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Charles Francis Massy Sir Lepel Henry Griffin.

The Panjab chiefs: historical and biographical notices of the ..., Volume 2 online

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the personal jagir of Diwan Banpat Bai, Bs. 2,000, was
maintained for life, half descending to his- two sons.
Masammat Sukhan, the widow of Diwan Dhanpat Bai, waa
granted a personal allowance of Bs. 1,000, but she died soon
afterwards, in 1851. Hukam Gband and Kishan Chand
received Bs. 600 and Bs. 400, respectively, and the sum of Bs.
1,000 was continued for life to Bishan Das, the only son of
the younger of the three brothers. Diwan Banpat Bai died
in 1856. Hukam Ohand and Eishan Chand are living in
Sodhra.

Diwan Bishan Das died childless in 1883, and his life
pension of Bs. 1,000 lapsed. He had acted as Honorary
Magistrate of Wazirabad, Gujranwala, for over ten yeans.



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196 THE PANJAB CHIEFS.

Tbe present head of the family is Lala Ganda Mai, son of
the late Diwan Banpat Bai. He is a Nadb-Tahsildar and
enjoys a family pension for life of Rs. 500 per annum. His
brother Jhanda Mai is in receipt of a similar allowance. They
are joint owners of a small plot of land at Sainwala in the
Sialkot district, yielding about Rs. 600 per annum. The
family are not now of much importance. They are Brahmans,
and have their home at Sodhran in the Gujranwala district.



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CVJRANWALA DISTRICT.



197



SABDAB SANT BmGH OF OHABJAEH.



SHAM K37GH.



I



Gulab Singlu



PKnJab Slnglu
KahanBisglu



J



Fiktdh

Ml.

i



Jodk



Dluuram Binffh
a. 1864.

Bajindar
Sinffh
a. liSS.



Sure
Szvtts
a. 1847.



Lahm Singh,
M. dAQffhterof
8. Hi^ Siiiffh

Iihur Singh
B. 18tt.



T



T



Tirmth Anurik ChaUr Labhindftr
Singh Sinflrh Singh Simrh -
a. 1878. a. 1878. a. 1888. a.



I,



Narindar Phian Mnrat Tr^o(dum

Singh Singh Singh
a. 1684. a. 1887. a, 1871. a,



DhLn



Indar Bioh]



J-



Lpal Bandhir Harnam Amar NahalSinsh



I



Balwaafe
Singh



« ^i .!^ .» ^. s!^ pr

. ' Panho- Banbhir

* tain Singh Singh

I I a. 1881 a. 1817.



I



Onrnmkh
Singh
arii74.



.1



Kand



Narpid



TeSk

Singh

». 1&4.



Karpa Baohitar
Singh Singh
a. 1888. a. 1888.



Sham Singh was a banker in the village of Gharjakh^
near Gujranwala. Of his two sons, the eldest, Gulab Singh,
followed his father's profession, but Panjab Singh, the younger,
enlisted in the force of Sardar Fateh Singh Kalianwala,
receiving Rs. 30 a month as a trooper. Like many other com-
mon soldiers in the Sikh army, he rose to command by his
courage ; and after the death of his patron, Sardar Fateh
Singh, not liking his successor Dal Singh, the nail-cutter, he
went over to Ranjit Singh, who placed him in a regiment
and gave him in jagir the villages of Aimah and Fatehpur in
the Amritsar district, worth Rs. 2,500 ; and after the second
Multan Campaign in 1818 he received jagirs to the value of Rs.
50,000, subject to the service of one hundred and twenty-five
sowars. On his death the jagirs were resumed by the State^



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198 THE PANJAB CHIEFS.

