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Charles Frederic Goss.

Cincinnati, the Queen City, 1788-1912; online

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Cincinnati, the
Queen City, 1788-1912

Charles Frederic Goss, S.J. Clarke

Publishing Company, Clarke, S. J., publishing company




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CINCINNATI

THE QUEEN CITY



1788-1912



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ILLUSTRATED



VOLUME IV. S.o-.^ -,.c3i.



THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY
CHICAGO CINCINNATI

1912



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BIOGRAPHICAL

THE LONGWORTH FAMILY.

For more than a century the Longworth family has figured most prominently
in connection with the history of Cincinnati. It was in May, 1804, that Nicholas
Longworth, grandfather of the Hon. Nicholas Longworth, the representative of
the family in the present generation, arrived in this city. He was then a young
man of twenty-one years, his birth having occurred in Newark, New Jersey,
on the i6th of January, 1783. Attracted toward the legal profession, he be-
came a student in the office and under the direction of Judge Burnet, at that
time the most distinguished lawyer of the city. Following his admission to
the bar Mr. Longworth engaged in active practice until 1819, when he retired
from the legal profession to give his supervision to his property and other in-
terests. He had ever regarded the purchase of real estate as the safest of all
investments and as his law practice brought him substantial financial return,,
he bought land and by its sale added materially to his financial resources, rein-
vesting still more largely in property. At times he was enabled to purchase city-
lots for ten. dollars or less. Remarkable sagacity seemed to indicate to him
what would prove a profitable investment and after holding a purchase for a
time he would sell at an advanced figure that would permit of more extensive
purchases. It is related of him that on one occasion a client agreed to give him
in payment of a fee two second-hand copper stills but afterward approached
Mr. Longworth with the proposition that he would give him instead thirty-three
acres with frontage on Western Row from Sixth to Seventh streets. The latter
proposition was accepted and today the property is worth about two million
dollars. Wherever opportunity offered for investment Mr. Longworth added
to his realty holdings until his aggregate possessions were greater than that of
any other property owner of the city. It is said that in the year 1850 his taxes
on realty were greater than that of any other man in the United States save
William B. Astor.

The conduct of business and the accumulation of wealth, however, consti-
tuted only one phase in the life of Mr. Longworth. He was a man of varied
interests and of versatile ability. A contemporary wrote of him: "Longworth
is a problem and a riddle ; a problem worthy of the study of those who delight
in exploring that labyrinth of all that is hidden and mysterious, the human
heart, and a riddle to himself and others. He is a wit and a humorist of a high
order; of keen sagacity and shrewdness in many other respects than in money
matters; one who can be exact to a dollar, and liberal, when he chooses, with
thousands; of marked peculiarity and tenacity in his own opinions and yet of

5



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6 CINCINNATI— THE QUEEN CITY

abundant tolerance to the opinions, however extravagant, of others — a man of
great public spirit and sound general judgment. All these things rarely accom-
pany the acquisition and the accumulation of riches. In addition to all this, it
would be difficult to Rnd an individual of his position and standing so perfectly
free from pride, in the ordinary sense. He has absolutely none, unless it be
the pride of eccentricity. It is no uncommon circumstance for men to become
rich by the concentration of time and labor and attention to some one object of
profitable emplo)rment. This is the ordinary phase of money getting, as closing
the ear and pocket to applications for aid is that of money saving. Longworth
has become a rich man on a different principle. He appears to have started
upon the calculation that if he could put any individual in the way of making a
dollar for Longworth and a dollar for himself at the same time, by aiding him
with ground for a lot or in building him a house on it — and if, moreover, he
could multiply cases of the kind by hundreds or perhaps thousands, he would
promote his own interest just in the same measure as he was advancing those
of others. At the same time he could not be unconscious that while their half
was subdivided into small possessions, owned by a thousand or more individuals,
his half was a vast, a boundless aggregate, since it was the property of one man
alone. The event has done justice to his sagacity. Hundreds, if not thousands,
in and adjacent to Cincinnati, now own houses and lots and many have become
wealthy who would in all probability have lived and died as tenants under a
different state of case. Had not Mr. Longworth adopted this course he would
have occupied that relation to society which many wealthy men now sustain —
that of getting all they can and keeping all they get.*'

Mr. Longworth gave much in charity. He did not, however, believe that
any one had the right to dictate to him the manner in which his bequests should
be made or his aid given, and there were those who did not receive solicited
assistance who spoke harshly of him and his methods. Those who knew him
well, however, relate almost innumerable instances of his generosity and the
timely aid which he gave when he felt convinced that the cause was a worthy
one. He did not believe in the indiscriminate giving which fosters vagrancy or
idleness and he usually chose as the recipients of his bounty those whom he
thought that other people, even though charitably disposed, would be apt to
overlook. About the middle of the nineteenth century he acted as a super-
numerary township trustee and at stated hours his office was crowded with people
to the number of twenty, thirty or fifty, seeking aid. Into these cases he care-
fully examined, thus making liberal gift of his time and patience as well as his
means.

