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his father, and the latter's expostu-
lation, 347 ; burns his MSS. and
Coleridge's letters, 351 ; six weeks
in a madhouse at Hoxton, 288 ;
his ravings on Coleridge, 289 ; de-
fence of his Sonnets to Coleridge,
307 ; translation of a French novel
revised by Lamb, 316 ; Burns the
* god of his idolatry,' 352 ; laughed
at for reading his Testament, 352 ;
finds Coleridge's Joan of Arc ' a
pot-girl," 355, 370 ; his Aunt dying,
359 ; her kindness, iii. 334 ; sug-
gested subjects for poems to Coler-
idge, i. 359 ; desires him to write an
epic, 363 ; had not a Christian
among his acquaintances, 364 ;
visits Coleridge with his sister, 87
n. ; his Poems published with those
of Coleridge and Lloyd ; quarrel
with Coleridge, 35 n. ; publishes
' Blank Verse ' with Lloyd, and
'Rosamund Gray,' 40; first ac-
quaintance with Southey, 43 ;
attacked in the ' Anti-Jacobin,' 45 ;
first meeting with Godwin, 47 ; be-
gins 'John Woodvil,' 48 ; becomes
acquainted with Manning, 49 ; re-
moves to Chapel Street, visits
Coleridge, and meets Wordsworth,
50 ; connection with the Morning
Post, ib. and n. 51 ; moves to Mitre
Court, Temple, 53 ; a.<sists Godwin
in his 1 lay, 54 ; publishes 'John
Woodvil,' 56 ; becomes acquainted
with Hazlitt, 59 ; his gloomy
manage described by Mary Lamb,
ib.n. ; his Farce, 'Mr. H.,' 65;



removes to Temple Lane, 67, ii. 4 ;
journey into Wiltshire, i. 68 ; pub-
lishes ' The Adventures of Ulysses'
and 'Specimens,' 69; attacked in
the Quarterly by Giffbrd, 70 ; re-
views Wordsworth's ' Excursion,'

72 ; fond of writing epigrams, 73 ;
description of, by Talfourd (1815),

73 ; meets T. Moore, -jj n. ; his
supper parties, 74 ; moves to Russell
Street, 83 ; his new acquaintances at
this time, 84 ; removes to Dalston,
ib. ; prejudicial effect of the life,
suppers, etc., 88 n. ; contrihiutes to
' the London Magazine ' under the
signature of ' Elia,' 89; honorarium
for his contributions, 95 ; sketched
by Procter, 96 n. ; visits Paris, 114
and n. ; publishes the Essays of
Elia, 117 ; offended by Southey 's
article in ' the Quarterly,' ib. ; moves
to Islington, 121 ; his life there
described by Mr. Daniel, ib. n. ;
letter to Southey and reconciliation,
125 ; retires from the India House,
131 ; his pension, ib. n. ; his friends
doubtful as to the result, ib. n. ;
retires to Enfield, 133 ; speculating
in necessaries, 365; religious doubts,
ib. ; an ' old hag of a relation '
takes charge of Mary Lamb, but
sends her back, 368 ; scene of being
asked his opinion of a lady, who
proves to be the questioner's wife,
369 ; his aunt's funeral, 372 ; fancy
for Quakerism, but disenchanted by
attending a meeting, 373 ; takes a
room for his sister at Hackney,
375; wishes Lloyd's poem to precede
his, 379 ; complains that afflictions
have not softened him, 386 ; his
satirical ' Theses ' sent to Coleridge,
390 ; lodges with Mr. Gutch m
Southampton Street, 392 ; visits
Oxford, ib. ; relapse of Mary Lamb,
396 ; implores Coleridge not to style
him ' gentle-hearted Charles ! ' 398,
400; imitation of 'old and young
Courtier,' 399 ; his Latin letter
to Coleridge, 415 ; declines to
translate German poems for the
papers, 417 ; suggestions to Cole-
ridge of a comparison between



INDEX.



