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HISTORY



....OF....



DURELL S BATTERY



....IN THE...



CIVIL WAR

(INDEPENDENT BATTERY D, PENNSYLVANIA
VOLUNTEER ARTILLERY.)




A Narrative of the Campaigns and Battles of Berks
and Bucks Counties Artillerists in the War of
the Rebellion, from the Battery s Organization.
September 24, 1861, to its Muster Out of
Service, June 13, 1865.




.7
IX-



TO THE MEMORY



OF THE



OFFICERS AND MEN

OF

DURELL S INDEPENDENT BATTERY D,

PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER ARTILLERY.

Whose devotion to their Country in the time of her peril is their
enduring honor, this book is offered as a sincere tribute.



1 88231



Approval of Durell s Battery Association.



HEADQUARTERS DURELL S BATTERY ASSOCIATION,
READING, PA., OCTOBER 31, 1903.

At the Annual Reunion of Durell s Battery Association, held
at Reading, J a. , on September 26, 1903, it was unanimously
resolved that the material collected by the Historical Committee
of the Battery Association be approved, and that Lieut. Charles
A. Cuffel, the battery historian, be authorized to publish the same
in book form.

HORACK I). BOONE, Secretary.



PREFACE.

Soon after the organization of DurelFs Battery Association,
which was effected in 1880, a committee was appointed for the
collection of historical matter, with the object of preserving the
services of the battery from oblivion. The committee has had a
long and difficult task to perform ; but the work has nevertheless,
been a pleasant one, recalling those stirring days of the past in
which the command played its part in the great War of the
Rebellion.

Little note of the services of Durell s Battery has been taken
by the historians of the Civil War. Nothing more has been
attempted here than a faithful account of its experience in the
marches, campaigns and battles through which it passed, and in
which it rendered such loyal and effective service. Generous aid
has been rendered by surviving comrades, who have kindly assist
ed in supplying incidents and dates from journals kept at that time.

The historian is conscious of imperfections in the text, but he
has endeavored to be accurate. The committee was fortunate in
securing the excellent illustrations drawn by Mr. William T. Trego,
the well-known painter of military subjects, and portraits and re
productions of war-time photographs through the courtesy of the

War Department.

CHARLES A. CUFFEL,

Battery Historian.
Doylestown, Pa., October 31, 1903.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I.

ORGAN I/ATION. I-AGK.

The First Camp Recruits from Reading Roster of Company
Lesson on Discipline Picnic Marches Off to the Front Fare
well of the Citizens The March Through Philadelphia Recep
tion at Baltimore Camp at Washington Detached from the
I04th Regiment Assigned to Artillery Camp 17

CHAPTER 11.
AT THK FROM.

Advance into Virginia P>ailey s Cross Roads Attached to
McDowell s Division Christmas Dinner - Ruin of the Country
Construct Quarters Drills and Inspections Funeral of Gen.
Lander Gifts from Reading s Aid Society 25



CHAPTER III.

ADVANCE UPON MANASSKS.

Leave Camp Du Pont Fairfax Court House Camp on Confederate
Ground The Enemy Abandons Manasses March in a Storm
Return to Camp Du Pont Await Orders to Ship for the Peninsula
Grand Review 30



CHAPTER IV.
CAI TTRE oi- FREDERICKSKURG.

Attached to the Iron Brigade March to Bristoe Station Snow
Bound Small-pox in Camp Foraging for Subsistance Lost on
the March Engagement at Falmouth The Enemy Flees from
Fredericksburg Reviewed by the President 34

CHAPTER V.

PURSUING " STONEWAI.I. " JACKSON.

A Hasty March to Thoroughfare Gap Looking for Guerillas Return
March Via Haymarket and Warrenton First Ration of Whisky
and Quinine Lieut. Leoser Return to Fredericksburg The
New Vork Recruits 42



CHAPTER VI.

CAMP LIFE AT FREDERICKSBURG. PAGE.

Celebrating July Fourth Red Tape Death of Bluch In a Southern
Church Swapping Horses Health of the Battery The Team
sters The Refugees Foraging Reconnoitering ....... 47

CHAPTER VII.

