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LONDON: CHAPMAN AND HALL, 193, PICCADILLY.



THE DALTONS



THREE ROADS IN LIFE.




•3^i«.






i^



THE DALTONS



THREE KOADS IN LIFE.



CHARLES LEVER

L'THOK or THE "KNIGHT Ol C AV Y N N E." " R O L A N J» <:ASrM. I„" ScV.



WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY PHIZ.



IN I'WO VOLUMES.
VOL. II.



LONDON :

CHAPMAN AND HALL, 193, PICCADILLY

1852.






CONTENTS OF VOL. II.



CHAPTER I. PAGE
A Last Scenf, 1

II.
A Package or Letters 10

III.
A Happy Day FOR Peter Dalton 25

IV.
" Madame de Heidendorf" 33

4

~NJ "At Vienna" 37

rS VL

\\J Priestly Counsels J4

VII.
^ Secrets of Head and Heart .52

0*" D'Esmonde's Letter 65

IX.

" The Cadet von Dalto.n" 72



1=



X.

l/>^ "Vienna" 82

XI.
"The March" .97

XII.
" The Skirmish" .106

xin.

" A Villa AND its Company" 119

XIV.
Peter Dalton on Politics, Law, .vnd Socialities 129

XV.
Nelly's Trials 142

XVI.
" An Act of Settlement" 149

XVII.
" The Cdrsaal" 161

XVIII.
The Last Stake of all 180

XIX.
Nell 's Sorkows . . . . • 193



VI CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XX. PAGE

A Last Adieu 200

XXI.
The Tvrol Journev 203

XXU.
"Florence" 210

xxin.

Priestcraft 225

XXIV.

Tiik " Moskova'" 233

XXV.

" Valeggio" 241

XXVI.

"Plots. Politics, AN u Priestcraft" 257

XXVII.
A ISecret, and a Snare 269

XXVIII.
A " Sad Exit" 279

XXIX.

" The Summons" 284

XXX.
"Inistioge" 289

XXX r.

" The Manor House of Corrig O'Neal"' 295

xxxn.

" The Eoee" . . s 305

XXXIH.
" A Talk over ' Bygones' " 313

XXXIV.
" The Gaol" 318

XXXV.
" A Fencing Match" 321

XXXVI.
" A Step in Vain" 325

XXXVII.

" The Court-house of Kilkenny" 329

xxxvni.

" The Retribution" 346

XXXIX.
"The End" 354



Envoy 358



LIST OF PLATES.-VOL II.



TAGK

Mrs. Eicketts" •' Evening at Home" disturbed 8

Frank visits his Uncle 18

The Princess and thk Cauet ......... 40

A Discovery 55

The Writing-Lesson 79

Teaching the Old Jm:\ now to shoot 92

The Barricade 110

The Benediction 123

ZoE " overcome" 13.")

ZoE doing the Affectionate and Ma TERNAi 151

Abel NARROWLY ESCAPES caning 171

The Queen of Sheba, etc., retires from the Banquet . . . . 186

The Funeral 201

The Journey 203

Lola and D'Esmonde 236

The Wounded Soldier 251

Alfred siaking Choice of a Wedding Garjient 268

Norwood's Exit 284

Black Sam recognised at the Fair 305

The Return TO THE " Ould" Country 310

The Coat 341

Retribution 353



THE DALTOJ^S;



THREE EOADS U LIFE.



CHAPTER I.

LAST SCEN



One last glance at the Mazzarini Palace, and we leave it for ever.

Seated in the drawing-room, where Lady Hester once held sway, in
the very chair around which swarmed her devoted courtiers and admirers,
3Irs. Ricketts now reclined, pretty much on the same terms, and with
probably some of the same sentiments, as Louis Blanc, or his friend
Albert, might have experienced on finding themselves domesticated
within the Palace of the Luxembourg. They were, so to say, parallel
circumstances. There had been a great reverse of fortune, an abdication,
and a flight. The sycophants of the day before were the masters now,
and none disputed the pretensions of any bold enough to assume dicta-
tion. To be sure, j\L's. Ricketts' rule, like Ledru Rollin's, was but a
Provisional Government ; for already the bills for an approaching sale of
everj^thing were posted over the fi'ont of the Palace, and Racca Mor-
lache's people were cataloguing every article with a searching accuracy,
very tormenting to the beholders.

