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some of y® principall of y® other Companie to escape. Andrew
Sherle will not lay his hand vpon the booke. Robert Bye
comminge into the Court, the Bishop of London spake kindly
to him saying, come, thou lookest like a good fellow that will
take thy oath. Bye. I am Christes freeman ; I owe obedience
to God & y^ King, and those that are lawfullie sent by him, but
to noe others : Att w/iich there being some laughter he said,
I am in deed & good earnest, I dare not take this oath : An
oath is for the ending of a controversie, but this is made to be
but the beginninge of y® controversie. ArchBishop of Canter-
bury ; yo" doe shew yowr selves the most vngratefuU to God &
to his Maiestie the King & to vs the Fathers of the Church : if
yo" haue anie knowledg of God, it hath come through & by vs
or some of our predecessors : We haue taken care vnder God to
give milke to y® babes & yonglinges and strong meate for the
men of vnderstanding, yo" haue y® word of God to feed yo", the
Sacramentes to strengthen yo", and we support yo" by prayer,
for all this what despight do yo" returne vs: yo" call vs
abhominable men, to be hated of all that we carry the Marke
of the beast, that we are his members : We doe beare this
patiently, not because we haue noe law to right vs, but because
of your obstinacie : But for yowr dishonouring of God & dis-
obeyinge y^ King, it is not to be indured : when yo" haue
readinge, preaching, singinge teaching, yo" are your owne
Ministers, the blinde lead y^ blinde, whereas his Matestie is
Godes vicegerent in y* Church, the Church is nothing wtth
yo", & his Ministers not to be regarded, and yo" runne into
woodes, as if yo" lived in persecution, such an one yo" make the
King, to whome wee are soe much bound for his great care for
y® truth to be preserved amonge vs and yo" would haue men
beleiue, that he is a Tyrant, this besides yowr wickednes,
vnthankfulnes, & vngraciousnes towardes vs the Fathers of the

B. II. 21



322



Early English Dissenters



Con-
venticlers.



Against
Ralfe
Grafton
one of
the Con-
ventielers.



Church. Therefore let these men be put 2. and 2. in severall
prisons.

lohn Cooke, lames, Margery Cleaver, lohn lapworth, Anne

[ ] One was a yong girle, these were all taken in

another Conventicle, but where I cannott directly say, I heard
about Christes Church in London : These alsoe all denyed to
take the oath, and were all sent to severall prisons, two, and
two./

[Under the date June 21, 1632.]



Ralfe Grafton an Vpholster dwellinge in Cornehill, London,
was required to take his oath to answere y^ Articles. He was
said to be a principall ringleader of those Conventicle''s that
mett at BlackFryers. Kinges Advocate this is a rich man
dwelling within the Citty, my Motion is, that jouv Grace &
the Court would sett a Fine vpon this man if he shall refuse
to answere, that other [sic] may be warned for contemning of
y^ Court. London. M'' Advocate I thanke yo" for this Motion.
Kinges Advocate, I require yo", & the Court requireth yo" to
take your oath to answere to matters of your owne fact as farre
as yo" know, & are bound by law. Grafton. An oath is a
matter of an high nature, & must not be taken rashlie, I dare
not therefore take this oath. We have done nothinge against
y^ law : it was noe Conventicle, there was nothinge spoaken
against y® King, nor against the State, I dare not take y® oath
and I am noe Ringleader of any to evill, Canterbury. Yo"
mett without law, yo^ had no authority. Poena ad paucos,
metus ad omnes. Wherefore, the Court for his Contempt in
refusing y® oath sett a Fine of two hundred pound vpon him,
& committed him to prison. Grafton. I have bayle heere
readie if yo" please to take it, I doe tender it to yo". London.
Canterbury. Noe away with him to prison : if he come not in
by the day of mittigation, let the Fine stand.



