Caroline Fox.

Memories of old friends : being extracts from the journals of Caroline Fox of Penjerrick, Cornwall from 1835 to 1871 (Volume 2) online

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events suggest no thoughts but what they have been
suggesting for many years past j and there is nothing for
a person who is excluded from active participation in
political life to do, except to watch the signs which
occur of real improvement in mankind's ideas on some
of the smaller points, and the too slender indications of
some approach to improvement in their feelings on the
larger ones. I do believe that ever since the changes in
the constitution made by Catholic Emancipation and the
Reform Act, a considerable portion of the ruling class in
this country, especially of the younger men, have been
having their minds gradually opened, and the progress of
Chartism is, I think, creating an impression that rulers are
bound both in duty and in prudence to take more charge,
than they have lately been wont to do, of the interests
both temporal and spiritual of the poor. This feeling
one can see breaking out in all sorts of stupid and frantic
forms, as well as influencing silently the opinions and
conduct ot sensible people. But as to the means of cur-
ing or even alleviating great social evils people are as
much at sea as they were before. All one can observe,
and it is much, is a more solemn sense of theii position,
and a more conscientious consideration of the questions
which come before them, but this is, I fear, as yet confined
to a few. Stillj one need not feel discouraged. There



336 APPENDIX.



never was a time when ideas went for more in human
atFairs than they do now — and one cannot help seeing
that any one's honest endeavours must tell for something
and may tell for very much, although, in comparison
with the mountain of evil to be removed, I never felt
disposed to estimate human capabilities at a lower rate
than now.

On other subjects I have been doing very little, except
reading Maurice's "Kingdom of Christ," and, for the
second time, his " Moral Philosophy," in the Encyclo-
paedia Metropolitana. The latter I like much the best,
though both are productions of a very remarkable mind.
In the former your Society has a special interest ; did
that, or other considerations, ever induce you to read it ?
He seems to me much more successful in showing that
other people are wrong than that churchmen, or rather
that an ideal churchman, is in the right. The " Moral
Philosophy " is rather a history of ethical ideas. It is very
interesting, especially the analysis of Judaic life and
society, and of Plato and Aristotle, and there seems to
me much more truth in this book than in the other.

Our people have been at Paris, and are just returned.
I suppose their, or rather our, friends will soon hear
of them. They are full of the subject of what they have
seen and enjoyed, and altogether the thing has answered
perfectly. Certainly, however pleasant home may be,
there is great pleasure in occasionally leaving it. I wish
some of you thought so, and that we lived in some place
where you wanted very much to come. — Yours faithfully,

J. S. Mill.



APPENDIX. 337



John Stuart JMill tu Robert Barclay Fox.

India House, September 20, 1842.

My dear Friend, — I write this line in haste to ask of
you and your family an act of kindness for a destitute
person — namely, the little girl whose card, as a candidate
for the Orphan Asylum, is enclosed. You know how
these things are decided — by the majority of votes of an
enormous number of subscribers j but the list, like all
similar ones, swarms with the names of your friends, the
Friends, and your interest with them would be equivalent
to many promises of votes. I know nothing of the girl
or her family personally, but one of the men I most
respect is warmly interested for them, Joseph Alazzini,
whom you have heard of (but whom I would not men-
tion to everybody ; as his name, with some, would do
more harm than good). Mrs. Carlyle is also exerting
herself for them.

I will send to you, or cause to be sent, as many cards
as you can make use of j in case your interest is not pre-
engaged for other candidates to the full number.

I am quite well again, and everybody here is well ;
otherwise we have no particular news.

Carlyle has been making a Cromwellian tour to
Huntingdon, St. Ives, Hinchinbrook, &c. He will really,
I think, write a Cromwellian book. — Ever yours,

J. S. Mill.



VOL. II.



338 APPENDIX.



John Stuart Mill to Robert Barclay Fox.

India House, December 19, 1842.

