Copyright
Carolyn Sherwin Bailey.

Stories for Sunday telling online

. (page 1 of 9)
Online LibraryCarolyn Sherwin BaileyStories for Sunday telling → online text (page 1 of 9)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES



3 3433 08252458 2



S












* t

XT




N/V*







e



Y/ u



STORIES FOR SUNDAY
TELLING



STORIES FOR
SUNDAY TELLING



BY
CAROLYN SHERWIN BAILEY

Author of

Stories and Rhymes for a Child, Firelight Stories, For the

Children's Hour, For the Story Teller, Songs of

Happiness, Every Child's Folk Songs and

Games, Make-at-Home Things for Girls,

Make-at-Home Things for Boys

Montessori Children



THE PILGRIM PRESS

BOSTON CHICAGO



'l49685B

Ti.

i: k



COPYRIGHT 1916
Br CAROLYN SHERWIN BAILEY



THE PILGRIM PRESS
BOSTON



PREFACE

The stories included in this collection
have all been used by Sunday School
teachers and mothers for the specific
value of bringing home to children of
kindergarten and early primary age cer-
tain moral and spiritual facts.

Their use has been successful in the
lives of the little ones who have loved
them.

Each story is written having in mind
its apperceptive relation to the life and
interests of the average Sunday School
child of this age. Each leads in its scope
and plot to an important life lesson which
children will easily grasp and feel and
^^ apply. The stories are very short and
can be read out loud or easily told by
the teacher or mother.

The collection covers a sufficiently va-
ried field to make the stories useful during
the entire period of the children's spir-






vi PREFACE

itual development during the early years
when they learn most simply and per-
manently through parable, fable and

allegory.

CAROLYN SHERWIN BAILEY.

New York, 1916.