479



Milton and Cromwell, 421 ; sees
Coleridge's Poems through the
press, 427 ; ii. 2 ; visit to Hazlitt, 7 ;
story of his aunt's cake, 19 ; de-
scribes his portrait, 22 ; his own
declaration as to the day of his
birth, 26 ; description of a distressed
friend, 40 ; burlesque project for a
series of 'Annual Poems,' 47; his
want of sympathy with Moorish
stories, travels, etc., 56; his com-
prehensive view of the Church, 63 ;
his feehngs to London, the busy
Strand, etc., 70 ; describes his
wretchedness after one of his sister's
illnesses, 74 ; treatment of his article
by Gifford, 96 ; complaint of too
much leisure, 107 ; leaves off spirits,
108 ; but still addicted to porter, ib.
n. ; his annoyance from the officious
attentions of friends, 123 ; dinner at
the London Tavern, 126 ; his re-
tirement and pension granted, 145,
316 ; leaves off strong drink, 158 ;
accident when not sober, 172 ; dines
at the Mansion House, 270 ; his
likeness, 331 ; his taste for drink,
387-391 ; at Enfield, 412 ; his reli-
gious belief, 421 ; his loneliness,
431 ; his banter on Talfourd's son
being named after him, iii. 12 ;
congratulates him on his promotion,
13 ; letter on return from Paris, 17 ;
makes his will, 86 ; his nervous
fever, 93 ; proposal to virite an
entertainment for Mathews, 122 ;
his eulogy of Christ's Hospital,
148 ; at school there, 148 ; his
school-fellows, 162 ; content to
stay on earth, 177 ; self analysis
of his own character, ib. ; his
distaste to music, 191 ; his ignor-
ance of history, etc., 209 ; no
relish for persons superior in capa-
city, 216 ; dislike to Scotchmen,
221 ; to Jews, 225 ; his fear of
witches, etc., when a child, 233,
235 ; his dream, 238 ; self-analysis,
253 ; his visits to the Brutons, 255 ;
his retirement from the India House
described, iv. 38 ; his feelings on
being enfranchised, 39 ; drunk, ii.
392 ; proposal for a second series



of ' Selections,' i. 134 ; tries living
in London as an experiment, but
finally returns to Enfield, 138 ;
publishes his 'Album Verses,' 139 ;
affectionate letter to Coleridge,
142 ; removes to Edmonton, 143 ;
letters to Moxon on Miss Isola's
marriage, 143 ; his grief at the
death of Coleridge, 147 ; his
Wednesday evenings, 149 ; his
friends and companions — Dyer,
Godwin, Thelwall, Hazlitt, Barnes,
Haydon, Coleridge, 165 ; accepts
a dinner at Talfourd's, 216 ; the
accident which led to his death,
219 ; Talfourd's account of his
last moments, 220 n. ; his cha-
racter analysed, 237 ; devotion to
his sister, 238 ; his liberality, 243 ;
the ' eccentric wildness of his
mirth,' 247 ; religious opinions,
250 ; collection of his jests, 256
n. ; his ' single frailty ' vindicated
by Talfourd, 257 ; not satisfactorily,
264 n. ; his literary tastes, 268 ;
indifference 10 Byron's poetry,
ib. ; to Shelley's, and to Scott's
novels, 269 ; Mr. Forster's charac-
ter of, 276 ; his grief for Coleridge,
285 ; on the Morning Post, 80 ; at
Miss Burney's wedding, 106 ; en-
joyment of his 'superannuation,
162; 'The Last Peach,' recollec-
tions of his childhood in, vi. 42 ,
questions as to his birthplace, 65 ;
defence of his religious opinions
(letter to R. S — ), 69 ; his school-
days at Starkey and Bird's, 96.

Lamb's, C, Autobiography, vi. 148.

Lamb, John, Charles Lamb's father,
attendant to Mr. Salt, i. i ; de-
scribed as 'Lovel,' 2; specimens
of his poetry, ib. ; his death, 30 ;
expostulation as to cribbage, 347 ;
described as Lovel, iii. 276 ;
accident to, i. 293, 301 ; death
of, 88 n.

