Copyright
Charles Lamb.

Prince Dorus: with illustrations in facsimile online

. (page 1 of 1)
Online LibraryCharles LambPrince Dorus: with illustrations in facsimile → online text (page 1 of 1)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project
to make the world's books discoverable online.

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject
to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books
are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover.

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the
publisher to a library and finally to you.

Usage guidelines

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying.

We also ask that you:

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for
personal, non-commercial purposes.

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help.

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it.

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe.

About Google Book Search

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web

at http : //books . google . com/|




Prince Dorus



Charles Lamb



lo'L




Tt.



f



/.




itrc/



^l/e/ ///yf/f^/iy ^Jt



'>U>c>i^e^



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google




a



oogle



Prince Dorus



BY

CHARLES LAMB

V/ITH NINE ILLUSTRATIONS IN FACSIMILE

(HAND - COLOURED)



-f'-



1889.

LONDON:

Field b' Tuer, The Leadenhall Press^ E.C.

Simpkin^ Marshall b Co.; Hamilton^ Adams 6* Co.

New York : Scribner 6* Welford^ /^j 6* 74Sy Broadway.




Digitized by



Google



/ ^



t




Field & Tuer,

The Leadenhall Press, London, B.C.

T 4,379-



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by VjOOQL <^



INTRODUCTION.



CHARLES Lamb understood children and their
ways, and he knew how " to fescinate with
the highest art in its simplest form." He under-
stood the difference between children's books and
childish books, and one cannot wonder that books
wherein can be traced his delicate humour and
subtle wit are as much prized now as they were
by those who have long since, turned to dust.

His humorous and charmingly illustrated
" Prince Dorus " — published at a shilling ; col-
oured, sixpence extra— is so scarce that the number
of copies of the first edition (1811) is limited pro-
bably



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



Vll

Years ago I was not alone in fully describing
the first edition of this rare little book, and
although collectors probably thought it worth
their while to make a note of the chief points,
dealers, whose bread and butter partly depend
upon being posted up in trivialities of this kind,
seem to have neglected doing so.

On the outside (unlettered) stiff paper cover
of the first edition of ** Prince Dorus " is a wood-
cut (herein reproduced in facsimile) of the Long-
Nosed King and Aged Fairy, and the back cover
is entirely without advertisements of which the
second edition has a goodly number. The second
edition is also without the wood-cut, the title page
being repeated on the cover with some variations
which it would perhaps be a waste of space to
here point out. How many copies of " Prince

Dorus "



Digitized by



Google



Vlll

Dorus" were printed in all it is impossible to
say, but from a comparison of the nine illustra-
tions in the first and second editions one may
judge it was a successful book, for in the latter
the flesh tints have mostly disappeared from the
wearing away of the copper-plates.

The fact that, besides being well read, a child^s
favourite book is apt to be badly used and literally
thumbed out of existence, hardly accounts for the
almost complete disappearance of Lamb^s '* Prince
Dorus,*' or of ** Poetry for Children" (1809) in
two small volumes "By the Author of Mrs.
Leicester's School,^' the joint production of Charles
and his sister Mary. Two original copies only —
one imperfect — are known of the " Poetry,'* which
disappeared so completely that for some years
there were doubts as to whether it had ever ex-
isted.



Digitized by



Googre



IX

isted. ** Poetry for Children" was republished
by a Boston (U.S.A.) bookseller in 1812, though
at the time escaping notice over here, and one or
two copies of the American edition have since
turned up.

Lamb^s " Beauty and the Beast,"* pubHshed
in 181 1 at 3^. 6^. plain, 5^. (>d, coloured, also dis-
appeared so completely that but three or four
copies are known. One of these has fallen to an
opulent American who, it is said, disbursed £^0
for it.

While not so scarce, some other little books
from the same source, including " The Adventures
of Ulysses," designed, we learn from the preface,

"as



* "Beauty and the Beast," with the pretty plates engraved in
facsimile, and an introduction by Andrew Lang, has recently been
republished at The Leadenhall Press.



Digitized by



Google



^* as a supplement to the Adventures of Telema-
chus," are amongst the quests of the collector.
The cleverly transposed and interestingly told
^* Tales from Shakespeare designed for the use of
Young Persons," by Charles Lamb (1807), in two
volumes, with copper-plates engraved by Blake
from Mulready*s designs, ran into several editions ;
and ** Mrs. Leicester's School, or the History of
Several Young Ladies related by Themselves,'^
published anonymously — but written by Charles
and his sister Mary — in 1808, was even still more
popular.