CONTENTS
SUNDAY FAIRY STORIES

PAGE

THE HAPPY LITTLE PRINCESS ... 3

THE LITTLE BLIND BOY 8

THE PRINCESS' GOLD SHOES .... 11

THE ROAD TO THE CASTLE .... 16

THE KING'S PAGE 21

THE THING OF MOST WORTH^ ... 25

THE Two WINDOWS 31

WHAT THE LILY NEEDED 33

THE GUEST 37

THE SHADOW POSY 41

THE SEED 44

THE LITTLE GOLD APPLE .... 46

THE ROAD UP THE HILL ..... 49

THE BAMBINO 54

STORIES OF PLAY

THE SOLDIER WHO LIVED IN THE DRUM 57

THE LITTLE RED HOUSE WITH No DOORS 60

THE TINKLING, SINGING Music Box . . 64

SNOW SHOVELS FOR Two 71

THE LITTLE SOLDIER 76


Vll



viii CONTENTS

PAGE

THE LITTLE RED WAGON .... 79

THE BROOK THAT HELPED .... 85

THE LITTLE BROWN PATH .... 90

THE HOUSE IN THE GARDEN WALL . 93

THE CITY CHILD AND THE COUNTRY

CHILD 98

THE FIRST DAY OF VACATION . . . 103

THE PUSSY WILLOW BASKET . 108



HOLIDAY STORIES

THE STORY OF THE CANDY STICK . . 112
THE DOLL WHO WAS SISTER TO A PRIN-

C-Eoo . > . . J.JLO

THE WONDER GIFT 121

THE CHRISTMAS OF THE LITTLE RICH

CHILD 126

BUNNY BOBTAIL'S MERRY CHRISTMAS . 130

THE LITTLE GRAY LAMB .... 136

THE LITTLE FIR TREE THAT BLOSSOMED 142

NANCY'S NEW YEAR GIFTS .... 146

THE NEW DAY 149

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON BOY . . 152

THE COOKY VALENTINE 157

BUNNY BOBTAIL'S EASTER .... 160

THE WONDER EGG 162

HAROLD'S HAPPY EASTER 165



CONTENTS ix

PAGE

THE FRESH AIRS' FOURTH OF JULY. . 170

THE LITTLE LEAF'S THANKSGIVING . . 174

GRANDMOTHER'S THANKSGIVING PRESENT 180

WHO'S THANKFUL? 184

THE THANKSGIVING CAKE . . . .186

PUSSY TINKER'S THANKSGIVING . . 189

STORIES OF EVERYDAY

THE HURRY-UP BOY 192

GRANDMOTHER'S SPECTACLES .... 196

THE CHILD WHO FORGOT TO WASH His

JT ACE .......... iyy

THE CAREFUL CHILD 202

THE COOKIES 205

THE PATCH-WORK QUILT . . . . 210

THE MAY PARTY 215



STORIES FOR SUNDAY
TELLING



STORIES FOR SUNDAY
TELLING



THE HAPPY LITTLE
PRINCESS

Her name was Felicity, the Princess
Felicity, and she had everything in the
world to make her happy.

She had a kind king and queen father
and mother who always said, yes, to her
when they ought, really, to have said, no.
She had honey every morning for break-
fast and strawberries and cream for sup-
per whenever she wished. She had two
or three dozen French dolls and her own
special little rose garden with a rustic
playhouse and a tinkling fountain. And,
oh, the Princess Felicity's dresses! They
were as many in number and as beau-
tiful as the colors in the rainbow.



4 STORIES FOR SUNDAY TELLING

But, strange to say, the little Princess
Felicity was not happy.

"My honey isn't sweet," she com-
plained often, or, "How very sour these
strawberries are!"

And she neglected her dolls most
shamefully because she said that they all
looked alike. Once, only fancy, she told
her Queen mother that she wanted a dress
of a color that is not in the rainbow, and
because there isn't such a color, and so,
of course, she couldn't have the dress, the
little Princess Felicity cried until her
pretty blue eyes were all red and swollen.

'The Princess Felicity is not happy,"
said all the court, so the Court Jester
tried to make her smile and the Court
Musicians tried to make her smile, but it
was no use.

Instead of being a happy Princess,
Felicity was a sorrowful one.

One day the little Princess Felicity
slipped outside of the gate of her rose
garden and into the big Outside. She
had always wondered what the Outside
was like and now she found it very pleas-



THE HAPPY LITTLE PRINCESS 5

ant. There was a little winding, green
path that led to a green wood, and on
either side of the path were fields where
busy farmers were cutting down golden
wheat, and small farmhouses where little
children played merrily. The Princess
walked quite far along the path until she
came to a little ragged boy picking blue-
berries beside the road. He whistled a
jolly tune as he worked.

"What makes you so happy, boy?"
asked the Princess.

The boy looked up surprised.
'Who wouldn't be happy when blue-
berries are ripe?" he asked.

"I am picking enough for mother and
father and all the children to eat with
bread and milk for supper."

"May I help you?" Felicity asked.

"If you like," the boy pushed his shin-
ing tin pail toward her, "but don't eat
any blueberries," he said. "They're to be
shared at home."

So the Princess and the little boy
picked blueberries for the boy's family
and they had a very pleasant time. Then



6 STORIES FOR SUNDAY TELLING

the Princess said goodbye, and went a
little farther down the road. By and by
she came to the edge of the green wood
and there she heard a sound:

Tweet, tweet, twitter, tweet.

Oh, it was a little brown bird lying on
the ground. The bird's wings were not
strong enough for flying. It had fallen
out of its nest and was not able to get
back.

"Poor baby bird," cried the Princess,
kneeling down softly beside the bird so
as not to frighten it. Then she lifted it
up into its nest in a low bush.

"Now, be happy and sing!" she said,
and the bird twittered its thanks as she
ran farther on into the woods.

Suddenly she saw a little girl, just her
own size, but wearing a poor, gray frock
and ragged shoes. She was picking up
twigs for her home fire and singing as
she worked.

