Copyright
Charles Henry Pope.

Loring genealogy : compiled from The chronicles or ancestral records of James Speare Loring, from his original manuscript in possession of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, by permission : from the manuscripts of John Arthur Loring, and from many other sources online

. (page 1 of 33)
Online LibraryCharles Henry PopeLoring genealogy : compiled from The chronicles or ancestral records of James Speare Loring, from his original manuscript in possession of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, by permission : from the manuscripts of John Arthur Loring, and from many other sources → online text (page 1 of 33)
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LORING GENEALOGY



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

Boston Public Library



http://www.archive.org/details/loringgenealogycOOpope




John Arthur Loring
One of the Compilers of this Work



LORING GENEALOGY



COMPILED FROM

"THE CHRONICLES OR ANCESTRAL RECORDS"
OF JAMES SPEARE LORING, FROM HIS ORIGINAL
MANUSCRIPT IN POSSESSION OF THE NEW ENG-
LAND HISTORIC GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, BY
PERMISSION; FROM THE MANUSCRIPTS
OF JOHN ARTHUR LORING, AND
FROM MANY OTHER SOURCES



BY

CHARLES HENRY POPE

assisted by
Katharine Peabody Loring



Cambridge, Massachusetts

MURRAY AND EMERY COMPANY

1917



•CSV/



Copyright, 1917
Bt

MUBRAT AND EmERY CoMPANY

Cambridge, Mas3.



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PREFACE

This Genealogy has quite a history. About the
year 1850 a Boston bookseller and publisher, James
Speare Loring, began to gather items of interest about
Lorings, and in process of time built up a history of the
descendants of Deacon Thomas Loring, who came from
England to America in 1634, writing out the records of
each of the deacon's four sons and carrying down the
Unes separately. Not completing it as he wished, at
his death in 1888 he bequeathed his manuscript to the
New England Historic Genealogical Society, by whose
permission we have pubHshed it. Some time later
Justice Wilham Caleb Loring, of Boston, borrowed the
manuscript and had it typewritten and bound in book
form; and it resumed its place on the shelves of the
Society. Afterward John Arthur Loring, master printer,
of Springfield, borrowed one of the copies Justice Loring
had made and indexed it very fully — typewritten —
and gave the volume back again for those interested to
peruse. But he went further; taking names of Lorings
from advertisements, letterheads and pubhc prints, in
addition to his own very wide circle of relations of the
blood, he revised the work of James Speare Loring and
did a very fine piece of compilation, extending the records
very much. When he found his health faiUng he hastened
eagerly to complete the work, and left it in what seemed
to him a stage very near the point of pubhcation. His
self-denying labors for the family came to an end in 1906,
and a decade passed before his dreams came true. Then
Charles Henry Pope was informed of the state of the
Book of the Lorings and was asked to take hold of the
enterprise. Mrs. John Arthur Loring was satisfied that
all would be properly done, when Miss Katharine Pea-



VI PREFACE

body Loring came forward with a proposition to purchase
the manuscript, and guaranteed its suitable pubhcation
under the editorship of Mr. Pope.

The latter copied all Loring births, marriages and
deaths found in the office of the Secretary of State of
Massachusetts, the transcripts of town and city records
since 1840, obtained addresses of Lorings in some five
hundred cities and towns from directories (in the hbrary
of Sampson & Murdock Company, Boston), sent out
circulars to the persons thus found and carried on an
extensive correspondence to get the largest practicable
roll of the family. This work has been done at the
charges and in accord with the ideas of Miss Loring
above mentioned, whose large experience in library and
other matters has made her service to the genealogy very
valuable. Thus the work has grown and rounded out
and gained in substance, till the latest returns from
Spain and additions to the "cradle-roU" have been
included, and the book is issued.

