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Decision. — Whereas, the Board of State Prison Directors, at a regular meeting held January
5, 1884, unanimously recommended that the sentence of said Cook, which had been commuted
to ten years by Governor Perkins, be still further commuted to the term of nine years. Let his
sentence be commuted to nine years. August 5, 1884.



Name of Prisoner.


County.


Crime.


Sentenced.


Term.


0. H. Lewis


Sonoma.


Grand larceny and
prior conviction.


June, 1882






Thirty vears.









Decision. — Whereas, the Board of State Prison Directors, at a regular meeting held July 17^
1884, unanimously recommended said Lewis for commutation of sentence, on the ground that



63

the prompt and successful interference of said Lewis to save the life of a prison official, when
murderously assaulted by another convict, justly entitles him to this reward; and, whereas,
the recognition of such services will have a most beneficial effect upon the prisoners, and upon
the future government of the prison. Let his sentence be commuted to fifteen years. August
21, 1884.



Name of Prisoner.


County.


Crime. Sentenced.


Term.


Henry Wolfe


Yuba


Burglary, first

degree May, 1880






Six years.









Decision. — Whereas, the Board of State Prison Directors, at a regular meeting held June 20,
1884, unanimously recommended the said Wolfe for commutation to five years, under Section
34 of the statute of 1880, for diligent and faithful services. Let his sentence be commuted to
five years. August 30, 1884.



Name of Prisoner.


County.


Crime.


Sentenced.


Term.


Charles Meyers


San Francisco


Burglary, second
degree


September, 1882.


Four and one

half years.



Decision. — Whereas, the Board of State Prison Directors, at a regular meeting held July 24,
1884, recommended that the sentence of said Meyers be commuted to two years, on the ground
of valuable assistance to the officers of the Folsom State Prison. Let his sentence be commuted
to two years. September 1, 1884.



Name of Prisoner. County.


Crime.


Sentenced.


Term.


Lee Tung Stanislaus


Murder, first de-
gree


December, 1881.


Life.









Decision. — Whereas, the Board of State Prison Directors, at a regular meeting held March 13,
1884, unanimously recommended that the sentence of the said Lee Tung be commuted to four
years, on the ground that it appears to them that he is but a victim of a plot to screen the real
murderer, who is a member of a powerful Chinese organization, and that, connected with this
doubt as to his guilt, his good conduct and faithful services are worthy of some reward. Let his
sentence be commuted to four years. September 10, 1884. '



Name of Prisoner.


County.


Crime.


Sentenced.


Term.


John Parker


San Francisco


Child stealing


March, 1883


Ten years.









Decision. — Whereas, the Board of State Prison Directors, at a regular meeting held July 24,
1884, recommended that the sentence of said Parker be commuted to one year, on the ground
that his action was misconstrued and his sentence was far in excess of a just penalty. Let his
sentence be commuted to one year. September 11, 1884.



64



Name of Prisoner.


County.


Crime. Sentenced.


Term.




Tulare


Robbery


January, 1874


Twenty-










two years.



Dkcision. — Whereas, the Board of State Prison Directors, at a regular meeting held August
14, 1884, unanimously recommended that the said Downen be pardoned, believing his sen-
tence excessive and that the ends of justice would not be more fully subserved by a further
incarceration ; and, whereas. Wells, Fargo & Co., the sufferers by the robbery, the District Attor-
ney of Tulare County, and many other county officials who are familiar with the facts of the
case, strongly urge the pardon. Let his sentence be commuted to ten and one half years. Sep-
tember 12, 1884.



Name of Prisoner.


County.


Crime.


Sentenced.


Term.




Monterey


Manslaughter


July, 1880


Ten years.









Decision. — Whereas, the Board of State Prison Directors, at a regular meeting held April 10,
1884, recommended that the sentence of said lams be commuted to six years, on the grounds
of meritorious and faithful services. Let his sentence be commuted to six years. September
17, 1884.



Name of Prisoner.


County.


Crime.


Sentenced.


Term.


Henry Lockyear


Alameda


Burglary, first de-
gree


June, 1882


Six years.









Decision. — Whereas, the Board of State Prison Directors, at a regular meeting held July 17,
1884, unanimously recommended that the said Lockyear be granted a commutation of his sen-
tence to three years. Let his sentence be commuted to three years. October 3, 1884.



Name of Prisoner.


County.


Crime.


Sentenced.


Term.


George Craft


Colusa-


Grand larceny


March, 1883


Three years.





Decision. — Whereas, the Board of State Prison Directors, at a regular meeting held October
21, 1884, recommended that the sentence of said Craft be commuted to two years; cause: good
conduct, diligent service, and prison discipline as affected by his example. Let his sentence be
commuted to two years. December 5, 1884.