"May I help you?" asked the little
Princess, "I never p'cked up fagots in
mv life."



THE HAPPY LITTLE PRINCESS 7

"But your dress is too beautiful," the
little girl said.

"Oh, never mind," said the little Prin-
cess, "I'll be careful," and tucking up
her dress she began helping.

It was almost supper time when they
finished and tied the twigs into bunches
and started home. All the way down
the path the little girl in the gray frock
told the Princess about how to make little
rag dolls and build her own playhouse
out in the woods, and many other pleasant
things. She promised, too, to visit the
Princess soon and play with her.

As the gate to the rose garden opened,
the sound of the Princess' laughter and
singing reached the palace.

The King, the Queen, the Court Jes-
ter everybody- -rushed out. "She is
happy!" they shouted.

'What can we do to keep you happy?"
they asked.

"Nothing at all," said the Princess
Felicity, merrily. "I know how to keep
happy myself, now."



8 STORIES FOR SUNDAY TELLING



THE LITTLE BLIJSTD BOY

There was once a little boy whom
everybody thought was blind because his
eyes were quite closed and he could not
walk unless someone took his hand and
led him.

One day he went for a little journey
with the other children, and one child took
one of his hands, and another child took
the other hand, and the child who walked
before him cried out to whoever they met,
"Have a carel A little blind boy is
coming."

And the last child who walked behind
said:

"Look out! a little blind boy is walk-
ing in front!"

They walked on and on for maybe an
hour, and then they turned around and
came all the way home again. When
they reached the house the mother stood
waiting at the garden gate with her arms
stretched out to greet them.

"Did you have a pleasant journey?"



THE LITTLE BLIND BOY 9

she asked, and to the first child she said:
"What did you see?"

The first child thought for a moment
and then he said, "Why, I don't believe
that I saw anything, mother, except the
window of the baker's shop. It was quite
full of sugar tarts."

"Oh ? " cried the second child, "I saw
much more than that ; I saw the toy shop
with all the little drums hanging outside."

"And I saw a Grandfather - Long -
Legs crawling along the sidewalk, and I
stepped on him, mother," said the third
child.

"Ah!" sighed the mother. "And what
did you see?" she asked the last child.

"I didn't see anything, mother," the
last child answered. "I looked at my feet
all the way, for I didn't want to get my
new shoes dusty."

Then the little blind boy spoke, lifting
his shut blue eyes up to his mother's face.

'We went as far as the woods," he
said, "where the pine trees grow tall and
high. I know, for I smelled them. And
I heard the wind singing in the branches.



10 STORIES FOR SUNDAY TELLING

A bird had built her nest in the top of
one of the trees. I heard her calling to
her babies. It is a pleasant day, mother,
for the sun shone warm on my cheeks
and on the way we met an angel."

"How did you know that she was an
angel?" asked his mother.

'The other children were taking such
good care of me," he said, "and wherever
we went they called, 'have a care! This
is a little blind boy.' Then we met the
angel and she said, 'I don't see any little
blind boy. He looks as if he saw a great
many tilings, and some day he is going
to see everything.'

The mother laid her soft hands on the
little blind boy's shut eyes.

'That must have been an angel," she
said. 'You do see more than the others,
dear, and some day you are truly going
to see all."



THE PRINCESS' GOLD SHOES 11



THE PRINCESS' GOLD SHOES

They were the most beautiful gold
shoes that you ever saw and they had
been made especially for the little Prin-
cess Merry. The skeins of thread that
were left and the pattern of the gold
cloth of which they were made had been
destroyed immediately after the weaver
had finished so that there should be no
other such gold cloth in the kingdom.
The shoemaker who made the pair of
gold shoes was obliged to destroy his last
and throw away all the tools with which
he worked after being paid a very large
price, of course- -that by no chance
should he make another pair of shoes of
the same pattern.