From some confused impression that they were friends of Lady Hester,
and that ;^L•s. Ricketts' health was in a precarious condition, Sir Stafford
gave orders that they should not be molested in any way, but permitted
to prolong their stay to the latest period compatible with the arrange?



2 THE DALTONS ; OR,

ment for sale. A sense of gratitude, too, mingled with these feelings ;
for Mrs. Ricketts had never ceased to indite euphuistic notes of inquiry
after George himself, — send presents of impracticable compounds in paste
and preserves, together with, bottles of mixtures, lotions, embrocations,
and liniments, — one tithe of which would have invalided a regiment.
Grounsell, it is true, received these civilities in a most unworthy spirit ;
called her " an old humbug," with a very unpolite expletive annexed to
it ; and all but hurled the pharmacopoeia at the head of the messenger.
Still, he had other cares too pressing to suffer his mind to dwell on such
trifles ; and when Onslow expressed a wish that the family should not be
disturbed in their occupancy, he merely muttered, " Let them stay, and
be d — d ;" and thought no more of them.

Now, although the Palace was, so to speak, dismantled, the servants
discharged, the horses sent to livery for sale, the mere residence was
convenient for Mrs. Ricketts. It afforded a favourable opportimity for
a general "doing up" of the Villino Zoe — a moment for which all her
late ingenuity had not been able to proA-ide. It opened a convenient
occasion, too, for supplying her own garden with a very choice collec-
tion of flowers from the Mazzarlni — fuschias, geraniums, and orchidse,
being far beyond all the inventorial science of Morlache's men; and
lastly, it conferred the pleasing honour of dating all her despatches to
her hundred correspondents, from the Palazzo Mazzarini, where, to oblige
her dear Lady Hester, she was still lingering — " Se sacHJicando" as
she delighted to express it, " ai doveri dell' amicizia.^' To these cares
she had now vowed herself a martyr. The General believed in her
sorrows ; Martha would have sworn to them ; and not a whit the less
sincerely, that she spent hours in secreting tulip roots and hyacinths,
while a deeper scheme was in perpetration — no less than to substitute a
copy of a Gerard Dow for the original, and thus transmit the genius
of the Ricketts' family to a late posterity. Poor Martha would have
assisted in a murder at her bidding, and not had a suspicion of its being
a crime !

It was an evening " at home to her few most intimate friends,"
when Mrs. Ricketts, using the privilege of an invahd, descended to the
drawing-room in a costume which united an ingenious compromise
between the habit of waking and sleeping. A short tunic, a kind of
female monkey-jacket, of faded yellow satin edged with swansdown,
and a cap of the same material, whose shape was borrowed from that
worn by the Beefeaters, formed the upper portion of a dress, to which
wide fvir boots, with gold tassels, and a great hanging pocket, like a
sabretasche, gave a false air of a military costume. " It was singular,"
she would remark, with a bland smile, "but very becoming !" Besides,



THBEE ROADS IN LIFE. 3

it suited every clime. She used to come down to breakfast in it at
AVindsor Castle ; " the Queen liked it;" the Bey of Tripoli loved it; and
the Hospodar of Wallachia had one made for himself exactly from the
pattern. Her gviests were the same party we have already introduced
to our reader in the Villino Zoe — Haggerstone, the Pole, and Foglass,
being the privileged few admitted into her august presence, and who
came to make up her whist-table, and offer their respectful homage on
her convalescence.

The Carnival was just over, the dull season of Lent bad begun, and
the Ricketts' tea-table was a resom-ce when nothing else offered. Such
was the argument of Haggerstone as he took a cheap dinner with Fo-
glass at the Luna.

" She's an infernal bore. Sir — that I know fully as well as you can
inform me — but please to tell me who isn't a bore?" Then he added, in
a lower voice, " Certainly it ain't you !"

'* Yes, yes — I agree with you," said Foglass ; '-'she has reason to be
sore about the Onslows' treatment."

" I said a bore, Sir — not sore," screamed out Haggerstone.

" Ha !" replied the other, not understanding the correction. '' I re-
member one day, when Townsend "

"D — n Townsend!" said Haggerstone.

" No, not Dan — Tom Townsend. That fellow who was always with
Mathews."

" Walk a little quicker, and you may talk as much balderdash as you
please," said the other, buttoning up his coat, and resolving not to pay
the slightest attention to bis companion's agreeability.

" Who is here?" asked Haggerstone, as he followed the servant up
the stairs.

