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in use of water craft placed in his custody. — See 10 L. N. S. 389.

Master's power to sell vessel and to hypothecate it and the
freight and cargo. — See 63 A. D. 638.

Mechanics' lien on vessels — Creation of by state. — See 1 L.
505.

Ownership of derelict. — See 18 L. 695.

Part owners of vessels. — See 88 A. D. 364; 90 A. S. 355.

Private action for violation of law and rules of navigation
and water carriage. — See 9 L. N. S. 375.

Prospective profits as element of damage for recovery of
total loss of vessel by collision. — See 6 A. C. 131.

Protest of master as evidence.- — See 13 A. D. 735.

Regulations of generally. — See 2 L. 380; 4 L. 125; 26 L. 484;
27 L. 414.

Relative duties of steamers and small crafts propelled by
oars on rivers and in narrow channels. — See 5 L. N. S. 303.

Relative rights and duties of master of vessel and pilot. — See
10 A. C. 382.

Right of cargo owner to treat contract of affreightment as
ended by abandonment of vessel. — See 4 A. C. 412.

Right of carrier to recovery for loss or destruction of cargo.
—See 2 L. 174.

Rights of seamen as salvors. — See 64 L. 193.

Seamen — Assignment of future wages of. — See 14 L. 127.

Same — Duty of ship owner to. — See 7 A. C. 202; 1 A. S. 812.

Same — Same — Sick and disabled. — See 7 A. C. 203.

Same — Duty to furnish medical aid to. — See 28 L. 549.

Same — End of voyage — What constitutes. — See 9 A. C. 505.

Same — Exemption of wages of. — See 18 L. 310.

Same — Liability of owners of vessels for injuries received by
seamen from the officers. — See 31 A. S. 805.

Same — Liability of shippers of goods for injuries to. — See 46
L. 104.

Same — Maritime lien under contract. — See 70 L. 377.

Same — Right of — As salvors. — See 64 L. 193.

Same — Same — Under contract of service for ordinary voyage,
to refuse to proceed to belligerent port without relinquishing
right to wages. — See 7 A. C. 347.

569



§ 961 CIVIL CODE. [Div.II,Pt.III.

Same — Wages of. — See 6 A. C. 65; 7 A. C. 434; 9 A. C. 536.

Same — Same — Right of seamen, under contract of services
for ordinary voyage to refuse to proceed to belligerent port
without relinquishing right of wages. — See 7 A. C. 347.

Same — Same — What constitutes loss within meaning of
statute termination seamen's wages upon loss of vessel. — See
6 A. C. 68.

Seaworthiness, what constitutes. — See 58 A. D. 671.

Shipowner and master's duties toward sick or disabled sea-
men. — See 7 A. C. 203.

Ship owner's duty to seamen. — See 7 A. C. 202.

Ship's husband — Right of to maritime lien for advances. —
See 70 L. 416.

Situs of vessel for purposes of taxation. — See 3 A. C. 1103;
6 A. C. 205; 7 A. C. 443; 69 L. 447; 2 L. N. S. 197.

Strike — Effect of on unloading cargo. — See 35 K 630.

Supercargoes, who are and their rights, duties, and liabilities.
— See 66 A. D. 325.

Taxation of receipts of steamship companies. — See 57 L. 64.

Towed vessels, liability for injury caused to. — See 25 A. D.
354.

Unloading cargo. — See 6 L. 172.

Validity and effect of stipulation in ocean steamship ticket
limiting liability for passenger's baggage. — See 9 A. C. 913.

Vessels at sea. — See 12 A. D. 511.

Vessels — Contracts to build, whether are maritime contracts.
—See 13 A. R. 273.

Same — Rights and duties of not based upon contract. — See
75 A. D. 601.

"Vessel" synonymous with ship. — See 7 W. & P. 6487.

What constitutes appurtenances of ship. — See 5 A. C. ~652.

What constitutes end of voyage. — See 9 A. C. 505.

When vessel is engaged in interstate commerce. — See 2 L. 381.

Where ships and vessels are taxable. — See 37 L. 518.