POPE S RETREAT KELLY S FORD AND BRISTOK.

Joined to the Ninth Corps March to Culpepper Pope s Army
Cedar Mountain Retreat by Night Battle of Kelly s Ford
Support Buford s Cavalry A Lively Fight A Narrow Escape
A Successful Reconnoisance General Reno March Up the
Rappahannock A Detail for the Cavalry- Shelled Out of Camp
Fight for a Bridge Defend a River Ford Struck by Light
ning Fayetteville Scarcity of Rations Warrenton Junction
Arrival of McClellan s Troops Move with Hooker Enemy Cuts
the Railroad Battle of Bristoe The Enemy Repulsed A Beef
steak Supper ............... ...... 52

CHAPTER VIII.
BULL RUN AND CHANTILLY.

Destruction of Manassas Bury a Dead Confederate On the Bull
(Run Field A Charge and Repulse Night on the Battlefield A
Federal Defeat Rescue of the Gun The Retreat Make a
Stand at Centreville An Unexpected Meeting Battle of Chan-
tilly Death of Kearney and Stevens Fighting in a Thunder
Storm Retire to Washington ............. 63

CHAPTER IX.

MARYLAND CAMPAIGN SOUTH MOUNTAIN.

Refit at Washington March into Maryland Battle of South Moun
tainMidnight on the Picket Line Incidents of the Fight _



Horrors of the Battlefield



CHAPTER X.
MARYLAND CAMPAIGN ANTIETAM.

Opening of the Battle Shelled Out of Camp Artillery Duel-
Explode an Enemy s Caisson Storming the Bridge Reconnoitre
the Enemy Hard Fighting Charge of Hawkins Zouaves-
Casualties Ammunition Exhausted Enemy Retires Across the
Potomac ........................ -7

CHAPTER XL
CAMPING IN MARYLAND.

On the Potomac An Historic Spot Reviewed by Lincoln Pleasant
Valley A Choice Mess Apple Dumplings and Paw Paws
General Ferrero Passes and Furloughs Patrols and Stragglers 85



CHAFFER XII.

PURSUING THE ENEMY. I-AGK.

Death in Camp Cross to Virginia Marine Fever Stages of the
March A Snow Storm On Picket Duty Amissville Pleasan-
ton s Cavalry The Enemy in Sight Short Rations 90

CHAPTER XIII.

DUEL AT WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS.

Assault upon the Baggage Wagons A Hot Artillery Fight Death of
Lieutenant Mcllvain The Enemy Repulsed Camp at Fayette-
ville A Race with the Enemy . . 95

CHAFFER XIV.
BURNSIDE S FREDERICKSBURI;.

In Position Opposite the City Rough Weather Friendly Pickets
Movements of the Enemy Lieutenant Leoser Build Winter
Quarters Battle of Fredericksburg Posted on Falmouth
Heights A Cold Night Terrible Bombardment A Forlorn
Hope A Bloody Battle The Army Withdrawn Finish Winter
Quarters Mess Changes Build Stables New Vear s Day, 1863
Spoilation of the Lacey Property The Mud Campaign Spirit
of the Army Burnside Relieved loo

CHAPTER XV.

FROM FREDERICKSBURG TO FORTRESS MONROE.
A March in Mid- Winter Floundering in the Mud Shipped on Canal
Boats An Oyster Feast Voyage Down the Bay Camp in the
Ruins of Hampton March to Newport News First Sight of
Gunboats 114

CHAPTER XVI.
THE KENTUCKY CAMPAIGN.

Embark for Baltimore By Rail to Kentucky Reception at Pittsburg
Lose a Caisson Cincinnati s Hospitality Arrive at Paris
March to Mount Sterling Peculiarities of the Country The
Guerillas The Town of Boone The Lost Caisson Found Paint
Lick Dick River A Settlement of Differences 123

CHAPTER XVII.
FROM KENTUCKY TO VICKSBURG.