Lamb, J., iii. 246; his remarks on
the Eton boys, 249 ; his rooms in
the South Sea House, iii. 418 ;
('Mitis') never able to refuse a
present, iv. 148.



48o



INDEX.



Lamb, Mary, character of, iii. 39.

Lamb, AL\ky, Poems by, vi. 370,
371, 383, 386, 387, 388.

Latnb, Mary, kills her mother^ i. 26 ;
allowed to remain w ith her t)rother,
31 ; defending C. Lamb from the
charge of ' stinginess," 51 n. ; her
opinion of husbands, 52 n. ; her
sad description of their home, 59
n. ; of their rooms in Temple Lane,
67 ; her repinings at Dalston, 88
n. ; seized with insanity on her
journey to Paris, 114 ; her pun,
130 n. ; increase of her malady,
143 ; points out a spot for her
brother's grave, 220 ; her confession
to Lloyd of her feelings, 222 ;
asylum in which she was confined,
223 ; Hazliti's opinion of, ib. ; her
delusions, 224 ; specimens of her
letters, 225 ; W. S. Landor's ad-
miration for 'a touch' in 'Mrs.
Leicester's School,' 228 ; her letters
to Miss Stoddart and Miss Words-
worth, ib. ; writing her ' Tales,' ii.
77 ; advertisements of her works, ii.
77 n. ; perpetually on the brink of
madness (in 179S), ib. ; under con-
finement at Mr. Walden's, ii. 155,
her illnesses, ii. 265, 336 ; her state
' deplorable,' ii. 397 ; her mode
of writing, 431 ; her last days, i.
233 ; death and funeral, 236 ;
described as Bridget Elia, iii.
252.

L.\MB, Mary, sonnet to, vi. 300.

Lamb, Mrs., C. Lanio's mother, de-
scribed, i. 3 ; her children, ib.

Landor, W. S. , his contributions to
' The London Magazine,' 1. 94 n. ;
his lines to Mary Lamb, i. 234 ; his
verses to Elia, iv. 426.

Languor, picture of, ii. 301.

I>ATE Empiric, on a, vi. 433.

Latin verses, ' Tom of Islington,' ii.

389-
Laugh, a man not to, at his own jest

(Popular Fallacies), iv. 135.
Lawton, Miss C, acrostic on, vi. 331.
Lazarus, the, of Sebastian del Piombo

praised, iv. 96.
Lear, common mode of acting, iii.

205.



Lear, King, Kent's devotion to, ex-
plained, vi. 155.

Lectures, Lamb's views on, ii. 126.

Le Grice, i. 288, and n. 328 ; his
kindness to Lamb, in affliction,
328 ; ii. 48 ; his form of grace,
iii. 293 ; his death, i. 420.

Leicester's, Mrs., School, v. 115-
140 ; 431.

Leishman, Mrs. , Lamb's landlady at
Enfield, i. 138 n.

Leisure, remarks on, ii. 140.

Leisure, sonnet, vi. 297.