Charles Lamb's books for children can some-
times be obtained by others than the deep-pocketed.
I know of a London second-hand bookseller in
whose catalogue one of these rareties was offered
not so long ago for 7^. 6d, It escaped the notice

of



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



Xll



shilling or two, he may recall the story of the
Parsimonious Person and the Inevitable Somebody,
and joyously discount the envy of the less
fortunate at the crisp paragraph announcing in a
breath his discovery and astuteness.

But whether advantage can legitimately be
taken of another's ignorance is one of those un-
comfortable questions best left alone. Until the
wearisomely-long-in-coming time of trial arrives,
it is idle to guess what may happen.




A. W. T.



Digitized by



Google



I
|i Digitized by GoOglC



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



PRINCE DORUS.



In days of yore, as Ancient Stories tell,
A King in love with a great Princess fell.
Long at her feet submiss the Monarch sighed.
While she with stern repulse his suit denied.
Yet was he form'd by birth to please the fair,
Dress'd, danc'd, and courted with a Monarch's air;
b2



Digitized by



Google



su



But Magic Spells her frozen breast had steel'd
With stubborn pride, that knew not how to yield.

This to the King a courteous Fairy told.
And bade the Monarch in his suit be bold ;
For he that would the charming Princess wed.
Had only on her cat's black tail to tread,
When straight the Spell would vanish into air.
And he enjoy for life the yielding fair.

He thank'd the Fairy for her kind advice. —
Thought he, '^ If this be all, 111 not be nice ;



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



6*

With wary, step the cautious King draws near.
And slyly means to attack her in her rear ;
But when he thinks upon her tail to pounce.
Whisk — off she skips — three yards upon a bounce-
Again he tries, again his efforts fail —
Minon's a witch — the deuce is in her tail —

The anxious chase for weeks the Monarch tried,
Till courage fail'd, and hope witinn him died.
A desperate suit 'twas useless to prefer.
Or hope to catch a tail of quicksilver. —
When on a day, beyond his hopes, he found
Minon, his foe, asleep upon the ground ;



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google




Digitized by



GooqIp



Digitized by



Google



r




Digitized by



Google



Her ample tail behind her lay outspread ,
Full to the eye, and tempting to the tread.
The King with rapture the occasion bless 'd.
And with quick foot the fatal part he press'd.
Loud squalls were heard, like bowlings of a storm.
And sad he gazed on Minon's altered form, —
No more a cat, but chang'd into a man
Of giant size, who frown'd, and thus began :

*^ Rash King, that dared with impious design
To violate that tail, that once was mine ;
What though the spell be broke, and burst the charms.
That kept the Princess from thy longino- arms, —
B 4



Digitized by



Google



8

Not unrevenged shalt thou my fury dare,

For by that violated tail I swear,

From your unhappy nuptials shall be born

A Prince, whose Nose shall be thy subjects' scorn.

Bless'd in his love thy son shall never be,

Till he his foul deformity shall see.

Till he with tears his blemish shall confess,

Discern its odious length, and wish it less ! "

This said, he vanished ; and the King awhile
Mused at his words, then answer'd with a emile,
" Give me a child in happy wedlock born,
And let his Nose be made like a French horn ;



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



10

The prettiest babe^ with lips as red as rose,
And eyes like little stars — but such a nose —
The tender Mother fondly took the boy
Into her arms, and would have kiss'd her joy;
His luckless nose forbade the fond embrace —
He thrust the hideous feature in her face.

Then all her Maids of Honour tried in turn,
And for a Prince's kiss in envy burn ;
By sad experience taught, their hopes they miss'd,
And mourn'd a Prince that never could be kiss'd.



Digitized by



Google



^^Jii^?tce^ r^^7^%^ cT/n^ /ttJ ^_^uu^:^.



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



11



In silent tears the Queen confess'd her grief.

Till kindest Flattery came to her relief.

Her maids, as each one takes him in her arms,

Expatiate freely o'er his world of charms —

His eyes, lips, mouth — his forehead was divine —

And for his nose — they call'd it Aquiline —

Declared that Caesar, who the world subdued,

Had such a one — just of that longitude —

That Kings like him compelled folks to adore them.

And drove the short-nos'd sons of men before them-

That length of nose portended length of days.

And was a great advantage many ways —

b6



A



Digitized by



Google



12

To mourn the gifts of Providence was wrong—
Besides, the Nose was not so very long. —

These arguments in part her grief redrest^
A mother's partial fondness did the rest ;
And Time, that all things reconciles by use,
Did in her notions such a change produce.
That, as she views her babe, with favour blind
She thinks him handsomest of human kind.

