Charles John Shore Teignmouth.

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SSTY OF
T LOS ANGE




MEMOIR

OF

THE LIFE AND CORRESPONDENCE

OF

JOHN LORD TEIGNMOUTH.

IN TWO VOLUMES.
VOL. II.



MEMOIR



OF



THE LIFE



AND



CORRESPONDENCE



OF



JOHN LORD TEIGNMOUTH.



BY HIS SON,
LORD TEIGNMOUTH.



VOL. II.



LONDON:
HATCHARD AND SON.

MDCCCXLIII.



LONDON : I'KINTEU BY KICIIAUP WATTS,
CKOWN COIUIT, TKMrT.K BAK.



^.



T-^-f



CONTENTS



THE SECOND VOLUME.



CHAPTER XIV. P^,

ARRIVAL AND RECEPTION IN ENGLAND RESIDES IN LONDON

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF HIS SERVICES BY THE COURT OF DIREC-
TORS RESIDES IN DEVONSHIRE COMMENCES MEMOIR OF

SIR W. JONES DECLINES OFFICIAL EMPLOYMENT CORRE-
SPONDENCE ON THE QUESTION OF PEACE THE INSTITUTION

OF THE COLLEGE AT FORT-W^ILLIAM, AND OTHER SUBJECTS —
RETURNS TO LONDON 1

CHAPTER XV.

RESIDES AT CLAPHAM SOCIETY AND PURSUITS NOMINATED

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE RECEIVES A CHALLENGE — CONTRIBU-
TIONS TO THE CHRISTIAN OBSERVER — THEOLOGICAL OPINIONS
ACTIVE INTEREST IN PUBLIC AFFAIRS APPOINTED VICE-
LIEUTENANT OF SURREY PREPARATIONS AGAINST FRENCH

INVASION ORIGIN AND FORMATION OF THE BRITISH AND

FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY LORD TEIGNMOUTH APPOINTED ITS

PRESIDENT 35

CHAPTER XVI.

PUBLICATION OF THE MEMOIRS OF SIR WILLIAM JONES — MOHAWK

TRANSLATION OF ST. JOHN's GOSPEL FIRST ATTACK ON BIBLE

SOCIETY MEETING AT LONDON- HOUSE AVELSH BIBLE

UNIFORMITY OF VERSIONS — ARABIC BIBLE 73



3£8034



CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLUME.

CHAPTER XVII. Pa^e

KEviEW OF Buchanan's " memoir on ecclesiastical esta-
blishments IN India" — nominated a commissioner- for

THE affairs of INDIA, AND A PRIVY COUNSELLOR OPERA-
TIONS OF THE BIBLE SOCIETY, AND PLANS FOR PROMOTING

CHRISTIANITY IN INDIA, OPPOSED PUBLICATION OF LORD

TEIGNMOUTh's " CONSIDERATIONS ON COMMUNICATING THE "
KNOWLEDGE OF CHRISTIANITY TO THE NATIVES OF INDIA " . . 106

CHAPTER XVIII.

RESIDENCE IN PORTMAN SQUARE PURSUITS — DEVOTION TO THE

AFFAIRS OF THE BIBLE SOCIETY AND OTHER INSTITUTIONS

DEFENCE OF THE BIBLE SOCIETY, IN REPLY TO THE REV. C.

WORDSWORTH — COMPOSITIONS ON RELIGIOUS SUBJECTS

RESUMES aiS JOURNAL CORRESPONDENCE EXAMINATION

BEFORE THE HOUSE OF COMMONS 148

CHAPTER XIX.

POETRY CORRESPONDENCE 210

CHAPTER XX.

EXTENSIVE AND ENCOURAGING SUPPORT OF THE BIBLE SOCIETY

ORIENTAL PURSUITS DEPARTURE OK LORD TEIGNMOUTn's

SECOND SON FOR INDIA 286

CHAPTER XXI.

HIS THIRD SON EMBARKS FOR INDIA, WITH HIS REGIMENT

CORRESPONDENCE RELATIVE TO THE BIBLE SOCIETY, AND
OTHER MATTERS 342

CHAPTER XXII.