Letters of C. Lamb's to Coleridge,
Nos. i. to l.\i., from p. 287, vol. i.,
to p. 25, vol. ii. ; to Southey,
Nos. Ixii. to lx.\xii., pp. 26-67 '<
to the Wordsworths, Nos. Ixxxiii.
to cxvii. , pp. 68-158 ; to Man-
ning, Nos. cxviii. to clix. , pp. 159-
251 ; to the Hazlitts, Nos. clx. to
clxxviii. , pp. 252-277 ; to B. Bar-
ton, Nos. clxxix. to ccxxviii., pp.
278-362 ; to Hone, ccxxix. to
ccxlviii. , pp. 363-373 ; to Procter,
ccli. to cclvii. , pp. 375-385 ; to
Gary, cclviii. cclxvi., pp., 386-393;
to Moxon, cclxvii. to cclxxxix. ,
pp. 325-411 ; to the Gilmans,
ccl.xxx. to cclxxxv., pp. 412-419;
to Wilson, cclxxxvi. to cc.xc,
pp. 421-427 ; to Miss Hutchinson,
ccxci. ccxcv, pp. 430-437 ; to C.
Lloyd, vol. iii. p. i ; G. Dyer, 2 ;
Mrs. Dyer, 8 ; Rickman, ib. ;
Talfourd, 12 ; B. Field, 14 ; a
bookseller, 18 ; a farmer, 19 :
Leigh Hunt, 21 ; Basil Montagu,
23 ; Mrs. Shelley, 25 ; H. C.
Robinson, 27 ; J. P. Collier, 33 ;
Patmore, 34 ; Miss Fryer, 39 ; T.
Hood, 41 ; Cottle, 43 ; T. Taylor,
46; Ainsworth, 50 ; to a lady, 53 :
Irving, 55 ; Ayrton, ib. ; Mrs.
Williams, 58 ; Rogers, 61 ; Childs,
63 ; Mrs. Collier, 65 ; H.'^C. Robin
son, 66 , C. Oilier, 67 ; W. S.
Landor, ib. ; Moxon, 69 ; J.
Forster, ib. ; Moxon, 73 ; H. C.
Robinson, 77 ; J. Kenney, ib. ; to

, 78 ; a publisher, 79 ; Thomas

Allsop. ib. ; Cary, 103 ; Hudson,
ib. ; Haydon, 104, Gilman, 105 ;



INDEX.



481



Gutch, iii. 106 ; Leigh Hunt, ib. ;
Olliers, 108 ; Sir J. Stoddart, no ;
Novello, 112 ; Haydon, 114 ; No-
vello, IIS ; T. Hood, 117 ; Dyer,
120 ; Hone, ib. ; Duff, 121 ; B.
Field, ib. ; Dil]<e, 123 ; Editor of
Athenceum, 124; Laman Blanchard,
124 ; Mary Lamb, ib. ; see also
Supplemental Letters, in Vol. i.

Letters to Editors, vi. 246.

Letters Under Assumed Signa-
tures Published in the ' Re-
flector,' iv. 323.

Letter-writing, Lamb's account of
his, ii. 323.

Leviathan, whimsical original of the
name, ii. 52.

Lines on da Vinci's ' Virgin of the
Rocks,' vi. 387 ; on the same, vi.
388.

Lines suggested by a picture of L.
da Vinci, vi. 385 ; on the same, vi.

387.

Linley, Miss, iii. 431.

LiSTON, Biographical Memoir of
Mr., vi. 12.

Liston, Lamb's memoir of, a ' pure
lie,' ii. 434-

Literature as a profession, warning
against, ii. 283.

' Lives of the Saints,' lines found
in a volume of, vi. 404.

Living Without God in the
World, vi. 313.

Lloyd, C. , i. 20 ; subject to delusion,
increased in his latter days, 377 n. ;
influence of Macready's acting on,
86 and n. ; his meeting Charles and
Mary Lamb on their way to the
madhouse, 241 ; his indiscretion
described by Lamb, ii. 16.

Lloyd, C, to, an unexpected visitor,
vi. 407.

Lloyd, R., his sketch of his father,
i. 427.

L[ocke], S[arah], Acrostic on, vi. 333.

Lockhart, Mr., his quarrel with
John Scott, i. 92.

Lofft, Capel, his initials often con-
founded with those of Lamb, i.

135 n-
Logan quoted, 1. 317.
Londoner, The, iv. 322.

VOL. VI.



London life, iv. 36 ; charms of, ii.

173 ; by night, ii. 190 ; praise of life

in, ii. 351, 357.
' London Magazine,' the, account

and its contributors, i. go.
London streets, iv. 323.
Lovegrove, the actor, vi. 209.
Lovell, his death, i. 296.
'Love me, love my dog' (POPUI R

Fallacies), iv. 155.
' Luster's tables ' story of a servant's

mistake, ii. 19.
Luther, Coleridge's description of, at

the Wartburg, ii. 7 n.



