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Charles Rufus Skinner.

Manual of patriotism : for use in the public schools of the State of New York online

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poems of each. So, a few suggestions, easily amplified, are here set
down:

I. Longfellow.

1. Sketch of Longfellow's Life.

2. Reading from Hiawatha. (Selected.)

3. Recitation, The Ship of State.

4. Recitation, Killed at the Ford.

5. Singing, America.

2. Whittier.

1. Essay, The Life of Whittier.

2. Recitation, Barbara Frietchie.

3. Reading, Laus Deo.

4. Singing, The Centennial Hymn.

5. Recitation, At Port Royal.

(152)



PATRIOTIC POETS. I( -~

3. Holmes.

1. Sketch of the Poet's Life.

2. Recitation, Old Ironsides.

3. Singing, The American Hymn.

4. Reading, A Ballad of the Boston Tea Party.

5. Recitation, Grandfather's Story of Bunker Hill.

4. Lowell.

1. Lowell's Life.

2. Reading, Character of Washington.

3. Singing, True Freedom. (Riverside Song Book.)

4. Recitation, Selection from the Commemoration Ode.

5. Singing, The Fatherland. (Riverside Song Book.)



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

GROUP VI.

THE FLAG RECALLS

i. Columbus' Day Song, Columbus.

2. Landing of the Pilgrims . Song, The Breaking Waves Dashed High.

3. Lexington and Concord. . .Song, Three Cheers for the Olden Time.

4. Fourth of July Song, Independence Day.

5. Yorktown Song, The Land of Washington.

(155)




COLUMBUS DAY.

FEW years ago " this country of ours " made a great cele-
bration in honor of the four hundredth anniversary of
the landing of Christopher Columbus on this continent.
I suppose all Empire State boys and girls can point
out on the map just the spot where the landing was
made, the cross planted, and the flag raised. Of course, it was not
the dear flag of the stars and stripes. Who can tell what banner
it was? I am quite sure you know that, — but perhaps you have for-
gotten the precise day — October 12, 1492 — when Columbus stepped
on shore, saved from the perils of the sea, and from death at the hands
of his own crew. Perhaps some of you — the older children — went
to Chicago in 1893 and saw the "White City " — a wonderful group
of buildings, filled with rare and beautiful things from every part of
the earth. And it was all in memory of the great sailor and discoverer,
Columbus. But you children cannot celebrate in that way — not even
by building palaces of play-blocks. You can recall the great navi-
gator by telling the story of his life, — his birth in far-off Genoa — his
longing for the sea — his appearance at the Court of Spain — his
reception by Queen Isabella — the sacrifices which, for his sake, she
made — his various voyages — his imprisonment and death. It is a
wonderful story, is it not? Such a story as boys and girls should
cherish because of the lessons of Faith and Perseverance which it
teaches, — lessons which may help them to the use of the same noble
qualities.



I5 8 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

SELECTIONS.

OBSERVATIONS ON THE CHARACTER OF COLUMBUS.

In Columbus were singularly combined the practical and the
poetical. His mind had grasped all kinds of knowledge, whether pro-
cured by study or observation, which bore upon his theories; impatient
of the scanty aliment of the day, his impetuous ardor, as has well been
observed, threw him into the study of the fathers of the Church, the
Arabian Jews, and the ancient geographers; while his daring, but
irregular, genius, bursting from the limits of imperfect science, bore
him to conclusions far beyond the intellectual vision of his con-
temporaries. If some of his conclusions were erroneous, they were at
least ingenious and splendid, and their error resulted from the clouds
which still hung over his peculiar path of enterprise. His own dis-
coveries enlightened the ignorance of the age, guided conjecture to
certainty, and dispelled that very darkness with which he had been
obliged to struggle.

In the progress of his discoveries he has been remarked for the
extreme sagacity and the admirable justness with which he seized upon
the phenomena of the exterior world. The variations, for instance, of
terrestrial magnetism, the direction of currents, the grouping of marine
plants, fixing one of the grand climacteric divisions of the ocean, the
temperatures changing not solely with the distance to the equator,
but also with the difference of meridians; these and similar phenomena,
as they broke upon him, were discerned with wonderful quickness of
perception, and made to contribute important principles to the stock
of general knowledge. This lucidity of spirit, this quick convertibility
of facts to principles, distinguish him from the dawn to the close of his
sublime enterprise, insomuch that with all the sallying ardor of his
imagination, his ultimate success has been admirably characterized as a
"conquest of reflection.'' — Washington Irving.



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SELECTIONS.

THE BOY COLUMBUS.

" 'Tis a wonderful story," I hear you say,

" How he struggled and worked and plead and prayed,

And faced every danger undismayed,

With a will that would neither break nor bend,

And discovered a new world in the end —

But what does it teach to a boy of to-day?

All the worlds are discovered, you know, of course,

All the rivers are traced to their utmost source:

There is nothing left for a boy to find,

If he had ever so much a mind

To become a discoverer famous;
And if we'd much rather read a book
About someone else, and the risks he took,

Why nobody, surely, can blame us."

So you think all the worlds are discovered now;

All the lands have been charted and sailed about,

Their mountains climbed, their secrets found out;

All the seas have been sailed, and their currents known —

To the uttermost isles the winds have blown

They have carried a venturing prow?