§ 961. APPURTE>ANCES AXD EQUIPMENTS. All things,
belonging to the owners, which are on board a ship, and are
connected with its proper use, for the objects of the voyage
and adventure in which the ship is engaged, are deemed its
appurtenances.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872.

See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. for 17 pars, annotation.

As to many miscellaneous matters as to ships and shipping,
see note § 960, ante.

570



Tit.II,ch.II,art.I.] navigation, foreign, etc. §§962-966

§962. FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC NAVIGATION. Ships
are engaged either in foreign or domestic navigation, or in
the fisheries. Ships are engaged in foreign navigation when
passing to or from a foreign country; and in domestic navi-
gation, when passing" from place to place within the United
States.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872.

See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. for 4 pars, annotation.

As to many miscellaneous matters as to ships and shipping,
see note § 960, ante.

§963. FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC SHIPS DISTIN-
GUISHED. A ship in a port of the state to which it belongs
is called a domestic ship; in another port it is called a foreign'
ship.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872.

§964. SEVERAL OWNERS. If a ship belongs to several
persons, not partners, and they differ as to its use or repair,
the controversy may be determined by any court of competent
jurisdiction.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872.

§965. OWNER FOR VOYAGE. If the owner of a ship
commits its possession and navigation to another, that other,
and not the owner, is responsible for its repairs and supplies.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872.

See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. for 8 pars, annotation.

As to many miscellaneous matters as to sliips and shipping,
see note § 960, ante.

§966. REGISTRY, ETC. The registry, enrolment, and
license of ships are regulated by acts of Congress.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872.

See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. for 11 pars, annotation.

As to many miscellaneous matters as to ships and shipping,
see note § 960, ante.



571



§ 970 CIVIL CODE. [Div.II.Pt.TII.



ARTICLE II.

RUIJ-:S OF NAVIGATION.

§ 970. Collisions:

1. Rules as to ships meeting each other.

•'• 2. The rule for sailing vessels.

3. Rules for steamers in narrow channels.

4. Same. [Pass on starboard side.]

5. Rules for steam vessels on different courses.

6. Meeting of steamers.

§ 971. Collision from breach of rules.

S 972. Breaches of such rules to imply wilful default.

§ 973. Loss, how apportioned.

§ {)7(>. COLLISIONS. In the case of ships meeting, the
following rules must be observed, in addition to those pre-
scribed by that part of the Political Code which relates to
navigation :

1. Kulos as to ships ineotiuj? each other. Whenever any
ship, whether a steamer or sailing ship, proceeding in one
direction, meets another ship, whether a steamer or sailing
ship, proceeding in another direction, so that if both ships
were to continue their respective courses they would pass so
near as to involve the risk of a collision, the helms of beth
ships must be put to port so as to pass on the port side of
each other; and this rule applies to all steamers and all sail-
ing ships, whether on the port or starboard tack, and whether
close-hauled or not. except where the circumstances of the
case are such as to render a departure from the rule neces-
sary in order to avoid immediate danger, and subject also
to a due regard to the dangers of navigation, and, as regards
sailing ships on the starboard tack close-hauled, to the keep-
ing such ships under command ;

2. Kules for sailing' vessels. In the case of sailing vessels,
those having the wind fair must give way to those on a wind.
When both are going by the wind, the vessel on the starboard
tack must keep her wind, and the one on the larboard tack
bear up strongly, passing each other on the larboard hand.

572



J



TitII,ch.II,art.II.] COLLISIONS. § 970

When both vessels have the wind large or abeam, and meet,
they must pass each other in the same way on the larboard
hand, to effect which two last-mentioned objects the helm
must be put to port. Steam vessels must be regarded as
vessels navigating with a fair wind, and should give way to
sailing vessels on a wind of either tack;

3. Eules for steamers in narrow channels. A steamer navi-
gating a narrow channel must, whenever it is safe and prac-
ticable, keep to that side of the fairway or mid channel which
lies on the starboard side of the steamer;

4. Same. [Pass on starboard side.] A steamer when pass-
ing another steamer in such channel, must always leave the
other upon the larboard side;

5. Eules for steam vessels on different courses. When
steamers must inevitably or necessarily cross so near that
by continuing their respective courses, there would be a risk
of collision, each vessel must put her helm to port, so as
always to pass on the larboard side of each other;