The Blue Grass Region From Lexington to Louisville by Rail
Embark for Vicksburg Scenes on the Ohio Down the Missis
sippi Features of Memphis -On the Alert for Guerillas Meet
Western Troops Ruins Along the Shores First View of Vicks
burg March to Carthage Return to Sherman s Landing Up
the Vazoo Land at Snyder s Bluff 132



CHAPTER XVIII.

THE MISSISSIPPI CAMPAIGN. PAGE.

Intrench to Meet Johnston Out-post Duty Fight Mosquitoes and
Fleas Surrender of Vicksburg March Against Johnston Lose
Caisson and Horses - Scarcity of Water Incidents of the March
Shell Mississippi s Capital Eastern and Western Pluck The
Insane Asylum Evacuation of Jackson Sacking the City A
Hard March Return to Mill Dale Await Transportation . . . 138



CHAPTER XIX.

RETURN TO KENTUCKY.

Much Sickness Leave Vicksburg The Hospitals Disembark at
Cairo The Hospital Boat Burial of the Dead Treatment of
the Sick A Boat Collision Camp at Covington Unable to
Follow the Corps The Ohio Election 155



CHAPTER XX.
A TRIP TO LAKE ERIE.

An Urgent Call Plot to Release Confederate Prisoners The Journey
Through Ohio Johnson s Island Awaiting the Conspirators
Drill Green Troops The Prisoners Return to Covington . . 161



CHAPTER XXI.
COVINGTON BARRACKS.

Winter Quarters Hospital Life A Guidon from the Ladies of
B uc ks The Second Best Battery First Re-enlistments Turn In
the Horses Christmas Day Bounty Jumpers 164



CHAPTER XXII.

VETERANIZING.

Cold Beginning of 1864 A Female Soldier Deserter Reprieved Re-
enlist for Three Years More - Return of Ninth Corps Troops from
Tennessee Home on Veteran Furlough The Battery Moves to
Annapolis 1 68



CHAPTER XXIII.

RECRUITED, REFITTED AND REORGANIZED.

Veterans Return from Furlough Drilling Recruits General Grant
Inspects the Ninth Corps Move to Washington Receive a New
Outfit Cross to Virginia March to Warrenton Junction . . . 175



CHAPTER XXIV.

FROM THK RAPIDAN TO THE JAMKS. PAGE.
Assigned to the Colored Division Guard the Supply Trains Chancel-
lorsville Battlefield Flank Movements by Night Battles of The
Wilderness, Spottsylvania and Cold Harbor Cross the Chicka-
hominy and James Rivers Shelled out of Camp Arrive at Peters
burg 180



CHAPTER XXV.

ASSAULT THE PETERSBURG LINES.

In the Trenches Harassed by Sharpshooters Engage the Enemies
Batteries The Awful Morter Shells The Batteries Wounded
Move to the Left Fort Durell Return to the Front Line Oc
cupy Fort Morton . . 188



CHAPTER XXVI.

THE BURNSIDE MINE.

Lying in Concealment Spring the Mine A Terrific Bombardment
Delay of the Assault Charge and Repulse of the Colored Troops
The Crater a Slaughter- Pen The Enemy Capture the Crater
A Truce Investigation of the Affair Recover the Dead and
Wounded . 195



CHAPTER XXVII.

SIEGE OF PETERSBURG.

Taylor Battery Under Constant Fire A Confederate Mine Strength
ening the Lines Suffering in the Trenches Testing a Bomb-
Proof A Destructive Rain Terrific Bombardment by the Enemy
A Terrible Crash of Shot and Shell Relieved from the
Trenches .



CHAFFER XXVIII.

WELDOX RAILROAD AND REAM S STATION.

Support Warren at the Weldon Railroad Return to a Former Camp
Hurried to the Support of Hancock Battle of Ream s Station
Garrison Forts on the Rear Line Building Fortifications The
Military Railroad Shotted Salutes for the Enemy 206



CHAPTER XXIX.

MUSTER OUT OF THREE YEARS MEN.

Starting for Home Sad Leave-Taking of Captain Durell Roll of
those Mustered Out Lieutenant Rhoads Takes Command Pro
motions in Reorganizing ...