No one will ever know its Umitations and imperfections
as painfully as the editor, who has done his best to make
it perfect; some errors have crept in through other avenues;
in some cases the date of an occurrence has been stated
in two or three ways by members of a family and found
different from that in the public record; in others suc-
cessive letters of a correspondent have shown difference,
either with apology or in simple carelessness. Worse
than that, perhaps, have been the neglect and failure of
some of the family to reply to letters, circulars or verbal
requests for information. Such causes have left certain
groups of the family imperfectly described. But we
beheve the genealogy as a whole is well up to the average
of such works, and in certain parts has definite excellence.
The method of the work is that called "the Register
plan"; in the Introduction the subject of English Lorings
is treated by Miss Loring; then the story of Deacon
Thomas Loring, of Axminster, England, and Hingham
and Hull, Massachusetts, is presented, and after that his
children in the order of their birth, with their family



PREFACE vii

lists; daughters with whatever is known about them and
their issue are given, but each son who married is numbered
and his story carried forward, and then follow these
grandsons of Deacon Thomas in the order of their fathers'
birth and their own. So through the book, each genera-
tion is treated as a whole and not in four groups as the
earher compilers arranged them.

The substance of these earUer compilations has been
edited in the interest of fair treatment for the whole family
and restatement of many matters in the light of later
study. In one case a hundred and fifty typewritten
pages upon one man have been condensed into a single
page of print; in others extensive discourses on various
subjects have been omitted as not germane to this work.
Yet very many records have been copied and great honor
is due to the able and self-denying efforts of those who
laid the foundations of Loring Genealogy. It has not
been practicable to give separate credit to the authors
of the successive paragraphs; but all articles have been
subjected to the closest scrutiny and repeated examina-
tion. If definite errors are discovered in the book please
communicate them to Miss Katharine Peabody Loring,
Pride's Crossing, Massachusetts.



ILLUSTRATIONS

John Arthur Loring Frontispiece

Opposite
Page

Loring Coats of Arms xii

Loring Coat of Arms (in colors) xiv

Axminster, England xvi

The Farm at Tolsais in Axminster xvii

Axminster Church 2

Lexington Burying Ground 76

The Mansion of Commodore Joshua Loring 78

Joseph Loring 80

Benjamin Loring 82

Caleb Loring 96

Reverend Bailey Loring 114

Captain George Loring 140

Captain Solomon Loring 160

Mrs. Emma (Loring) Conant 160

Charles Greely Loring 166

Daughters of Major John Loring 218

Loring Pasha (General W. W. Loring) 228

Warden John Hayes Loring 252

Caleb WilHam Loring 262

Miss Katharine Peabody Loring 264

Miss Louisa Putnam Loring 264

Charles Greely Loring 266

Captain Benjamin William Loring 278

Captain John Loring 294

Deacon Ira Loring and sons John and Albert 306

Justice William Caleb Loring . 336

Augustus Peabody Loring 338

Charles Greely Loring, 3d 340

Colonel Edward P. Loring 358

Lieutenant-Colonel Walter Latham Loring 362

Major Charles Buxton Loring 362

ix



INTRODUCTION

It is pleasant and desirable to know about our ancestors,
and, sooner or later, every one has the wish to do so;
for membership in patriotic societies, careful investigation
is necessary, as family legends and unverified discoveries
are misleading. It is to provide a solid foundation
for enlarged studj^ of families of Loring that this book
is made. It deals only with the descendants of Thomas
who migrated from Axminster, Devonshire, in 1634.
Although its scope is strictly limited we record in this
introduction all that has been learned of Lorings in
England before the time of Thomas, in order to save
trouble for futm-e students and to suggest directions for
research.

Extracts from parish registers and probate records
in England show us the Founder of the Family as a farmer
and chiirch warden, but fail to establish his parentage
or ancestry.

For the origin of the name and for notices of early
Lorings, the reader is referred to the volumes of manu-
script by James Speare Loring and those of John Arthur
Loring in the library of the New England Historic Genea-
logical Society.

The first Loring seems to have been Robert, a poet,
mathematician and architect, who built the Cathedral
of Hereford and was made bishop of that see in 1279.
The next Loring of importance mentioned is Sir Pers
(Piers or Petrus), a very active citizen, knighted in the
reign of Henry III, and granted a coat of arms described:
"Quarterly argent et goules, et bend sable." He
married Jane Morteyn and had a son Roger, also knighted,
who married Cassandra, daughter of Reginald Perth.
His son was Sir Neell (Nele, Neale or Nigel) Loring,
who is the hero of Conan Doyle's historic novels,

xi



xii INTRODUCTION

"The White Company" and "Sir Nigel." A great deal
is known of him, the principal facts only are given here,
quoted from "The Stall Plates of the Kiiights of the
Order of the Garter," by Sir W. H. St. John Hope, Arnold
Coustable and Company, Ld., London, 1901, from which
the stall plate is copied.