Mackery End in Hertfordshire,

iii. 252.
Mackintosh, Sir J., To, vi.

425-

Macready, Mr., influence of his actmg
on C. Lloyd, i. 86 n. ; recognising
Wainright in prison, 113 n.

Mann, clerk, iii. 137.

Manning, his first acquaintance with
Lamb, i. 49 ; his death, i. 214 ;
'a man of a thousand,' i. 394;
sketch of his parties, ii. 159 ; hoax-
ing letter to, ii. 243.

Mara, Madame, Coleridge's descrip-
tion of, i. 323.

Margate, voyage to, iv. 8 ; a boaster's
tales, iv. 11.

Marlowe, 'Jew of Malta,' ii. 31 ;
criticised, iv. 214, 241.

Marriage on, of daughters, iv. i 5.

Married people, young, their be-
haviour, iii. 337.

Marston criticised, iv. 218, 284.

Martin, Louisa, appeal for, ii. 157.

Martin the painter, his ' Belshazzar's
Feast' criticised, ii. 330, 346 ; iv.

91-

Marvells verses on gardens, ni.

^73- .. „ ... „

Maseres, Baron, n. 185 ; ni. 282*
Massinger criticised, iv. 236, 237 ;

iv. 251.
Massinger, specimen of, i. 314.
Mathews, C, his theatrical portraits

at Higligate, v. 402.
May, John, his kindness to Lamb, ii.

40, 42.

2 I



482



INDEX.



Merr (Delia Crusca) story of, iv.

15 •
'Merry Devil of Edmonton criti-

cis d, iv. 220.
Mi'taphysics, modern, Lamb's dislike

of, ii. 130.
Methodist clergymen saying Grace,

iii. 292.
' M. Hylas ' (qy. Hazlitt) ii. 95.
Middleton, T., criticised, iv. 221,

223, 237, 246.
Midnight, Composed at, vi. 304.
Milton, portrait of, ii. 105, 112 ; how

to read, iii. 402 ; his sonnets

compared with Sir P. Sydney's, iv.

68.
Mingay, a Bencher, iii. 282.

Miss , album verses to, vi. 322.

Miirte Court Buildings, sketch of, ii.

185.
M. L., acrostic on, vi. 333.
M (Martin) to LouiSA, vi. 409,

437-

Modern Gallantry, hi. 265.

Monkhouse, Mr., his death, ii. 144,
146.

Montagu, Basil, i. 414 n.

Montagu, Mrs., her dinner to chim-
ney sweeps, iii. 433.

Months, 1 he, vi. 106.

Moore, T. , impressions made on by
Lamb, i. 77. n.

Morgan, his 'cos lettuce' explained,
ii. 14.

Mother, on His, vi. 306.

MoxoN, Dedication to, vi. 315.

Moxon, Lamb's friendship with, i.
133 ; his verses to Mary Lamb, i.

235-

Munden, Lamb at his benefit, i. 129 ;
as Cockleiop, iii. 372 ; in the
'Cobbler of Preston,' 374 ; under-
stands the 'quiddity of a leg of
mutton," ib.

Munden, Autobiography of Mr.,
vi. 22.

Munden, on the Death of, vi.

Museum, British, Lamb's ticket for,
i. 147 n ; arrangements at, praised,
iv. 252.

Music, iii. 191.

My First Play, iii. 259.



Mylius, his 'well-bred scholar,' mis-
take of Southey's described, ii. 11. ;
iii. 429.

My Relations, iii. 244.