Mr. Longworth was public-spirited in an eminent degree and gave active aid
and cooperation to many movements which he believed would constitute ele-
ments in Cincinnati's growth and progress. On one occasion the question was
put to him concerning the terms for which he would sell the Mount Adams
property for observatory purposes. He asked no price but promptly made a
donation of the ground — four acres in extent — for that purpose. Then arose
a little incident which clearly indicated the nature of Mr. Longworth. An
assertion which appeared in one of the city papers after the building had been
completed intimated that Mr. Longworth was prompted by interested motives
— that his adjoining property would become more valuable because of the use



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CINCINNATI— THE QUEEN CITY 7

made of the land. Such an imputation was supremely ridiculous but Mr. Long-
worth resented the attack thus made upon him and caustically replied that if
the individual who wrote the article would deed the same quantity of ground
for an observatory he would himself put up a building equal to that which had
been erected upon Mount Adams and appropriate the spot thus vacated for
promenade grounds to be forever used by Cincinnati's citizens, adding that the
writer in such a case, according to his own deductions in relation to Mr. Long-
worth, must derive profit from the improvements of his adjacent property and
at the same time would confer a lasting public benefit on his fellow townsmen.
It is needless to say that no reply was made, and the original gift of the four
acres by Mr. Longworth remains today as an indication of his public spirit and
generosity. He was also the founder of the Cincinnati Art School, which re-
mains as another expression of his public spirit.

In many ways Cincinnati benefited by the efforts and influence of Mr. Long-
worth, in which connection a contemporary writer says: "Nor ought it to be
forgotten that Mr. Longworth's labors in the introduction of the grape and
improved cultivation of the strawberry, on which objects he has spent thousands
of dollars, he has made these fruits accessible to the means of purchase of every
man, even the humblest among us. How much more manly and spirited is this
than tempting the poor man with sight of luxuries he may look at but can never
expect to taste." Aside from the keen insight and aptitude for successful man-
agement which Nicholas Longworth displayed, he possessed considerable literary
ability, and again we quote from a former biographer, who said: "Mr. Long-
worth is a ready and a racy writer, whose vein of thinking and expression is
always rich and who blends pleasantry and wit with grave arguments and earnest
purposes. His writings on the strawberry and the grape and his various con-
tributions to the press abound with examples of this kind, recognizable here
as his at a single glance. His bon mots and quizzicalities are like his own
sparkling chaAipagne, brilliant and evanescent." Mr. Longworth indeed left the
impress of his individuality upon the city in which he resided for many years,
not only by reason of his business ability, which made him Cincinnati's most
wealthy resident, but also owing to his personal character. He wiay have been
eccentric but his ideas and his efforts were usually practical and accomplished
results which were beneficial and lasting and which perhaps others would not
have undertaken.

The representative of the family in the second generation to bear the same
name was Judge Nicholas Longworth, who for an extended period sat upon the
bench, his connection with the common pleas court being followed by election
to the supreme court of the state. He came to be known as one of the foremost
exponents of the law in Ohio. His birth occurred June .16, 1844, in this city,
his parents being Joseph and Annie (Rives) Longworth. Liberal educational
facilities were offered him and after graduating from Harvard College with
the class of 1866 he was matriculated in the Cincinnati Law School and in 1869
secured his admission to the bar. His university course had been completed
with high honors and served as an excellent foundation upon which to rest the
superstructure of his professional learning. He at once entered upon active
practice in Cincinnati and although advancement at the bar is proverbially slow,
he was not long in establishing himself in a foremost place as a capable exponent



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8 CINCINNATI— THE QUEEN CITY

of the law. He was seldom, if ever, at fault in the application of a legal prin-
ciple and his work in the courts was particularly free from judicial bias. There
was in him little of that variable and disturbing force which is sometimes the
expression of personal prejudice or previous study. Even in practice he weighed
carefully the evidence presented by his opponent and was therefore able to
meet his argument with a strong defense. In 1876 he was called to the bench of
the conmion pleas court, whereon he served for five years or until 1881, when
he was elected one of the supreme court judges of Ohio, filling that position
until 1883.