My dear Friend, — There are abundance of subjects on
which I should like a little mental communion with you,
if I could get my thoughts together for the purpose.
First, there is in public atfairs much in the wind ; your
prediction about the Corn Laws seems in a way to be
verified sooner than we either of us expected ; and that is
sure to lead to great changes in the condition and char-
acter of our rural population, and, above all, in the relation
of landlords and tenants, which, on its present footing, is
essentially an unwholesome relation, and cannot last.
Things have certainly come to a strange pass when the
manufacturing majority must starve in order that the
agricultural minority may — starve also. But these things,
important as they are, do not occupy so much of my
thoughts as they once did : it is becoming more and more
clearly evident to me that the mental regeneration of
Europe must precede its social regeneration, and, also,
that none of the ways in which that mental regeneration
is sought, — Bible Societies, Tract Societies, Puseyism,
Socialism, Chartism, Benthamism, &c., — will do, though
doubtless they have all some elements of truth and good
in them. I tind quite enough to do in trying to make
up my own mind as to the course which must be taken
by the present great transitional movement of opinion
and society : the little which 1 can dimly see, this
country even less than several other European nations,
is as yet ripe for promulgating.

In the meantime I do not know that there was any-
thing better for me to do, than to write the book I



APPENDIX. 339



have been writing, destined to do its little part towards
straightening and strengthening the intellects which have
this great work to do. The said book is printed as far
as p. i6o, vol. ii., and will be published when Providence
and the publisher see fit.

I heard of you the other day from Philip Melvill,
who, I believe, brought the first intelligence which had
reached the India House of such a thing being on the
anvil. ^Jpropos, there was some time ago a very pretty,
but very unnecessary — what shall I call it ? deprecation
from your sister Caroline, relative to this book, and to
something which occurred near the tombs of the old
Templars. I do not recollect any more of what passed,
than that she accused herself of having impliedly insti-
gated a very natural announcement which I made,
certainly, not for the Jirst time then, touching the
superfluousness of her troubling any bookseller respect-
ing the two volumes in question, since I should as soon
have thought of my own brother buying any book of
mine, as of any of your family doing so. You will cer-
tainly receive in due time what has been from the first
destined for you. I mean you in the plural number, for
I never separate you in fact or in thought, and the one
who reads most of it may keep it, if the others choose.

We are thankful for the exertions of you all about the
little orphan. What her chances are, I do not know ;
such elections by universal suffrage are, as you truly say,
a monstrous thing. — Ever affectionately,

J. S. Mill.



340 APPENDIX.



John Stuart Mill to Robert Barclay Fnx.

India House, February 14, 1843.
My dear Friend, — In a few days you will receive two
ponderous volumes, concerning which you have shown an
interest that I desire very much they may justify. I have
not defaced them with any marks, because, after going
finally through the whole as it passed through the press,
I have come to the conclusion tliat it will not bear to be
read in any way except straight through, and it is pro-
bably worth your reading in that way, while I am certain
it is not worth it to your sisters, being a kind of book so
entirely abstract that I am sure they would never think of
reading it, if it did not happen to be written by one whom
they know, and to make that a reason for reading a book
out of one's line, is to make friendship a burden. If I
could fix on any part as capable of being read with any
interest apart from the rest, it would be the fifth book, on
Fallacies, and especially the chapter in the sixth book on
Liberty and Necessity, which is short, and in my judg-
ment the best chapter in the two volumes. However,
as Sterling will have a copy and will certainly read it
through, he will be able to tell your sisters if there is any
part which he thinks would interest them — in case they
require any opinion besides yours. You will not suspect
me of the stupid coxcombry of thinking that they could
not understand it, which would be my own condemna-
tion, for if they could not, the book would be a failure. —
I only mean that whatever be the value of the book, it is
(like a book of mathematics) pure and not viixed science,
and never can be liked by any but students, and I do not
want them to spoil themselves by becoming that on my



APPENDIX. 341



account. They know that when I write anything on
philosophy in the concrete, on politics, or morals, or
religion, or education, or, in short, anything directly prac-
tical, or in which feeling and character are concerned, I
desire very much to be read by them, because there I can
hope really to interest them, but any interest they could
feel in this would be only like what I might feel in a
treatise on mining.

Our little girl did not carry her election, but the proxies
were not lost, but bartered for an equivalent number
next June, when Mazzini tells me she is sure of success,
that is (I suppose) if those who gave their proxies this
time will be kind enough to do so again. — Yours ever,

J. S. Mill.

John Stuart Mill to Robert Barclay Fvx.

