Carl Skottsberg.

The wilds of Patagonia; a narrative of the Swedish expedition to Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego and the Falkland Islands in 1907-1909 online

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THE WILDS OF

PATAGONIA




Carl Skottsberg.



THE WILDS OF

PATAGONIA

A NARRATIVE OF THE SWEDISH
EXPEDITION TO PATAGONIA
TIERRA DEL FUEGO AND THE
FALKLAND ISLANDS IN 1907-1909

^^l^Ci>^ BY / c r _-> -

CARL SKOTTSBEKG, D.Sc, etc.



LONDON
EDWARD ARNOLD

1911

All rights reserved



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, ^'



Baacroft iibnuy

Bancroft Library
Wlvtrvfy of CalifornH



] TO

' SIR JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER

O.M., G.C.S.I., C.B., D.C.L., LL.D.. F.R.S., etc.

THE PIONEER AND THE

MASTER

THIS VOLUME IS DEDICATED IN PEOFOUND
^ ADMIRATION

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■6







PREFACE

When, in January 1904, 1 had returned from taking part
in the Swedish Antarctic Expedition, and had begun
to work out my notes and collections, it happened to me,
as it has happened to so many others before, that every
now and then questions cropped up which, for want
of material, had to be left unanswered. Gradually also
quite new problems presented themselves, and the
thought of returning once more to some of the countries
I had visited soon arose. One of my companions
from the Antarctic, Dr. J. G. Andersson, had just the
same experience, but was kept in Sweden by his work
as director of the Geological Survey. Without knowing
of my scheme, he had got two of our common friends,
T. Halle and P. Quensel, interested in our old field of
operations in South America, and one day, as we
happened to be speaking of it, we considered the
possibihty of planning a modest expedition, principally
for geological and botanical purposes. With a geo-
logical survey were connected a number of geographical
problems, such as the changes of the land after the Ice
Age ; the formation and true nature of the Patagonian
Channels ; the origin of the transverse Andine V alleys ;

vii



viii PREFACE

the influence of geology and plant- geography on the

landscape, &c. The algological investigations would

also lead to the formation of zoological collections, and

besides, we thought that in the Patagonian Channels

we should have opportunities of making ethnographic

studies.

In order to discuss our plans I arranged with Quensel
and Halle that they should meet me in Stockholm at
the Geological Survey office, and one evening was born
the enterprise, afterwards called the " Swedish Magel-
lanic Expedition," of which the author consented to
undertake the leadership, the members being: Carl
Skottsberg, born 1880, D.Sc, Lecturer at the Univer-
sity of Upsala; Percy D. Quensel, born 1881, B.Sc.
(now Dr.), Upsala; and Thore G. Halle, born 1884,
B.Sc. (now Dr.), Stockholm.

I devoted myself to botanical work, but also made
most of the insignificant zoological collections. The
speciality of Mr. Halle was the survey of fossihferous
deposits, and as a clever bryologist, he assisted me
in gathering mosses and other cryptogams. Mr. Quensel
was mainly occupied with studies of the eruptive
rocks, the origin of the Andes and the phenomena of
glaciation. On many occasions the two geologists
collaborated.

But it is one thing to make up one's naind to go to
South America, another to get money for such a purpose.
The expedition cost about 23,000 Swedish crowns



PREFACE ix

(£1280), and thanks to several funds, scientific societies
and private persons, we procured the necessary money
without great difficulty. Many useful articles in our
equipment were presented to us, and the Swedish
Johnson Line in Stockholm gave us a free passage on
its steamers to and from Buenos Aires. To all those
who assisted us, I have tried to express our gratitude
in the preface to the Swedish edition of this book, and
have explained how it would have been absolutely
impossible to make a journey which lasted nearly two
years at such small expense, had it not been for the
unparalleled generosity shown by Argentina and more
especially by Chile — not that the Argentine Government
was less interested, but we spent most of the time in
Chile. I need not repaat this, nor my sincere thanks
to the representatives of Sweden. There is, however,
one thing that I want specially to mention on the
occasion of my book being laid before EngHsh readers.
We spent part of the time in a British colony, the
Falkland Islands, where His Excellency the Governor,
Mr. W. L. AUardyce, C.M.G., and Mrs. AUardyce, both
deeply interested in scientific work in general as also
in our personal welfare, did all they could to promote
our success. We are also greatly indebted to the
Falkland Islands Company Ltd., to its director in
London, Mr. F. E. Cobb, as well as to its representatives
in Port Stanley, Mr. W. Harding, Mr. W. C. Girling
and Lieutenant Colonel A. Reid, D.S.O. (no longer in the