Nature, Lamb's unrelish of, ii. 190.
Nay lor, J., the Quaker, iii. 205.
Negroes, iii. 227 ; Fuller's description

of, ib.
Newspapers Five and Thirty

Years Ago, iv. 78.
Newspapers intolerable when read

out, iii. 404.
Newton's Pkincipia, vi. 346.
New Year's Eve, iii. 173 ; Cotton's

poem on, iii. 179.
' Nonsense Verses,' vi. 436.
Norris, R., i. 325, 328 ; his deathbed,

iii. 27, 284 ; also iv. 130 ; described

in 'Ca])tain Jackson,' iv, 427, 436.
Norton, T., iv. 240.
Novelists assuming their readers to

be stupid, &c. , ii. 72.
Novello, v., banter on his religious

opinions, iii. 21 ; at the organ, iiu

^95-
N. (Novello), to Clara, vi. 412.

NuGiE Canor^, Lloyd's poems re-
viewed, vi. 223.

' Nut-brown maid, the,' comparison
between Prior and the older ballad,
vi. 156.

Ogles, the, of Somersetshire, de-
scended from King Lear? i. 429.
Old Actors, on some of the, iii.

346- _

Old Benchers, The, ofthe Inner

Temple, iii. 270.
Old China, iv. 119.
Old Familiar Faces, the, vi.

365 ; i. 28.
Old Gentleman, Letter to an,

vi. 32.
Old Margate Hoy, iv. 8.
Old, The, and the New SchooI/-

master, iii. 209.
Oilier, C, author of Inesilla, i. 85.
One Dip, vi. 439.
Oriana's Dream, vi. 371.
Orkney, C, album verses to, vL

319-
Othello's Colour, iv. 207.



INDEX.



483



Oxford, charms of, iii. 143 ; suppressed
portion of essay on, iii. 418.

Oxford in the Vacation, iii.
140.

Paice, Joseph, a real personage, ii.

357 ; account of, iii. 267.
Pain, why no sympathy with, ii. 361.
Painters, modern, lack of imagination

in, iv. 87; the conception of a Dryad,

iv. 97 ; Artists confuse poetic and

pictorial subjects, iv. 99.
Painting, historical and 'vulgar'

schools compared, iv. 292.
Palmer, ' Bob,' iii. 359.
Palmer, ' Jack,' sketch of, iii. 358 ; in

Joseph Surface, iii. 366.
Palingenius, translation from,

vi. 349-351.
Pamela, Lamb reading on Primrose

Hill, iii. 405.
Pantisocracy, the, i. 16 n.
Pardo, Father, ii. 58.
Paris, speculations on, ii. 216 ; sketch

of, iii. 125.
Parnell, two lines from, i. 293.
Parting Speech, The, of the

Celestial Messenger, vi. 351.
Pawnbroker's Daughter, The,

farce, v. 365.
Peach, The Last, vi. 40.
Peele, G. , appeal to Novello for, iv.

266 ; criticised, iv. 241.
Penny, 'the ingenious Mr.,' iv. 304.
Perry, steward of Christ's Hospital,

regret for his death, iv. 175.
Persian Ambassador, description of,

ii. 241.
• Peter's Net,' No. i, vi. 165.
Petition, The Humble, of an

Unfortunate Day, vi. 115.
Phillips, ii. 266 ; iii. 56 n.
Physic, ii. 301.
Picture sales, ii. 258-260.
Pcture, subject suggested, iii. 104.
Pierson, Peter, iii. 280.
Pierson, Susan, iii. 277.
Pig, a Dissertation upon roast,

iii. 327 ; praise of, 332 ; sauce for,

336 ; idea of ' the dissertation '

borrowed from Manning, ii. 290,
Pillory, Reflections in the, vi.

43-



'Pimpernel, H., and John Naps,"

allusion explained, iii. 418.
Pindaric Ode to the treadmill, vi.

389.

' Pipos,' nickname for H. Coleridge,
i. 419 n.

Play-writing, plan for, iii. 26.

Plumer, S. , iii. 138.

Plumer, W., mistake as to, corrected,
iii. 418.

' Poetry for Children," published, i.
66.

Politeness, decay of, iii. 266.

Poole, John, his contributions to
' The London Magazine,' i. 94 n.

Poor man, the, driven to public-
house, iv. 151.

Poor Relations, iii. 390 ; different
classes of, ib.

Poor, that the, copy the vices of rich,
(Popular Fallacies), iv. 137.