CHAPTER XXX.

PEEBLES FARM AND POPLAR GROVE CHURCH. PAGE.

Battle of Peebles Farm A Sharp Fight and a Union Victory - Advance
to Poplar Grove Church The Enemy Assaults and is Repulsed
Rhoads Receives a Captain s Commission Other Promotions . . 215



CHAPTER XXXI.
HATCHER S RUN.

Forts Gregg and Welsh Peace and Trade Relations on the Picket Line
Ninth Corps Moves on Hatcher s Run Repulse of the Enemy-
Return to the Intrenchments Movements of the Caissons The
Presidential Election Build Winter Quarters Thanksgiving Day



CHAPTER XXXII.
SUPPORTING THE CAVALRY.
On the Rear Line of Intrenchments The Battery Mans Three Forts

Build Winter Quarters Raid on the Enemy s Communications

Shooting Deserters 22 4



CHAPTER XXXIII.
AGAIN AT THE FRONT.

Posted in Forts Meikle, Rice and Sedgwick Again Build Winter
Quarters Close Proximity of the Lines Fraternity on the Picket
Line Enemy Shell Fort Meikle The Whitworths and the
" Seven Sisters " Confederates Desert Caisson Park Shelled
Stormy Close of the Year 227



CHAPTER XXXIV.
THE SIEGE IN WINTER.

New Year, 1865 Granting Furloughs A Flag of Truce Pickets
Swamped Out of the Pits Increase of Enemy s Deserters Con
federate Peace Commission Prepare for the Spring Campaign
Celebration of Washington s Birthday Shotted Salutes for the
Enemy Forts Meikle and Morton Bombarded Enemy Capture
a Herd of Beef 231



CHAPTER XXXV.
BATTLE OF FORT STEADMAN.

The Enemy Capture Fort Steadman Charge of Hartranft s Pennsyl-
vanians Large Capture of the Enemy Storming the Confederate
Picket Line Sheridan s Cavalry Arrives 238



CHAPTER XXXVI.
CAPTURE OF PETERSBURG.

The Final Bombardment The Enemy Replies Vigorously The
Infantry Assault Willcox Breaks the Line Potter and Hartranft
Equally Successful Capture of Fort Mahone Fierce Fighting
to Hold the Points Frantic Efforts of the Enemy Sailor s Men
Serve Captured Guns The Battery Actively Engaged Victory in
Sight Evacuation of Petersburg 241



CHAPTER XXXVII.
PURSUIT AND SURRENDER OF LEE.

Ninth Corps Enters Petersburg The Battery Reduced to Four Guns
March Along the South Side Railroad Lee s Surrender
Assassination of Lincoln 247



CHAPTER XXXVIII.
RETURN TO WASHINGTON.

March to City Point Petersburg After the Evacuation Embark for
Alexandria The Voyage Down the James and Up the Bay
Encamp at Fairfax Seminary The Men Impatient to Go Home 250



CHAPTER XXXIX.
THE GRAND REVIEW AND MUSTER-OUT.

Camps of the Great Army The Two-Days Review The Army of
the Potomac Sherman s Army Muster-Out Orders Parting
With the Horses and Guns The Journey to Philadelphia
Spring Mill Barracks The Muster-Out 253

Itinerary of the Battery 257

Roster of the Battery 258



DURELL S BATTERY.

BATTLES AND ENGAGEMENTS.