Sir Neell was one of the first twenty- six knights of
the order founded by Edward III in 1348. His plate
is to be found in the twentieth stall on the north side
of St. George's Chapel at Windsor Castle. "A cut out
plate representing the shield, which is quarterly silver
and gules, a bend engrailed sable, with silver helm covered
with red mantling, Hned ermine, and surmounted by
the crest, a fine brush of feathers sable, encircled by a gold
band. On a scroll affixed to the lower edge of the plate
is inscribed:

Mons: Neell: Loryng: p'm: fund'""
(Monsieur Neell Loryng primus fundatorum).

"Sir Neel Lorying was son and heir of Roger Loryng
of Chalgrave in Bedfordshire, and was knighted for
his gallant conduct in the battle off Sluys in 1340. After
a life of great activity and devotion to his King and
Country, Sir Neell Loryng retired to his estate at Chal-
grave, and on his death in March, 1385-6, was buried
in the priory church of Dunstable. He married Margaret,
daughter and heir of Sir Ralph Beauple of Cnubeston,
County Devon, by whom he left two daughters." It
is known also that he was at the battle of Poictiers, 1356,
with the Black Prince, and afterwards at Bordeaux
in Gascony. In a book, title unknown, written to show
the claim of the Warren family to the earldom of Warren,
Sussex and Surrey, mention is made of arms and the fol-
lowing inscription on the lowest pillar of the north aisle of
the church at Oundle. The arms are very complicated and
do not resemble the other arms of the Lorings, except
that there are red quarterings and a " bend sable."





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INTRODUCTION xiii

HERE LYETH Y^ BODY OF WiLLIAM LORINGE, SECOND,

SONNE OF William Loringe of haymes in the coun :

OF GLOSTER ESQ. LINEALLY DESCENDED FROM THE
BROTHER OF Y® HONORABLE S'NeALL LoRINGE ONE OF YE
FOUNDERS OF Y^ NOBLE ORDER OF Y® GARTER HE TOOKE

TO WYFE Edith davghter of Thomas Warren of

SNOWSHILL IN THE COUNTY OF GLOSTER ESQ WHO IS
DESCENDED OF S'JoHN DE WaRREN SECOND SONNE OF
THE RIGHT HONORABLE JOHN Y® LAST EARL WaRREN
SURRY & SUSSEX BY WHOM HE HAD ISUE 5 SONNES
& 5 DAUGHTERS & DIED THE 6*^ DAY OF MARCH ANNO

DOMI. 1628
TO WHOSE MEMORIE EdITH HIS MOST SORROWFUL WYFE IN
TESTIFICATION OF HER EVERLASTING LOVE DOTH WITH
UNFAYNED TEARES CONSECRATE THIS MONUMENT.

No connection has been established between these
Bedfordshire Lorings and those of Devonshire, whence
Thomas came, though James Speare Loring remarks
about heraldry (page 389): ''That the Lorings of New
England were descendants of the race of Bedfordshire
is very probable for the reason that the arms of Sir Nele
Loryng have been hung up in their dwellings from the
time of their ancestor of Hingham to the present period."

''America Heraldica" gives the following crest for
the Chalgrave Lorings, "Out of a bowl or, five quills
erect, argent. Motto, Faire sans dire." This crest was
used by the late Admiral Sir John Wentworth Loring
of Southampton and the motto is added to the shield
of Sir Petrus, borne as coat of arms of the Lorings of
Spain. "In the case of the Marques de Casa Loring
and the Conde de Mieres, a coronet is added. Accord-
ing to Spanish heraldry, the arms of the Marques AmaHa
de Silvela, which were granted to AmaHa Loring, will be
those of the Loring family, even if the title goes to some
one who does not bear the Loring name." (From a
letter from the Conde de AlLriz, giving the information
of the family in Spain July, 1917.)

The extracts from parish records printed herewith



xiv INTRODUCTION

do not show anything of value as regards Thomas, but,
by following these clues, something may be found.