X PREFACE

Company's service). We also owe very much to
numerous sheep- farmers, Mr. Allen of Darwin, Messrs.
Benney of Saunders Island, Mr. Bertrand of Roy
Cove, Dr. Bolus (now in Punta Arenas, then in Fox
Bay), Mr. Felton of Westpoint Island, Dr. Foley, of
Darwin, Mr. Mathews of Port Howard, Mr. Miller of
Hill Cove, Mr. Packe of Port Louis, and many others*
too numerous to mention. In Chile as well as in Argen-
tina we met and were assisted by a great number of
EngHsh people; we made good friends wherever we
came, and learnt to admire the English nation as the
great civilising power of the world.

It may not be considered unnecessary to mention, that
during the whole journey under most trying conditions,
I and my comrades remained the same good friends as
we had been on leaving Sweden. Nothing is so well
calculated to try friendship as a wild life away from
culture and from other people. In this case friendship
certainly stood the test.

Upsala, 1911



CONTENTS



PREFACE Page vii



CHAPTER I

THE COASTS OF THE FALKLAND ISLANDS

We leave Sweden : Visits to Buenos Aires and Montevideo 3 Arrive at the
Falkland Islands ; Position : Port Stanley and its Social Life i Com-
munications : The Landscape round the Town ; Cape Pembroke
Lighthouse and the Forest in the Sea : To the West Falklands : Wild
Cattle : The Falkland Fox : Adventure on Fox Island : Life on Remote
Islands : Roy Cove and the Tale of a Ship's Adventure ; Westpoint
Island : Tussock-grass : Bird Life : The Dead Forest Pp. 1-18

CHAPTER II

RIDING THROUGH THE FALKLANDS

Hill Cove, a Fine Settlement ; Shepherds and their Life i Ascent of Mount
Adam j A Nocturnal Excursion : Saunders Island and a Page of
History : Valley of the Warrah River : A Dangerous Passage : Port
Howard : Across Country to Fox Bay : A miserable Christmas : Notes
on Geology : Lafonia and Port Darwin : A Ride to San Carlos : Return
Overland to Port Stanley ; Port Louis and its History : Departure

Pp. 19-31

CHAPTER III

IN TIERRA DEL FUEGO

Punta Arenas ; Babylonian Confusion : Preparations : Dawson Island and
the Salesian Mission Station : On the Shore of Lake Fagnano : Hardships
in the Azopardo Valley : The First Guanaco : We Pitch the Tents at
Fagnano : Pagela s The Betbeder Pass and Discoveries South of it : A

xi



xii CONTENTS

chilly awakening : Halle's Excursion to Lake Desoado : Boat Trip
on Lake Fagnano t We Raise our Camp : A Difficult Embarking :
Back in Punta Arenas Pp. 32-61

CHAPTER IV

OTWAY WATER AND SKYRING WATER

Cape Froward 8 Jerome Channel t Patagonian Gold Fever : Along the
Shores of Otway ; Notes on Vegetation : Fitzroy Channel : Storm :
A Solitary Hut : Traces of Indians : Excelsior and Glacier Sounds :
Gajardo Channel and a Perilous Boat Excursion : HuemuL Aground :
The Water of Skyring ; Fossiliferous Beds ; Another Tale of a Mine :
A Nocturnal Adventure : Saved Pp. 62-74

CHAPTER V

THE PATAGONIAN CHANNELS

Preparations : Captain Bordes : Our Indian Interpreter : The Magellan
Skargard ; On the EvangeUstas Rocks : Unknown Waters : The Pata-
gonian Channels and their Nature : We meet the first Indians ; Two
Tracks : The Penas Gulf : Baker Inlet : In the unknown Interior of
Peel Inlet : Back through Smyth Channel Pp. 75-90



CHAPTER VI

A DYING RACE

Our first Encounter with Aborigines : Appearance : Visit to an Indian
Camp ; The Indian Wigwam : Food ; Hunting and Weapons : Social
Customs 5 Treatment of the Women : Character : Nomadic Life :
Canoes : TraveUing : Remarkable Portages : Language : Extermma-
tion ! Views of the Future Pp. 91-103