India House, Octobe7- 23, 1843.
My dear Friend, — I am ashamed when I think that I
have not once written to you since you called upon me
on your way home, but you would excuse me if you
knew in how many ways my time and thoughts have
been occupied. It is not, however, so much my work,
in the proper sense, as by other things, for I have written
little or nothing, extra-officially, except an article on the
recent French historians, and especially on Michelet's
" History of France," which I have just finished, and
which has brought my hand in again for work. You will
see it in the Edinl-urgh Review, unless Napier takes fright
at some of the very heterodox things in the eyes of an
Edinburgh Reviewer, still at the point of view of the
eighteenth century, which the article contains. There
is, in particular, some arrant Hildebrandism, which 1



342 APPENDIX.



suspect will shock him, especially after the Scotch Kirk
controversy.

By the by, you will perhaps see in the same number
another communication from me, with my name signed
to it, occasioned by a shabby, trumpery article on Ben-
tham, which has just appeared in the Review. The
writer's object seems to be to bring down, as much as
he can, the character both of Bentham and of every one
whose name has ever been connected with his — and he
states facts and opinions respecting my father, against
which I have thought it imperative on me to protest
publicly, and have asked Napier to let me do it by a
letter in his Review, which he has consented to. I am
sure if you have seen the article you will say it was high
time. Thanks for the votes which your (plural) perse-
vering kindness has got for the little girl. With regards
and remembrances to all, — Yours,

J. S. Mill.



INDEX.



INDEX



Abeken, ii. 159

Aberdeen, Lord, i. 289; ii. 115

About, ii. 265

Acland, Sir Tliomas D., i. 205

Adams, Professor, ii. 83, 91-94,

291
Adelaide, Queen, i. 313 ; ii. 217
Agnew, Miss, i. 320 ; ii. 99
Airy, Professor, i. 42 ; ii. 47, 92,

105
Albemarle, Lord, i. 48
Albert, Prince, i. 195, 204, 289, 290 ;

ii. 88, 281
Alderson, Baron, ii. 102
Alexander of Russia, ii. 224
Allen, William, i. 160
Anster, Dr., ii. 72
Arago, i. 51 ; ii. 98
Arnold, Dr., i. 328; ii. 26, 32, 258
Ashantee Princes, i. 170-172
Ashburton, Lady, ii. 300, 303, 304
Ashley, Lord, i. 205 ; ii. 161



B



Babbage, i. 254

Backhouse, H. C, ii. 136, 139, 140

Bacon (Sculptor), ii. 95

Bailey, ii. 71



Balfour, Clara, ii. 142-151, 154-

156
Ball, Professor, ii. 64, 70, 71
Ball, William, ii. in
Barclay of Ury, ii. 160
Barclay's "Apology," i. 33
Baring, T. G., ii. 179
Barnicoat, Mrs., ii. 52
Barrow, Sir John, i. 95
Barrot, O, i. 52 ; ii. 98
Barth, Dr., ii. 254, 255
Becquerel, i. 50
Bedford, Duke of, i. 74
Begum of Oude, i. 17-21
Belcher, Sir E., i, 16 ; ii. 4, 5
Bell, Jacob, ii. 62
Benedetto, i. 209
Bentham, Jeremy, i. 123, 162 ; ii.

342
Bergam, ii. 132
Beust, Count, i. 218
Binney, Dr., ii. 213
Blanc, Louis, ii. 137
Brandis, ii. 168
Brandram, A., ii. 31, 32
Bremer, Miss, ii. 64
Brewster, Dr., i. 82
Brewster, Sir David, i. 40 ; ii. 183
Bright, John, ii. 160, 280, 306
Bohme, i. 308
Bonaparte, De Canino, i. 243; ii. i86



346



INDEX.



Bonaparte, Joseph, i. 243

Bonar, H., ii. 96

Borrow, George, ii. 19, 31

Boswell, i. 185, 186; ii. 6

Bowles, W. L., ii. 39

Bowring, Sir John, i. 63, 215-217

Boyle, Courtney, ii. 217

Bronte, Charlotte, ii. 253

Brougham, Lord, i. 53-55

Brown, ii. 313, 314

Brunei, ii. 239

Buckland, Dr., i. 7-9, 83, 84; ii.