XXI

NOTICE OF A SEPARATIST CONVENTICLE TAKEN AT
A HOUSE IN "REDERIFFE" IN DECEMBER, 1638

Surre?/ to wit. The Examinacion of Edward Hurst late

of Cambridge Tayler taken the 23 of
December. 1638.i

He saith that he came to london on thursdaye
bailed laste. and lodged at the bull in Bishopsgate

streete and this daye he enquiringe for a freind
of his, was tould that he might finde him att
a howse in Rederiffe, which, made him goe
thither, where he founde aboute, 20. or 30.
persons men & woemen. beinge all strangers
vnto him & knewe not the names of either of
them, where they did all pray togeather and
dispute & exhorte one an other, and there
Contynued aboute 2. howers togeather vntill
the Constables & officers of RederifFe came in
tooke some of them awaye. this Exa/ninaie
denyeth that he did exhorte or dispute wtth
them or any of them Edward [?] hurst [?]

bayled. Phillippa Cowlake. St Giles Cripplegate parishe

Frances Greene the wife of Phillipp Greene

of the same. Clothworker.
bayled lohn Dyer of Barmondsey Lastmaker he saith

that they were all Readinge a Chapter & ex-
poundinge of it
1 S. P., Dom., Charles I., Vol 404 (118).

21—2



324 Early English Dissenters

bayled — Beniamyn Pratt of oldstreete weauer.

word taken — Martha Elliott of S^ Gyles Cripplegate.

Thomas Tyle

bayled. John Ellis of S'' Pulkers Cordwainder

Nicholas Rothwell and Peter Blake Church-
wardens of Rederiffe togeather with John
Stoakes & John Lingwood Constables goeinge
aboute in tyme of devine service to see good
orders kepte did finde the said persons & diners
others that ran & Convayed themselues awaye
gathered togeather in a howse where on [one]
hayward dwells, he beinge at sea And his wife
with her frends in the Countrye, but howe
they came into the howse the said officers
knowe not.

nicolas Rothwell] Church
peter blake J wardens

John Lingwood] ^ ^ , ,

, , )■ Constables

John stokes J

Thomas Laish
John Lewis



XXII

DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE PEISON LIFE AND
DEATH OF THE SEPARATIST, SAMUEL EATON

[A Petition concerning him which was probably sent to
Archbishop Laud in 1638,]i

To the most Reverend Father in God William Lord [Laud]
Arch^BJ^P of Canterbury his Grace Primate and
Metrapolitan of all England.
Humbly The most humble Peticion of Frauncis Tucker

Sheweth. Bachelour of Divinity and Prisoner in Newgate

for Debt.

That whereas there is one Samuell Eaton Prisoner in
Newgate com/nitted by yowr Grace for a Scismaticall and
dangerous Fellowe. That the said Eaton hath held diverse
Conventicles in the said Gaole some whereof hath bin to
the number of 70 persons, or more and that hee was per-
mitted by the said keeper openly, and publiquely to preach
vnto them, and that the said Eaton hath oftentimes
affirmed in his said Sermons, that Baptisme^ was the
Doctrine of Devills, and its Originall was an Institucion
from the Devill and oftentimes hee would rayle against
your Grace, affirminge that all B'-'"'' were Heretickes
Blasphemers, and Antechristians, That the said keeper
haueinge notice hereof by the peticioner whoe desired him
to bee meanes that these greate resorts and Conventicles

1 S. P., Dom., Car. I., Vol. 406 (No. 64), in the Public Record Office,
London.

2 [?in the Church of England.]



326 Early English Dissenters

might bee prevented and that hee would reproue the said
Eaton for the same, and remoue him to some other place
of the Prison. That herevpon the said keeper in a dis-
dainfuU manner replyed that the petictoner should meddle
with what hee had to doe and if hee did dislike the
said Eaton and his Conventicles hee would remoue the
petictower into some worser place of the Prison, That at
this time there was a Conventicle of 60 persons or more
that the said keeper comminge into the Roome where this
Conventicle was, and the said Eaton preachinge vnto them
and maynteyninge dangerous Opinions, havinge viewed
the said Assembly hee said there was a very faire, and
goodly Company and stayinge there some season departed
without any distaste thereat, to the greate encouragement
of the said Eaton, and the said persons to frequent the
said place &c That the said keeper had a strict Charge
from the highe Commission to haue a speciall Care of the
said Eaton &c, that since this the said keeper hath severall
times permitted him to goe abroad to preach to Con-
venticles appointed by him the said Eaton. That dayly
there doth resorte to the said Eaton much people to heare
him preach..,. [that just before the death of the petitioner's
wife, after she had been removed from the chamber she
had occupied in the prison] the said Chamber was by the
keeper assigned over to the said Eaton, it beeinge the
most convenient place in the prison for keepinge his Con-
venticles — .