SUMMARY.

Pardons from State Prisons 100

Pardons from County Jails 27

Commutations of Sentence 35

Total number of cases in which clemency was extended 162



BIENNIAL REPORT



SECRETARY OF STATE.



■1883-1884




SACRAMENTO:

STATE OFFICE, JAMES J. AYERS, SUPT. STATE PRINTING.

1884.



Department of State, |

Sacramento, September 30, 1884. \

To his Excellency George Stoneman, Governor of California:

Sir: Herewith I have the honor to submit the report of the Secre-
tary of State for the last half of the thirty-fourth fiscal year, ending
June 30, 1883, and the whole of the thirty-fifth fiscal year, ending
June 30, 1884, as required by Section 408 of the Political Code.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. L. THOMPSON,

Secretary of State.



REPORT.



THIRTY-FOURTH FISCAL YEAR— JANUARY 8, 1883, TO JUNE 30, 1883— (FOR THE

HALF YEAR).

The position I have the honor to fill in the State Government is not
a political sinecure, as some would suppose. The responsibilities are
great, and the labor necessary to the faithful discharge of the varied
duties incumbent upon the office is unceasing. The Secretary of
State is made, by law, a member of the Board of Capitol Commission-
ers, and a member of the State Board of Examiners, the latter an
important care, and one that demands considerable of his time. He
is, also, charged with the superintendence of the State Capitol and
grounds. Dur^'ng the last fiscal year, the Capitol Commissioners,
jointly with the State Board of Agriculture, were charged with the
adoption of plans and building of the new Agricultural Pavilion,
located at the southeast corner of the Capitol park, which added con-
siderably to the labor and cares of my office. The pavilion, now
completed, is a credit to the State, and one that will answer, for many
years, the requirements of the Agricultural Society.

Though the means therefor were limited far below what they
should be, a marked improvement was made the past year on the
Capitol grounds, especially east of the Capitol, where new beds have
been laid out, flowers and shrubbery planted, terrace steps rebuilt, a
better system of drainage introduced, walks graveled, etc. Some prog-
ress was made, also, towards the completion of the stone fence on the
line of Tenth, approaching N Street, the difficulties attending which
you will find more fully set forth in the report of the Capitol Commis-
sioners. Sidewalks and inclosures about the grounds are a necessity.
With the limited means at my disposal for that purpose, some work
in the way of renovating has been done to the Capitol; the doors and
windows of the building especially need painting. During the year,
a very elegant donation of statuary (by Mead), representing Colum-
bus before Queen Isabella, and presented to the State by D. 0. Mills,
Esq., was placed in the rotunda, at the expense of that gentleman,
where it has been admired by thousands of visitors, who have come
especially to see the beautiful work of art — I regret to say, the only
one in stone about the Capitol.

In connection herewith, I respectfully submit statements showing
receipts and disbursements, and the condition of all appropriations
under the care of this department.



STATIONERY ACCOUNT.

Appropriation for Stationery, Fuel, and Lights.

Appropriation for thirty-fourth fiscal year $12,500 00

Expended by ex-Secretary Burns the first half of the thirty-fourth fiscal year,

from July 1, 1882, to January 8, 1883, when Burns' term expired 11,001 14

Leaving a balance of $1,498 86

The present administration took possession with a Legislature just
convened and to be provided for with but $1,498 86 in this fund, and
with bills on hand aggregating $1,500. Hence, I was compelled to
ask the Legislature for an appropriation of $7,000, the lowest estimate
we could make of the probable consumption of stationery, fuel, and
lights for the Legislative and State Departments for the last half of
the thirty-fourth fiscal year. Notwithstanding the extra expense of
the Legislature, which should have swelled the expense of the last
half of the fiscal year in the neighborhood of $3,000 more than the
first half, yet it will be seen from figures below that the last half of
the fiscal year we were enabled, by close management, to maintain
the various departments at a saving of $2,602 98 over the cost of the
first half of the thirty-fourth fiscal year, and with the expense of the
Legislature taken out, at a saving of over $5,000 over the cost of the
first half of the thirty-fourth fiscal year. How close the estimate of
$7,000 was to the probable demand for the Stationery, Fuel, and Lights
Fund, over and above the amount left in the fund and the demands
against the same, may be gathered from the following summary :

Unexpended balance left by outgoing administration $1,498 86

Special appropriation 7,000 00

Total $8,498 86

Expended by this administration in maintainiag Legislative and State Depart-
ments for last half thirty-fourth fiscal year:

For stationery .' I $5,082 17

Wood and coai 1,590 80

Gas 1,663 80

Sundry supplies 150 87

Total 8,487 64

Unexpended balance infund $11 22

Appropriation for Postage, Expressage, Telegraph, etc.