They were finished at last, gold tips,
gold buttons, gold tassels and all. One
of the very important ladies in waiting
carried them on a yellow satin pillow up
to the pretty bedchamber of the little
Princess Merry and put them on her
dainty, pink feet.



12 STORIES FOR SUNDAY TELLING

4 They are said to be magic shoes, your
Highness,*' explained the very important
Lady in waiting. "It is said that these
gold shoes will carry you into paths of
happiness."

The little Princess Merry jumped up
and down and clapped her hands and
danced into the throne room to show her
King father and Queen mother her beau-
tiful new gold shoes, but on the way her
little spaniel met her, glad and barking
with joy to see her. His paws were
dusty from running about in the palace
garden and he stepped upon the toes of
the Princess Merry's gold shoes, tarnish-
ing them.

"Get down!" cried the Princess Merry
quite crossly, and she kicked her little
spaniel. Then she went on to the throne
room but she found that her new shoes
felt very tight and uncomfortable, sud-
denly.

At the door of the throne room waited
the small page who carried the queen
mother's train. The little Princess Merry
liked the small page boy, for he often



THE PRINCESS' GOLD SHOES 13

played with her in the garden and carved
wooden boats that she could sail in the
fountain basin. He stepped forward
now to speak to her but she lifted her
head very high and looked scornfully at
him.

"Don't stop me, boy," she said, "I am
on my way to show my gold shoes. Your
shoes are only leather." Then she went
up to her father and mother, but they sat
on their thrones, very busy giving counsel,
and had no time to stop and admire the
Princess Merry's gold shoes.

"Run out to the garden and play,"
they told her, but the small page boy did
not offer to go with her and she went
out sadly. The shoes grew heavier all
the way and they seemed to make the
heart of the little Princess Merry heavy
too.

In the palace garden several unpleas-
ant things happened. The stones of the
garden path cut up through the thin soles
of the gold shoes and hurt the little
Princess Merry's feet. Then her white

*/

cat came rubbing and purring up to the



14 STORIES FOR SUNDAY TELLING

Princess and scratched the golden cloth
of the shoes.

"Go away, naughty pussy," said the
Princess Merry crossly, and she pushed
her little white cat very hard so that she
hurt her paw.

"Oh, dear!" sighed the Princess. "My
gold shoes are no longer nice. They are
dirty and scratched and they pinch," and
she sat down on a garden seat and began
to cry.

Now it was a rule of the kingdom that
the little Princess Merry should never be
allowed to cry. As soon as the sound of
her loud boo Tioo's reached the palace
everyone came running out to see what
was the matter; the King, the Queen,
the ladies, the knights and everyone.
And when they found it out, they issued
a proclamation and the court crier went
up and down the streets crying it:

"Oh, dear ; oh, dear, what shall we do,
To find the Princess a happy shoe?"

The great shoemakers and the lesser
shoemakers came flocking from far and



THE PRINCESS' GOLD SHOES 15

near with little silver shoes and little silk
shoes and little satin shoes of every color
of the rainbow, but not one would fit the
dainty! pink foot of the Princess Merry.

At last there came the small page who
held up the Queen's train and he carried
in his hand a pair of stout little leather
shoes to offer the Princess Merry. They
had nails in the heels and stout tips and
thick soles.

"Oh, those will never do for the Prin-
cess!" everyone cried, but as soon as the
Princess Merry saw them she slipped her
feet into them and they felt very com-
fortable and exactlv fitted.

*

"You can jump in them, and you can
run races in them, and you can go for
long walks in them," said the small page,
and the Princess Merry jumped and ran
a little way and walked and she found
that it was quite true. Leather shoes
were much nicer, even for a Princess,
than gold ones.



16 STORIES FOR SUNDAY TELLING



THE ROAD TO THE CASTLE

No one in the town had ever really

.

seen the castle. They had been told
about it by their grandfathers and grand-
mothers in whispers over the home hearth
fires.