RECORDS OF LORINGS
FROM AXMINSTER PARISH, ENGLAND*

Copied for Misses Katharine Peabody Loring and

Louisa Putnam Loring by Mr. Cornish, of

Cedar House, Axminster

Note. The registers of Axminster parish begin in
1559 and extend to 1580; then there is a gap to 1648
for baptisms and burials and to 1695 for marriages.
Clerks were required to send copies of all records to the
office of the bishop of each diocese, and these transcripts
may exist at Exeter for the missing years. All that
Mr. Cornish obtained affords very slight material for
ascertaining the history of the Loring family, and gives
nothing that is certainly connected with the New England
pioneer family.

The name is spelled Loring, Loreing, Loringe,
Loren, Lowring, Loryng, etc.

Richard, son of John and AUce, buried Feb. 21, 1559-
1560.

Alice, wife of John, of Tolsais, buried April 24, 1560.

Agnes, daughter of Ehzabeth and William, buried
March 1, 1562-3.

Alice, daughter of John and Agnes, baptized Feb. 23,
1566-7.

Ahce, daughter of John (smith by trade) bapt. Oct. 10,
1568.

Joane, daughter of John of Tolsais, bapt. Oct. 18, 1568.

Gertrude, daughter of John of Tolsais, bapt. Mar. 24,
1570-1.

EU^n, daughter of John of Tolsais, baptized April 10,
1575.

Joane, daughter of Thomas, tailor, by trade, bapt.
May 12, 1575.

Alexander, son of Thomas, tailor, bapt. July 15, 1576.

John, son of Gyles and Agnes, bapt. Nov. 1, 1577.

* The farmstead of the family still to be seen, with the old house.




LoRiNG Coat of Arms



INTRODUCTION XV

Roger, son of John, at Tolsaiss, bapt. Sept. 7, 1577.
Notice the long gap.

Richard, son of Richard, bapt. Feb. 7, 1648-9.

Thomas, son of Edward and Mary, bapt. Feb. 9, 1648-9.

Hanna, daughter of John at Abbey Gate, bapt. Mar.
31, 1650.

Robert, son of Richard, buried April 20, 1650.

Richard, son of John of Bever, bapt. Aug. 17, 1650.

Richard, the elder, of Bever, buried Nov. 8, 1661.

Giles, son of Giles and Christian, buried July 12, 1670.

Mr. Cornish copied many other records of the years
long after Deacon Thomas Loring and his family had
come to New England, which afford no light whatever
on the origin of the American family.

We know that Deacon Thomas' son Thomas was born
about 1629; by that token we may estimate that Thomas,
the father, was born not far from 1600. His father may
have been born thirty years earlier, or about 1570.
Roger, son of John of Tolsaiss, baptized September 7,
1577, would have been old enough to have been father
of the father of Deacon Thomas, and may have died
before the commencement of extant records in 1648. Or
John, son of Gyles and Agnes, baptized November 1,
1577, may have been the person. Or, again, Alexander,
son of Thomas, the tailor, may have been that grand-
father of the American immigrant.

It is well to study the registers of adjacent or neighbor-
ing parishes in Devonshire and Dorsetshire; since Ax-
minster may have been the residence of oiu* Deacon
Thomas for only a short time before coming across the
Atlantic, while he and his wife may have been born
some distance from that parish.

The early transcripts of Devonshire have been printed
since the above research was made. In the Axminster
items we find several of interest.

William Lorynge, Thatcher, buried July 24, 1606-7.
(See administration, page xix.)

John, son of Edward Lorynge, Smyth, baptized June
25, 1614. The same, buried . . . July 13, 1614.



xvi INTRODUCTION

Thomas, son of Thomas Loringe, baptized Mar. 27,
1624-5; buried Mar. 30, 1624-5.

Thomas, son of Thomas Loring, baptized Mar. 5, 1625-6.

John, son of Thomas Loren, baptized Dec. 27, 1629-
1630.

Thomas Lorin was one of the church wardens who
signed the register-transcript for the year 1629-1630.
(Evidence of his full accord with the church at that
time.)

Edward, son of Edward Loring, baptized July 30, 1625.

Giles, son of Richard Loring, baptized Apr. 1, 1626.

Thomas, son of Nichollas Loering, baptized Nov. 26,
1634.