CHAPTER VII

CHILOE AND THE GULF OF CORCOVADO

Chiloe, Historical Retrospect : Ancud, the Capital : Schools : Power of the
Roman Catholic Church : The Chilotes and their Life : A Ride to the
Pacific Coast : Pudeto River s Primeval Forest of Chiloe : Castro ;
Adventurous Voyage to Huafo Island j Forest Scenery ; Wild Days :



CONTENTS xiii

To the Island of San Pedro in the Footsteps of Darwin : Quellon :
Corcovado, " el famoso " ! The Yelcho Valley Pp. 104-124



CHAPTER VIII

IN THE HEART OF CHILE

To the Centre of Chile j Corral and Valdivia : Halle's Surveys in the Coal-
mines of Arauco : Lota : Valparaiso : Santiago and its Swedish
Colony ! Los Andes : The Uspallata Pass and the Transandine
Railway : Aconcagua : Bano del Inca : A Strange Descent : The
Great National Festival of Chile : To Port Montt

Pp. 125-133

CHAPTER IX

ROBINSON CRUSOE'S ISLAND

The Islands of Juan Fernandez s Discovery and Position : First Impression :
Robinson's " Look-out " : Wonderful Plant World s The Chonta
Palm : Marvellous Fema : Extermination of a Unique Vegetation :
The Memorial Tablet of Alexander Selkirk, the real Robinson ; The
History of the Sandal Tree : The last Sandal Tree : Robinson's Grotto :
Bahia del Padre : Masafuera Island : Topography : Remarkable Plain :
Wild Goats : Marvellous Valleys : Our Scientific Results : The Future
of the Islands Pp. 134-148

CHAPTER X

ACROSS THE ANDES INTO ARGENTINA

Plans for the Return South i Notes on the Discoveries in Patagonia : The
Boundary Dispute between ChUe and Argentina ! We leave Port
Montt 6 Osomo and Calbuco Volcanoes : LakeTodos los Santos : On
the Glaciers of Mount Tronador : Across the Pass : Snowstorm :
Bariloche : Preparations for a Long Journey : Our Caravan and Equip-
ment : On Horseback Pp. 149-166

CHAPTER XI

THROUGH NORTHERN PATAGONIA

First Impression of the Pampas s Our First Campuag-place : Norquinco :
Half the Caravan Disappears ! : Inquiries : Across the River Chubut ;
Life on the Lelej Farm : A Hearty Welcome : Ostriches and Guanacos ;



xiv CONTENTS

Through the Nahuelpan Pass ; 16th October Valley : Notes on Vegeta-
tion : Along the Futaleiifu River to the Chilean Boundary : South
Again : In the Valley of the River Carrenleufu : Another Bankrupt
Company and a Swedish Colonist Pp. 167-186



CHAPTER XII

THROUGH THE CORDILLERAS TO THE PACIFIC COAST

Salt Lagoons and Abundant Bird-Ufe : The First " Meseta " : The Cisnes
Valley : Excursion to the Forest Region : Tuco-tuco and Patagonian
Deer ; Senguerr River : No Water ; Back in Chile ; Lamb-marking :
The Coyaike Valley : The Aysen Company : To the Pacific Coast :
Luxuriant Rain-forest : Return to Aysen Pp. 187-197

CHAPTER XIII

LAKE BUENOS AIRES

The Swamp of Rio Mayo : Meseta Chaha, an Adventurous Passage ! Float-
ing Soil and Tuco-tucos : A Dangerous Descent : The Puma : Valle
Koslowsky : A Singular Telegraph Office ; The Landscape round Lake
Buenos Aires : In the Fenix Valley : Interesting Vegetation ; Hunting
Young Guanacos : Patagonian Fur-trade : Armadillos ; Ruckel's
Peril : Difficulties in the Jeinemeni Valley ! Ascent of the Mountain
ridge at Zeballos River Pp. 198-220

CHAPTER XIV

LAGO BELGRANO

The Zeballos Pass : Natural Features at Lake Pueyrredon s Troublesome
Ascent : In the Tarde Valley : Across to Belgrano River : Unexpected
Encounter with German Colonists : Our Sin against the Eighth.
Commandment : Christmas t We Start on the Lake : Contrary Winds :
On the Lake Azara ; Glorious Mountain Scenery : A Happy New Year !
We strike Camp Pp, 221-238