"It lies very near this town, within easy
walking distance," they said. "You could
reach it by going straight to the east if
you could find the road. No one lives
in the castle, and its gates are wide open,
and whoever succeeds in finding it may
be the master of the castle."

They also told tales of its wonders.
"The gardens bloom with flowers that
never fade," they said, "and there are
chests full of gold and silver and red
rubies and blue sapphires, enough to
make all the poor people in this town
comfortable always with food and shelter
and clothing."

"Oh, if only we might find the road
that leads to the castle," they said.

Sometimes they thought that they saw



THE ROAD TO THE CASTLE 17

the castle. In the very early morning
when the sun rose and sent long bright
shafts of light up through the white
clouds, the townspeople would peer out
of their upper windows and say:

"See, there are the gold towers of the
castle standing above its white marble
walls."

And when it was evening and the sun
set in bright colors, orange and violet and
rose and gold, the townspeople would
again watch the sky and whisper to one
another :

"We see the gardens of the castle, full
of fruit trees and violets and red and yel-
low roses."

Many people tried every year to find
the road that led to the castle. There
was a soldier who started out boldly one
morning, going toward the east and cut-
ting down with his sword all the little
animals of the woods who ran across his
path. He came running back in a short
time, with his sword broken and his eyes
full of terror. He said that he had en-



18 STORIES FOR SUNDAY TELLING

countered wild beasts and had found no
road to the castle.

There was the rich man who started
out on the same quest because he wished
more riches than he already had. He had
gone only a mile when a great tree fell
and completely blocked his path. He
came back without finding the road to
the castle.

And there were other people who
searched for the road; people of impor-
tance who wanted to be decorated with
badges for finding the castle, people who
wished to be called "Master," instead of
just "Mr." They always came back with
the news that they had been stopped by
a prickly hedge or a roaring dragon or
something else as troublesome.

Hans was the little boy of the lady who
did fine washing for the townspeople.
He was a good, kind little boy, but be-
cause he spent most of his time carrying
baskets of linen and because he had rag-
ged clothes the children of the town did
not play with him and he was often very
lonely. When he had no baskets of linen



THE ROAD TO THE CASTLE 19

to fetch and carry, he used to take long
walks in the wood, alone, making friends
of the trees and the birds.

One day he had gone quite far in the
woods because he had found many pleas-
ant things to do on the way. He had
lifted a very heavy stone that was keep-
ing a little tree from growing straight
and tall. He had broken a trap that a
cruel person had set to snare the pretty
little rabbits. He had lifted the wood-
chopper's baby over a narrow place in
the brook that she might find her father.
He had gathered pretty twigs and put
them in a pile at the foot of a tree that
the thrush might find them for her nest-
building. As he went on, he came to a
green little path that twisted and turned
and went a long way. In following it,
Hans was very careful not to step on the
earthworms that wriggled happily across
it, or the busy ants building their sand
houses or the spiders spinning their pretty
lace webs. And as he walked carefully
along the little green path, Hans sud-
denly smelled the most delicious perfume.



20 STORIES FOR SUNDAY TELLING

It was like all the roses and all the vio-
lets and all the lilies that he had ever seen
crowded into one breath of odor.

"I must find that garden and pick a
flower for mother," Hans said, running
on. Just around a turn in the path he
stopped and his eyes were almost blinded
with the brightness and he was dizzy with
the sweet perfume. There, in front of
Hans, lay the castle, white and gold and
big and beautiful. Its gates were wide
open and beyond was the wonderful gar-
den full of flowers that would not fade.
No one was inside and Hans went in and
through the garden, picking his arms full
of roses and finding the chests of jewels
that were his, now, to give away.

No one could understand how Hans
had found the road, but when he came
home in the evening with his pockets full
of jewels to give to the poor and took his
mother back to live with him in the castle,
they decided that it must be true.