[An Account of his Burial, evidently written on "Aug: 31:
1639."]^

M"" Alsop, I wrote to you the other weeke, how y^ I had beene
with Eaton [i.e., Samuel Eaton]. This is further to let you
understand y*' upon Sunday, being Aug. 25. I was accidentally
at his buriall, for being to visit one in Bethelem comming

1 S. P., Dom., Car. I., Vol. 427 (107), in the Public Kecord Office, London.



The Separatist, Samuel Eaton 327

home, I met Brownists & Anabaptists (I thinke) at least
200 wtth Batons corpes, so I went backe with y™ to see how
they would bury y® dead, & I observed how they answered such
as met y"", demanding who y* was to be buried, they said it
was one of y® Bishop's prisoners, but when they came to y®
grave, it being made ready for y™ in y® new Church yard neere
Bethelem ; they like so many Bedlams cast y^ corpes in ; &
with y'' feet, in stead of spades cast & thrust in y^ mould till y®
grave was allmost full : then they paid y® grave maker for his
paines, who told y" y'^ he must fetch a minister, but, they said,
he might spare his labour.

I could wish y'^ you would certify my Lord of this, also y*
I had beene at y^ gate house...



XXIII



A BROADSIDE WHICH MENTIONS THE EXCOMMUNICATION
OF SAMUEL HOW, AND THE PLACE AND DATE OF HIS
BURIAL IN 1640.

The Coblers threed is cut.

OR,
The Coblers Monument : wherein, to the everlasting memory of the folly
of Samuel How, his doctrines are detected, and his life and death
described : together with an Epitaph written on him at the
Last, with an exhortation to the ignorant to avoid
such phantastick spirits ; he being buried
in the high-way neer Dame Annes
a Clear (a place so called,
neer Shores-ditch, on
tuesday, Sept. 29.
1640.1

T is an ancient and worthy custome to
weep for the deceased ; but How ? not
for this Samuel How, who being a Cobler,
took upon him beyond his Last, the
mending of soules, and in a Sermon
preached to above an hundred persons in
the Nags-head Taveme neere Coleman-
street, delivered many absurd Doctrines
& Vses, against humane Learning: and afterward published
and entitled his Sermon, The suficiencie of the Spirits teaching
without humane Learning, for the light and information of the

1 This definite information serves to correct a misstatement as to the
date of Samuel How's death made in Vol. i., p. 201. On account of the
exigencies of space the heading of the broadside, as here reproduced, has
been differently arranged from that of the original, which consists of only
six lines in all.




Samuel How : Ms Excommunicaticyii and Burial 329

ignorant: wherein he published his owne folly, it being a knowne
truth, that Learning is no essentiall immediate cause of grace,
but an instrumental! cause, whereby the knowledge of the
Scriptures are gained ; and humane learning doth prepare the
soule, and enlarge it to receive divine mysteries, and by
judgement assisted by Gods Spirit, to finde out hidden truth,
and to defend fundamentall Principles, How durst then this
lump of ignorance assume so much boldnesse, with reasons
drawne ah absurdo, from absurdity, to detract from learning, or
with his blacke Thumb wax so impudent to touch, much lesse
to handle humane Science or Learning; who will thus requite
him with an old saying :

Scientia non hahet inimicum nisi ignorantem.

The ignorant will onely be

To humane Learning an enemie.