87, 88
Buckland, Frank, ii. 307
Buckle, ii. 261, 262
Budock Churchyard, ii. 15
Bull, adventure with, ii. 202-204
Buller, Charles, i. 327; ii. 109
Biirger, i. 210
Burlington, Lord, i. 40
Burnard, ii. 89, 94, 109
Burnes, Sir Alexander, i. 293
Burns, i. 184, 187, 188
Burritt, Elihu, ii. 128, 196
Burton, Captain, ii. 254
Buxton, Sir Fowell, i. 59, 195, 196 ;

ii. 17, 18
Byron, Ada, i. 14, 318
Byron, Lady, i. 14, 318
Byron, Lord, i. 14, 37, 67, 277 ; ii.

156



Calvert, Dr., i. 106, 114, 116,
118-121, 148, 159, 168, 169, 219-
228, 242, 243, 245-248, 250, 252,
267, 268, 270, 271, 277-287, 322

Campbell, i. 114

Campbell, Lord, ii. 69

Canova, i. 129

Carclew, i. 42

Carlile, Richard, i. 56, 57, 296

Carlisle, Lord, ii. 254

Carlyle, Dr., i. 230

Carlyle, Mrs., i. 150, 182, 232; ii.



12, 21, 27-29, 57, 80-85, 89, 127,
128, 147, 148, 202, 290, 330, 337

Carlyle, Thomas, i. 150, 181-188,
190-195, 203, 204, 219, 220, 230,
240, 244, 285, 293-301, 307-312,
325-333 ; ii- 1-3, 7. 9, 12, 14, 21,
23-26, 28, 29, 63, 80-85, loi, 109,
no, 138, 147, 148, 173, 261, 300-
305, 326, 330, 337

Carne, Miss, Letters to, ii. 175-180,
187-191, 194-196, 198-200, 215-
220, 222, 223, 227-230, 233-234,
238-242, 245-248, 255-258, 260-
262, 265, 266, 268-270, 280, 283-
285, 289, 290, 308, 309

Caspary, Dr., ii. 153

Castlereagh, Lord, i. 66, 210, 211

Cavaignac, ii. 174

Cecilia, St., ii. 127

Cellini, ii. 245

Chabaud, Mdlle. de Latour, ii. 120

Challis, ii. 93

Chalmers, Dr., i. 107; ii. 83

Changamier, ii. 173

Channing, Dr., i. 62

Chantrey, i. 129 ; ii. 90

Charles I., i. 164

Charles IL, i. 44, 136

Charlotte, Princess, i. 13

Charlotte, Queen, i. 12, 13

Chatterton, i. 138

Chaworth, Mary, ii. 156

Chesney, Colonel, ii. 190

Christina of Sweden, ii. 154

Clarke, Samuel, ii. 131

Clarke, Sir James, i. 197

Clarkson, i. 108

Clement, Pope, i. 91

Cleopatra, ii. 134

Cenci, the, i. 231

Cobden, ii. 97, 126, 128, 204

Cole, Lord, i. 31

Coleridge, Derwent, i. 4, 23, 32, 298;
ii. 129, 131

Coleridge, Hartley, i. 34-36, 38,
237. 304 ; ii- 15. 32-36, 106, 108



INDEX.



347



Coleridge, Sara, ii. 22

Coleridge, S. T., i. 23, 62, 108, 122,

123, 161 ; ii. 36, 54, 132, 227, 317,

318
Coldbath Fields Prison, i. 313
Columbus, ii. 85
Combe, George, i. 21
Compton, Lord, i. 41
Conolly, Dr., i. 319
Conybeare, i. 258 ; ii. 223
Cooper, Thomas, ii. 263
Coronation, i. 61
Correggio, i. 135, 136, 315, 316
Cowley, Lord, ii. 211
Cowper, i. 126 ; ii. 149
Crabbe, i. 135
Cranworth, Lord, ii. no
Croker, J. W., i. 213
Cromwell, i. 58, 190-193, 240, 330
Crosse, A., i. 10
Cruikshank, George, i. 64, 251
Cumming, Dr., ii. 161, 213, 240
Cunningham, Allan, i. 330
Cunningham, F., ii. 161
Curran, i. 74, 112, 113
Cuvier, i. 84, 261
Cuyp, ii. 273.