6. Meeting of steamers. The rules of this section do not
apply to any case for which a different rule is provided by
the regulations for the government of pilots of steamers
approaching each other within the sound of the steam-whistle,
or by the regulations concerning lights upon steamers, pre-
scribed by or under authority of the laws of the United States.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872; amended by Code Com-
mission, Act March 16, 1901, Stats, and Amdts. 1900-1, p. 394,
held unconstitutional, see history, § 4 ante; amendment re-
enacted March 21, 1905, Stats, and Amdts. 1905, pp. 600-601. ■

See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. for 8 pars, annotation.

As to duty of sailing- vessel to hold her course, see 75 A. D.
601-604.

As to duty of steamer and sailing- vessel when approaching
each other, see 45 A. D. 55.

As to duty of vessel overtaking another, see 75 A. D. 601-604.

As to many miscellaneous matters as to ships and shipping,
see note § 960, ante.

As to rights and duties of vessels in navigation, see 75 A. D.
601-612.

573



§§971-973 CIVIL CODE. [Div.II.Pt.III.

§971. COLLISION FROM BREACH OF RULES. If it

appears that a collision was occasioned by failure to observe
any rule of the. foregoing section, the owner of the ship by
which such rule is infringed cannot recover compensation for
damages sustained bj^ the ship in such collision, unless it
appears that the circumstances of the case made a departure
from the rule necessary.

HiMlory: Enacted March 21, 1872.

§ 972. BREACHES OF SUCH RULES TO IMPLY WILFUL
DEFAULT. Damage to person or property arising from the
failure of a ship to observe any rule of section nine hundred
and seventy, must be deemed to have been occasioned by the
wilful default of the person in charge of the deck of such
ship at the time, unless it appears that the circumstances of
the case made a departure from the rule necessary.

HLstory: Enacted March 21, 1872.

§973. LOSS, HOW APPORTIONED. Losses caused by col-
lision are to be borne as follows:

1. If oitlier iJarty was exelusivelj in fault he must bear his
own loss, and compensate the other for any loss he has sus-
tained ;

2. If neither was In fault, the loss must be borne by him
on whom it falls;

3. If both were in fault, the loss is to be equally divided,
unless it appears that there was a great disparity in fault,
in which case the loss must be equitably apportioned;

4. If it cannot be ascertained where the fault lies, the loss
must be equally divided.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872.

See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. for 34 pars, annotation.

As to burden of proof in case of collision, see 4r> A. D. 54.

As to collision of vessels and the liability of tug and tow, see
3 L. 234.

As to duty to exhibit lights, see 45 A. D. 55; 75 A. D. 601-610,
611.

As to inevitable accident or inscrutable fault, see 45 A. D. 51.

As to liability for Injury caused by towed vessel, see 25 A. D.
354.

574



A



Tit.II.Ch.III.] AUTHORSHIP— OWNERSHIP. §§980,981

As to liability of vessels and others for damages caused by
collisions, see 45 A. D. 51-60.

As to many miscellaneous matters as to ships and shipping,,
see note § 960, ante.

As to rule where both parties are in fault, see 45 A. D. 52.

As to rule where one vessel only is in fault, see 45 A. D. 53.

As to when collisions at sea are deemed the acts of God, see
46 A. D. 592.



CHAPTER III.

PRODUCTS OF THE MIND.

§ 980. How far the subject of ownership.

§ 981. Joint authorship.

§ 982. Transfer.

§ 983. Effect of publication.

§ 984. Subsequent inventor, author, etc.

§ 985. Private writings.

§ 980. HOW FAR THE SUBJECT OF OW?fERSHIP. The

author of any product of the mind, whether it is an invention,
or a composition in letters or art, or a design, with or without
delineation, or other graphical representation, has an exclu-
sive ownership tlierein, and in the representation or expres-
sion thereof, which continues so long as the product and the
representations or expressions thereof made by him remain
in his possession.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872.

See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. for 27 pars, annotation.
As to many miscellaneous matters as to personal property, see
note § 946, ante.

Trade-marks. — See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. § 991 and note.