"Nobody but Count Petrolaffsky, Sir."

" Un Comte a boh compte," muttered Haggerstone to himself, always
pleased when he could be sarcastic, even in soliloquy. " They'll find it
no easy matter to get a tenant for this house now-a-days. Florence is
going down, Sir, and wUl soon be little better than Boulogne-sur-Mer."

" Very pleasant, indeed, for a month in summer," responded Foglass,
who had only caught up the last word. " Do you think of going
there?"

" Going there !" shouted out the other, in a voice that made miscon-
ception impossible. " About as soon as I should take lodgings in Wap-
ping for country air!"

This speech brought them to the door of the drawing-room, into
which Haggerstone now entered, with that peculiar step which struck
him as combining the jaunty slide of a man of fashion with the martial
tread of an old soldier.

b2



4 THE DALTONS ; OB,

" Ha ! my old adherents — all my faithful ones !" sighed Mrs.
Ricketts, giving a hand to each to kiss; and then, in a voice of deep
emotion, she said, "Bless you both! May peace and happiness be
beneath your roof-trees ! Joy sit beside your hearth!"

Haggerstone reddened a little ; for however alive to the ludicrous in
his neighbours, he was marvellously sensitive as to having a part in the
piece himself.

" You are looking quite yourself again," said he, bluntly.

" The soul, indeed, is unchanged ; the spirit "

" What's become of Purvis?" broke in Haggerstone, who never gave
any quarter to these poetic flights.

" You'll see him presently. He has been so much fatigued and
exhausted by this horrid police investigation, that he never gets up till
late. I've put him on a course of dandelion, and acoxute, too ; the first
effect of which is always unpleasant."

Leaving Foglass in conclave with the hostess, Haggerstone now ap-
proached the Count, who had four several times performed his toilet
operation of running his hands through his hair, in expectation of being
addressed.

" How d'ye do — any piquet lately ?" asked the Colonel, half cava-
lierly.

" As if I was tinking of piquet, wid my country in shains ! How
you can aske me dat?"

" What did you do with Norwood t'other night ?" resumed the other,
in a voice somewhat lower.

"Won four hundred and fifty — but he no pay!"
"Nor ever will."

" What you say? — not pay me what I wins !"
" Not a sous of it."

" And dis you call English Noblemans — Pair d'Angleterre !"
" Hush ! Don't be carried away by your feelings. Some men, Nor-
wood won't pay, because he doesn't know them. There are others he
treats the same w^ay, because he does know them — very equitable, eh?"
The observation seemed more inteUigible to the Pole than polite, for
he bit his lip and was silent, while Haggerstone went on :

"He's gone, and that, at least, is a point gained ; and now that these
Onslows have left this, and that cur Jekyl, we may expect a little quiet-
ness for awhile at least; but here comes Purvis." And that worthy indi-
vidual was led in on Martha's arm, a large green shade over his eyes,
and his face plentifully sprinkled with flour.

" What's the matter with you, man? You're ' got up' like a ghost
in a melodrama."

" They've taken all the cuti — cuti — cuti— — "



THREE ROADS I>' LIFE. 5

" Call it skin, Sir, and go on."

" Sk — skin off my face with a lin — liniment," cried he, '•' and I could
sc — scream out with pain whenever I speak I"

"Balm of marigolds, with the essential oil of crab-apple," said
Martha, " I made it myself."

" I wish to Hea— Heaven you had tr — tried it too," whispered he.

" Brother Scroope, you are ungrateful," said Mrs. Ricketts, with the
air of a Judge, charging. " The vicissitudes of temperature, here, require
the use of astringents. The excessive heat of that police-court "

" By the way, how has that affair ended ?" asked Haggerstone.

" I'll tell you," screamed out Purvis, in a burst of eagerness.
" They've fi — fi — fined me a hundred and f — f — fifty scudi for being
w — where I never was, and fighting somebody I n — never saw."

" You got off cheaply. Sir. I've known a man sentenced to the galleys
for less ; and with a better character to boot," muttered he to himself.

" Lord Norwood and the rest said that I was a pr — pr — principal,
and he swore that he found me hiding in a cave."

" And did he so ?"

" Yes ; but it was only out of curi — curi — curi "

" Curiosity, Sir, like other luxuries, must be paid for ; and, as you
seem a glutton, your appetite may be expensive to you."