Meantime in spite of his disfigured face,
Dorus (for so he's calPd) grew up apace ;



Digitized by



Google



c



r»r»alp



14

The hoary Tutor, and the wily Page,
Unmeet confederates ! dupe his tender age.
They taught him that whate'er vain mortals boast-
Strength, Courage, Wisdom — all they value most-
Whate'cr on human life distinction throws —
Was all comprised — in what?— a length of nose !
Ev'n Virtue's self (by some supposM chief merit)
In short-nosed folks was only want of spirit.

While doctrines such as these his guides instill'd,
His Palace was with long-nosed people fiU'd ;
At Court whoever ventured to appear
With a short nose, was treated with a sneer.



Digitized by



Google



15

Each courtier's wife, that with a babe is blest,
Moulds its young nose betimes ; and does her best,
By pulls, and hauls, and twists, and lugs and pinches.
To stretch it to the standard of the Prince's.

Dup'd by these arts, Dorus to manhood rose,
Nor dream'd of ought more comely than his Nose ;
Till Love, whose pow'r ev'n Princes have confest,
Claim'd the soft empire o'er his youthful breast.
Fair Claribel was she who caused his care ;
A neighb'ring Monarch's daughter, and sole heir.
For beauteous Claribel his bosom burn'd ;
The beauteous Claribel his flame retum'd ;
b8



Digitized by



Google



to approve,

or love,

3se

>f his Nose,

d;

mind ;

^ace.

old,

mould ;
k'd—
feet—



Digitized by



Google



17

Wise Nature, who to Dorus over kind,
A length of nose too liberal had assigned.
As if with us poor mortals to make sport.
Had giv'n to Claribel a nose too short :
But turned up with a sort of modest grace ;
It took not much of beauty from her face ;
And subtle Courtiers, who their Prince's mind
Still watch'd, and turned about with every wind,
Assur'd the Prince, that though man's beauty owes
Its charms to a majestic length of nose,
The excellence of Woman (softer creature)
Consisted in the shortness of that feature.



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google




(^^^A^^/^ec^^^ciA^Ue^:^ i






Digitized by



Google



Digitized by VjOOQIC



20

Bereft of her that was his only care,
Dorus resign'd his soul to wild despair ;
Resolv'd to leave the land that gave him birth,
And seek fair Claribel throughout the earth.
Mounting his horse, he gives the beast the reins,
And wanders lonely through the desert plains ;
With fearless heart the savage heath explores,
Where the wolf prowls, and where the tiger roars.
Nor wolf, nor tiger, dare his way oppose ;
The wildest creatures see, and shun, his Nose.
Ev'n lions fear ! the elephant alone
Surveys with pride a trunk so like his own.



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google




Digitized by



Google



21

At length he to a shady forest came^
Where in a cavern lived an aged dame ;
A reverend Fairy, on whose silver head
A hundred years their downy snows had shed.
Here entering in, the Mistress of the place
Bespoke him welcome with a cheerful grace
Fetch'd forth her dainties, spread her social board
With all the Store her dwelling could afford.
The Prince with toil and hunger sore opprest,
Gladly accepts^ and deigns to be her guest.
But when the first civilities were paid,
The dishes ranged, and Grace in order said ;



Digitized by



Google



wm



22

The Fairy, who had leisure now to view
Her guest more dosely, from her pocket drew
Her spectacles, and wip'd them from the dust,
Then on her nose endeavour'd to adjust;
With difficulty she could find a place
To hang them on in her unshapely face ;
For if the Princess's was somewhat small,
This Fairy scarce had any nose at all.
But when by help of spectacles the Crone
Discerned a Nose so different from her own.
What peals of laughter shook her aged sides !
While with sharp jests the Prince she thus derides.



nigitized by Vj005l-^

BOB "~



Digitized by



Google




Digitized by



Google



23

FAIRY.

" Welcome great Prince of Noses, to my cell;
Tis a poor place, — but thus we Fairies dwell.
Pray, let me ask you, if from far you come—
And don't you sometimes find it cumbersome?"

PRINCE.

" Find what?"

FAIRY.

" Your Nose—*'

PRINCB.

"My Nose, Ma'am!'



Digitized by



Google



24

FAIRY.