DEATH OF RELATIVES AND FRIENDS CORHESPONDENCE 389

CHAPTER XXm.

APOCRYPHAL CONTROVERSY IN THE BIBLE SOCIETY CORHESPON-
DENCE WITH LOUD AMHERST RELATIVE TO HIS SECOND SON IN
INDIA 419



CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLUME.

CHAPTER XXIV. Page

DKATH Of LORD TEIGNMOUTH's YOUNGEST SON APOCRYPHAL

CONTROVERSY: CONCLUDED IN ENGLAND: ITS PROGRESS IN
SCOTLAND, TERMINATING IN THE SECESSION OF THE SCOTTISH
AUXILIARIES FROM THE PARENT INSTITUTION 484

CHAPTER XXV.

LORD TEIGNMOUTH PRESIDES FOR THE LAST TIME AT AN ANNIVER-
SARY MEETING OF THE BIBLE SOCIETY SOCINIAN CONTRO-
VERSY IN THE SOCIETY DEATH OF HIS SON-IN-LAVi^ bd2

CHAPTER XXVI.

LAST ILLNESS AND DEATH TRIBUTES TO HIS MEMORY 562



APPENDIX I.

EFFECTS OF THE ANTI-APOCRYPHAL RESOLUTIONS 595

APPENDIX II.

OCTOGENARIAN STANZAS 599



LIFE

OF

LORD TEIGNMOUTH.



CHAPTER XIV.

ARRIVAL AND RECEPTION IN ENGLAND RESIDES IN LONDON AC-
KNOWLEDGMENT OF HIS SERVICES BY THE COURT OF DIRECTORS

RESIDES IN DEVONSHIRE COMMENCES MEMOIR OF SIR W. JONES

DECLINES OFFICIAL EMPLOYMENT CORRESPONDENCE ON THE

QUESTION OF PEACE THE INSTITUTION OF THE COLLEGE AT FORT-
WILLIAM, AND OTHER SUBJECTS — RETURNS TO LONDON.

On his removal from India, just previous to the oc-
currence of those difficulties in which the Admini-
stration of his successor was involved, Lord Teign-
mouth perceived — and some years afterwards, in the
concluding sentences of the Selections from his Jour-
nal, expressly acknowledged — the merciful direction
of Divine Providence. Twice had he thus been
rescued from the necessity of exertions beyond the
strength of a constitution debilitated by unremitting
labour and ill-health, and from which a sense of

VOL. II. B



y LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH.

personal honour and patriotic considerations would
have prohibited him from withdrawing : and in
each crisis, he had the satisfaction of reflecting that
the abilities and energy of those to whose hands he
had consigned the helm of affairs were commensu-
rate with the emergency.

His homeward voyage was boisterous, and af-
forded him much of that "sublime delight" of
which his poetical temperament was peculiarly sus-
ceptible. There was no species of enjoyment to the
remembrance of which he recurred with more zest,
than that of reading Ossian, during a storm at sea.
It had been however, on one occasion, at this time
not unattended with danger ; as his ship was struck
by lightning off the Cape, and much damaged.

Lord Teignmouth experienced in his own coun-
try a most cordial reception, both public and pri-
vate. One of his first employments was, to engage
a house, temporarily, in Stratford Place ; — in com-
pliance with the advice he gave to his Indian friends,
not to fix their abode till after a year's residence in
England, and then to select it in conformity to the
Arabic maxim : " Seek a neighbour before you
seek a house." His leisure was passed agreeably,
in the society of his numerous friends : but he com-
plains, in his correspondence, of the burden of
idleness, and of the non-improvement of his time.
He received much attention from Mr. Pitt, Mr.



LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH. 3

Dundas, and other Members of the Government.
Among those whose acquaintance Jbe now for the
first time forme(|jjvas .that pf the Rev. John Newton,
the friend^ of Cpw;pei:,_whose society he cultivated,
and who was not an unfrequent guest at his house.
Whilst residing in Stratford Place, Lord Teignmouth
commenced the practice of assembling his house-
hold morning and evening for family prayer, and
ofj^eading_gL^(gXiriQaJo~.tliem^£U^ iL^as

jQ^Millduring th that he

add^d tojthe Morning Prayers the reading a por-
tion of the Holy Scriptures, with some exp^

The following Letter was written under the
recent impression of delight he had experienced on
seeing, for the first time, the Townley Collection of
Statues, since removed to the British Museum.
He always spoke of the effect, as having been equi-
valent to the discovery of a new sense ; as India
had afforded him no opportunity of ascertaining
and cultivating his taste for the productions of art.

" DEAR HUBERT "July 1, 1799.

" I was going to write to you yesterday, to tell
you to hang yourself, for having left town without
seeing the most curious and interesting sight in
London — the collection of ancient statues belonsinsf
to Mr. Townley ; and you may trust me, that no

B 2



\y



4 LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH.

modern statue can in any degree give an idea of
the beauty and perfection of the ancient models.
1 had not an idea of the difference, until my eye-
sight convinced me of it.

" But 1 have a more melancholy tale to send you,
comprised in the accompanying Letter from Barlow,
of the 8th of February from Calcutta. You will see
with affliction the assassinations of that monster.
Vizier Ali; to which. Cherry, Captain Conway, a
Mr. Evans, and young Graham, have fallen victims.
I pity Cherry, and Mrs. Cherry, from my soul. Your
nephew, you see, is safe, and does not appear even
to have been in danger. When I reflect upon the
repeated warnings which I received at Lucknow of
the designs of Vizier Ali against my person — the
opportunities which he had of effecting them before
his deposition — those which he had afterwards, for
I was three times in his presence almost unattended,
and once particularly at Benares on my return —
I see more reason than ever to be grateful to Pro-
vidence for my preservation, which my own pre-
cautions could never have effected.

" We are all well ; and going, on the 4th, to sjtend
some days with Mr. Wilberforce at Battersea. —
Shew the enclosed to George, but do not make it
public. I thank God that we have lo^t no relations.
— Our love to all ; and believe me

" Affectionately yours."



LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH. O

In a Letter to the same relation, dated July 22d,
Lord Teignmouth mentions his having been enter-
tained by the Court of Directors : —



" I dined with the Court, as I mentioned to you,
on Wednesday last, after being speechified in full
Court by the Chairman. By the way, he tired me,
and the whole Court, by a tedious though flattering
harangue. The Duke of Montrose, Lords Spencer,
Elgin, and Hawkesbury ; Messrs. Pitt and Dundas,
Mr. Rose, &c. &c., were present ; and I heard some
most excellent singing, during the course of the
dinner, by professional men. A man of the name
of Leake, who is Clerk in the Excise, delighted me
excessively : he has a bass voice, which for sweet-
ness I never heard excelled ; it is also of wonderful
compass. Grace was performed by a No?i nobis,
and never heard I any thing more delightful : the
company all stood up, excepting the Chairman, who
is fixed, as far as depends upon his own locomotive
powers. James would quote Virgil upon him : —

Sedet aeternumque sedebit
Infelix.

"To-day 1 am to dine with Mr. and Lady J.
Dundas at Wimbledon.



6 LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH.

The Directors had previously borne testimony to
the merits of Lord Teignmouth's Administration, in
the following Resolution : —

" That the thanks of the Court be given to the
Right Hon. Lord Teignmouth, for his long, able,
and faithful services in India ; and particularly for
his distinguished merit and attention, in the admi-
nistration of every branch of the Company's Affairs,
during the period in which he held the office of
Governor-General." — Political hetter, May 15, 1799.



The Directors of the East-India Company might
well be satisfied with their late Governor-General ;
who, having devoted twenty-six years of his life,
involving the sacrifice of his health, to their employ-
ment, never applied to them for that compensation
to which he was justly entitled, and to which the
moderate amount of his income alForded an addi-
tional claim : and they were too ready to avail
themselves of his well-known moderation, to ori-
ginate any other recognition of his eminent services
than a recorded formal acknowledgment.