as his only son, Kalian Singhi was but fifteen years old. How-
ever, when the boy grew up, the Maharaja sent him to
Makhad and Pindi Gheb in command of five hundred horsemen,
and conferred on him a jagir of Bs. 15,000. He remained here
for nine years, when, his payments haying fallen into arrears
and his accounts not successfully passing a rigid examination,
he was recalled and dismissed from Government employ. He
then became a follower of Sardar Hari Singh Nalwa, and ac-
companied his new master in his nimierous expeditions. He
fought in the campaign against the Qhazis of Yusufzai in 1831,
and soon after, not getting on well with his brother officers,
went over to Sardar Atar Singh Sindhanwalia, who gave him a
subordinate command with a jagir of Rs. 7,000. He then
went to Kashmir with the Governor-General, Mian Singh,
and returned after three years to Lahore with a considerable
fortune. His son Lahna Singh married the daughter of his
old leader, Sardar Hari Singh, who took his son-in-law with
him to Peshawar in the last and disastrous campaign of
1837, in which the great General was killed. During the
life of Nao Nahal Singh and the reign of Maharaja Sher
Singh, Diwan Kahan Singh and his three sons were treated
with favour and received military appointments ; but when
Raja Hira Singh rose to power trouble came upon the
family. Lahna Singh was in the service of Sardar A jit Singh
Sindhanwalia ; and the new Minister, who hated the Sindhan-
walias and their adherents, confiscated Kahan Singh's jagir
and threw him and Fateh Singh into prison. Lahna Singh,
who contrived to escape, took refuge with Baba Bir Singh,
the great Sikh Guru. Not till Jaw^ahir Singh became
Minister did the family regain their liberty and their former
position. Diwan Kahan Singh was killed by a musket-shot
during the Satlaj Campaign in 1846, and the Darbar granted
the family a jagir in Gharjakh and Dholanwala, worth Rs.
2,910, subject to service. On the annexation of the Panjab



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GVJRANWALA DISTRICT. 199

the jagir was resumed, and in lieu of it cash pensions of Bs.
600 and Bs. 360 were granted to Fateh Singh and Lahna
Singh respectively. The widow of Kahan Singh also received
a pension of Bs. 360.

Sardar Fateh Singh was appointed an Honorary Magis-
trate of Gujranwala in 1869, and continued in the office until
his death in 1881. His mother, Mai Kishan Eaur, died in
1875, and her pension lapsed to Government.

Sardar Sant Singh, a Viceregal Darbari, son of Sardar
Fateh Singh, is now at the head of the family. His brother
Dharam Singh is an Assistant Engineer in the Public Works
Department. Their first cousin, Hamam Singh, is a clerk in
the same department. Sant Singh's son, Narindar Singh, is
employed as a Zaildar of Canals. The joint annual income
of the family from land in Gharjakh and other villages in
the Gujranwala district is estimated at about five thousand
rupees.

Sardar Lahna Singh lives at Gujranwala. The family are
Khatri Sikhs. Their home is at Gharjakh, a village founded
by the Waraich Jats in Gujranwala.



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200



THE PAIUAB CHIEFS.



EABAM ILAm, OHATA.



NUBICAHOMBD.



Pir Mahomed
9.1785.

I



A iCfthomed*



Ahmad Khan
9.1790.



Fateh Mahomed Ghnlam i
9. 1781. I

Jan Mahomed.

GhnhunKadar
9.1860.
J



KadarBakhah.



Bahram



Bnrfaan BIhan
9.1860.



Ghnlam Hasain
B. 18».



Ghnlam NaM
B.18Si.



Ghnlam All
1.1841.



I



Mahomed E[han EhndaBaUiah
9. 1888. 9. 1877.

Ghnlam Baanl Thiee eons. Kasax Ilmmi
9. 1858. B. 1861.
I I



HayatKhan
9.1800.



Mahomed Khan
9.1868.



Ahmad Khan
9.1868.



Nasirndin Mahomed Haaain
9. 1881. 9. 1886.



Bar Biland
9. 1874.



JAN BAXHSH
9. 17M.

Xhnda Bakhih
9.1867.

I



Bakht
9.1874.



Mahomed Faleh
Bakhth Din
1848. 9.1818.



Din
9.1888.