THE KING'S PAGE 21



THE KING'S PAGE

There was once a little boy who wished,
very, very much to be a page in the palace
of the King. He lived in a tiny house
at the foot of a hill and at the tip-top of
the hill stood the palace, shining bright in
the sun with many sparkling towers and
minarets. Once a day the great gates of
the castle grounds opened wide and out
came the King and all his retinue, riding
down the hill and past the little boy's
house and on to the woods to hunt.

Oh, but the sight was wonderful!
White, and brown, and black horses
pranced by, their trappings as bright as
gold. The King rode ahead, dressed in
his bright hunting costume and followed
by all his retainers. There were the little
page boys, too, manly and straight, as
they walked at the end of the procession
in their green velvet doublets and wearing
feathers in their caps.

'I want to be a page. I want to be a
page. I want to walk behind the King,"



22 STORIES FOR SUNDAY TELLING

said the little boy every day when the
King went by.

And one day came his chance.

"Come with me," said a messenger who
waited at the doorway of the little boy's
house. "You are needed at the castle."

So the little boy kissed his mother
good-bye and climbed up the hill with the
messenger. He was quite happy and all
the way his joyful heart beat time to the
tramp, tramp, tramp of his stout leather
shoes. And his heart sang, too.

"I shall see the King's gold throne. I
shall eat my supper from a bowl of silver.
I shall wear a green velvet cloak and have
a feather in my hat," he thought.

But when they came to the top of the
hill the little boy felt, as he looked down,
that he was a long way from home. He
was surprised, too, to see how dark and
gloomy the old castle looked. Instead of
going straight to the throne room, he was
taken through long stone passages to the
kitchen, a great, busy room. Here the
messenger left him.

'Where is my sword?" the little boy



THE KING'S PAGE 23

asked, and the King's cook, laughing, put
a wooden ladle in his hand with which he
was to stir the soup in the broth pot.

"I want to sit at the foot of the King's
throne," begged the little boy; but one
of the maids showed him a rough wooden
bench with no back where he was to sit
and polish the copper pots after the soup
was finished.

'Where is my green velvet cloak?" he

questioned at last, and at that all the

scullery boys in the kitchen laughed and

they tied a big, coarse apron on him.

'This is your new uniform," they said.

The little boy was not used to crying
when things went wrong, so he began to
work as hard as he could in the King's
kitchen. It was not so bad a place, after
all, and always warm and cheerful with
the odors of basting fowl, savory sauces
and spiced puddings. Every one had
something to do every minute of the time
and whether it was sweeping or cutting
up vegetables, everybody did it very well.

"This is a huge household to feed," said
the King's cook, "and it is quite as im-



24 STORIES FOR SUNDAY TELLING

portant to pare a potato neatly as to
wield a sword."

The little boy listened and decided to
learn how to be a good little kitchen
helper. So he searched the woods and
fields for the rare herbs that helped to
make the King's broth tasty, and he
stirred the broth so hard that it was more
perfectly blended than ever before. He
sat on his hard wooden bench and polished
the copper pots until they caught the
sunshine. And he sang at his work like
a little brown thrush, all day long. And
so, in working, he forgot to wish for a
sword, a green velvet cloak and a feather.

After the little boy had been a helper
in the King's kitchen for many months,
the big door opened one morning. There
stood the same messenger who had called
for him at his house.

"The King wishes to see the page who
sings at his work," said the messenger.
"Come." He reached out his hand to the
little boy.

"But I am not a page yet, I have not
learned to be a page," he said.



THE THING OF MOST WORTH 25

"You have been learning here in the
Kitchen," the messenger beckoned to the
little boy to follow him. "A boy who can
serve a cook can serve a King."

So the little boy was a page and carried
a sword and wore a green velvet cloak
and had a feather in his cap. And he
walked behind the King in the procession.



THE THING OF MOST WORTH

There was once a very important King
who was growing quite old and gray. He
had three sons, Prince Proud and Prince
Charming and Prince Great Heart, all


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Online LibraryCarolyn Sherwin BaileyStories for Sunday telling → online text (page 1 of 9)