratory, students' fees

College celebrations, diplomas

Laboratory, from students

Land fees for issuance of approvals, certificate of purchase, and patents

Admission and tuition fees

Cottage rents

Equipment and repairs, sale of gas machine



Total __ _ $105,353 39



$2,735


01


4,637


75


10,140


04


20,172


21


2,059


26


50,021


24


4,785


00


994


83


1,189


25


4,416


31


6


72


100


00


36


95


115


40


302


50


950


92


1,114


00


200


00


1,276


00


100


00


$105,353 39



RECAPITULATION OF STATEMENTS.

Cash receipts from endowments, trust funds, and State appropria-
tions

Cash receipts from income available for current expenses

Cash balance with Treasurer D. 0. Mills June 30, 1883

Cash disbursements on account of endowments, trust funds, and

State appropriations

Cash disbursements on account of current expenses

Cash balance with Treasurer James C. Flood June 30, 1884



$91,925


08


105,353


39


63,989


05


$116,788 69


91,738


73


52,740


10







$261,267 52



$261,267 52



r9



THE PAYMENT OF CURRENT EXPENSES FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1884.



DISBUKSEMKNTS.

Salaries— Educational $65,119 92

Salaries— Attorneys, Secretaries, Land Agents, and Janitors 12,342 00

Equipment and repairs

Fuel

Advertising and printing

Telegraphing and expressing

Stationery .

Postage

University Printing Office (material)

Land administration

Incidental expenses

University site improvements

University Water Company

Physical Laboratory

Insurance

College celebrations

Official and lecturing expenses

Museum

Chemical Laboratory

Library

Military Department

Students' cottages

Total



$77,461
1,297

478


92
91

75


703


10


210


35


77


68


209


05


221


99


1,992

1,234

3,172

100


69
91
44
17


118


93


300


65


252


10


241


86


57


71


3,138
339


67

85


in


90


16


10



n,738 73



80



REPORT OF THE LAND AGENT OF THE UXTVERSITY OF

CALIFORNIA.



Receipts for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1883.

From sales of tlie Agricultural grant of 150,000 acres

Less cancellation for want of title



$67,863 22
1,310 00



From collections of $1 25 per acre due United States on double minimum land.

From interest on deferred payments due Agricultural Grant

From fees for applications, certificates of purchase, and patents

From State fees due Secretary of State for affixing State seal to patents ..



Total cash receipts.



Number of acres for which certificates of purchase have issued

Number of acres for which patents have been issued for minimum laud

Number of acres for which patents have been issued for double minimum land

Receipts for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1884.

From sales of the Agricultural Grant of 150,000 acres $20,510 59

Less cancellation for want of title , 1,328 87



From collections of $1 25 per acre due the United States on double minimum land.

From interest on deferred payments due Agricultural Grant

From fees for applications, certificates of purchase, and patents

From State fees due Secretary of State for affixing State seal to patents



$66,553 22

3,999 13

13,698 51

1,347 00

67 00



$85,664 86



6,945.42
4,337.02
5.379.52



Total cash receipts $32,192

Number of acres for which certificates of purchase have been issued

Number of acres for which patents have been issued for minimum land

Number of acres for which patents have been issued for double minimum land..



$19,181 72


1,014 40


10,768 53


1,114 00


114 00


$32,192 65


4,677.70


3,807.99


6,893.60



Total sales of the Agricultural Grant to June 30, 1884 §553,231 32

Total interest received on deferred pavments 268,455 33

Total fees ." 13,181 00



STATEMENT OF LANDS LISTED AND CHARGED AGAINST THE AGRICULTURAL
GRANT OF 150,000 ACRES TO JUNE 30, 1884.



Xunilier of
Acres.



San Francisco District.

Sacramento District

Los Angeles District

Humboldt District

Shasta District

Stockton District

Visalia District

Marysville District

Susanville District

Aurora District



48,779.18

6,360.06

8,038.56

13,687.18

17,341.90

9,450.30

12,258.02

21,716.23

1,177.53

1,920.65

Independence or Bodie District I 1,440.65



Total acres listed i 142,169.61



81

The records of this office show the following number of acres listed
against the Seminary and Public Building Land Grants :

Seminary Lands.

Marysville District 25,287.24 acres

Sacramento District (536.09 acres sold, but not listed) 400.00 acres

Visalia District (320 acres sold, but not listed) 640.00 acres

Humboldt District (2,000 acres sold, but not listed) 1 „ „„„ ,(. ^„_gg

Humboldt District (480 acres forfeited to Regents, but not listed) j '

Stockton District 5,120.00 acres

San Francisco District (1,924.66 acres sold, but not listed) 1,724.51 acres

Total listed 39,774.11 acres

Sold, but not listed ,-^ 5,261.75 acres

45,035.86 acres
Total number of acres of grant, 46,080 ; leaving yet to be applied for, 1,044.14 acres.