1




1 1

Shndft Attal


Xaxam


Dad Dad


Dad


a. I860. 8. 1860.


9.1878.


AU Bakhih




9.1886.




i



r



Ghnlam

Kadar.

l_



Bhahhaa

Khan

9. 1884.

Bardar Khan
9. 1808.



Said Mahomed
9.1888.

i FUal Dad

Bhaimf ». 1««1.

9.18mL I^ittehAU
' ^^ 9. 1880.



Mahomed



Doat
9. 1887.



Nawab Khan
9.1868.



Ghnlam Haldar
9.1878.



Ghnlam



Tl^af^H



Ghnlam Ala Dad
Nahi 9. I860.



Mania Dad



L



Ghnlam Mnetafa
9. 1867.

FUa Ahmad
9. 188U



kliaa
9. 1866.



1



All Akbar
9.1684.



Abdnla Wfihmf^ Khan
9. 1867. 9. 1816.



Jalal



B3iaa



r



I



9.1864.



9.1074.



All Ahmad
9.1877.



Ahmad
9.1880.



r



Aia
Dad
9.1861



niam



(»inU ^

NaU

9.1867.



9.1868.



FUal Ahmad
9. 1878.



Gfattlaa Haiain



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GVJRANWALA DISTRICT. mi

The Chatas are a numerous Mahomedan tribe, chiefly
inhabiting the Hafizabad and Wazirabad parganas of the
Gujranwala district, where they hold seventy-eight villages.
They claim to be by origin Ohohan Rajputs and to have
emigrated to the Panjab from the Dehli district. The date
of the emigration is not exactly known, but it was probably
about three hundred years ago. They rapidly increased in
numbers, spreading along the banks of the Ghanab, and
founded Nadala, Manohar, Bangli, Pandorian and other
villages. One Gagu seems to have been the first to adopt the
Mahomedan faitb, about the year 1600, and his example was
followed by the remainder of the tribe. Nur Mahomed wagf
bom in 1704. When he grew up his friendship was sought
by Raja Ranjit Deo of Jamu and by the Chiefs of Multan ; for
the Chatas had now grown powerful, and Nur Mahomed was
their acknowledged Chief. When Nur Mahomed grew old,
Ahmad Khan, his younger son, a brave and skilful soldier, led
the Chatas to battle. The great enemies of the tribe were the
Sukarchakia Cliiefs of Gujranwala, who were ever striving
to extend their possessions. In the time of Sardar Charat
Singh the Chatas held their own, and Ahmad Khan iq
1765 captured the celebrated Bhangi gun which Charat
Singh had placed in Gujranwala. Soon after this, Ahmad
Khan and his brother Fir Mahomed quarrelled, and fought for
some time with varying success ; and among the killed were
Bahram Khan and Kadar Bakhsh, sons of Ahmad Kban
and Fateh Mahomed his nephew. At last. Fir Mahomed
sought help from Gujar Singh and Sahib Singh Bhangi, who
invited Ahmad Khan to a conference, captured him, and
shut him up without water till he agreed to resign the great
gun, which was carried to the fort of Gujrat.

Mir Mann, the Viceroy of Ahmad Shah Durani, laid
siege to the fort of Manchar for some months without success ;
but when the Emperor himself invaded the Panjab^ he seema



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aoa THE PANJAB CHIEFS.

to have treated the Cbata Chiefs with consideration and to
have confirmed them in their possessions. Sardar Cbarat
Singh, the Chata enemy, died in 1774, closely followed by
Nur Mahomed and his son Pir Mahomed.