CHAPTER XV

LAKE SAN MARTIN

Across the High Pampas : Crossing the Rivers Belgrano and Lista i The
Troublesome Tuco-tuco Rivulet : Through the Forest to Carbon



CONTENTS



XV



River : The Fosiles Pass, our Worst Day : Lake San Martin : Start
with a Berthon Boat : Head Wind : In the Northern Arm j The
Schoenmeyr Glacier : Imminent Peril ; " Galley-slavery" : Farewell
to San Martin Pp. 239-257

CHAPTER XVI

ACROSS THE SIERRA DE LOS BAQUALES

The Swamps round Laguna Tar : An Unexpected Encounter ; Pavo and
the Skunk : On the shores of Lake Viedma : Leona River and a Dead
Landscape : With Carlos Fuhr ; The Ferry-boat on Santa Cruz River s
Visit to Cattle's Farm : A Lady Gaucho : The Baguales Range : Back
to Civilisation ! : Notes on the History of South Patagonia

Pp. 258-271

CHAPTER XVII

LAGO ARGENTINO

Quensel's Boat Journey in 1908 : The Start and Equipment : Squally
Weather : Bismarck Glacier, a Splendid Sight : Large Icebergs : With
a Canvas Boat in the Ice : To the North Arm ; Hell Gate : A Dangerous
Landing : A Narrow Escape ; Upsala Glacier : Another Clean Shave :
Back again with Rich Results Pp. 272-277

CHAPTER XVIII

OUR JOURNEY TO PUNTA ARENAS

Estancia Payne t Importunate Foxes : Cerro Payne, Patagonia's most
Beautiful Mountain : Quensel's Excursion in 1907 : Cerro Donoso ;
A Bad Day and a Worse Night : Tame Deer ; In the Payne Mountains :
The White Stag : A Picnic Party : My Excursion to the Inland Ice :
A Heavy March : Ultima Esperanza : The Eberhard Family : The
Maylodon Cave s A Night's Ride : We part with our Horses : Arrival
at Punta Arenas Pp. 278-295

CHAPTER XIX

THE BEAGLE CHANNEL

Back in the Channels : The Brecknock Pass : Wonderful Glaciers : Lapataia
and Lake Acigami : The Mission in Douglas Bay ; The Last Yahgans :
Notes on Geology : Ushuaia : Bridges' Farm ; Slogget Bay and Gold-



xvi CONTENTS

digging in Tierra del Fuego ; Another Boundary Dispute : Return to
Punta Arenas and to Buenos Aires Pp. 296-313



CHAPTER XX

A WINTER TRIP TO SOUTH GEORGIA

We leave on Board the Cachalote : Severe Damage of Engines : Adrift on
the High Seas : Exciting Situation : The Engines Repaired ; Bad
Night on the Coast ; At Anchor again ; Nature and Position of South
Georgia : Climate : Flora and Fauna : Winter's Unexpected Arrival :
Along the Coast ; Stormy Days : Whaling : A Singular 1st of May :
With Escort to Buenos Aires : Return to Sweden Pp. 314-329