Unexpended balance on hand January 8, 1883 • 1 $1,113 94

Expended by this administration:

For telegraphing $154 50

For postage . .* 622 30

For expressage 4U6 21

Total . 1,083 01

Unexpended balance in fund $30 93

Appropriation for Repairs to Capitol.

Unexpended balance on hand January 8, 1883 $81 75

Special appropriation 1,000 00

Total $1,081 75

Expended by this administration 849 41

Unexpended balance in fund $232 34



The original appropriation was $2,500. As will be seen above, on
Januarj'- 8, 1883, when this administration took possession, the fund
was nearly depleted, there being but $81 75 on hand to serve the last
half of the fiscal year. There being many needed repairs, I was com-
pelled to ask the Legislature for an appropriation of $1,000, which,
however, was not all absorbed; nearly one fourth of the appropria-
tion, or $232 34, as indicated above, remaining unexpended at the
end of the fiscal year, and reverting back to the General Fund.

Appropriation for Water for Irrigation, Purchase of Hose and Implements, etc.

Balance on hand January 8, 1883 $852 23

Expended by this administration to July ], 1883 851 13

Balance in fund $1 10

Appropriation for Water in Building.

Balance on hand January 8, 1883 _ $300 00

Water to July 1, 1883, 6 months @ $50, as per contract 300 00

Appropriation for Contingent Expenses.

Balance on hand January 8, 1883 $16 30

Expended by this administration 12 15

Balance in fund $4 15

THIRTY-FIFTH FISCAL YEAR— JULY 1, 1883, TO JUNE 30,1884.

Appropriation for Stationery, Fuel, and Lights.

Regular annual appropriation $12,500 00

Expended for stationery $4,757 43

Expended for wood and coal 2,092 19

Expended for lights 1,908 50

Expended for sundry supplies • 1,625 73

Total expended 10,383 85

Unexpended balance in fund $2,116 15

To review the Stationery, Fuel, and Lights Fund, the records show
that for the years 1865-6, and 1867-8, the appropriations for stationery,
fuel, and lights, were $30,000 for each brace of years. For the years
1869-70, and 1871-2, even that large amount was increased to $40,000.
Subsequent to 1871-2 it was reduced, and up to, and including the
present time, the appropriation has been $25,000, or $12,500 per year.
This amount, owing to the natural growth of the State Government,
and the large increase incident thereto in Commissions and new offices
created, all of which, added to the consumption of the Stationery
Fund, was found insufficient by the administration preceding us,
and which was, in consequence, compelled to ask for special appro-
priations—in 1880, $2,200 65 ; in 1881 two— one of $3,033 14, and
another of $12,000. In 1883, as is hereinbefore noticed, this adminis-
tration took possession with a depleted fund, and the Legislature, and
the half of a fiscal year, to provide for, necessitating a special appro-
priation of $7,000. Thus it will be seen from the record of the
preceding four years that the appropriation of $12,500 per year was
largely insufficient. However, notwithstanding the increased de-
mands upon the Stationery Fund, all of which we have met, and the
fact that the regular appropriation is the same that it has been for
twelve years, the present administration, by economical management,



has supplied, in addition, an extra session of the Legislature with
stationery at an extra expense of $1,114 04, not anticipated when the
appropriation was made; and now, instead of asking for the usual
deficiencj' of from S3,000 to $12,000, is thus, at the end of the fiscal
year, enabled to report an unexpended balance in the fund of
$2,116 15. And, believing that by economy the same ratio of saving
can be maintained, we advocate and suggest a reduction in the next
legislative appropriation of $5,000, making the appropriation $20,000
for the next two fiscal years, instead of $25,000 as heretofore.

Appropriation for Postage, Expres-iage, Telegraph, etc.

Appropriation $1,500 00

Expended for postage $195 50

Expended for telegraphing 132 12

Wells, Fargo & Co., expressage on Statutes, Reports, Journals, etc 645 17

Hauling _ 26 10

998 89

Balance in fund... $501 11

From the above it will be seen that we have been enabled to meet
all the demands against this fund and still return at the end of the
year over one third of the original appropriation. We think by
economy we can maintain the same ratio of reduction the next two
years; hence, suggest and advocate a reduction in this fund also of
$300 per year, making the biennial appropriation $2,400, instead of
$3,000 as heretofore.

Appropriation for Repairs to Capitol.