D



Dalton, Dr., i. 52, 119

Dante, i. 91, 268

Darling, Grace, ii. 24

Darwin, Charles, i. 13, 180

D'Aubign^, Merle, ii. 60, 61

Dawson, George, ii. 153

De Runsen, Baron, ii. 73, 76-80, 87,

114, 116, 117, 162-170, 188, 251
De Bunsen, Ernest, ii. 63, 73-79,

117, 159, 250, 258
De Bunsen, George, ii. 163-168
De Bunsen, Henry, ii. 78
De Dunstanville, Lady, i. 42
De la Beche, Sir Henry, i. 6, 24, 26,

28, 29, 31, 253, 254 ; ii. 252, 253
Denbigh, Lady, i. 313



D'Orsay, Count, i. 145 ; ii. 62

De Quincey, i. 34

Derby, Lord, i. 290

De Stael, Madame, i. 127, 210

De Tocqueville, ii. 137

De Vere, Aubrey, ii. 44, 67, 139

Deville, i. 56, 57, 318

De Wette, Professor, ii. 224, 225

De Wette, Madame, ii. 224-226

Dickens, Charles, i. 64, 222 ; ii. 171,

326
Diderot, i. 194, 285
Dryden, ii. 175
Duke, Sir James, ii. 209
Drummond, Henry, i. 4
Dtirer, A., ii. 245
Durham, Lord, i. 176



Eardley, Culling, i. 53
Edinburgh Review, ii. 325, 328, 334,

341, 342
Edhem Bey, i. 63
Elgin, Lord, i. 211
Elliot, Ebenezer, ii. 317
Emerson, R. W., i. 244, 269, 294;

ii. 13, 81, 109
Enniskillen, Lord, i, 267
Enys, John, i. 5
Erasmus, i. 138
Erskine, Thomas, ii. 83
Espartero, ii. 15
Everett, ii. 62
Exeter, Bishop of, i. 75



Faraday, ii. 172

Faucit, Helen, ii. 130
Fauntleroy, i. 87
Fell, Dr. John, i. 96
Fichte, i. 321
Fesch, Cardinal, i. 123



348



INDEX.



Fitz-Roy, Admiral, i. 13 ; ii. 18

Flaxman, i. 129, 318 ; ii. 135

Fletcher, Mrs., ii. 82

Forbes, Professor, ii. 56, 253

Ford, ii. 168

Forster, Right Hon. W. E., i. 43,

201, 330 ; ii. 15, 66, 151
Fox, C. J., i. 44, 45, 291
Fox, George, i. 159, 189, 267, 325 ;

ii. 84, 85
Fox, Mrs. Charles, i. 33 ; ii. 318
Fox, R. Barclay, i. 12; ii. 43, 44,

200, 204, 216, 229-231, 233-238,

313-342
Fox, Robert Were, i. 6 ; ii. 239, 253.

255, 256, 259
Francia, Dr., ii. 29
Franklin, Lady, ii. 119
Franklin, Sir John, i. 255 ; ii. 103,

174, 186, 268
Frederick II., i. 244
Froude, J. A., i. 282, 327, 328 ; ii.

99, no, 223
Fry, EUzabeth, i. 290, 312-314 ; ii.

104



Galitzen, Princess, i. 120

Gall, ii. 93

Garibaldi, ii. 290, 291

Gaudsey, ii. 184

Gauss, ii. 46

Gavazzi, ii. 247, 248

George III., i. 13, 124

George IV., i. 21

Gibbon, ii. 12

Gibson, Milner, ii. 126

Gilbert, Davies, i. 10, 43, 44, 94

Gilmans, i. 62

Gladstone, W. E., ii. 209, 302, 308,

315
Glaisher, ii. 307
Glengarr)', i. 21
Goethe, i. ito, 277; ii. 13
Goldsmith, i. 219



Good, i. 296

Graham, Sir James, i. 289

Grattan, i. 113

Gray, i. 329

Grey, Lady Jane, ii. 35

Grellet, Stephen, ii. 32

Grote, G., i. 134

Grote, Mrs., i. 189

Guggenbiihl, Dr., ii. 112

Guizot, i. 134, 206, 211 ; ii. 98, 102,

120, 121-125, 136, 315, 320
Gurney, Anna, ii. 16
Gurney, Samuel, i. 319, 325 ; ii. 115,

212
Gurney, J. J., i. 258 ; ii. 31



H



Hallam, H., ii. 136-139, 273
Hamilton, Sir William, i. 7, 40 ; ii.