On October 3, 1866, Judge Longworth was united in marriage to Miss Susan
Walker, a daughter of Judge Timothy Walker and a granddaughter of Benja-
min Walker. Judge Walker was married first at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,
May 9, 1832. His first wife died in Cincinnati in 1834, and in this city, on the
nth of March, 1840, he married Eleanor Page Wood. Judge Walker was a
graduate of Harvard College of the class of 1827 and became a prominent lawyer
and jurist of Cincinnati, where he died January 15, 1856. Judge and Mrs.
Longworth became parents of a son and two daughters: Hon. Nicholas Long-
worth, Annie Rives and Clara Eleanor. The elder daughter was bom in Cin-
cinnati, December 10, 1870, and was married at Rookwood, the Cincinnati home
of the Longworths, June 3, 1902, to Buckner Ashby Wallingford, who is an
iron merchant of Pittsburg and a son of Buckner A. Wallingford, Sr., of Mays-
ville, Kentucky. The younger daughter was bom October 18, 1873, and was
married at Rookwood, Febmary 19, 1901, to Count Aldebert de Chambran, a
son of Marquis de Chambrun. He is a captain of artillery in the French army
and resides in Paris.

The death of Judge Longworth occurred January 18,. 1890, when he was in
the forty-sixth year of his age. Few men of his years attain so distinguished a
position at the bar. He was fearless in attack because his position was based
upon a comprehensive knowledge of the law, and a remarkable discernment
enabled him to readily understand the weak points in an adversary's cause.
However, he was not learned in the law alone. He possessed mechanical skill
and was equally proficient in music. Few have equal knowledge of the writings
of standard authors and his love of poetry was a paramount force in his life.
His acquaintance with the classics was most wide and his translation of Electra,
while preserving the pith of the original, makes Greek poetry readable even in
the English language.

Hon. Nicholas Longworth, the representative of the family in the present
generation, was bom in Cincinnati, November 5, 1869. Harvard was to him,
as to other members of the family, his alma mater and after winning his literary
degree, that of Bachelor of Arts, in 1891, he spent a year in the Harvard Law
School. His legal training, however, was completed in the Cincinnati Law
School and in 1894 he was admitted to the Ohio bar, after which he devoted
four years to the practice of law. Since 1898 he has figured prominently in
Ohio politics and in 1899 was elected to represent his district in the Ohio legis-
lature and afterward became a member of the senate. He was next sent from
the first Ohio district to the fifty-eighth congress and was reelected for a second
term. His time is now largely devoted to the management of his business in-
terests which have come to him as a part of the Longworth estate.



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CINCINNATI— THE QUEEN CITY 9

His marriage was one of the most brilliant social functions ever witnessed
in Washington. On the 17th of February, 1906, in the east room of the White
House, he wedded Miss Alice Lee, daughter of Theodore Roosevelt, the twenty-
sixth president of the United States.



JOSEPH SCHREIBER.



One of the older and well established undertaking establishments of Cin-
cinnati, is that located at 1910 Race street, which was founded by the late Joseph
Schreiber. He was bom in Darmstadt, Hesse, Germany, in 1828, and there he
was also reared, obtaining his education in the common schools. After laying
aside his text-books he was apprenticed to the cooper's trade, which he con-
tinued to follow during the remainder of his period of residence in the father-
land. In his early manhood he decided to become a citizen of the new world,
so took passage for the United States. Upon his arrival in this country he
located in Cincinnati, where he was for a time identified with the cooper's
trade. He subsequently engaged in the undertaking business, which proved to
be very successful from the start, and was the means of numbering Mr. Schreiber
among the capable business men and substantial citizens of the city. He was
in every sense of the word a self-made man, having arrived in this country
ignorant of the language and customs and with no capital save an inexhaustible
faculty for work and the courage that gave him the fortitude to meet every
misfortune and hardship with a brave heart and the unflinching determination
to proceed in the attainment of his ambition. No financial aid was ever rendered
him, other than that afforded every business man, while the influence and friends
who assisted in promoting the development of his enterprise were won through
the recognition of his sterling worth and many substantial qualities. In the
parental home in Germany there had been instilled into his youthful conscious-
ness an appreciation of thrift, industry and honesty as the most indispensable
assets in the acquirement of success, and thus was laid the foundation of Joseph
Schreiber's commercial career.