Capture of Frederick sburg, Va., April i8th, 1862

Kelly s Ford, Va., August 2ist, 1862

Bristoe Station, Va., August 27th, 1862

Bull Run, Va., . . August 29th and 3oth, 1862

Chantilly, Va., September 1st, 1862

South Mountain, Md.. September J4th, 1862

Antietam, Md., September lyth, 1862

White Sulphur Springs, Va., November I5th, 1862

Fredericksburg, Va., December I2th to i6th, 1862

Vicksburg, Miss,, June iyth to July 4th, 1863

Jackson, Miss., July loth to lyth, 1863

The Wilderness, Va., May 5th and 6th, 1864

Todd s Tavern, Va., May 8th, 1864

Po River, Va May loth, 1864

Spottsylvania, Va., May I2th, 1864

North Anna River, Va., May 23rd, 1864

Pamunkey River, Va., May 28th, 1864

Cold Harbor, Va., June 3rd, 1864

Assaults on Petersburg, Va., June l6th to i8th, 1864

Siege of Petersburg, Va., June igth, 1864 to April 2nd, 1865

The Burnside Mine, Va., July 3Oth, 1864

Weldon Railroad, Va., August I9th, 1864

Ream s Station, Va., . August 25th, 1864

Peebles Farm, Va., September 3Oth, 1864

Poplar Grove Church, Va. October 1st, 1864

Hatcher s Run, Va., October 27th, 1864

Fort Steadman, Va., March 25th, 1865

Final Assault on Petersburg, Va., April 2nd, 1865

Appomattox, Va., April 9th, 1865



ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE.

BATTERY IN ACTION, 5

CAPTAIN GEORGE W. DURELL, 23

LIEUTENANT LEMUEL CRIES, 27

LIEUTENANT GEORGE W. SILVIS, 33

LIEUTENANT HOWARD MC!LVAIN, 37

LIEUTENANT CHRISTOPHER LEOSER, 37

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, 41

BATTERY ON DRILL, 49

MclLVAiN GOING TO THE SUPPORT OF BUFORD S CAVALRY, ... 55

POPE S RETREAT DESTROYING THE RAILROAD, 61

RESCUE OF THE GUN, 65

MAJOR-GENERAL JESSE L. RENO, 75

MAP OF ANTIETAM BATTLEFIELD, 77

INFANTRY GIVING A HELPING HAND, 79

AWAITING ORDERS TO CROSS THE BURNSIDE BRIDGE, 81

SUPPORTING THE CHARGE OF HAWKINS ZOUAVES, 83

GENERAL EDWARD FERRERO, 87

MAJOR-GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE, 93

BATTLE OF FREDERICKSBURG, 105

ON PICKET IN WINTER, 109

THE MUD MARCH, 113

MAJOR-GENERAL JOSEPH HOOKER, 117

PRIVATE HORACE D. BOONE OF THE LINEAGE OF THE KENTUCKY

PIONEER, 127

GENERAL ULYSSES S. GRANT, 141

THE FIRST GUIDON, 165

THE WILDERNESS, 181

IN THE WILDERNESS THIRTY YEARS AFTER, 183

SPOTTSYLVANIA ONE YEAR AFTER THE BATTLE, 185

MAP OF PETERSBURG, 193

POPLAR GROVE CHURCH, 217

OFFICERS OF RHOADS BATTERY, 219

WINTER QUARTERS NEAR PETERSBURG LINES, 223

THE "SEVEN SISTERS," 229

FORT SEDGWICK, 235

MAJOR-GENERAL JOHN F. HARTRANFT, 239

SCENE OF THE ASSAULT ON PETERSBURG LINES, . . . . 243

OBSTRUCTIONS IN FRONT OF FORT MAHONE, 245




CHAPTER I.

ORGANIZATION OF THE BATTERY.

THE war for the Union was fairly under way ; the first battle
of Bull Run had been fought and lost to the National cause,
and the three-months troops had returned to their homes,
when enlistments were begun for Durell s Ringgold Battery by
Captain George W. Durell, of Reading, Pa. Its organization was
started in connection with that of the io4th Pennsylvania Volunteer
Infantry, under command of Colonel W. W. H. Davis, of Doyles-
town, Pa., who had received authority from the War Department
to recruit a regiment of infantry and a battery of artillery under
President Lincoln s first call for 300,000 volunteers for three years
service.