Lord Teignmouth thus alludes, writing to his
friend Anderson, to the firtrt symptoms of a dispo-
sition to investigate his conduct in the Lucknow
alTair, which led to no result : —



LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH. /

" With respect to Mr. M. A. Taylor's motion,
although I am far from wishing the celebrity of a
public attack upon my conduct, I cannot blame
him, or any Member of Paliament, for calling the
attention of the House to a measure of such mag-
nitude as the Revolution at Oude. It will give you
pleasure to learn that the Court of Directors have
not only expressed a general and strong approba-
tion of my Administration in India, but a most
comprehensive and marked eulogium on the Oude
business, with the concurrence of the Indian Coni-
missioners."

We are carried back to the calamitous sequel of
the dethronement of Vizier Ali, by a Letter written
to a modest but distinguished member of the Indian
Service, who had held the important and respon-
sible office of Persian Translator to the Govern-
ment during Lord Teignmouth's Administration,
and had accompanied him to Lucknow — the confi-
dential friend to whose judicious consideration Lord
Teignmouth had referred his more important Public
Minutes; afterwards, during many years. Director
of the East-India Company.



8 LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH.

" TO N. B. EDMONSTONE, ESQ.
" MY DEAR SIR — " London, Sept. 16, 1799.

" Accept my thanks for your obliging and in-
teresting Letter of the 18th of May. The events
which have occurred since my departure from
India have indeed been momentous ; and I cannot
reflect upon them vrithout congratulating myself
on having escaped scenes of continual perplexity
and horror ; whilst I sincerely rejoice that the ad-
ministration of my successor has equally tended to
promote his own reputation and the interests of
Great Britain in India. Poor Cherry's infatuation
was most unaccountable ; but the idea of assassi-
nation is so discordant to the feelings of a man of
honour and resolution, which he most undoubtedly
possessed, that the mind is hardly capable of su-
specting it. He knew, however, from you and
myself, the character of Vizier Ali, his depraved
disposition, and that he was capable of any atrocity ;
and the intimation and injunctions of Lord Mor-
nington ought to have had weight with him. I do
from my heart lament his fate ; and the more so,
as I cannot but attribute it, in some degree, to the
exertions of poor Cherry in assisting my measures.
I had the misfortune, a few days ago, to be ushered
into a room where Mrs. Cherry was sitting, and
I scarcely ever experienced a more disagreeable



LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH. 9

interview. I could scarcely speak to her, and her
distress added to mine : her affections will long
retain the pain of the wound which they have re-
ceived. I now turn to more pleasing events — the
termination of the war with Tippoo, and his death.
These are events of incalculable advantage to the
Company ; and the rapid and important success of
the contest proves the wisdom of the measures
adopted to ensure it. That the same good fortune
may ever attend Lord Mornington's Administration
is my constant wish. — 'You have had your share
in Revolutions.



" I sent to you some time ago a Letter from my
friend Tufuzzool, whom I shall ever remember with
regard and esteem. He will, I hope, continue to
write to me : and most happy should I be to take
him by the hand in England.

" I see no prospect of the termination of the war ;
but I see, with infinite delight, the zeal and unani-
mity of the nation in supporting the contest with a
foe whose object in warfare is devastation, and the
subversion of all that is dear to society.

" I conclude with a most earnest wish for the
capture or destruction of Vizier Ali. In the former
case, I should have no hesitation in making him
pay the forfeit of his crimes.

" Yours very sincerely."



10 LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH.

" TO THE SAME.
" MY DEAR SIR — " London, Oct. 23, 1799.

" I have already replied to your long and inter-
esting Letter of the 18th of May last, under date the
16th of last month. Since that time, we have re-
ceived a succession of bad news, in the victories of
the French in Switzerland: but Uhe English are
not,' as the old proverb says, ' yet in the cellar,
although they have descended from their elevation
in the garret' : in plain English, the depression of
the public mind is by no means equal to its former
exaltation : and I trust with confidence in the zeal
and patriotism of my countrymen for perseverance
in the contest in which we are engaged, until we
attain the desirable end of a secure and honourable
peace. With respect to myself, 1 have all the
comforts and happiness which I can or ought to
expect in this world.



" Yours very sincerely."