The towns founded in the Gujranwala district by these
Chiefs are neither few nor unimportant. Among those
founded by Nur Mahomed were Ahmadnagar, Ghudhi Gul
Mahomed, and Rasulnagar, re-named Ramnagar by the Sikhs ;
while Pir Mahomed built three different forts called after his
own name ; also Kot Mian Khan, Alipur, re*named by the
Sikhs Akalgarh ; NaiwaJa, Eot Salim, Eot Ali Mahomed and
Fatehpur. Ghulam Mahomed, who succeeded to the estate,
succeeded also to the hatred of the Sukarchakias. Both Sardar
Mahan Singh, .son of Charat Singh, and Ghulam Mahomed
were able and brave men, and it was clear that peace could
only result from the death of one or the other. For a long
time the advantage lay with the Chatas, and Mahan Singh
was defeated on several occasions. Once he besieged Jokian,
held by Mian Khan, uncle of Ghulam Mahomed, who came
down in haste to relieve it. After some hard fighting, peace
was agreed upon; but in an unguarded moment the
treacherous Sikh seized Mian Khan, carried him off prisoner,
and blew him from a gun. At length, in 1790, Mahan Singh,
having become very powerful, assembled his forces and
besieged Manchar. The siege lasted for more than six
months, and the Sikhs lost a large number of men. The
young Ranjit Singh himself was in great danger ; for Hashmat
Khan, uncle of Ghulam Mahomed, charged his escort with a
few sowarss and, climbing upon his elephant, was about to kill
the child when he was struck down by the attendants.
Ghulam Mahomed, seeing that he could no longer hold the
fort, offered to surrender if he were allowed to leave for
Mecca in safety. This Mahan Singh promised solemnly ; but
he had hardly sworn his truths than one of his men^ by his



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GVJRANWALA DISTRICT. §03

orders or with his conniyance, shot the brave Chata Chief
through the head. Mahan Singh then gave up Manchar to
plunder, and seized the greater part of the Chata territory.

Jan Mahomed, son of Ghulam Mahomed, escaped to
£abul, from whence he returned in 1797 with Shah Zaman,
and by the aid of the Afghans recovered his possessions on
the Chanab; but when his protector had returned to
Afghanistan, Banjit Singh attacked Basulnagar, determined
to destroy for ever the Chata power. The besieged made
a gallant resistance ; but day by day their numbers and their
strength diminished. Unlike the divine twin brothers, who
fought so well for Eome by Lake Regillus, the Mahomedan
saints abandoned their followers; for the story is that the
Chatas asked a famous fakir, who lived at Basulnagar, to aid
them, " How can I help you," was his reply, " when I see
the holy* Mahbub Subhani, dressed in green, fighting on
the side of Banjit Singh.'' At length Jan Mahomed was killed
by a cannon-shot and the fort surrendered.

The history of the family contains little worthy of notice
after the fall of Basulnagar. The sons of Jan Mahomed
received a small jagir from Banjit Singh, and were employed
by him in the irregular cavalry. Several members of the family
have served under the English Government both in 1849 and
1857. Karam Ilahi, grand-nephew of Kadar Bakhsh and
Bahram Khan, at the head of the family, holds a small mafi^
yielding Bs. 52 per annimi, and his patrimony in Ahmadnagar
brings in about a thousand rupees a year. He is a member
of the District Board, Zaildar of Ahmadnagar, Gujranwala,
and receives a chair in Provincial Darbars.

The only Chata Jagirdars at the present time are the
descendants of Jan Bakhsh, a petty Chief famous for his cattle*
lifting exploits. He was killed in 1794 in a fight with the
enemy of his tribe, Sardar Mahan Singh, who marched upon

•Tbeiaint allad«d to is Abdul Kadar Gilanii whoie iliniie ifl ntnated in Baghdad.