72, 105
Handel, ii. 251
Hare, Julius, i. no, 239; ii. 9, 10,

75, 95, 97
Harris, Snow, i. 30, 254
Haydn, ii. 87, 188, 251
Hegel, ii. 10
Helps, Sir Arthur, ii. 71
Herbert of Cherbury, i. 129
Herder, i. 180
Herries, i. 90
Herschel, i. 58 ; ii. 48
Haynau, General, ii. 158
Hogarth, ii. 63
Hogg, J., i. 168
Holland, Lady, i. 263, 291
Holmes, O. W., i. 50
Home, Sir Everard, ii. 22
Hooker, Sir W., i. 313
Hope, i. 72 ; ii. 86
Houghton, Lord, ii. 69
Howell, Miss, ii. 185
Howitt, Mar)', i. 67
Humboldt, i. 52 ; ii. 66, 104, 1S5,

201, 251



INDEX.



349



Hunt, Holman, ii. 276, 277
Hunt, Leigh, i. 66
Hunter, i. 292
Hutton, James, i. 85
Huygens, i. 266



India House, i. 173, 197

Irving, Edward, i. 77, 107, 150, 297,

327 ; ii. 82, 118, 146
Irving, Washington, i. 70

J

Jeffrey, Lord, i. 48, 108, 327
Jephson, Dr., i. 222
Jerrold, Douglas, ii. 213, 214
Jewsbury, Geraldine, ii. 82
Johns, Charles, ii. 46
Johnson, Dr., i. 184; ii. 6
Johnston, Professor, i. 9

K

Kant, E. , i. 232, 261, 321

Kaulbach, ii. 152

Kean, Charles, ii. 288

Kean, Edmund, i. 107

Keats, i. 213

Kemble, Charles, i. 43

Kent, Duchess of, i. 13 '

Kestner, ii. 159, 162

Keswick, i. loi

Kinglake, ii. 47

Kingsley, Charles, ii. 198, 221-223,

239, 240, 262
Kisting, ii. 199
Klopstock, i. 210
Knox, John, i. 187
Kossuth, ii. 213-215
Kotzebue, ii.i^225



La.martine, ii. 98, 122



Lamb, Charles, i. 23, ^7, 88, 100,

278, 327
Landor, W. S. , i. 130, 210; ii. 75,

218
Landseer, Sir E., ii. 62
Lane, E. W., i. 64
Lardner, Dr., i. 40, 83
Laurence, Samuel, i. 331 ; ii. 53, 69,

126
Lavater, i. 25
Law, i. 308

Lawrence, Lord, i. 238-240
L'Abbadie, ii. 151, 255
Leibnitz, i. 276, 321
Lemon, Sir Charles, i. 5, 42 ; ii. 30,

90, 137, 226, 243
Leonardo da Vinci, ii. 273
Lepsius, ii. 252
Leslie, R. A., ii. 171
Lessing, i. no
Leverrier, ii. 92
Lewes, G. H., ii. 71.
Lieder, ii. 236
Lind, Jenny, ii. 104, 185
Linnceus, i. 166, 167
Lister, i. 59

Livingstone, Dr., ii. 254-258
Lloyd, Charles, i. 99 ; ii. 33
Lloyd, Professor, i. 254, 255, 264,

265 ; ii. 64-66, 71, 72, 102, 104,

105, 181-188, 191, 254
Lockhart, i. 48
Longfellow, ii. 27, 61, 62
Louis Napoleon, ii. 98, 173, 209-

212
Louis Philippe, ii. 45, 46, 98, 99
Luther, i. 9, 137-139, 224, 229, 275
Lyell, Sir Charles, i. 58, 300
Lyne, Catherine, ii. 189



M



Macaulay, Miss, ii. 278
Macaulay, Lord, i. 80, 113 ; ii. 243,
:; 278, 279
Mackenzie, Henrj', i. 49



350



INDEX.