But his folly hath been formerly enough derided : For as
sober obedient knowledge is rewarded, so foolish ungrounded
opinions are disregarded : they are like Solomons thornes,
crackling under the pot; & it is likely these flames of the
Coblers zeal proceeded from pottles of wine, it being preached
(as above said) in the Nags-head Taverne, neere Coleman-
street: a fit place for such a preachment, tending to the disgrace
of all humane learning; which scorning to answer a foole
according to his folly, it seems that this selfe-conceited Cobler,
Samuel Hoiu, being stricken with shame, and afterward with
sicknesse, sneaked out of this world and died ; and being
formerly excommunicated out of the Church, he was buried in
the high-way, after his threed of life was cut. And therefore
let the Reader take this as a monument of his folly; whereupon
in conclusion may be engraven this Epitaph.

An Epitaph on Samuel How a Cobler, the unlearned enemy
of humane Learning.

\His vnlearned Cobler, by the Spirits discerning,
Was a great enemy to humane Learning.
How could that be ? Why How that in a stall,
Gould sing Queen Dido, or the Ladies fall,



T



330 Early English Dissenters

Would in a Taverne needs set up his stage,

And against humane Learning shew his rage.

Doctrines and Vses from his Text he drew,

That was us'd to draw threeds through an old Shew

And with sharp argument he seemed to prick,

As with an Aule, all learning to the quick.

And having wrought himselfe so out of breath,

The Coblers thred of life was cut by Death.

And in the high way buried under ground,

Studies how he all learning may confound.

He needs no Monument, nor Epitaph,

For at his folly every one doth laugh.

To think how he did go beyond his Last,

The Coblers end is shame for folly past.

Then let no ignorant above his reach,

Speake against learning, or attempt to preach.

Lest having spet and spoke, they doe come off,

Like this unlearned Cobler with a scoff.

Who having done his worke, by death is paid

His wages, and in the high-way is laid.

Where he no foolish Arguments con hold :

For How, his zeale, and corps in ground are cold.

He that was humane Learnings great Kil-kow,

Lies in the high-way, you need not ask How ?^

Printed for Richard Harper at the Bible and Harp
in Smithfield. 1640.2

1 In the original this epitaph is printed in two columns.
In the original the imprint consists of only one line.



INDEX



A., H. (See H. Ainsworth)

Aarau, j., 76

Abbot, G., I., 27, 39, 66, 67, 267; ii.,

170, 260
Abbot, R., I., 311
Abingdon, i., 356
Abraham, I., ii., 18
Abraham, R., i., 125, 142, 143, 145,

146, 147, 153; ii., 36, 47, 49
Aburne, E. (See R. Abraham)
Achm-ch-cum-Thorpe, i., viii, 28, 96,

110
Act of Uniformity, first, i., 50; under

Elizabeth, 79; 353
Adamites, i., 59
Adams, R., i., 3, 338-40, 349, 351;

n., 292, 302
Adams, W., ii. , 134
Adlam, S., i., 10
Adriaansz., J., ii., 208
Ailesbuiy (Aylesbury), i., 354
Ainsworth, H., i., xii, 15, 30, 88, 115,

130, 153, 159, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166,

167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173,

174, 175, 176, 179, 181, 187, 190,

202, 232, 238, 267, 293, 304; ii., 134
Ainsworthians, i., 41, 166, 167, 168,

170, 173, 177, 178
Airey, Dr., n., 147
Albertsz., C, i., 249; ii., 213
Alchemist's laboratory, of J. Canne,

I., 181
Aldemianbury, i. , 85
Aldersgate Street, i., 147, 148, 196, 205
Aldgate, i., 72, 85, 128, 145, 147
Alison, R., I., 127, 221, 232
Alkmaar, ii., 239
Allen, — , I., 121; ii., 20
Allen, A., i., 142; ii., 36
Allen, J., I., 313; ii., 294
Allen, Mrs., i., 322, 327; ii., 296, 300
Allen, P., I., 121; ii., 20
Allen, T., i., 326-7; n., 299
Allerton, — , i., 364
Allison, R. (See R. Alison)
Almanack, i., 131



Almey, A., i., 313; n., 294

Alsop, — , II., 326

Amen-clerk, i., 195

America, i. , 94, 320; Puritan Con-
gregationalism in, 33, 300, 317

Amersham, i. , 274

Ames, W., i., 292, 361; ii., 283

Amstelredam. (See Amsterdam)