" TO WILLIAM WILBERFORCE, ESQ.
" MY DEAR SIR — " Stratford Place, Nov. 9, 1799.

"1 had yesterday the satisfaction to see Mr.
Owen*, safe returned from his Dutch Expedition :
and his information was so interesting, that 1 most

* Late Cliaplain at Calcutta.



LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH. 11

heartily wished you had heard it. The details
were rather different from those of a common
campaign, such as the Commander-in-Chief would
have given ; as he very properly left the history of
marches and counter-marches to those who ordered
them. The object of his journey, or rather the
motive of it, was Christian benevolence ; and in
this warfare his occupation principally consisted.
You will be pleased, however, to learn summarily
what he communicated ; — that the Duke of York
conducted himself with great regularity and pro-
priety, exhibiting in his practice a sense of religion,
and various acts of humanity : he was very popular.
Mr. Owen lived with several officers of the Guards,
and was witness to an uniform propriety of beha-
viour, great zeal for the Service, and perfect con-
tentment under the fatigues and inconveniences
attending it. He never met with one scoffer at
Religion. Every scope was given to his own exer-
tions ; and he had full employment for his religious
functions, particularly amongst the wounded, both
officers and men. With the latter he mixed a
great deal, and found no difficulty in restraining
immoral habits by reproof and admonition : they
appeared to receive his advice and attentions with
satisfaction. The behaviour of the British troops
was perfectly orderly : he neither saw nor heard of
any instance of plunder by any of them, but universal



12 LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH.

zeal for the Service, and good conduct. The
hospitals were remarkably well attended, and the
sick and wounded had all the comforts which their
situation admitted ; so that, upon the whole, al-
though the object of the Expedition was not
obtained, the officers and troops are entitled to the
greatest praise and commendation. Their bravery
and perseverance exceed all praise, and their cha-
racter stands high with their enemies. To these
striking and leading facts he added a variety of
interesting details, which are too long to write.
Taking the debtor and creditor statement of the
Expedition, although we have not gained Holland,
we have gained useful experience, and the Dutch
Fleet ; we have made a formidable impression on
our enemies ; and have probably restrained their
exertions in other quarters. Notwithstanding the
severity of the Service, the troops were not pleased
with the orders to retreat : they would have advanced
more cheerfully. In my opinion, tlie retreat and
convention do great honour to our Commanders.

" We have not yet been able to procure a resi-
dence ; and remain in statu quo — all well. We sin-
cerely hope that you find benefit from the Bath
waters. Lady Teignmouth joins me in best re-
membrance to Mrs. Wilberforce ; and
" I am, my Dear Sir,
" Your obliged and sincere humble Servant."



LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH. I •)

" TO THE SAME.
" MY DEAll SIR — " Stratford Place, Nov. '29, 1799.

" The late Revolution in France puts me in
mind of four lines I once read :

Or, like men viewing at a distance
Three persons thrown out of a casement :
All they can do, for their assistance,
Is, just to lend them their amazement.

I should, however, have reserved them for the next
Revolution, which I think will ere long take place ;
for I am not disposed to think that the Five Hundred
ruffians who have been deprived of power and ex-
pectations will lose their influence, or their turbu-
lence — that the people of Paris will renounce the
habit of Revolution — or that Buonaparte will find it
as easy to preserve his controul over the Parisian
military as over his troops in Italy. I fear, how-
ever, that the late topsy-turvy proceedings remove
the prospect of peace. Nor do I think our winter
prospects at home very comfortable. The price of
provisions is great, and increasing ; and the winter
only begun. Thej;ich must renounce some part of
their luxuries, or the jDoor will starve. What ought
to be done, we know ; but what the rich will do,
we doubt : they have^ warning sufficient^ if they are
disposed to receive it.



/



14 LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH.

" Amongst the extraordinary occurrences to my-
self — I mention it for your private information — is
an invitation from Mr. Martindale, in the name of
His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, to become
a Member of the Club at Grafton House. I will
not suppose the Prince's knowledge of it ; nor will
you suppose me capable of accepting of it : — •

Utcumqiie defecere mores,
Dedecorant bene nata culpae.