Pope, A., ii. 375.

Popular Fallacies, iv. 133.

Popular Fallacy, A ('That a de-
formed person is a Lord '), vi. 141.

Porter, H., criticised, iv. 256.

Poverty, pleasures of, iv. 122.

' Praise, The, of Chimney
Sweepers,' iii. 307.

' Pratt's Gleanings ' ridiculed, ii. 37.

Preface to the Last Essays ok
Elia, iii. 377.

Presents, on, iii. 51.

Presents, suitable and unsuitable, iv.
149.

Priestley, Lamb's ' love and honour '
for him, i. 298 ; almost sins in
adoring, 364.

Procter, legal hoax on, ii. 378 ; mar-
ries Miss Skipper, iii. 22.

Procter's, Mr., recollections of 'The
London Magazine,' i. 93 ; descrip-
tion of Lamb's Wednesday evenings,
i. 155 ; Lamb's generous offer to, i.
244 and n. ; collection of Lamb's
jests, i. 259.

Projected Journey, A, on, vi.

433-

Prologues, vi. 417.

' Prometheus Unbound,' joke, ii. 309.

Proper Names, on the Ambigui-
ties of, vi. 55.

Powel, Mrs., iii. 347.

2 12



484



INDEX.



Puns, Lamb's, on Salisbury Spire, ii.
240, ; 'knock-eternal' visitors, ii.
259 ; 'liver,' ii. 299, 360 ; flavours
of, iii. 304 ; ' Puns not wit : '
popular fallacy, iv. 140 ; ' the
worst the best,' fallacy, 141 ; Swift's
' Cremona ' pun, 143.

Q. , Rotha, Album verses to, vi.

318.
Quakeress, Young, of Pentonville, i.

58, ii. 216.
Quakerism, Lamb inclined to, i. 373.
Quakers' Meeting, A, iii. 202 ; their

silence, ib.
Quaker Speaker, who ' had been a

wit,' iii. 207, 227 ; instance of

their coolness, 229 ; their silent

grace, 290.
Quaker Slory, told by Sir A. Carlisle,

ii. 290.
Quarrel, description of, by C. Lamb,

ii. 309.
Quincey, De, contributions to ' The

London Magazine,' i. 94 n.
Quixote, Don, true pictorical concep-
tion of, iv. 99.

'R.' — Mr., Ramsay, Ludgate Lib-
rarian, iii, 199, 428.

Rank, Lamb's grotesque self-promo-
tion, to, ii. 240.

Raphael, Print of, iv. 89.

Rattlesnake, e.xhibition of, ii. 183.

Read, a Bencher, iii. 283.

Reading at Bookstalls, iii. 406 ; verses
on, ib.

Recollections of a late Royal
Academician, vi. 165.

Red-letter days, regrets for, iii. 141.

' Reflector,' The, Lamb a contributor
to, i. 70.

Regent, The, his files in Hyde Park,
ii. 102 ; hoax at Brighton, iv. 91.

Rejoicings upon the New Year's
Coming of Age, iv. m.

Religion of Actors, On the, vi.
144.

' Religious musings, praises of, 1.

295.
eminiscences of Juke Judkins,

vi. 133.



' Remorse,' Prologue to, vi. 419.
Repentance, a Vision of, vl.

367-
Restraint, a characteristic of good

writers, vi. 156.

Reynolds Gallery, The, vi. 243.

Reynolds, H. J., contributing to
' The London Magazine,' i. 94.

Reynolds, Mrs., Lamb's School-
mistress, i. 324 ; ii. 272.

Reynolds, Sir J., his style, iv. 295.

Richardson, in India Office, i. 320.

Rickman, Mr., i. 215 ; ii. 187.

' Rise with the Lark ; ' ' Lie down
with the Lamb,' (Popular Fal-
lacies), iv. 160.

RiTSON versiis']oun Scott, vi. 185.

River, To a, in which a Child
WAS Drowned, vi. 365.