Appropriation $3,000 00

Expended in repairs 2,293 30

Unexpended balance in fund $706 70

In connection with this showing attention is directed to the fact
that for the four years ending January, 1883, the deficiency appro-
priations for this fund, in addition to the regular appropriations,
aggregated $12,010 45, or an average of $3,000 per year.

Appropriation for Water for Irrigation, Parchase of Hose, Implements, etc.

Appropriation $1,500 00

Expended for water, as per contract $450 00

Expended for gravel and repairing walks 258 90

Expended for plants, hose, implements, etc 534 29

Total expended 1,243 19

Unexpended balance in fund l $256 81

Appropriation for Water in Building.

Appropriation $600 00

Water @ $50 per nionth, for 12 months, as per contract 600 00

Appropriation for Contingent jExpensei.

Appropriation $100 00

Expended for ice, papers, washing towels, etc 98 20

Unexpended balance in fund $1 80



Appropriation for Ventilating Senate and Asxembli/ Chamba-fi, Plumbing, Renovating, etc.

Appropriation $15,000 00

Expended 4,939 59

Unexpended balance in fund $10, 060 41

The sum of $4,939 59 of this special appropriation for "plumbing,
repairing of roof, and ventilation of the Senate and Assembly Cham-
bers, and water-closets in, and painting and renovating of the State
Capitol," has been expended in repairs to roof, painting, whitening,
and renovating. The remainder will be consumed in ventilation of
Senate and Assembly Chambers, new water-closets, and improved
drainage.

STATIONERY CONSUMED.

From the foregoing report, it will be observed that the adminis-
tration preceding us consumed out of the stationery, fuel, and lights
fund, for the last six months of its administration, 811,001 14, or at
the rate of 822,002 28 per year; and that this administration expended
but $10,383 •85 in maintaining the same departments the entire thirty-
fifth fiscal year, the expense of which was materially increased bj'
an extra session of the Legislature. Contrasting the two years, the
saving in the management of this fund alone is at the rate of $11,-
608 43 per year in favor of this administration. For still further
comparison we append the following figures:

stationery supplied Legislature, attaches, and officei-s, of regular session ofl883_- $2,587 32

Stationerv supplied Legislature, attaches, and officers, of extra session of 1884 1,114 04

Supplied"State officers from January 1, 1S83, to July 1, 1883- 3,021 48

Supplied State officers from July l,"l883, to July l,"l8S4 3,953 35

Total $10,67tj 19

It will be seen the last regular and extra sessions of the Legislature were supplied
stationery at an aggregate of.. $3,701 36

The regular and extra sessions of the preceding administration in 1881 were sup-
plied at an expense of.- 5,984 08

Saving in favor of this administration $2,282 72

The stationery consumed for the same period by the State officials
is likewise considerably less than that of the corresponding period of
the preceding administration, but the last biennial report does not
.segregate the fiscal years so as to enable us to make that comparison.

PAPER ACCOUNT.

Section 1182 of the Political Code directs that "the Secretary of
State must provide and keep constantly on hand a sufficient quantity
of paper, uniform in color, weight, texture, and appearance, without
marks of any kind thereon, to supply the demand for paper for
tickets." When I came into office I found:

Ballot paper in room 21 563* reams

to July 1, 1884 179| reams

Balance on hand 384^ reams

2'



10

Old Slock.

Remnants in basement 1,262A reams

Sales to July 1, 1884- 1,037| reams

On hand __. 225 reams

The remnants in basement consisted of five different kinds of
paper, much of it damaged and in a decaying condition. This, after
conference with your Excellency, was sold for $1,000.

Appropriation for Ballot Paper.
For purchase of ballot paper $7,000 00

Unexpended $7,000 00

SUPREME COURT REPORTS.

Fifty-ninth Report.

Received from A. L. Bancroft k Co., publishers 300 volumes

Distributed 266

Sold 5

On hand 29

300 volumes

Sixtieth Report.

Received from A. L. Bancroft & Co., publishers 300 volumes

Distributed 266

Sold 4

On hand 30

300 volumes

Sixty-first Report.

Received from A. L. Bancroft i Co., publishers 300 volumes

Distributed 267

Sold 2

On hand 31

300 volumes

Sixty-second Report.

Received from A. L. Bancroft & Co., publishers 300 volumes

Distributed 264

Sold 2

On hand 34

• 300 volumes

STATUTES OF 1883.

Received 2,235

Distributed 1,634

Sold 153

On hand 448

2 235

CONSTITUTIONAL DEBATES.

Received from predecessor 1,321 sets

Sold 10 sets

Distributed 66 sets

On hand 1,245 sets

1,321 sets

RECEIPTS.