INDEX P. 330



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

To face
page
Carl Skottsberg Frontispiece

Percy D. Quensel 4

Thore G, Halle 4

Typical Landscape in East Falkland with quartzite ridge 10

MoUymawk Rookery, West Point Island l6

Penguin Rookery (Eudyptes), West Point Island 1 6

The Great Stone-run South of Port Louis, East Falkland 28

The Roads of Punta Arenas, South-wester blowing 32

Punta Arenas from the hills 32

Back from the Betbeder Pass 38

Indians at the Dawson Mission Station 38

The Betbeder Valley 52

Mount Svea, with glacier and moraines 52

The Bottom of Ventisqueros Sound 68

The Entrance of Excelsior Sound 72

Our Interpreter, Channels of Patagonia 78

Two Channel Indians 78

Peel Inlet, with great glaciers 90

Indian Camp, Sarmiento Channel 94

Chilote House 106

The Plaza in Ancud, Chiloe 106

The Famous Corcovado ll6

Valdivia 126

Harbour at Valparaiso 126

XV ii h



xviii LIST OF ILLUSTKATIONS

page

Robinson's "Lookout/' with commemorative tablet 140

View from top of Masafuera showing canyons 144

Robinson's Grotto 144

Puerto Montt 158

Ready to start 158

Small Patagonian Sheep Farm \7Q

Patagonian Rain-forest 194

Fenix River 214

Valley of Antiguos River looking South 214

The Belgrano Pass, with giant basalt pillars 226

West Arm of Lake Belgrano 226

German Colonists, Lake Belgrano 234

Breakfast Table on Christmas Day, Lake Belgrano 234

View of Pampas, near Lake Argentino 262

Dead Landscape, East of Leona River 262

The Bismarck Glacier, Lake Argentino 274

The Upsala Glacier, Lake Argentino (the biggest in

Patagonia) 274

Icebergs and Canvas Boat, Lake Argentino 274

Last Hope Inlet 288

The "Neomylodon" Cave, Last Hope Inlet 292

The Beagle Channel, looking West 296

Ushuaia and Martial Mountains 304

Glacier in N.W. Arm of Beagle Channel 310

Panorama South-west side of Lake Acigami 312

" The Winter's Bark," Tierra del Fuego 312

The Norwegian Factory, South Georgia 31 6

A Meeting in South Georgia 31 6



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

Humpback Whale, upside down, South Georgia
Three Right Whales, South Georgia



XIX

To face
■page

324
324



MAPS



Map of South America
The Falkland Islands
Otway and Skyring Waters



At end
FacltKj page t)
„ 62



«



CHAPTER I

THE COASTS OF THE FALKLAND ISLANDS

The Swedish steamer Princess Ingeborg left Gothenburg
on September 10, 1907. Wind and sea favoured us,
and, after a most agreeable passage, which came like
a strengthening, refreshing rest after all the work of
the preceding months, we arrived in Buenos Aires
on October 7. The Swedish Minister, Mr. 0. Gylden,
gave us a hearty welcome, and informed us that the
Argentine Republic had generously granted us the help
we had applied for. We had ample time to get a glimpse
of the surrounding country, but naturally preferred to
confine our attention chiefly to the scientific centres, to
La Plata, Buenos Aires, and Cordoba, where people
always showed themselves interested in our enterprise
and helped us to make a good start.

In Montevideo the Swedish Consul, Mr. Rogberg,
met us, and after a short stay, which we thoroughly
enjoyed, we began our voyage on the P.S.N.C. liner
Oravia.

The big steamer made its way over a calm and friendly
sea that lay glittering in the bright sunshine. For a
couple of days we carried the spring of favoured Uruguay
with us, but on the very morning when we expected
to get our first glimpse of the Falklands a chill fog
slowly descended over the waters, and anxious passengers

1 A



2 THE WILDS OF PATAGONIA

tried in vain to get a sight of land. All at once,
close by, the brown and yellow, storm-beaten coast
loomed up out of the heavy mist, and through furious
squalls and a deluge of rain the Oravia steered between
the Narrows and anchored in the spacious, natural
harbour of Stanley.

The first person to greet us was one of the staff of
the Falkland Islands Company, Lieut.- Colonel Alexander
Reid, D.S.O., who had served with the C.I.V.s during
the last South African War. We shall always remember
him as one of the best friends our expedition met on
its long journey. Presently the acting Swedish Consul,
Mr. Girling, arrived on board, and soon afterwards we
found ourselves comfortably seated at afternoon tea
in our new quarters. Once more the smoke from
the Falkland peat- fire filled my nostrils, recalling to
memory my old acquaintance with this peculiar land
and its inhabitants — an acquaintance that I was now
to revive and to increase. We said good-bye to Mr.
Quensel for some time, as he was going straight on to
Punta Arenas, in order to make an expedition into the
interior of South Patagonia.

The Falkland group extends from S. Lat. 51 ° to 52° 30'
and from Long. 57° 40' to 61° 25' W., and consists of two
large and a very great number of small islands, which
form a regular barrier against the ocean waves. The
coast- Hne is exceedingly broken; long, narrow, and
winding creeks penetrate far into the country, marking
the course, as there are many proofs to show, of old
valleys now submerged under the level of the sea.