" The mystery remains unsolved as to young Onslow, Colonel ?" said
Mrs. Ricketts, half in question.

" I believe not, Madam, The explanation is very simple. The
gallant Guardsman, having heard of Guilmard's skill, preferred being
reported ' missing' to ' killed,' having previously arranged with Norwood
to take his place. The price was, I fancy, a smart one — some say five
thousand, some call it ten. Whatever the amount, it has not been paid,
and Norwood is furious."

"But the accident?"

" As for that. Madam, nothing more natural than to crack your skull
when you lose your head." And Haggerstone drew himself up with the
proud consciousness of his own smartness.

"Then of course the poor young man is ruined ?" observed Martha.

" I should say so. Madam — utterly ruined. He may figure on the
Committee of a Polish Ball, but any other society would of course
reject him." This was said to obtain a sneer at Petrolaffsky, without
his being able to guess why. " I believe I may say, without much fear
of contradiction, that these Onslow,-^ .. .re all humbugs ! The old
Banker's wealth, my Lady's ^-efinement, tb Guardsman's spirit, were all
in the same category — downright humbugs ! '

" How he hates us — how he detests the ar stocracy," said Mrs Ricketts,
in a whisper to the Pole.



6 THE DALTOXS J OK,

"And de Dalton — what of her? — is she millionaire?" asked Petro-
laffsky.

" The father a small shopkeeper in Baden, Sir ; children's toys, nut-
crackers, and paper-knives being the staple of his riches, Foglass can
tell you all about it. He wants to hear about those Daltous," screamed
he into the deaf man's ear.

" Poor as Job — hasn't sixpence — Uves 'three-pair back,' and dines
for a ' zwarmger.' Lame daughter makes something by cutting heads
for canes and umbrellas. He picks up a trifle about the hotels."

"Ach Gott! and I was so near be in loaf wid de sister !" muttered
the Pole.

" She is likely to d— d — do better, Count," cackled in Purvis. " She's
caught her Tartar — ha, ha, ha !"

" MidchikoflF doesn't mean marriage, Sir, depend upon it," said Hag-
gerstone.

*' Martha, leave the room, my dear," said Mrs. Ricketts, bridling.
" He could no more relish a pleasure without a vice, than he could dine
without caviare."

" But they are be — be — betrothed," cried Purvis. "I saw a letter
with an account of the ceremony. Mid — chikoff fitted up a beautiful
chapel at his YiUa, and there was a Greek priest came sp — special from
3I_M—M— Moscow ''

" I thought you were going to sav from the Moon, Sir ; and it would
be almost as plausible," croaked Haggerstone.

" I saw the letter. It wasn't shown to me, but I saw it ; and it was
that woman from Breslau gave her away."

"What! old Madame Heidendorf? She has assisted at a great
many similar ceremonies before. Sir."

" It was the Emperor sent her on purpose," cried Purvis, very angry
at the disparagement of his history.

" In this unbelieving age. Sir, I must say that yoiu* fresh innocence
is charming; but permit me to tell you that I know old Caroline
Meersburg — she was sister of the fellow that stole the Archduke
Michel's dress sword, at the court ball given for his birthday. I have
known her five-and-thirty years. You must have met her, Madam, at
Lubetskoy's, wlien he was 3Iinister at Naples, the year after the battle
of Marengo."

" I was wearing trousers with frills to them, and hunting butterflies
at that time," said Mi"S. Ricketts, with a great effort at a smile.

" I hav'n't a doubt of it. Madam." And then muttered to himself,
*' And if childishness mean youth, she will enjoy a perpetual spring !"

" The ceremony," resumed Purvis, very eager to relate his story,



THKEE ROADS IN LITE. 7

"was dr — droll enough; they cut off a — a — a — lock of her hair, and
tied it up with one of his."

" A good wig spoiled !" croaked Haggerstone.

" They then brought a b — b — b "

" A baby, Sir."

'* No, not a b — baby, a b — basin — a silver basin — and they poured
water over both their hands."

" A ceremony by no means in accordance with Russian prejudices,"
chimed in Haggerstone. " They know far more of train oil and bears'
fat than of brown Windsor !"

" Not the higher nobility, Colonel — not the people of rank," objected
Mrs. Ricketts.

" There are none such, Madam. I have lived in intimacy with them
all, fix)m Alexander downwards. You may dress them how you please,
but the Cossack is in the blood. Raw beef and red breeches are more
than instincts with them ; and, except the Poles, they are the dirtiest
nation of Europe."