Robinson, H. Crabb, his description of
Mary Lamb's slate when in Temple
Lane, i. 68 ; his kindness to her
before her death, i. 233 ; his account
of her funeral, 234 ; collection o\
Lamb's jests, 261 ; ii. 11. 14.

Rogers, Sonnet to, vi. 298.

Rogers, Defence of, from accusation
of want of originality, i. 361.

Rosamund Gray, a tale, iv. 375.

' Rosamund Gray,' published, i. 41 ;
reviews of, 42.

Rowley, W., criticised, iv. 221, 223,
224, 237, 246.

Russell Street, Covent Garden,
sketch of, ii. 121.

Sabbath Bells, The, vi. 303.
Salome, vi. 384.
Salopian House, The, iii. 309.
Salt, S., a Bencher, described,

275, 283.
' Salutation and Cat ' Tavern, i.

13 n.
Sanity of True Genius, iv. 25.
Sara, to, and her Samuel, vi.

456-
Satan in Search of a Wife, vi.

441.
Satan's banquet in ' Paradise Lost

iii. 288.
Satirical Pieces, vi. 425-440.
Saturday Night, vi. 174.
Savory, Hester, poem on, i. 58.



INDEX.



485



Savory, in the India Office, i. 318,
320.

Scenery, ' realistic,' fails, iv. 210.

Scholastic life, effects of, iii. 218.

School for Scandal, The, iii. 367.

Schoolmaster in the Coach, story of,
iii. 211.

Scotchmen described, iii. 221.

Scott, Mr. J., editor of the 'London
Magazine,' account of, i. 90 ; his
death in a duel, 92 n. ; his contri-
butions to the ' London Magazine,'
93 n.

Scott, Sir Walter, Lamb's admira-
tion of, i. 269.

Sea, first sight of, iv. 13 ; monotony
of seaports, iv. 16.

Self-enchanted, The, vi. 408.

Sergeant, W., Mrs. , album verses for,
vi. 316.

Servant, sketch of, ii. 352.

Servant, sketch of when sick, ii. go.

Shade of Elliston, To the, iii.
412.

Shakspeare, On the Tragedies
OF, iv. 188.

Shakspeare, the ' bellows portrait ' of,
iii. 17 ; not to be illustrated, iii.
62, 402 ; reading well of, supposed
to imply a congenial mind, iv. 190 ;
no relish for his ' hackneyed '
speeches, iv. 192 ; principles of
interpretation on the Stage, iv. 193 ;
Tate and Gibber's ' trash,' iv. 202 ;
the Plays subjects for meditation
rather than for acting, iv. 203 ;
Lear, iv. 205 ; Othello, iv. 207.

Shakspeare, Tales from, v. 5 ;
original preface to, v. 3, 431.

Shakspeare, Tales from, published, i.

66 ; Lamb's share in, ib.
She is Going, vi. 402.
Shelley, his ' squeak, ' ii. 280.
Shirley criticised, iv. 237, 251, 252,

265.
Siddons, Mrs., her exclamation on
seeing Haydon's picture, 'The
Entry into Jerusalem," i. 204.
SiDDONS, Mrs., Sonnet to, vi. 300.
Signing letters, thoughts on, ii.

135-
Smith, Mrs., the fat lady of Cam-
bridge, ii. 144.



Smiths, 'the vile,' ii. 131.

Smoking, seasons for, i. 428.

Soap, Lamb on, iii. 10 ; vi. 175.

Some Sonnets of Sir Philip Syd-
ney's, iv. 68.

Sonnets, vi. 288-300.

South Sea House, The, iii. 129 ;
description of, ib. 417.

Southern, H., his contributions to
the ' London Magazine,' i. 95.

Southey, R., acquaintance with Lamb,
i. 43 ; Lamb's quarrel with, i. 117 ;
lines in defence of Lamb, i. 140 ;
Lamb complains of, ii. 294 ; critic-
isms on his verses, ii. 33, 44 ; his
'Roderick' and ' Kehama,' critic-



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