M'Clintock, Captain, ii. 268
M'Neile, Hugh, ii. 213
Macready, ii. 172
Mahomet Ali, i. 93
Malibran, i. 89
Manning, Cardinal, ii. 88
Marie Amalie, Queen, ii. 99
Martineau, Harriet, i. 62, 270 ; ii.

27, 109, 228
Martin, John, i. 10 ; ii. 267
Martyn, Henry, ii. 279
Maskelyne, Professor, ii. 246
Mathew, Father, ii. 20
Mathews, Charles, the elder, i. 72-

74
Mathews, Charles, the younger, i. 74
Maurice, F. D. i. 299 ; ii. 17, 54,

55, 63, 86, 113, 119, 170, 195, 217,

230, 233, 336
May, Thomas, i. 26
Mazzini, ii. 201, 337, 341
Melanchdion, i. 139, 210
vMelbourne, Lord, ii. 95
Melvill, Henry, i. 108
Melvill, Philip, ii. 339
Mendelssohn, ii. 75, 258
Merivale, Herman, i. 329 ; ii. 67,

68
Metternich, ii. 100
Mezzofanti, i. 68 ; ii. 157, 158
Michelet, i. 228 ; ii. 61, 122
Mill, Henry, i. 124, 132, 157
Mill, John Stuart, i. 124, 132, 134,

140-168, 173-179, 188-190, 197-

206, 285, 292, 300, 309, 315, 316,

333 ; "• 8, 9, 27, 56, 97, 237, 238,

269, 3T3-342
Milman, Dean, ii. 56, 226
Mirabeau, i. 238 ; ii. 147
Molve, Mohammed, i. 17, 23, 24
Montpensier, Duke of, ii. 285
Moore, Tom, i. 7, 8
Moultrie, i. 98
Munster, Lord, i. 24
Murchison, Sir R., ii. 67, 186
Murray, A., ii. 88



Murray, John, i. 21 ; ii. 330
Murray, Sir George, i. 55
Murray, Lady George, i. 12

N

Nadir Shah, i. 96

Napoleon L, i. 116, 123, 194; ii.

56,88
Neander, i. 285
Nelson, Lord, i. 169
Neukomm, Chevalier, ii. 87, 159,

168, 169, 181, 182
Newgate, i. 290
Newman, F., ii. 85, 135
Newman, T. H., ii. 54
Newstead Abbey, i. 70 ; ii. 156.
Newton, Sir Isaac, i. 57, 265
Nicholas I, i. 97 ; ii. 221
Nichols, Professor, i. 197 ; ii. 251
Niebuhr, ii. 11, 76, 188
Nightingale, Florence, ii. 252;
Normanby, Lord, ii. 99
Northampton,! Lord, i. 41, 205
Northumberland, Duke of, ii. 172
Norwich, Bishop of, i. 82
Novalis, i. 271

O

O'CONNELL, Daniel, i. 55, 113,

205 ; ii. 66, 85, 86, 182
Opie, Amelia, i. 302 ; ii. 20, 163,

218
Opie, John, ii. 20
Overbeck, ii. 75
Overburg, i. 120
Owen, Professor, i. 256, 259-264,

266, 293, 326 ; ii. 21, 22, 56, 59,

60, 70, 134, 135, 186
Owen, Robert, i. 95 ; ii. 263



Palev, ii. 67



INDEX.



351



Palgrave, Francis, ii. 276

Palmerston, Lord, ii. 126, 316

Pantheon, i. 198

Paris, i. 50

Parker, ii. 330-332

Pascal, i. 109, 207

Pauli, Dr., ii. 163-165

Peard, Colonel, ii. 290, 291

Peel, Sir Robert, i. 145, 205, 289 ;

ii. 115, 126
Pellico, Silvio, i. 213.
Penn, William, ii. 151, 250, 251
Perugino, i. 140
Petermann, ii. 186
Playfair, Professor, i. 85 ; ii. 158
Pope, A., i. 5 ; ii. 149
Powell, Professor, i. 10
Powles, Cowley, i. 22
Prinsep, Val, ii. 276, 277
Prussia, King of, i. 290 ; ii. 10, 79
Punch, ii. 129
Pusey, Dr., i. 125, 328



Quebec, i. 329

Queen, H. M. The, i. 13, 42, 65,


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