*' No offence —
The King your Father was a man of sense,
A handsome man (but lived not to be old)
And had a Nose cast in the common mould.
Ev'n I myself, that now with age am ^rey,
Was thought to have some beauty in my day,
And am the Daughter of a King. Your sire
In this poor face saw something to admire —
And I to shew my gratitude made shift —
Have stood his friend— and help'd him at a lift —
'Twas I that, when his hopes began to fail,
ShewM him the spell that lurk'd in Minon's tail —



Digitized by



Google



25

Perhaps you have heard — but come. Sir, you don't eat-
That Nose of yours requires both wine and meat —
Fall to, and welcome, without more ado —
You see your fare — what shall I help you to 1
This dish the tongues of nightingales contains ;
This, eyes of peacocks ; and that, linnets' brains ;
That next you is a Bird of Paradise —
We fairies in our food are somewhat nice. —
And pray. Sir, while your hunger is supplied,
Do lean your Nose a little on one side ;
The shadow, which it casts upon the meat.
Darkens my plate, I see not what I eat — "



Digitized by



Google



26

The Prince on dainty after dainty feedings

Felt inly shock'd at the old Fairy's breeding ;

And held it want of manners in the Dame,

And did her country education blame.

One thing he only wonder'd at, — what she

So very comic in his nose could see.

Hers, it must be confest, was somewhat short,

And time and shrinking age, accounted for't ;

But for his own, thank heaven, he could not tell

That it was ever thought remarkable ;

A decent nose, of reasonable size,

And handsome thought, rather than otherwise.

But that which most of all his wonder paid.

Was to observe the Fairy's waiting Maid ;



Digitized by



Google



27

How at each word the aged Dame let fall ;
She courtsied low^ and smil'd assent to all ;
But chiefly when the revVend Grannam told
Of conquests, which her beauty made of old. —
He smiled to see how Flattery sway'd the Dame,
Nor knew himself was open to the same !
He finds her raillery now increase so fast.
That making hasty end of his repast,
Glad to escape her tongue, he bids farewell
To the old Fairy, and her friendly cell-
But his kind Hostess, who had vainly tried
The force of ridicule to cure his pride.



Digitized by



Google



28

Fertile in plans, a surer method chose,
To make him see the error of his nose;
For till he view'd that feature with remorse.
The Enchanter's direful spell must be in force.

Midway the road by which the Prince must pass.

She rais'd by magic art a House of Glass ;

No mason's hand appear'd, nor work of wood ;

Compact of glass the wondrous fabric stood.

Its stately pillars, glittering in the sun.

Conspicuous from afar, like silver, shone.

Here, snatch'd and rescued from th' Enchanter's might.

She placed the beauteous Claribel in sight.




Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google




Digitized by



Google



29

The admiring Prince the chrystal dome survey'd.
And sought access unto his lovely Maid ;
But, strange to tell, in all that mansion's bound,
Nor door, nor casement, was there to be found.
Enrag'd he took up massy stones, and flung
With such a force, that all the palace rung ;
But made no more impression on the glass.
Than if the solid structure had been brass.
To comfort his despair, the lovely maid
Her snowy hand against her window laid ;
But when with eager haste he thought to kiss.
His Nose stood out, and robb'd him of the bliss.



Digitized by



Google



30

Thrice he essay'd th' impracticable feat ;
The window and his hps can never meet.

The painful Truth, which Flattery long conceal'd,
Rush'd on his mind, and " O ! " he cried," I yield ;
Wisest of Fairies, thou wert right, I wrong —
/ own, I owTif I have a Nose too long/*

The frank confession was no sooner spoke.
But into shivers all the palace broke,
His Nose of monstrous length, to his surprise
Shrunk to the limits of a common size ;



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google




Digitized by



Google



31

And Claribel with joy her Lover view'd,
Now grown as beautiful as he was good.
The aged Fairy in their presence stands,
Confirms their mutual vows, and joins their hands.
The Prince with rapture hails the happy hour,
That rescued him from self-delusion's power ;
And trains of blessings crown the future Ufe
Of Dorus, and of Claribel, his wife.

THE END.



tized by Google



Digitized




Digitized by



Digitized by



Google












Digitized by



Google



^^(? 4^1.1.5,1



l^arbarir College iiftrarg



FROM THE BEqUEST OP

FRANCIS B. HAYES

Class of 1889

This fund it $10,000 and its income it to be used

"For the purchase of books for the Library"




Digitized by



Googlf



Digitized by



Google





1

Online LibraryCharles LambPrince Dorus: with illustrations in facsimile → online text (page 1 of 1)