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t04 THE PANJAB CHIEFS.

his village Gajar Gola and plundered it of considerable
wealth ; the family of Jan Bakhsh escaping to Pindi Bhatian.
When Banjit Singh had succeeded his father, Khuda Bakhsh
and his brothers waited upon him, and were taken into the
Ghorcharas, receiving jagirs to the amount of Rs, 12,000.
Khuda Bakhsh served under the Maharaja in all his chief
campaigns, Kasur, Multan, Mankera, Kashmir and Peshawar,
and was distinguished for his gallantry. He was several
times wounded ; and at the battle of Teri, when badly hurt
himself, he cut ofE the head of an Afghan with a single blow.
The family had a quarrel with Wasakha Singh, the Kardar of
Kadianbad, and their jagirs, with the exception of Kot Jan
Bakhsh, Gajar Gola and two other villages, worth Rs. 2,500,
were resumed. The cash pension of Rs. 2,500 was left to them.
During the disturbances of 1848-49 Khuda Bakhsh
remained loyal. His two grandsons, Ghulam Haidar and
Shamasdin, were made Thanadar and Deputy Thanadar at
Kadianbad. On annexation Gajar Gola, worth Rs. 1,500, was
released for the life of Khuda Bakhsh. He died in 1856, and
two-thirds of the jagir have been resumed. The remaining
one-third descends to his heirs in perpetuity. They own two
thousand ghumaos of land in Kot Jan Bakhsh and other
villages of Gujranwala.



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GVJRANWALA DISTRICT. *es

LALA BAM DAYAL.



LAOmRAK.
Suift Bam.



I Bam.



Jifta]

GandalCal
]>.1880i.
I

.rr: — ttttt: — rrx



Jhoiha SiDfrh. HnthnakBai Gnrdit Singh Bam Bakha ICal Bam Bang

1 9.1846. l>. 1833. 9.1888. 9.1873.

Hari Singh. I J nn.Jr^

t ' f Thakar Das

1 T"^ i 1 1 ^1 •• ^^

Har Bhagwan Bithan Das Atma Bam Bax Datal Gsn««l Bam Das

9. B. 1821. 9. B. 1817. Harsnkh Bai b. 18I8.



_L

I.



Simdar Das Jawahir ICal
B. 1847. B. 1841.



9. 1867.
L



Jiwan Das Karpa Bam



9. 1887. B. 1800.

Sain Das ICathraDas Naranian Das ^*^JS^
B. 1881. B.1888. 3^1847. B. 1885.

I I

SiiNath Baghnnandaa E3shoriLaL

B. 1888. B. 1881. „ ^ I ^ ^

) I Hardajia Singh

Two sons.' Two sons. b. 1880.

Lachi Ram, a respectable Khatri of the Kapur tribe, .
left Lahore about the year 1740 for Hafizabad, where he
married and settled, and where his descendants have since
resided. The first of the family to take service under the
Sikh Government was Gurdit Singh, who entered the cavalry
under Prince Kharak Singh on a salary of Rs. 2,000 per
annum. He married a daughter of Lala Nanak Cband,
elder brother of Diwan Sawan Mai, Nazim of Multan, and
had two sons, one of whom was Harsukh Rai. His brothers
were not men of any note.

Ram Rang married the daughter of Lala Gurmukh Rai,
another brother of Diwan Sawan Mai, and served under his
kinsman as Kardar, and afterwards as commandant at
Dera Ghazi Khan on a salary of Rs. 1,800 per annum.
Ram Rakha Mai, who died in 1883, was also a Kardar under
Sawan Mai.

Harsukh Rai went to Multan in 1833, and was made
AdalaU or Judge by the Diwan, and soon afterwards received



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:266 THE PANJAB CHIEFS.

a military appointment. But he only remained there for two
years, when, failing to obtain leave of absence, he threw up
his appointment in disgust and came to Lahore, where in
1836, through the favour of Raja Dhian Singh, he obtained
a lucrative post about the Court, which he held till 1839, when
he was sent to Multan in charge of the salt customs : but this
appointment he only held four months. Maharaja Sher
Singh made him Kardar of Shekhopura on a salary of Rs.
1,800 per annum ; but he fell into disgrace with his patron.
Raja Dhian Singh, whose influence was used to procure his
dismissal in 1841. He was then appointed Eardar of Haweli,
near Pak Patau, but his administration was very impopular.
He made Sardar Jawahir Singh, the Minister, his enemy by
his intrigues with Prince Pashora Singh, who after the death
of his brother in July 1843 had fled to Ludhiana ; and
Harsukh Rai was not only dismissed from his employment,
but his jagirs and property were confiscated.