Amsterdam, i., 17, 25, 30, 32, 73-4,
97, 140, 141, 151, 155, 156, 157,
158, 159, 163, 166, 167, 168, 170,
171, 172, 174, 175, 178, 179, 180,
181, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 189,
190, 196, 197, 200-1, 225, 232, 275,
294, 306, 308, 311; ii., 167, 172,
181-2, 184, 187, 200, 202-3, 205,
207-10, 213, 222, 225, 243, 257,
270-1, 273, 277, 282, 286, 305, 307

Anabaptist Churches in London(Seven),
II., 304-5

Anabaptists, i., 4-5, 9, 11, 16, 23, 24,
26, 27, 30, 31, 32, 37, 41-69, 71,
77, 84, 90, 98, 127, 150, 156, 171,
181, 193, 197, 201, 212, 214-15,
221-80, 304, 308, 326-56, 365-6;
n., 21, 72, 82, 141, 171, 172-259;
a distinctive style of clothing worn
by them, 241; 260, 283, 303, 327

Anabaptism. (See Anabaptists)

Ancient Church, of the Barrowists in
London, i., 172, 314, 323; ii., 296

Anderson, — (Justice), n., 56

Anderton, J., ii., 10, 12

Andrewes, L. (See Andros?)

Andrewes, R., i., 132; ii., 22

Andros (Andrewes?), Dr [Lancelot?],
I., 195, 200

Anesz., A., n., 205

Anglicans, i., 198

Angus Library, London, i., 25, 228,
343

Anne — , i., 204

"Annes a Clear", ii., 305, 307, 328

Anslo,C. C.,i., xiii; ii., 213-5, 239-41

Antibaptism, i., 365

Anti-Calvinists, i., 52



832



Index



AntipsBdobaptists, i., 327, 348, 354;

ii„ 305
Antwerp, i., 137
Apocrypha, i., 157
Apology, of J. Penry, i., 150-1; ii.,

87-93
Apostates, i., 127
Appleby, R., ii., 134
Appletaste, A., ii. , 9
Aqua Vitae shop, of J. Canne, i., 181
Arber, E., i., xiv, 14, 16, 17, 20, 31,

115, 120-1, 136, 156, 162, 169,

170, 192, 200, 202, 228, 234, 237-8
Archbishops, i., 37, 38-9, 40, 79, 95,

103, 118, 130
Archer, J. or H., i., ix, 279
Ardivey, R., i., 200
Aresto, C. (See C. C. Anslo)
Arians, i., 171, 194, 304
Arminians, ii., 304
Armond, J., i., 189
Armourer, H., i., 196
Arnefield, A., i., 244, 246 ; ii., 178, 200
Arnfeld, J., i., 246; ii., 200
Arnold, W., i., 4
Amheim, i., 299; n., 291
Arnold, — , i., 322, 326; n., 296, 299
Arrowe. (See Aarau)
Arthurbury, W., i., 193, 272
Arundel, ii., 49
Arundell, T., i., 322; ii., 318
Ashford, i., 52, 202, 274; ii., 5
Ashly, — , n., 132
Ashmore, J., i., 229
Ashton, R., I., 10
Ashton, — , II., 86
Askewe, A., i., 27, 49
Asplin, W., n., 134
Asplund, J., I., 5
Assembly, i., 71, 124
Athenae Oxonienses, i., 319
Athenaeum Library, Boston, Mass., i.,

25
Atkin, M., I., 323; ii., 297
Attwood, W., I., 322; ii., 316
Austerfield, i., 230
Austria, i., 64
Awbynes, J., ii., 18
Awger, — , I., 133
Awoburne, R. (See R. Abraham)
Axon, E., I., 15, 162, 165
Axon, W. E. A., i., 15, 162, 165
Aylmer, Bishop, ii., 112
Aynsworth, H. (See H. Ainsworth)
Aynsworth, T., i., 162

B., D. (See D. Bucke)
B., I. (See J. Bale)
B., S. (See S. Bredwell)
Babworth, i., 230
Backus, I., I., 6, 8