Public Building Lands.

Humboldt District 1,283.80 acres

Visalia District 1,294.24 acres

Stockton District (640.78 acres sold, but not listed) 1,582.85 acres

San Francisco District (320 acres sold, but not listed). — None listed.

Marysville District 800.00 acres

Total acres listed 4,960.79 acres

Sold, but not listed 960.78 acres

5,921.57 acres
Total number of acres of grant, 6,400 ; leaving yet to be applied for, 478.43 acres.



6'



REPORT



STATE ENGINEER



YEARS 1883 AND 1884.




SACRAMENTO:

STATE OFFICE JAMES J. AYERS, SUPT. STATE PRINTING.

1884.



REPORT.



To the Legislature of the State of California:

I respectfully report, concerning the operations of the State Engi-
neering Department, for the two years ending with December 31, 1884,
and the condition of the work in hand, as follows:

THE DEPARTMENT AND ITS WORK.

As an introduction to that which is to follow, I take the liberty of
reproducing from my report to the Legislature for the years 1881 and
1882, the following statement of the nature and scope of the opera-
tions conducted by this department:

The State Engineer Department was created by an Act of Legislature approved March 29,
1878, and the State Engineer was therein instructed to undertake certain works of inquiry and
investigation, as follows :

DUTY IN GENERAL.

Sec. 3. The duty of the State Engineer shall be, under the direction of the Governor, to
investigate the problems of irrigation of the plains, the condition and capacity of the great
drainage lines of the State, and the improvement of the navigation of rivers.

Sec. 4. In order to carry out the purpose specified in section three, it shall be required of
the State Engineer to ascertain as nearly as possible the following named facts, and to express
opinions as is hereby required.

DRAINAGE EXAMINATIONS.

First — To ascertain the present water-carrying capacity of the Sacramento and San Joaquin
Rivers, in the different sections which are liable to overflow.

Second — Whether this carrying capacity can be increased, and, if so, by what means, and at
what cost.

Third — The maximum quantity of water which may reasonably be expected to present itself
on any day, at the head of any of the sections of the rivers as before mentioned.

Fourth — Whether it is possible to make the rivers carry the maximum quantity thus ascer-
tained, and if not, to suggest such other measures as may be judicious for the relief of the rivers
and the protection of adjoining lands, and to give detailed estimates of the cost of the suggested
works.

Fifth — To ascertain whether there has been any change in the height of beds of the naviga-
ble rivers of the State, and if so, to determine as nearly as may be the extent of this change,
and the cause or causes to which it is due, and whether change is now taking place in the
height of the beds of the rivers, and if so, what legislation, if any, will be effectual in prevent-
ing the rise of the beds, or in diminishing the rate of rise.

Sixth — To ascertain the eflect of any change in the bottom of the rivers, or the carrying
capacity, and in the height of floods in the rivers.

IRRIGATION INVESTIGATIONS.

Seventh — To ascertain the position and acreage of all lands in the valleys of the State which
are now, or may be in the future, in need of irrigation; to divide these lauds into their natural
districts; to ascertain the water source or sources from whfch each district may be most con-
veniently irrigated; to ascertain the quantity of water which these sources can supply in difier-
ent years for irrigation ; the length of time in each year during which these sources will supply
sufBcieut water for irrigation; make studies of the best means for irrigating each district, and
give his opinions and advice to such parties as may be engaged in irrigating a district, or who
may be about to undertake the irrigation of a district; and for this advice no compensation
shall be received from the parties to whom this advice is given.



DEBRIS INQUIRY.

Eighth — The State Engineer shall also inquire into the relation which hydraulic mining bears
to the navigation of the rivers, and to their carrying capacity; to inquire into the question of
the flow of debris from the mines into the watercourses of the State; to ascertain the amount
and value of agricultural lands and improvements which have been covered up or injured by
the overflow or deposit of debris, coming from the hydraulic and other mines in the Sacra-
mento Valley, and to devise a plan whereby the injuries caused thereby can be averted without
interfering with the working of such mines.

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS.

Ninth — In addition to making these inquiries, the State Engineer shall make such other
investigations as may appear to him to be necessary, and approved by the Governor, for the
proper and complete solution of the problems stated in section three.

THE CHARACTER OF THE WORK.

The amount of work laid out for the State Engineer by this law is not to be appreciated,
unless the foregoing instructions be carefully read and the subject be deliberately thought over,
and even then, the difficulties and expense attending its accomplishment are only to be thor-
oughly understood by those who have a clear conception of the great extent and varied physical
character of our State, and some knowledge of the methods of a physical survey.