When Raja Lai Singh rose to power, Harsukh Rai
again came into favour ; he was created General, and received
command of the brigade which Lai Singh had begun to form
in the hope that it, being his own creation, would-" stand by
him in any new revolution. He was also made Eardar at
Pati, at the south-western extremity of the Lahore district, in
spite of the opposition of his enemies at Court, who asserted
that if the ruin of any place was desired it was sufficient to
send Harsukh Rai there. But the General, though by no
means scrupulous, was energetic and a good officer. His
brother Ram Das conducted most of the civil work at Pati,
while Harsukh Rai remained at Lahore till, at the close
of the year. Raja Lai Singh fell from power, and his
protege fell with him. The new brigade, of which only one
regiment, the Ram Paltan, had been formed, was broken
up, and at the same time the General lost th$ Eardarship of
Pati.



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GUJRANWALA DISTRICT. liof

Soon after the outbreak at MiUtan in 1848 Harsukh Rai
was again sent, by the desire of Colonel H, Lawrence, to the
Manjha as Eardar on Rs. 4,310 per annum. It was a time
when energy, resolution and fidelity were invaluable, and the
Resident thought that Harsukh Rai could be depended
upon for their exercise. The selection was fully justified by
the result. With every temptation to disloyalty : for the rebel
Governor of Multan was his connection, and his own brother
was in the hostile ranks : Harsukh Rai performed his duty
faithfully, and through all these troublous days did good and
zealous service. On the annexation of the Panjab his jagir,
worth Rs. 1,700, was maintained for life, and he was made
Tahsildar, receiving an exceptional allowance of Rs. 428.

In 1857 he was stationed at Amritsar, where he was
very active, pursuing the mutineers of the 26th Native
Infantry and raising the country against them. For this he
received a grant of Rs. 1,000 and an increase to his allowance.
In 1859 Harsukh Rai was raised to the rank of Extra Assist*
ant Commissioner. He held the post until 1865, when he
was obliged by failing eyesight to retire on a pension of
fifteen hundred rupees per annum. He died in 1867.

Jiwan Singh, elder son of Harsukh Rai, died in 1887.
Karpa Ram, surviving, enjoys a jagir grant of Rs. 300
per annum, released in 1860 to the family in perpetuity.
His income is about Rs. 2,600 per annum, including
Rs. 800 from lands and Rs. 1,500 house-rents and trade
profits.

The present representative of the family is Lala Ram
Dayal, a first cousin of General Harsukh Rai. He is a
Lambardar and Zaildar of Hafizabad in the Qujranwala
district, a member of the District Board and a Darbari on the
Lieutenant-Governor's List. He holds a cash inam of Rs.
258, sanctioned in 1873 ; and he has a mafi grant valued
at Rs« 130, sanctioned in 1876 for life. He has an income



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«o8 THE PANJAB CHIEFS.

in addition of about Rs. 2,500, mainly derived from rents
of land in eight villages in the Hafizabad Tahsil. One of his
sons, Sain Das, holds the post of Sadar Kanungo at Qujranwala
on a salary of Bs. 60 per mensem. The family is eminently
respectable, but no longer commands much local influence.



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GVJRANWALA DISTRICT.



»09



BUDH SINGH, MATU.



IVMIiSilwli






NfthAl
81

B.1I



GTJBIASINaH.



B. I



8ahAj Bingh.



iBhftr

Slnffh
(Adopted).



BVBX

8nr«x
B. 1848.

J»wind
Sinffh
B. 1^1.



jAWAhir
Bingh.



IHuMiind*
aingh.



f

PardhMi
Singh.



LalSisgh.



Kamm
Singh.



Bbarsm
Singh.



KhftTAk
Bingh

B.



DajA
Bingll
B.1S8.



J»w«U I
Singh.