Bacon, L., i., 13, 116

Badkinge, R. (I.e., probably R. Bod-
kyne. See R. Bodkin)

Baffam, Mrs. R., n., vi, 309-10

Bagge, R., i., 52; ii. 5-6

Baillie, R., i., 68, 181, 311, 361-3

Baines, P., i., 296, 300, 361; n., 271

Baker, J., i., 188

Baker, T., i., 29, 120

Bale, J., I., 49, 50, 69

Balford, W., ii., 301

Balfurth, E., i., 88; n., 11, 18

Ball, — , n., 86

Ball, — , I. 266; n., 222

Balles, J., n., 309-10

Balmeford, — , i., 298; ii., 277

Bamford, E. (See E. Balfurth)

Bampfield, F., i., 334, 353

Bancroft, R., i., 21, 23, 39, 95, 131,
139, 140, 141, 144, 145, 159, 167,
192, 282, 284-5; n., 127-32, 148,
152-3, 166

Baptism, i., 32, 42-50, 56, 59, 60, 63,
64, 66, 69, 76, 90, 126-7, 142, 143,
173 ; Plain and well-grounded Trea-
tise concerning, 263-4, 370; by
midwives, 351 ; among the English
Anabaptists, 330-50, 378-9, ii.,
219-21; among the Barrowists, n. ,
30-1, 70-1, 73

Baptist Historical Society, Transac-
tions of, I., 19, 33, 182

Baptist Review and Expositor. (See
Review and Expositor)

Baptists, I., 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12,
17, 19, 20, 26, 27, 35, 37, 42, 43,
46, 47, 48, 49, 54, 170, 3-54, 355,
356, 379; ii., 302

Baptist Year Book, i., 340

Barbary, i. , 159; English merchants
in, 192; Brownists there, 192

Barber, E., i., 204

Barbon, S., i., 322; u., 311, 315, 319

Barbon, — , i., 229

Barbone, S. (See S. Barbon)

Barbones, W., ii., 134

Barbor, W. (See W. Barbones)

Barclay, R., i., 13-4, 20, 209, 215,
260-1

Barebone, P. G., i., 325; ii., 296, 302

Barfote, T., i., 356

Barkeley, — , i., 298; ix., 288

Barker, E., i., 188

Barker, G., i., 188

Barker, R., i., 97

Barlow, Dr, i., 352

Barnaby Street, ii. , 300

Barne, — , ii., 49, 55-6

Barnes, J., i., 124, 132, 142, 145, 146,
153; n., 23, 34, 39, 41-2, 44, 52, 54

Barnes, — , ii., 86



Index



333



Barnet, H., i., 321-3; ii., 296-7, 311,
317

Barnet, Mrs., i., 322

Barrel!, — , i., 203

Barrens, J. (See J. Barnes)

Barrett, J., i., 52; ii., 5-6

Barrey, — . (See J. Barrett)

Barrowe, E., i., 122

Barrowe, H., i., 14, 17, 21, 28, 29,
34, 39, 61, 65, 97, 120, 122, 123,
128-9, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134,
136, 140, 141, 148, 149, 151, 152,
155, 157, 158, 159, 187, 190, 193,
194, 284, 314, 323, 360, 371; ii.,
23, 38, 40, 42, 52, 56-7, 59, 97-108,
114, 115, 173-4

Barrowism. (See Barrowists)

Barrowists, i., 18, 22, 23, 26, 28, 29,
30, 31, 33, 37, 39, 41, 61, 63, 68, 69,
118-208, 221-3, 238-40, 255, 274,
281-3, 297, 310, 314, 316-8, 371;
n., 19-24, 27-61, 109-26, 138-45,
171, 260, 273-6, 283

Bartlett, W. H., i., 10

Basel, I., 76

Basford, i., xi, 229

Bashforth. (See Basford)

Bastwick, J., i., 367

Batchelour, S., n., 276-7, 290

Bate, B., i., 176

Bates, E., n., 134

Bath, I., 146; n., 47

Batkine, R. (I.e., probably, R. Bod-
kyne. See R. Bodkin)

Battee, W., i., 327; ii., 300

Batten, J., i., 332-4; n., 303

Battle Bridge, i., 70

Batty, W. (See W. Battee)