Below are presented the monthly receipts from all sources, received
from the commencement of my term of office, January 8, 1883, up to
and including June 30, 1884. For convenient reference I append the



11

monthly receipts of my predecessor for the corresponding period in
his term:



Fob the Month of —



Keceived by

this Ad-
ministration.



Received
by Preceding
Administra-
tion.



1883.



January $1

February

March i 1

April I 1

May I 1

June ! 1



July

August

September.

October

November-
December .



January.-
February.
March ._.

April

May

June



,019
889
,025
,007
,039
,1.34
7U
822
771
796
738
,317



1884.

1.258 25

1,136 25

1,275 75

2,079 50

1,009 10

1,098 00



Totals I $19,154 35



1881.

?207 75
218 50
439 00
430 00
439 75
329 90
422 45
590 25
310 15

»945 75

3»4 25

1882.

584 50
502 00
650 00
603 00
647 00
571 00



3,245 25



Increase of receipts in favor of this administration for the eighteen months $10,909 10

Paid into Treasury, as per Controller's receipts on file 19,154 35

^NoTE. — Our predecessor made but one report for the months of October and November, 1881,
hence the $945 75 is in settlement for two months.

CONCLUSION.



In conclusion it is gratifying to be able to direct your Excellency's
attention to the following facts that this report develops, viz.: That
notwithstanding the increased demands made upon the various appro-
priations for this department, incident to the growth and develop-
ment of the State and its government, which are annually augmented,
there has been during this administration a decrease in expenditures
made from the respective appropriations. That there is consequently
a substantial unexpended balance in each appropriation. That for
the first time in twenty-five years (since 1859) the Department of
State does not ask the Legislature for a deficiency appropriation.
That in consequence of the foregoing, I am enabled to recommend
a reduction in two of our principal appropriations, which for several
years preceding this administration, as shown by the record, it has
been found necessary to supplement with deficiencies. That while
the expenditures have decreased the receipts of the office have largely
increased.

THOS. L. THOMPSON,

Secretary of State.



12

State of California, | ^^

County of Sacramento, j '

Thos. L. Thompson, being sworn, deposes and says, that the above
is a true statement, in detail, of the manner in which each of the
appropriations for the office of the Secretary of State have been
expended during the years named.

THOS. L. THOMPSON.

Subscribed and sworn to before me, this the thirtieth day of Sep-
tember, 1884.

E. W. Maslin,
Clerk State Board of Equalization.



BIENNIAL REPORT



STATE TREASURER



STATE OF CALIFORNIA.



1882—1884,




SACRAMENTO:

STATE OFFICE JAMES J. AYERS, SUPT. STATE PRINTING.

1884.



REPORT.



State of California, Treasury Department,
Sacramento, June 30, 1884.

To his Excellency Governor George Stoneman:

Sir: In compliance with section three hundred and thirty-two,
Political Code of the State, I have the honor to submit the following
report of the transactions of this department for the thirty-fourth
and thirty-hfth fiscal years, ending June 30, 1884:

First — Receipts from County Treasurers.

Second — Receipts from other sources.

Third — Disbursements.

Fourth — Transactions in each Fund.

Fifth — Recapitulation — balance in each Fund.

Sixth — Transactions in State bonds.

Seventh — Bonds held in trust for School Fund.

Eighth — Bonds held in trust for University Fund.

Ninth — Bonds held in trust for Relief of Jas. Saultry Fund.

Tentli — State debt, and kind of money in the Treasury.

Eleventh — Interest and coupon account.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. A. JANUARY,

State Treasurer.



RECEIPTS INTO THE STATE TREASURY.



Receipts.



Thirty-fourth
Fiscal Year.



Thirty-fifth
Fiscal Year.



FROM COUNTY TREASURERS

Alameda

Alpine —

Amador

Butte

Calaveras

Colusa

Contra Costa

Del Norte

El Dorado

Fresno

Humboldt

Inyo

Kern

Lake

Lassen

Los Angeles

Marin

Mariposa

Mendocino

Meroed

Modoc

Mono

Monterey

Napa

Nevada

Placer

Plumas

Sacramento

San Benito

San Bernardino

San Diego

San Francisco

San Joaquin

San Luis Obispo

San Mateo

Santa Barbara

Santa Clara

Santa Cruz

Shasta

Sierra

Siskiyou

Solano

Sonoma

Stanislaus

Sutter

Tebama

Trinity

Tulare

Tuolumne

Ventura

Yolo

Yuba

Totals, carried forward



$265,270

2,222

19.006

88,344

21.217

106,996
60,644
8,265
23,24.3
58,653
55,549
8,802
52,704
17,894
10,012

131,131



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