On the east coast of East Falkland is situated the



THE COASTS OF THE FALKLAND ISLANDS 3

little^town of Port Stanley, with about 1000 inhabitants.
Along the south shore of the harbour and on the slope
of a low ridge, which shuts out the view of the ocean
towards the south, long rows of houses are erected, for
the most part small cottages built of wood. They leave
a very homely impression, as their occupants have
tried to transform their porches into small conservatories,
where the eye rests on bright colours — which the soil
itself absolutely refuses to reproduce.

Some buildings attracted our attention more than the
rest. In the far " West End " there is a conglomeration
of houses, together constituting the Government House,
the residence of his Excellency the Governor. Mr. W. L.
AUardyce, C.M.G., now holds this position. He is a
man warmly interested in the material as well as the
spiritual welfare of his colony, and we fully recognized
his appreciation of our scientific work, which he tried
to promote as far as lay in his power. He rules a vast
dominion. Some years ago Great Britain painted red
another large section of the globe, the colony now
including, besides the Falklands and South Georgia,
the South Sandwich Islands, South Orkneys, South
Shetlands, and Graham's Land. The result of this
spread of British power was far-reaching. The whahng
industry having languished in Norway, energetic
whalers started in the South Atlantic and Antarctic
Seas, and numerous vessels hunt there every summer
and pay their tribute to the Falkland Government,
which has thus increased its revenue.

At the other end of the town lies a long white building,
representing the second power here — not the people,



4 THE WILDS OF PATAGONIA

but the RI.C. — the Falkland Islands Company — a
mighty institution. Only with the assistance of its
chief on the spot, Mr. W. Harding, were we able to carry
out our investigations in the most interesting part of
East Falkland, or to visit the western islands, where
the company's small schooners are the sole available
means of communication.

The third State power, the press, is closely connected
with the Church, as the name of the only paper, The
Falkland Islands Magazine and Church Pamper, issued
once a month, bears incontestable witness. Close to
the beach rises the cathedral; a proud title which is
borne as a matter of fact by a little stone chapel.
The city of Stanley is the headquarters of a bishop,
but as his diocese includes almost the whole of South
America the islanders do not enjoy his presence for
more than a fortnight in the year. Naturally, the
inhabitants are too numerous to be of one faith. Both
Roman CathoHcs and Baptists have their own churches,
but the relations between the different sects seem to be
most amicable, at least if one dare judge from a certain
little scene that has remained in my memory. A
welcome was arranged for the bishop, and on that
occasion the faithful gave free scope to their talents,
and a Roman Catholic, whose intentions were excellent
if his voice was poor, appeared on the stage and sang
a little song in honour of his lordship.

It is remarkable and almost touching to observe
with what faithfulness the 2300 Falklanders chng to
the habits of the old country, from the parlour with its
polished stove, the china cats on the mantelpiece,




I




►J



5S






THE COASTS OF THE FALKLAND ISLANDS 5

the breakfast of eggs and bacon, to the bedrooms without
a fire. When you have drawn the curtains and lit the
lamp you can believe that you are in a snug little house
in a small Enghsh town. But take a look out of doors,
and you generally meet a howling west wind, a cold rain
beats on your face, and whichever way you turn you
always see the same dreary, desolate landscape. You
must certainly be born in Northern Europe, or you
would lose heart in this forlorn corner of the world.

The centre of Stanley society is Government House,
and picnics, dances, and dinners follow hard upon
each other. I can assure you that there is plenty to
amuse you in Stanley — that is, if you have the privilege
of being admitted to the "upper ten" (without a
thousand !).

Life is much less easy for those who have been
stranded on this inhospitable coast, not of their own
free will, but by a cruel fate. Generally they seek
refuge in one of the six small " hotels," where statistics
show the consumption of whisky to be considerable.
Nevertheless, the police can go to bed early in Port
Stanley, where the peace is seldom broken.

Communication with England is kept up by the
P.S.N.C. steamers, which touch once a month on their
outward and once on their homeward passage from the
west coast of Chile and Punta Arenas. Their visits
put new life into the little town; boxes and parcels
bring dainties and the latest fashions; the post-office
is besieged; strangers come ashore to have a look
round and to buy illustrated post- cards. But the huge
black hull soon disappears, and the town sinks back into



6 THE WILDS OF PATAGONIA

its usual quiet. Now and again a sailing-vessel happens
to come inside the harbour — generally it is some
damaged craft, which then often loses its freedom.



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