Captain Durell, fresh from his service as orderly sergeant of
the Ringgold Artillery of Reading, which was among the First De
fenders to arrive. in Washington at the outbreak of hostilities, was
well qualified to organize and command a battery. He arrived at
Camp Lacey, located on the Doylestown fair grounds, where Colonel
Davis had already gathered half a dozen companies of infantry, on
September 131x1, 1861, accompanied by thirty or forty recruits,
principally from Berks County. This squad was in a few weeks
increased by the enlistment of a number of men from Bucks, Mont
gomery, Chester, Philadelphia, and other points to almost the
maximum number required to man a six-gun battery of light artil
lery. Three lieutenants were appointed and commissioned-
Lemuel Gries, Howard Mcllvain and George W. Silvis, all of
Reading. A few weeks before the departure from Camp Lacey
the appointments of the non-commissioned officers were made,
after which the company was marched to Doylestown and mustered
into the United States service by Colonel Davis, in front of his
printing office, for the term of three years or during the war, to
date from September 24, 1861, when the company roster was as
follows :

17



i8



DURELL S BATTERY.



CAPTAIN. George W. Durell, Reading.

FIRST LIEUTENANT. Lemuel Gries, Reading.

FIRST LIEUTENANT. Howard Mcllvain, Reading.

SECOND LIEUTENANT. George W. Silvis, Reading.

ORDERLY SERGEANT. William P. Andrews, Doylestown.

QUARTERMASTER SERGEANT. Azariah L. Ratz, Berks.



DUTY SERGEANTS.



Harrison G. Bouse, Reading.
James Q. Irwin, Waynesburg.
Henry Sailor, Reading.



George A. Everhart, Doylestown.
Samuel K. Whitner, Reading.
Samuel H. Rhoads, Amity.



CORPORALS.



B. Frank Bender, Waynesburg.
William Dunlap, Reading.
Robert Conard, Buckingham.
John O. Burden, Pottstown.
Mahlon B. Buckman, Newtown.
I. Carey Carver, Buckingham.



Benjamin Albright, Hilltown.
Daniel I). Althouse, Berks.
William D. Althouse, "
Amos Antrim,
George Barton, Bucks.
Jacob Bauer, Waynesburg.
Jacob L. Beam, "
Stephen B. Bechert, Berks.
Amos Bechtel, Reading.
Charles C. Berg, "
Valentine Bissey, Buckingham.
James Bissey, "

George Bluch, Berks.
Valentine Bloomer, Bucks.
Thomas L. Breese, "
Henry L. Buck, Berks.
Samuel O. Burden, Reading.
Mark M. Caffrey, Bucks.
G. Ross Carver, Buckingham.
Wellington F. Clouser, Reading.
William Clouser, Reading.
Henry C. Clymer, Bucks.
Elias K. Cooper, "
Nicholas Cramer, Reading.



James L. Mast, Reading.
Oliver D. Giffins, Lehigh.
Abraham D. Blundin, Hulmeville.
William G. Mack, Berks.
William J. Wealthy, Philadelphia.
Frederick W. Berg, Reading.



PRIVATES.



Robert W. Creighton, Philadelphia.
Charles A. Cuffel, Doylestown.
Joseph M. Cuffel,
John Coney, Newtown.
William K. Cleaver, Berks.
Cyrus Davidheiser, "
George Douglass, Hulmeville.
Joseph Derflinger, Bucks.
Uriah H. Engle, Berks.
John L. Everett, Kutztown.
Christian Eyler, Reading.
Charles A. Fageley, Bucks.
Gotlieb Fageley, "

Jacob S. Foster, ;"

Jesse D. Foulke, Quakertown.
William H. P>ankin, Philadelphia.
Jacob C. Franks, Bucks.
Michael Fry, Adams.
Richard S. Garber, Berks.
Isaac R. Good, "

Henry Graul, Reading.
Hiram Grove, Berks.
George W. Hagerman, Bucks.
Henry Hargrave, Doylestown.



ORGANIZATION.



PRIVATES Continued.



Reuben G. Herbine, Reading.

George Hart, "

Henry B. Hearing, Hilltown.

Mahlon Y. Hill, Reading.

William E. Hill,

John Hinnershotz, "

loseph L. Hughes, Waynesburg.

Monroe Jenkins, Hilltown.

Charles Jones, Doylestown.

Samuel Johnston, Reading.

Amos Knabb, "

George L. Knopp, "

Isaac S. Knowles, Bucks.

Adley B. Lawrence, Waynesburg.