Baudrand, M. A., i., 320

Bawdwyne, K., ii., 11

Bawtry, i., 230

Baylie, R., ii., 134

Beacham, J., i., 200; ii., 137

Becbe, J., i., 142; ii., 36

Bedell, — , n., 12

Bedleim (Bedlem), i., 132, 145; ii., 39,
49

Bedlein. (See Bedleim)

Belford, Col., ii., 278

Bellarmine, ii., 94

Bellot, A. (See A. Billet)

Bellot, S., I., 153

Benedict, D., i., 7

Benet, E., n., 134

Bennet, J., i., 206

Benson, J., n., 12

Bentham, — , i., 71

Bergen op Zone, n., 277-8

Berkshire Association, Records of the,
I., 337, 341, 344, 356

Bermondsey, n. , 323



Bernard, H. (See H. Barnet)

Bernard, R., i., 197, 232, 241, 289

Bember, A., i., 71

BeiTy, Mrs, i., 326; ii., 301

Best, W., I., 173, 180, 309

Betbelem (London), I., 329; ii., 326-7

Beza, T., n., 131

Bibles, I., 178

Bibliography, i., 1-22, 169

BickuoU, E., I., 64

Bilborough, i., 229

Billet, A., I., 142, 146; ii., 36, 42,59,

134
Billingsgate, i., 72
Bilson, — , I., 145; ii., 36, 39, 41, 52,

54
Birchall, W., i., 191; ii., 309-10
Bishop, T., II., 134
Bishop, Mrs T., n., 134
Bishoppe, R., n., 309-10
Bishops, I., 37, 38, 39, 40, 69, 102-3,

111, 118, 130
Bishops' Prison. (See New Prison)
Bishops' Courts, n., 305, 307
Blackfriars, I. , 72 ; II., 311, 315, 319-20,

322
Blacklock, L. (?), i., 333-5; ii., 303
Blacklock, S. (See L. Blacklock)
Blackwell, F., i., 170, 171; n., 134
Blackwood's Magazine, i., 285
Bladwell, Dr., ii.. 293
Blagge, R. (See R. Bagge)
Blakborowe, W., i., 132; n., 22
Blake, P., ii., 324
Blogg, J., II., 309-10
Blue- Anchor Alley, i., 205
Blue Books, i., 180
Blunt, R., I., 326, 330-5, 337; ii., 299,

302-3
Bocher, J., i., 41
Booking, i., 26, 50-3; ii., 1-6
Bodkin, R., i., 123, 132, 146 ; ii., 22, 60
Bodkyn, A., i., 142; ii., 36
Bodkyn, R. (See R. Bodkin)
Bodleian Library, i., 23, 24
Bolingbroke, L. G., i., 188
Bolton, J., I., 88-9, 92; ii., 10, 12, 140
Boman, C. (See C. Bowman)
Bond, — , I., 97
Bonde, R., ii., 10
Bonde, Mrs R., n., 10
Bonham, W., i., 82-3, 86; ii., 11-2
Bonner, E., i., 70; ii., 112-3
Book of Common Prayer, i., 123, 143,

171, 180, 188, 205; ii., 76-7, 267,

273-4
Boston, Eng., i., 289; ii., 260, 264
Boston, New England, i., 357, 362
Boswell, Sir W., i., 138, 178-80. 302,

307-8; n., 260, 272-3, 278, 281,

282, 284, 285-6



334



Index



Boswell Papers, concerning the English
churches in the Netherlands, 22-3,
33, 137, 281, 295, 299-300, 303, 306 ;
II., 260-90

Boughtell, — , I., 52; n., 5-6

Bowden, A., ii., 305

Bowelande, T., i., 80, 88-9, 92; n.,

10, 12

Bowland, T. (See T. Bowelande)

BowUande, T. (See T. Bowelande)

Bowie, B., I., 153

Bowles, Mrs, i., 354

Bowman, C, i., 132, 142, 144, 145,

146, 156, 159, 185, 188-9; n., 22,

38, 40-1, 48, 50, 53, 134



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