By the enactment of these instructions, the State virtually ordered a physical survey of its
territory. Indeed, only upon the results of such an examination can any really valuable dis-
cussion of the problems it is sought to throw light upon, be predicated; and, further than this,
the law ordered a thorough exaviiimtion — "a proper and complete solution" of these problems.

In old settled countries, such as France, Italy, and Spain, where irrigation and drainage
works have long been in existence, a perfect chaos of conflicting rights and interests, frequent
failure in works of improvement, and deplorable unhealthfulness of localities, have resulted
from the development of systems of works unguided by the information which such examina-
tions would have afforded. And at this very time, these European States, each and every one
of them, are prosecuting physical surveys of their great river basins, and wrestling with the
problem of remodeling old and defective systems of irrigation and drainage works and laws.

As to the definite uses to which the results of a physical survey should be put by the State,
these have been heretofore reported, and will be again referred to in general terms at the close
of this paper.

Nothing which I have said is to be taken as implying that the State should, in my opinion,
undertake the construction of either reclamation or irrigation works. There is a wide difference
between the provision of proper system and laws of government, and the construction of works
for local improvement. « » «

I respectfully represent that I do not take the responsibility of recommending a continuation
of this work with a view to its present prosecution to completion, as it was marked out in the
law which originally directed its undertaking, nor the incurring of other expense than that
necessary for properly putting before the public that portion of it now in hands.

In accordance with the foregoing general idea, the State Engineer
recommended in the same report that an appropriation of S20,000 be
made for the completion of the irrigation report as then in hands,
and that a further appropriation be made for its publication with the
maps and cuts necessary to illustrate it.

Following that report there was embodied in the General Appro-
priation Act of that session, an item as follows: .

For completion of the State Engineer's irrigation investigation, report, and maps, and the
State maps, as per the estimate in the Third Progress Report of the State Engineer; for the
making of a correct outline map of each county in the State, and for the revision of the legal
description of all such county boundaries to correspond with said outline maps, together with a
report on the same to the Legislature of 1885, twenty thousand dollars.

There was also passed at the session of 1883, a joint resolution of the
Senate and Assembly, instructing the State Engineer to report to the
Governor, on the subject of irrigation legislation, on or before the first
day of January, 1884.



THE WORK FOR THE YEARS 1883 AND 1884.

Thus, the State Engineer was instructed to close up one work,
according to a certain statement, and given means to the amount
estimated to be necessary for the purpose, but at the same time in-
structed to do a considerable amount of work in addition, with the
same means; and furthermore, no appropriation whatever was made
for the publication of the maps and illustrations, as was recom-
mended.

It has been my endeavor to comply with the instructions of the
Legislature, and I have spared no possible amount of personal labor
to accomplish the end desired, but I have not been able to do so.

The duty imposed upon the State Engineer is that of a professional
service, and not those ordinary routine duties of an office having some
certain executive functions; and the elements of that professional
dut}^ are, from the nature of things, exceptionally difficult to foresee
and estimate upon. Nevertheless, the estimate for completion of the
work in hands on the first of Januarj^ 1883, would have been at least
very nearly sufficient, and the work would be now in an advanced
state of publication had there not been other and extended duties
required of the State Engineer, and additional work ordered and to
be paid for out of the money appropriated, and had there have been
provision made for publishing the detailed maps and illustrations
as was recommended.

However, I have the satisfaction of saying that the report and
maps are now in such condition as to require but a comparatively
small appropriation, in addition to that necessary for publication, to
bring them out before the public in a useful form, and that some
portions are now in course of publication, while very much will be
ready for the press or lithographer before the appropriation now
available will have been exhausted at the end of the present fiscal
year; as will hereinafter be explained in detail.

In addition to this chief work of the department, other duties have
been performed.

COUNTY BOUNDARIES.

In endeavoring to comply with the terms of the appropriation, I
have had compiled all the information concerning county boundaries
which could be obtained in the various State offices of record, in the
statutes and codes, and at the county seats, so far as information
could be obtained from such county seats by correspondence with
the Surveyors, Recorders, and Clerks of the counties, and by visiting
a number most accessible from Sacramento.

From this information, and the United States land and other sur-
veys, I have endeavored to make correct descriptions of the count j^
boundaries, but I have found so much of uncertainty and conflict,
requiring inspections to be made in the field and personal visits to
the county seats to acquire needed data — which in many instances it
seems impossible to obtain by correspondence without paying heavily
for it; and I have found that to complete this branch of work as
directed would require so much expense as to seriously cripple the
main work of the department— that I have concluded to leave it in
unfinished form, and ask to have the condition of the matter exam-
ined and reported upon by the suitable committees of the Senate and
the Assembly, which I now respectfully do.



PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS.

In accordance with instructions from his Excellency the Governor,
I have rendered professional service to the Board of Directors of the
State Asylum at Stockton, in the matter of preparing a report and
plans for and generally superintending the construction of sewage
disposal and sewerage works for that institution ; and also to the Board
of Directors of the Napa Asylum, in the matter of planning and
advising concerning the construction of works for the extinguish-
ment of fire at that institution.

Together these two services have occupied during the past sixteen
months, at least five months of mj'^ time, most of which was spent on
the Stockton Asylum work, where the operations were in large part
of a character new to this coast, and required personal attention.

THE REPORT ON THE PROBLEMS OF IRRIGATION.

The special attention of the Legislature is asked to the subject of
the Report on the Problems of Irrigation, now in course of publica-
tion, of which an outline of the entire contents and a large part of
the first book is transmitted in printed form, by his Excellency the
Governor.

As planned, the work consists of three parts, made up of seven
books, with subject-matter as indicated hy the following titles:

PART I.

The Social, Political, and Legal Problems of Irrigation.

Book I — The laws of waters and water-courses, and the customs,
laws, and policies with respect to irrigation, in civil law countries.

Book II — The laws of waters and water-courses, so far as these
directly affect irrigation questions, and the customs, laws, and policies,
with respect to irrigation, in common law countries.

PART II.

The Physical, Practical, and Technical Problems of Irrigation.

Book III — The physical questions of water supply, conservation,
and division for purposes of irrigation in California.

Book IV — The existing works, practice, and ppssibilities of irri-
gation in California.

Book V — The technical questions of water distribution and use in
the practice of irrigation in, and as applied to, California.

PART III.

The Planning, Construction, Operation, and Maintenance of Irrigation

Works.

Book VI — Of works for the interception and storage of waters for
irrigation.

Book VII — Of works for the diversion, conducting, and applying
waters in irrigation.



The first five books of the work, with their necessary appendices,
will make up four volumes, each of 450 to 550 pages, of the size and
style of the sheets now printed, varying with the provision which
may be made for printing, illustration, revising, and editing the mat-
ter now available.

The matter for the last two books is being collected incidentally to
' the preparation of the first five. It may be published within the com-
pass of one volume or may be extended to two volumes, according to
the provision made for completion and the operations of publication
as above.

SCOPE OF, AND PROVISION FOR THE WORK.

It may appear to some persons unacquainted with this great inter-
est of irrigation that I have attempted in this report more than was
contemplated in the original Act authorizing the investigation. It is
possible that I have undertaken more than has been expected, but
not more than the law, as quoted in the beginning of this present
report, plainly directs and authorizes, and not more than the neces-
sities of the case demand.

In other countries such a work as this would have been confided
to a commission of half a dozen or more able men of professions
varied and suited to the task, and they would have been given ample
means from the start to carry their work to completion.

In the case of the work committed to the State Engineer of Califor-
nia, the law said :

Tenth — Inasmuch as these inquiries involve a broad and scientific treatment of the physical
facts of the water system of the State,, and as their study may properly be divided, the Gov-
ernor is authorized to employ, for the purpose of advising and assisting the State Engineer, two
consulting engineers, acquainted with hydraulic engineering, and of good standing in their
profession, who shall receive not exceeding three thousand dollars a year each, and who shall
join with the State Engineer in making his final report.

In accordance with this provision, during the first two years of the
prosecution of the work, the State Engineer had the advice of two
gentlemen eminent in the profession, but the duty was then confined
to gathering data by surveys and field examinations principally con-
nected with the drainage and river improvement work. Since that
time and during the period of the preparation of the report now
being considered, the State Engineer has not had the advice and
assistance of consulting engineers, for the reason that provision for
paying for such service has been refused b\' the Legislature.

NECESSITY FOR, AND CONDUCT OP THE WORK.

The present condition of affairs with respect to irrigation in Cali-
fornia, must bring home to every thinking person who appreciates
the situation, a realization of the necessity for a thorough under-
standing of this whole subject.

I ask careful scrutiny of the outline of matter, or table of contents,
of the report in preparation, on the part of those who do realize the
facts, in order that they may form an idea as to whether or not it is
likely to contain the needed information.

I ask a fair reading of the advance sheets of the report, on the part
of those who would judge as to whether or not the matter is to be pre-
sented in useful form.

I ask a viewing of the work in progress in this ofl&ce, on the part of



those who would know whether or not the work is being carried for-
ward as well as thus far published.

In the preparation of this report, it is sought to keep constantly in



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