Oliver C. Leidy, Montgomery.

Joseph Lear, Solebury.

John L. Lewis, Montgomery.

S. Richard Lewis, Reading.

George . Ludwig, Berks.

Henry Leidig, Reading.

Henry Lenhart, Bucks.

Charles H. MacCorkle, Hulmeville.

Ezra McKinstry, Plumstead.

William S. McNair, Doylestown.

Stewart McAlees, Bucks.

Aaron Martin, Reading.

Frederick K. Miller, Reading.

Henry Miller, "

John W. Morris, "

George W. Moyer, Reading.



Daniel W. Noll, Reading.

Joseph Ney, Waynesburg.

J. Beatty Price, Buckingham.

William H. Quaintance, Waynesburg.

Henry Y. Rauh, Germany.

James S. Rich, Buckingham.

John M. Rich,

Charles Reigling, Lehigh.

John Rightmyer, Berks.

Harrison K. Rhoads, Berks.

John R. Rice, Doylestown.

Albert H. Reider, Reading.

John C. Sherwood, Bucks,

Isaac C. Sterner, Berks.

Patrick Scanlon, Doylestown.

Andrew J. Schweimler, Reading.

Henry M. Seagrist, Bucks.

Jacob H. Schaffer, Reading.

Henry Schlichter, "

Henry C. Stahler, Lehigh.

John C. Schmidt,

Isaiah J. Sellers, Hilltown.

Martin H. Smith, Doylestown.

John L. Smith, Hulmeville.

John H. Thompson, Bucks.

Levi Thomas, Hilltown.

Edward H. White, Solebury.

Emanuel Wolf, Doylestown.

Charles P. Weissig, "

Bertolet Y. Yoder, Berks.



The company was daily trained at foot drill, and soon attained
such proficiency that its manoeuvres attracted the admiration of the
spectators at the evening dress parades of the regiment. Among
the noteworthy incidents which occurred while in this camp was the
shooting of an infantryman by I. Carey Carver. The latter was on
guard duty at one end of the camp near the fair ground on a very dark
and cloudy night, when some person attempted to cross his beat
and scale the fence. The sentinel called upon the intruder to halt,
and, the challenge being unheeded, fired with a pistol, the ball
taking effect in the calf of the latter s leg. The report of the pistol
created a great commotion, both in the infantry and artillery
camps, which were separated by about five hundred yards distance.
The identity of the disobedient soldier was soon ascertained. His
intention was to climb the fence and take " French leave " for



20 DURELL S BATTERY.

town or for his home. The bullet, passing only through flesh, the
wound did not prove serious, so that the wounded man soon re
covered, and Carey Carver received a corporal s chevrons for first
blood drawn by the battery.

While at Camp Lacey the regiment and battery made two short
marches out into the country the first to attend a Union mass
meeting held in a grove near Danborough, five miles from camp,
on the 5th of October. The next morning, Sunday, after Divine
service, the entire command was marched to Neshaminy creek, in
the neighborhood of the Castle Valley bridge, where the men
stripped for a bath and disported themselves in that quiet and
peaceful stream much to the amusement of the spectators.

The second march was made on the iyth of October, to
Hartsville, to attend a Union festival, held partly in honor of the
regiment, where the citizens gave the soldiers a warm reception,
the ladies setting out a bountiful collation. His excellency, Gover
nor Andrew G. Curtin, accompanied by his staff, visited Camp
Lacey on October 2ist, for the purpose of presenting the State
colors to the regiment. The occasion drew a very large number
of people from the surrounding country.

The next important event was the order to "pack up" and
move to Washington. The orders for the journey were read at dress
parade on the evening of Tuesday, November 5th. Reveille was
sounded about 4 o clock in the morning, and long before daylight
everything was in readiness for the march. Though the orders
were announced but the evening before, there were several hun
dred civilians, upon the camp-ground to see the boys off. The
skies were dark and threatened rain, and many faces both of soldiers



Online LibraryCharles A CuffelHistory of Durell's Battery in the Civil War (Independent Battery D. Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery.) → online text (page 1 of 25)