Sher Singh
B. 1843.



EfthAr Singh
B. 1852.



lAbh



GnLb



Partob



Singh Bingh Singh
B. 1868. B. 1878. B. 1879.



Onlab

Singh

B. 187D.



Kanun



Sttndtt
Singh
B. 1881.



OnlLb
Singh
B. 1860.



Banjodh
Singh

B.
I



BSMUlt

Singh
B.



Chatar
Singh
B. 18&
I.



AJab Singh Gaian Singh
- '"*• B. 1886?



B. 1883.



Guria Singh, the founder of the family, was a Misaldar
of Sardar Charat Singh Sukarchakia. The connexion was
strengthened by Guria Singh marrying his daughter Sahju
to Sardar Dal Singh of Akalgarh, the brother-in-law of Charat
Singh. When Ranjit Singh first succeeded his father he had
great confidence in Dal Singh, and used to be guided in every-
thing by his advice ; but they soon quarrelled, and in the year
1800 Ranjit Singh imprisoned Dal Singh and marched against
Akalgarh, intending to take it by surprise. But Sahju was
a brave woman, and, with the assistance of her brother
Sahaj Singh, successfully held out for three months till the
siege was raised. Ranjit Singh obtained the fort later, in
1804, on the death of Dal Singh, and then attacked Ahmad-
abad, which was bravely defended by Sahaj Singh for some
time ; but the garrison was at length compelled to capitulate.
On the death of Dal Singh, Sahaj Singh received in jagir the
Dakas of Jathu Nangal and Bharial. Sardar Fateh Singh, his
son, served with credit against Fateh Khan, Wazir of Kabul



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210 THE PAHJAB CHIEFS.

and in the Kasbmir and Mnltan Expeditions. In 1834 the
Maharaja made over the Bharial estate to Jamadar Khushal
Singh, giving another to Sardar Qanda Singh in exchange.
Qttnda Singh was an officer under Hari Singh Nalwa, and
fought in many frontier battles and skirmishes. In 1848 he
and his cousins joined the rebels, and the family jagirs,
amoimting to Rs. 19,000, were resumed. Gaoda Singh receiv-
ed a pension of Rs. 1,200, and Dasaunda Singh and Nahal
Singh each Rs. 120 per annum.

Ganda Singh was appointed an Honorary Magistrate
of Oujranwala in 1865. He was also a Lambardar of
his village and a Zaildar. He always loyally assisted the
local authorities, and had more than once been honoured in
Darbar by the bestowal of sainads and khilats. He enjoyed
a mafi holding of forty acres. He died in 1887. Before the
birth of his son Budh Singh, he had adopted his wife's
brother's son, Ishar Singh, now a Tahsildar in this Province.
Ganda Singh's brother Nahal Singh is a Zaildar. His
allowances amoimt to Rs. 320 per annum. Two of the
cousins are Lambardars. But the family are badly off, owning
only one hundred and thirty acres of land of inferior descrip-
tion, and most of the members have sunk into compara-
tive insignificance. None of them is entitled to a seat in
Darbar. They are Matu Jats, living at Matu in Gujranwala.
Budh Singh, son of Ganda Singh, may be said to be at the
head of the family.



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CVJRANWALA DISTRICT. tn

DAPADAB MOTI SINGH, WAZIEABADIA.



DAYALA.



Gftfinm.
I Singh. Dew Singh.



Run Singh*
Gnrbftkhsh Singh.



Diwan Singh. Wir Singh. Jodh 6ingh B. Deian,

n.l809. ]c8.Ghant



SnkaroiiftkiA.



Amrtk Singh G«nda Singh

9. 1828. n. 186S.



Hira Singh ICon SzvftK.
n. 1870.

Hira Siogh Wazirabadia, father of Moti Singh, was



Online LibraryCharles Francis Massy Sir Lepel Henry GriffinThe Panjab chiefs: historical and biographical notices of the ..., Volume 2 → online text (page 15 of 29)