Parva componere magnis: I will contrast the above
with an anecdote of no fair hue — 'of a Church Clerk
in London. I proposed to him the baptism of my
boy at a church out of my parish. ' Then, Sir/ said
he, ' if the Clergyman should ask you where you
reside, there will be nothing in replying. In Bond
Street.' I assured the accommodating gentleman
that I was not disposed to lie anywhere, but cer-
tainly not in a church. — This was a Clerk !

'' I have not seen Mr. Owen since I last wrote to
you ; but I will desire him to record his observa-
tions and reflections.

" We hope that you continue to mend, and that
Mrs. Wilberforce and your babes are well. We
join in best remembrances to them. My family, by
the blessing of Providence, is well. Our friend
Grant's interesting daughter, Charemile, was with
us lately for three days ; and I have seen none of



LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH. 15

her age comparable to her. She is, I know, a
favourite of yours. Excuse a brief Letter from
" My Dear Sir,

" Your affectionate and obliged."



Lord Teignmouth did not as yet fulfil his che-
rished purpose of settling himself in the society of
his valued friends at Clapham ; but early in the
following year he removed to Exmouth in Devon-
shire, in the neighbourhood of which his brother
and several of Lady Teignmouth's relatives resided.
Here, in the spring of 1800, he commenced his
" Memoir of the Life and Correspondence of Sir W.
Jones " ; a work which he undertook at the request
of his friend's widow; and he felt bound, as he
observes, by honour and inclination to fulfil his
engagement. In the summer, he made, with his
family, an extensive excursion ; embracing a visit to
Hawkstone, the seat of his friend Sir Richard Hill,
with whom he was connected by marriage. Lord
Teignmouth's correspondence at this period, espe-
cially with Mr. Wilberforce, refers principally to
two topics, on which they both felt an anxious
interest — the means of relieving the existing scar-
city, and the important question of peace with
France.



\^



16 LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH.

" TO \V, WILBERFORCE, ESQ.
" MY DEAR SIR — " Exeter, Nov. 6, IftOO.



"The question of peace or war is too mo-
mentous to be answered, with four brats in the room
with me : indeed, I do not pretend to be equal to
the discussion of it. There are, however, some
obvious reflections, which I shall give you as they
occur. Considering the state of the country, in-
cluding the dearness of provisions, and the discontent
produced by it, we should look to nothing more
than to a secure peace : it would be a great folly
to make a peace that should leave us at the mercy
of an enemy devoid of faith and principle ; but it
would be equal folly to hazard the prosecution of a
war, in hopes of greater advantage, while the public
are suffering under the pressure of dearth, and
disposed to think the war the cause of it. I would
not hesitate a moment to relinquish every con-
quest compatible with our security, to obtain peace :
the terms ' advantageous ' and ' honourable ' must
bend to necessity, and security alone ought now to
be the object of our negociations. If we do not
yield to circumstances, they will govern us. The
Ministry will not brook the idea of reducing their
hopes within these narrow limits ; nor do I pretend
to say that they can make peace, even upon these



LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH. 17

terms. Unless, however, the present scarcity can
be removed, the continuance of the war may, in
my opinion, lead to most serious evils : they will,
however, be submitted to with less reluctance, if
the public are convinced that our only object is to
obtain secure peace, and that every attempt has
been made for that purpose. I give you my sen-
timents without qualification, although they much
require it.



" I am, my Dear Sir,

"Your affectionate humble Servant."



" TO THE SAME.
MY DEAR SIR "Jan. 24, 1801.



" Feeling, as I do, that all things are directed
by a Providence whose wisdom is as unerring as
its dispensations are inscrutable, I am not disposed
to view the present state of affairs in a gloomy
light. I confess, however, my weakness, when I
look upon my babes ; and it requires some effort to
check the apprehensions suggested for their tem-
poral and eternal welfare, in the present disor-
dered state of the world. I fear we are at present
an instance of Solomon's observation, ^ that righte-
ousness exalteth a nation, but sin is a reproach to
VOL. n. c



18 LIFE OF LORD TEIGNMOUTH.

any people ' — of one part of it at least ; and wish



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