§981. JOINT AUTHORSHIP. Unless otherwise agreed, a
product of the mind in the production of which several per-
sons are jointly concerned, is owned by them as follows:

1. If the product is single, in equal proportions;

2. If it is not single, in proportion to the contribution of
each.

Hi.story: Enacted March 21, 1872.

As to many miscellaneous matters as to personal property, see
note § 946, ante.

575



§§ 982-985 CIVIL CODE. [Div.II,Pt.III.

§982. TRAlVSrER. The owner of any product of the
mind, or of any representation or expression thereof, may
transfer his property in the same.

History: Enacted March 21. 1872.

See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. for 6 pars, annotation.
As to many miscellaneous matters as to personal property, see
note § 9%^, ante.

§983. EFFECT OF PUBLICATION. If the owner of a
product of the mind intentionally makes it public, a copy or
reproduction may be made public by any person, without
responsibility to the owner, so far as the law of this state is
concerned.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872.

See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. for 9 pars, annotation.

As to many miscellaneous matters as to personal property,. see
note § 946, ante.

§ 984. SUBSEQUENT INVENTOR, AUTHOR, ETC. If the

owner of a product of the mind does not make it public, any
other person subsequently and originally producing the same
thing has the same right therein as the prior author, which
is exclusive to the same extent against all persons except the
prior author, or those claiming under him.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872.

§985. PRIVATE WRITINGS. Letters and other private
communications in writing belong to the person to whom they
are addressed and delivered; but they cannot be published
against the will of the writer, except by authority of law.
History: Enacted March 21, 1872.

See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. for 12 pars, annotation.

As to many miscellaneous matters as to personal property, see
note § 946, ante.

Letters — Property rights in — As between sender and receiver.
— See 57 A. S. 619.

Same — Same — Common-law rights in respect to. — See 51 L.
360.

Same — Same — Injunction to protect. — See 5 A. D. 725.

576



Titll.ch.IV.] TRADE-MARKS. § 991

CHAPTER IV.

OTHER KINDS OF PERSONAL PROPERTY.

§ 991. Trade-marks and signs.

§ 992. Good-will of business.

§ 993. Good-will and name, transfer of.

§ 994. Title deeds.

§ 995. "Tare" on baled hops.

§ 991. TEADE-MARKS AND SIGNS. One who produces or
deals in a particular thing, or conducts a particular business,
may appropriate to his exclusive use, as a trade-mark, any
form, symbol, or name which has not been so appropriated
by another, to designate the origin or ownership thereof;
but he cannot exclusively appropriate any designation, or part
of a designation, which relates only to the name, quality, or
the description of the thing or business, or the place where
the thing is produced, or the business is carried on.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872; amended March 30, 1874,
Code"Amdts. 1873-4, p. 224. See Act 1863; 29 C. 292, 294, 87 A.
D. 170.

See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. for 214 pars, annotation.

63 C. 445, 446, 49 A. R. 96 (applied to business sign); 100 C.
672, 677, 35 P. 623, 22 L. 790 (applied to name); 103 C. 71, 73, 37
P. 210 (applied to tea labels— .distinction) ; 136 C. 351, 352, 68
P. 1014 (applied to use of name or word); 150 C. 180, 182, 88 P.
704 (applied to words "Old Homestead" stamped on loaves of
bread).

As to discretion of court in granting injunction, see 10
Bncyc. P. 983-994.

As to good-wills, see Kerr's Cyc. C. C. Ǥ 992, 993 and notes.

As to labels adopted by trade unions, etc., see Kerr's Cyc.
Pol. C. §§ 3200, 3201 and notes.

As to many miscellaneous matters as to personal property, see
note § 946, ante.

As to matters which may and which may not be adopted as
trade-marks, see 12 Fed. 704-706.

As to right of corporation to have name, see Kerr's Cyc. C. C.
§ 354 subd. 1 and note.

As to violation of covenants Involving good-will, see Kerr's
Cyc. C. C. § 992 and note.

Kerr's C. C. — 19 577



§§992,993 CIVIL CODE. [Div.II.Pt.III.

As to what constitutes infringement of trade-mark, see 47
A. D. 284-299.

As to when injunction will lie against infringement of trade-
mark, see note bk. 24 L. ed. U. S. Reps. 828-830.