Christian, daughter of John Loringe, baptized Oct. 18,
1635.

These complete the records of the parish of Axminster
relating to the Loring family, now extant. They fail
to show the parentage of Deacon Thomas Loring, the
founder of the American family. That can be discovered
only by search of the registers of a number of adjacent
parishes in Devonshire and the neighboring counties
of Dorset and Somerset, and by wills of persons of the
name, and related famihes, Newtons, and others. De-
liberate study on the ground is very likely to result in
much of interest. The following have been obtained
by a scion of the family, Mr. Conant, and are given
here as a contribution to the full study which may be
made.

Philip Lorynge was a witness to a will at Woodland
Abbots, 20 June, 1412. (Somerset Record Society, vol.
16, Mediaeval Wills.)

John Loryng had a bequest of ''a blew gowne furred,"
and his wife Sybil one of 3 silver spoons, in the will of
Thomas Ashcombe, of St. Clement Danes, London,
Oct. 6, 1460.

John Lorijng, rector of St. Andrews, Hereford Hundred,
in 1524. (Herts, ii: p. 169.)




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INTRODUCTION xvii

ABSTRACTS OF WILLS OBTAINED IN EXETER,
ENGLAND

By Mr. C. A. Hoppin, for Mr. Fred Odell Conant,
OF Portland, Me.

Richard Loringe of Axminster, Devon, husbandman.
Will, 13 Dec. 1619. I doe wholye comend my soule unto
almightye god, beleivinge undoubtedlye to be partaker
of Joyes Eternall purchased by the bloude of o' Saviour
the Sonne of god And my bodye to be buryed at the
pleasure of myne Executrix.

To youngest sonne Richard; he shall have my grounde
at Bever called Southe ffeildes aboute tenne akers

To my daughter Garthred £ 20 in 3 yeares

To my son Edward 10^ To my daughter Margrett
Marcombe* 10^ To my daughter Alice Actkjnis 10'
and there children all of them to have xU d All the
residue unto my wife Ehzabeth Loringe executrix
Overseers: Wilham ffrenche The marke of

John Gilles Richard Loring

Probated 9 ffebry 1619 Inventory annexed xliii li-xiiii
s - X d (Archdeaconry of Exeter.)

Elizabethe Loringe of Axminster. widowe.

In the name of god Amen xxviiith October 1623

To Richard Loringe my sonne the standinge bedsteed
in the chamber.

after his decease to his sonne John Loringe my godsonne

To Ellen Loringe my daughter in Lawe one pillowe and
one apron

To my sonne in lawe Richard parsons one standing bed-
steed and another bed in the parlor, one table bord a cup-
borde, a cheste and a forme in the haule. halfe a dosen
of peuter vessells, my beste brasse crocke.my best brasse
panne.Two barrells.one Trendell.one great bruinge vat.

To margrett marcombe my daughter my beste brasse
caldron and my beste gowne

*Robert Morcombe Gent and Margaret Lorynge were married at
Axminster, Devon, March 19, 1606-7. (Lost Parish Registers of Devon.]



xviu INTRODUCTION

To Robert marcombe (my sonne in lawe) daughters
Margrett and Elisabeth all goods wch 1 have by vertue
of a certaine wrightinge sealed and confirmed unto me
from him.

To Alice Atkyns my daughter my beste peticotte . one
double kerchiffe.

To Mary Atkyns my beste partlett

To Silles Atkyns Three sonnes xii apece.

To Margrett my sonne Edwards wyfe one smocke

To Gartrude Parsons my daughter one peere of sheets
and one pere of pillow-wtyes. one double kerchife Residue
to Edward my sonne executor, overseers Wm Vynecom
and Wm ffrenche.

Probated 15 January 1623 Inventory annexed. 12 li-7
s- 8 d. (Archdeaconry of Exeter.)