" 'What you say of Polen ?" asked Petrolaffsky.

" That if oil could smooth down the acrimony of politics, you ought
to be a happy people yet, Sir."

" And we are a great people dis minet. Hav'n't we Urednfrskioctsch,
de best General in de world ; and Krakouventkay, de greatest poet ; and
Vladoritski, de most distinguish pianist ?"

'•' Keep them, Sir, with all their consonants ; and Heaven give you
luck with them," said Haggerstone, turning away.

" On Tuesday ; no. We — Wednesday next they are to set out for St.
P — P — Petersburg. And when the Emperor's leave is gr — granted,
then ]VIidchikoff is to follow ; but not before."

"An de tyrant no grant de leave," said the Pole, gnashing his teeth
and grasping an imaginary dagger in his wrath. " More like he send
her to work in shains, wid my beautiful sister and my faders."

" He'll have more important matters to think of soon. Sir," said
Haggerstone, authoritatively. " Europe is on the eve of a great con-
vulsion. Some Kings and Kaisers will accept the Chiltern Hundreds
before the year's out."

" Shall we be safe, Colonel, here ? Ought Martha and I "

" Have no fears, Madam ; age commands respect, even from Huns
and Croats. And were it otherwise, 3Iadam, where would you fly to ?
France will have her own troubles, England has the income-tax, and
Germany will rake up some old grievance of the Hohenstaufen, or the
Emperor Conrad, and make it a charge against Prince 3Ietteniich and
the Diet ! It's a very rascally world altogether, and out of Tattersall's



THE DALTONS ; OR,

yard I never expect to hear of honesty or good principles ; and, apropos
to nothing, let us have some piquet, Count."

The table was soon got ready, and the players had just seated them-
selves, when the sound of carriage-wheels in the court attracted their
attention.

" What can it mean, Scroope ? Are you quite certain that you said

1 wouldn't receive to-night?"

" Yes ; I told them what you b— bade me ; that if the Archduke
called "

"There, you needn't repeat it," broke in Mrs. Ricketts, for certain
indications around Haggerstone's mouth showed the sense of ridicule
that was working within him.

" I suppose, Madam, you feel somewhat like poor Pauline, when she
said that she was so beset with Kings and Kaisers she had never a
moment left for good society ?"

" You must say positively, Scroope, that I admit no one this evening."

" The Signor Morlache wishes to see you, Madam," said a servant.
And close behind him, as he spoke, followed that bland personage, bow-
ing gracefully to each as he entered.

" Sorry — most sorry — Madam, to intrude upon your presence ; but
the Prince Mldchikoff desires to have a glance at the pictures and deco-
rations before he goes away from Florence."

" Will you mention to him that to-morrow, in the afternoon, about
five or "

" He leaves this to-morrow morning, Madam ; and if you could "

But before the Jew could finish his request the door was flung wide,
and the great Midchikoff entered, with his hands in his coat-pockets,
and his glass in one eye. He sauntered into the room with a most pro-
found imconsciousness that there were people in it. Not a glance did
he even bestow on the living figures of the scene, nor did a trait of his
manner evince any knowledge of their presence. Ranging his eyes
over the walls and the ceilings, he neither noticed the martial attitude
of Haggerstone, or the graceful undulations by which Mrs. Ricketts was,
as it were, rehearsing a curtsey before him.

" Originals, but all poor things, Morlache," said the Prince. And,
really, the observation seemed as though uttered of the company rather
than the pictures.

" Mrs. Ricketts has been good enough, your Highness " began

the Jew.

" Give her a Napoleon," said he, listlessly ; and turned away.

" My sister, Mrs. Ricketts — Mrs, M — M — Montague Ricketts," began
Scroope, Avhose habitual timidity gave way under the extremity of pro-



THREE ROADS IK LIFE. y

vocation. And the Prince turned slowly round, and surveyed the
speaker and the imposing form that loomed behind him.

" Tell them that I don't mean to keep any establishment here,
3Iorlache." And with this he strolled on, and passed into another room,
while, like as in a tableau, the others stood speechless with rage and
indignation.

" He took you for the housekeeper. Ma'am," said Haggerstone,
standing up with his back to the fire — " and a housekeeper out of



" Martha, where 's the General ? Where is he, I say ?" cried Mrs.



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