Criminal prosecution for violation of trade-mark. — See Kerr's
Cyc. Pen. C. §§ 350-354% and notes.

Damages for infringement of patents, copyrights, or trade-
marks, as affected by loss of profits. — See 51 L. 801-825.

Deception as bar to relief for infringement of trade-mark. —
See note bk. 47 L. ed. U. S. Rep. 282-286.

Definition and general characteristics of trade-mark. — See 47
A. D. 284-286.

For other definitions, see Kerr's Cyc. Pen. C. § 353 and note;
and Kerr's Cyc. Pol. C. § 3196 and note.

Infringement — Criterion of. — See 9 L. 150, 151.

Infringement — Simulation is necessary. — See 9 L. 151.

Origin or ownership must be indicated to make trade-mark
valid.— See 47 A. D. 287, 288.

§992. GOOD-^VILL OF BUSINESS. The good-will of a
business is the expectation of continued public patronage, but
it does not include a right to use the name of any person
from whom it was acquired.

HLstory: Enacted March 21, 1872.

See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. for 6 pars, annotation.

71 C. 142, 148, 11 P. 856, 859 (cited); 31 P. 155 (cited); 114 C.
635, 664, 46 P. 742, 34 L. 265 (applied); 124 C. 429. 431, 71 A. S.
94, 57 P. 468, 46 L. 142 (referred to); 145 C. 380, 388, 78 P. 879
(trading corporation's expectation of continued public patronage
constitutes good-will of its business); 149 C. 575, 598, 87 P. 102
(franchise of corporation is good-will of its business, see con.
op. of Henshaw, J.); 3 C. A. 291, 292, 85 P. 132 (contract con-
strued as being, in effect, transfer of good-will of business).

As to many miscellaneous matters as to personal property, see
note § 946, ante.

§993. GOOD-^VILL A>D NAME, TRANSFER OF. The

good-will of a business is property, transferable like any
other, and the person transferring it may transfer with it the
right of using the name under which the business is con-
ducted.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872; amended by Code Com-
mission, Act March 16, 1901, Stats, and Amdts. 1900-1, p. 395,

578



Titll.ch.IV.] TITLE DEEDS— "TARE." §§ 994, 995

held unconstitutional, see .history, § 4 ante; amendment re-
enacted March 21, 1905, Stats, and Amdts. 1905, p. 602.

See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. for 58 pars, annotation.

71 C. 142, 148, 11 P. 856, 859 (referred to); 31 P. 155 (referred
to); 114 C. 635, 664, 46 P. 742, 34 L. 265 (cited); 124 C. 429, 431,
71 A. S. 94, 57 P. 468, 46 L. 142 (referred to); 149 C. 575, 598, 87
P. 102 (con. op. of Henshaw, J. — franchise of corporation is
good-will of its business).

As to judicial sale of trade-mark, see Kerr's Cyc. C. C. § 991
and note par. 126.

As to many miscellaneous matters as to personal property, see
note § 946, ante.

Analogy between good-will and trade-mark. — See Kerr's Cyc.
C. C. § 991 and note.

Dissolution of partnership — Agreement not to carry on simi-
lar business. — See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. P. § 1675 and note.

Partner has no authority to dispose of good-will. — See Kerr's
Cyc. C. C. § 2430 subd. 2 and note.

Warranty on sale of good-will. — See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. § 1776
and note.

§ 994. TITLE DEEDS. Instruments essential to the title
of real property, and which are not kept in a public office as
a record, pursuant to law, belong to the person in whom, for
the time being, such title may be vested, and pass with the
title.

Hi.story: Enacted March 21, 1872.

55 C. 564, 566 (meaning of "instrument" — it does not embrace
what).

As to many miscellaneous matters as to personal propert5^ see
note § 946, ante.

§ 995. "TARE" OX BALED HOPS. There shall be allowed
on baled hops a tare at the rate of two per centum of the
weight of the bale for the cloth and other material used in
baling; that is, the tare shall be at the rate of two pounds
per hundred on the weight of the bale.

HLstory Enacted March 21, 1907, Stats, and Amdts. 1907,
p. 845, Kerr's Stats, and Amdts. 1906-7, p. 423.