Roger Loring of Axminster, yeoman. Unto the
poore people of Axminster 13 s 4 d Unto Robert Scotte,
clerk, my sisters sonne, £ 10 within one yeare

Unto my kinsman John Scotte 20 s 1 doe owe my
kinsman Cheritie Loaring £ 6-12 s due May third next:
1 bequeath him £ 3-8s & that to be paied the whole £ 10.
within one yeare.except he be payed the sayed six
pounds and twelve shillings in the meane time.
To my kinsman Benet Loaring als Turner 10 s
To my kinswoman Temperance Hawker 20 s
To my kinsman Richard Crowe 6 s 8 d
To my brother Hawkins his daughter 20 s
To my brother Sprakes two daughters 20 s apeece and
his sonne Jasper 10 s. To Alexander Wades foure
children 5 s apeece To my kinsmen Zacharie and
Priamus Paule 20 s apeece To all my godchildren 12 d
apeece . To the widow Wade my wives mother in lawe 10 s.
Residue to Joane Loaring my wif executrix.
Hand and seale 23 Aug 1623. Witnesses :

William Knoles clerk
Inventory £ 150-13-1. Thomas Chasse

Probated vii Sept. 1623 Robert Scotte clerk

(Archdeaconry of Exeter.) Joane Hacker




TOLSAIS

Ancient seat of the Lorings near Axminster



INTRODUCTION XIX

Administration granted on estate of William Loringe
of Axminster, deceased to Thomazine Sauvage of Ax-
minster, widow of deceased, 6 Aug 1606. Tristram
Powning of Sydberie Devon surety on her bond.

(Archdeaconry of Exeter.)

(See ''WilHam Lorynge, Thacher" page xv ante.)

To Dr. Johnson is attributed the saying: "The most
difficult thing in the world. Sir, is to get possession of
a fact — ." This justifies the long and careful labor of Mr.
Pope and others in compifing this book.

Katharine Peabody Loring.

Pride's Crossing, Massachusetts
September, 1917.



LORING GENEALOGY



FIRST GENERATION

1. Deacon Thomas Loring, founder of the American
family, was born at Axminster, Devonshire, England.
So much his grandson. Rev. Israel Loring, learned from his
father and left on record. But neither the name of his
father, mother or any ancestor has come down to us. As we
have seen on previous pages, the parish registers of Axmin-
ster are sadly defective and wills thus far examined fail to
show the origin of the pioneer. It is matter of great sat-
isfaction that the fragmentary records exhibit the man as
one of the wardens of the parish, and so dispel any notion
that he came here in any quarrel with the mother church
as so many of the colonists did; from a life of fellowship
with the congregation where he had lived he came to a new
coxmtry and joined with the Congregational church, the
only organization of Christian people here, so continuing
in brotherly love with good people everywhere.

Thomas Loring married, in England, Jane Newton; her
grandson, aheady quoted from, says ''she was a woman of
a lively spirit, . . . skilled in the practise of physick,"
which shows that she was above the average in the com-
munity and useful to her neighbors. Her ancestry is thus
far unknown to her descendants. There were other
persons of the name in Axminster, as the registers show,
but no token of relationship. Mr. Loring came here.
Rev. Israel affirms, "December 23, 1634," and joined
the church colony at Hingham, which had come from Hing-
ham, Norfolkshire, under the lead of an Independent
minister, Rev. Robert Peck. Admitted "freeman" or
citizen of the colony March 3, 1635-6, he was already

1



I LORING GENEALOGY

established on a home lot near what is now the corner
of Town and Ship Streets. He became the proprietor
of other lots at later times. He was a farmer. As the
fish that abounded along the shore furnished a large part
of the food of the inhabitants, and were also '' set " with
the corn to enrich the soil, Deacon Loring and his neigh-
bors, by permission of the town in 1637, built a weir to
catch this floating wealth ; and the stream is called today
Weir River. He was an innkeeper, too, perhaps the
first in the plantation, licensed by the General Court
along with some from other towns in March, 1637. To
show how careful the people were to have proper per-
sons to entertain man and beast, especially when in-
toxicating drinks were sold in the inns, an extract from
the records of the General Court may be given :

WilHam Clark, who lived on the border of Salem and
Lynn, kept public house. After his death his widow
applied for renewal of the license; the court licensed
her to ''keep the inn and sell wine, if she provide a fit
man that is godly for the business." Such sentiment



Online LibraryCharles Henry PopeLoring genealogy : compiled from The chronicles or ancestral records of James Speare Loring, from his original manuscript in possession of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, by permission : from the manuscripts of John Arthur Loring, and from many other sources → online text (page 1 of 33)