Mr. Schreiber married Mary Herberger and to them were born the following
children: Carrie, the deceased wife of John Heinrich, whose death occurred
September 11, 1909, at the age of fifty-eight years; Joseph, unmarried, who
passed away on the 25th of July, 1886, at the age of twenty-four years and six
months; Rosie, also unmarried, who died in June, 1910, at the age of forty-
three ; Louisa ; William A. ; Catherine ; Amelia ; and Matilda, who married J. P.
Morbrink.

Although he was ever most loyal in his allegiance to the United States in
both thought and deed, Joseph Schreiber never forgot the fatherland and main-
tained close relations with his fellow countrymen through the medium of his
membership in all of the German fraternal organizations of Cincinnati. In
religious faith he was a Roman Catholic, and belonged to St. John parish. He
passed away on the 26th of August, 1897, at the age of sixty-nine years.

William A. Schreiber, who is in charge of the business founded by his father
many years ago, has always conducted all of his transactions in such a manner



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10 CINCINNATI— THE QUEEN CITY

as to fully sustain the reputation given to the enterprise by its founder, who
was ever known to be loyal to every trust and thoroughly reliable. In the
acquirement of his education Mr. Schreiber attended the public schools of this
city, later matriculating at St. Joseph's College, from which institution he was
graduated with the class of 1886. Immediately after leaving college he became
associated with commercial activities, entering his father's business, which he
has now conducted for twenty-eight years. He married Miss Katherine Grieb,
a daughter of Joseph Grieb, a well known baker of Cincinnati. Mr. Schreiber
is a member of the Elm Street Club, and both he and his wife are communicants
of the Roman Catholic church.



THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY.

The Procter & Gamble Company ranks as one of the greatest and most
perfectly conducted manufacturing concerns of America, if not of the world.
This distinction has been gained by many years of skilful management and
today the products of its factories are recognized as standard wherever the
name is known. Practically three-quarters of a century has elapsed since the
company entered upon its career, the partners little dreaming at the outset that
the whole world would become the theater of their operations. Adapted in a
remarkable degree for the business, they resolutely applied themselves and,
notwithstanding the financial panics of 1857, 1873 and 1893 and temporary
reverses which are inevitable in the development of every important enterprise,
they bravely faced every obstacle and the great plant at Ivorydale stands as an
enduring monument to their genius and foresight.

In 1890 the firm of Procter & Gamble was incorporated as The Procter &
Gamble Company. The leading officers at the time of its incorporation were:
William A. Procter, president; James N. Gamble, first vice president; Harley
T. Procter, second vice president; David B. Gamble, secretary and treasurer;
Wm. Cooper Procter, general manager, all of whom represented the second
generation of the families in the business. Having been identified with the
business almost from their boyhood, they were well prepared at the outset to
take up the work which their fathers had so ably conducte4 and to carry it
forward upon even a larger scale than before had b^n "attempted. This mag-
nificent enterprise is a splendid example of achievement in the industrial world
through the combined efforts of men actuated by high ideals and working
harmoniously together for a common purpose. The Procter & Gamble Com-
pany is notable especially for its attention to the welfare of its employes — it
was the first in this section of the country to establish the Saturday half-
holiday throughout the year, and its efforts to devise a satisfactory plan of
profit sharing for its employes is known the country over.

The profit-sharing plan of the company, which has borne the test of a
number of years, has attracted great interest and it is believed by many students
of economic conditions that this system will ultimately be applied by leading
business organizations all over the country. Already its beneficial effects are



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WILLIAM PROCTER



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CINCINNATI— THE QUEEN CITY 13

to be witnessed in several of the states and a description of the plan and its
practical application cannot fail to be of general interest.

A profit-sharing plan was tried first in the factory of the firm of Procter &
Gamble in the year 1887; at that time it consisted, in effect, of a semi-annual
distribution of cash, in amount equal to a percentage of the employe's wages,
the rate of dividend being dependent upon the earnings of the firm; later, after
the incorporation of The Procter & Gamble Company, in 1890, the rate was
fixed the same as that paid upon the common stock of the company. The profit-
sharing plan at first was extended to all employes, but very soon was limited



Online LibraryCharles Frederic GossCincinnati, the Queen City, 1788-1912; → online text (page 1 of 99)