579



§§ 1000, 1001 CIVIL CODE. [Div.II.Pt.IV.



PART IV.
ACQUISITION OF PROPERTY.

Title I. Modes in which Property May Be Acquired, §§ 1000,
1001.
II. Occupancy, §§ 1006, 1007.

III. Accession, §§ 1013-1033.

IV. Transfer, §§ 1039-1231.

V. Homesteads, §§ 1237-1269c.

VI. Wills, §§ 1270-1377.

VII. Succession, §§ 1383-1409.

VIII. Water Rights, §§ 1410-1422.

IX. Hydraulic Mining, §§ 1424, 1425.

X. Locating Mining Claims, Tunnel Rights, Mill Sites,
etc., §§ 1426-1426S.

TITLE I.

MODES IN WHICH PROPERTY MAY BE ACQUIRED.

§ 1000. Property, how acquired.

§ 1001. Acquisition of property by exercise of eminent domain.

§1000. PROPERTY, HOW ACQUIRED. Property is
acquired by:

1. Occupancy;

2. Accession;

3. Transfer;

4. Will; or,

5. Succession.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872.
112 C. 387, 394, 44 P. 734 (referred to).

§ 1001. ACQUISITION OF PROPERTY BY EXERCISE OF
EMINENT DOMAIN. Any person may, without further legis-
lative action, acquire private property for any use specified
in section twelve hundred and thirty-eight of the Code of Civil

580



Tit, I.] EMINENT DOMAIN. § 1001

Procedure either by consent of the owner or by proceedings
had under the provisions of title seven, part three, of the
Code of Civil Procedure; and any person seeking to acquire
property for any of the uses mentioned in such title is "an
agent of the state," or a "person in charge of such use,"
within the meaning of those terms as used in such title. This
section shall be in force from and after the fourth day of
April, eighteen hundred and seventy-two.

History: Enacted March 21, 1872.

See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. for 13 pars, annotation.

62 C. 182, 183, 45 A. R. 659 (applied); 69 C. 255, 301, 10 P.
674, 698 (construed and applied); 79 C. 159, 162, 21 P. 547, 548
(construed and applied); 79 C. 549, 550, 21 P. 958 (applied); 91
C. 238, 248, 27 P. 604, 606 (construed and applied); 95 C. 105,
111, 112, 30 P. 197 (applied); 99 C. 210, 213, 33 P. 885. 886
(referred to); 119 C. 164, 165, 51 P. 34 (referred to); 129 C. 8,
11, 61 P. 947 (construed); 137 C. 619, 632, 92 A. S. 188, 67 P. 1040.
70 P. 1083, 59 L. 581 (referred to in dis. op.); 2 C. A. 546, 558,
84 P. 298 (limitation of charter of corporation cannot be cir-
cumscribed by this section, nor by §§1238 or 1242 C. C. P.); 46
F. 709, 711 (applied — waters of running streams may be con-
demned for purpose of supplying town witli water — waters of
non-navigable running streams may be acquired by appropria-
tion for purposes authorized by law).

As to corporation being person, see Kerr's Cyc. C. C. § 14 and
note.

Complaint in condemnation proceedings. — See Kerr's Cyc. C.
C. P. § 1244 and note.

Constitutionality of statute. — See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. P. § 1238
and note.

Estates and riglits in land which may be taken. — See Kerr's
Cyc. C. C. P. § 1239 and note.

Necessity must exist to justify taking. — See Kerr's Cyc. C.
C. P. § 1241 and note.

Private property which may be taken — Classes enumerated. —
See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. P. § 1240 and note.

Public uses — Statutory enumeration of. — See Kerr's Cyc. C.
C. P. § 1238 and note.

Railroad corporations— Exercise of power of eminent domain
by. — See Kerr's Cyc. C. C. §§ 465, 467, 469, 472 and notes.



581



§ 1006 CIVIL CODE. [Div.TI.Pt.IV.

TITLE II.

OCCUPANCY.

§ 1006. Simple occupancy.
§ 1007. Prescription.

§ 100«. SIMPLE OCCUPANCY. Occupancy for any period



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