Yet there lie all about us new worlds, everywhere,

That await their discoverer's footfall; spread fair

Are electrical worlds that no eye has yet seen,

And mechanical worlds that lie hidden serene

And await their Columbus securely.
There are new worlds in Science and new worlds in Art,
And the boy who will work with his head and his heart

Will discover his new world surely.
II



162 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

All hail, Columbus, discoverer, dreamer, hero, and apostle! We
here, of every race and country, recognize the horizon which bounded
his vision, and the infinite scope of his genius. The voice of gratitude
and praise for all the blessings which have been showered upon man-
kind by his adventure is limited to no language, but is uttered in
every tongue. Neither marble nor brass can fitly form his statue.
Continents are his monument, and unnumbered millions, past, present,
and to come, who enjoy in their liberties and their happiness the fruits
of his faith, will reverently guard and preserve, from century to cen-
tury, his name and fame. — Chauncey Mitchell Depcw, from Dedicatory
Oration at World's Columbian Exposition.




-IE LANDING OF THE PILGRIMS.

N the year 1620 — some people say on December
2 1 st, others December 22a. — a company of Pil-
grims, as they are called, landed at a place now
known as Plymouth, on the coast of Massachu-
setts. They were English folk, but came to
this country straight from Holland, having been
driven from their former home in England by religious persecution.
But I need not tell here the story of their sufferings on the slow
and stormy voyage across the ocean — nor how cold and cheerless
was the landing in the depth of winter. What child has not read
it in the history book, or heard the story repeated at the fireside?
Yet no matter how often the story may have been read, or told, it is well
to keep in mind and to celebrate, at least once a year, the good traits
of the Forefathers.

They were not real generous men and women in their treatment
of those who differed from them in belief, yet they were mild indeed
in comparison with the Puritans, as they were called, — a company of
men and women who came to this country much later in the century.
But if we cannot celebrate the kindness of the Pilgrims, we certainly
may their faith. How greatly they needed it in all their troubles on
land and tempests on sea, and how grandly they showed it! And so
with their courage. Was it not a splendid trait in their character?
Neither starvation, disease, nor the Indian's tomahawk could make
them fear. (Just here might come in a study of " The Indian " in our
country's history.) And so, children, study out and tell to your teach-
ers other good things about these early and hardy colonists, — for

" they fought a good fight."

(163)



l6 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

THE MEDITATIONS OF COLUMBIA, 1876.

Mayflower, Mayflower, slowly hither flying,

Trembling westward o'er yon balking sea,
Hearts within, " Farewell, dear England," sighing,
Winds without, " But dear in vain," replying.
Gray-lipped waves, about thee, shouted, crying,
" No! It shall not be!"



Jamestown, out of thee;
Plymouth, thee; thee, Albany.
Winter cries, "Ye freeze; away!"
Hunger cries, "Ye starve; away!"
Vengeance cries, "Your graves shall stay!"

Then old shapes and masks of things,
Frames like Faiths, or clothes like kings;
Ghosts of Goods, once fleshed and fair,
Grown foul Bads in alien air;
War, and his most noisy lords.
Tongued with lithe and poisoned swords,
Error, Terror, Rage, and Crime.
All, in a windy night of time,
Cried to me, from land and sea —
"No! Thou shalt not be!"

Now Praise to God's oft-granted grace.

Now Praise to Man's undaunted face,

Despite the land, despite the sea,

I was, I am, and I shall be.

How long, Good Angel, O. how long?

Sing me, from heaven, a man's own song!

" Long as thine Art shall love true love,

Long as thy Science truth shall know,
Long as thy Eagle harms no Dove,

Long as thy Law by law shall grow,
Long as thy God is God above.

Thy brother every man below,
So long, dear Land of all my love,

Thy name shall shine, thy fame shall glow! "

— Sidney Lanier.



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THE FLAG RECALLS.



167



SELECTIONS.

Here, on this rock, and on this sterile soil,

Began the kingdom, not of kings, but men;

Began the making of the world again.

Here centuries sank, and from the hither brink,

A new world reached and raised an old world link,

When English hands, by wider vision taught,
And here revived, in spite of sword and stake,
Their ancient freedom of the Wapentake.

Here struck the seed — the Pilgrims' roofless town,
Where equal rights and equal bonds were set;
Where all the people, equal-franchised, met;

Where doom was writ of privilege and crown;

Where human breath blew all the idols down;
Where crests were naught, where vulture flags were furled,
And common men began to own the world!

— John Boyle O'Reilly.



LANDING OF THE PILGRIMS.

Methinks I see it now, that one solitary, adventurous vessel, the
Mayflower of a forlorn hope, freighted with the prospects of a future
state, and bound across the unknown sea. I behold it pursuing, with
a thousand misgivings, the uncertain, the tedious voyage. Suns rise
and set, and weeks and months pass, and winter surprises them on
the deep, but brings them not the sight of the wished-for shore. I
see them, now, scantily supplied with provisions, crowded almost to
suffocation in their ill-stored prison, delayed by calms, pursuing a cir-
cuitous route; and now, driven in fury before the raging tempest, in
their scarcely seaworthy vessel. The awful voice of the storm howls
through the rigging. The laboring masts seem straining from their
base; the dismal sound of the pumps is heard; the ship leaps, as it
were, madly from billow to billow; the ocean breaks and settles with
ingulfing floods over the floating deck, and beats with deadening
weight against the staggering vessel. I see them escaped from these
perils, pursuing their all but desperate undertaking, and landed at last,
after a five months' passage, on the ice-clad rocks of Plymouth, weak



j68 manual of patriotism.

and exhausted from the voyage, poorly armed, scantily provisioned,
depending on the charity of their ship-master for a draught of beer on
board, drinking nothing but water on shore, without shelter, without
means, surrounded by hostile tribes.

Shut now the volume of history, and tell me, on any principle
of human probability, what shall be the fate of this handful of adven-
turers? * * * Student of history, compare for me the baffled
projects, the deserted settlements, the abandoned adventurers of other
times, and find the parallel of this. Was it the winter storm, beating
upon the houseless heads of women and children? was it hard labor
and spare meals? was it disease? was it the tomahawk? was it the deep
malady of a blighted hope, a ruined enterprise, and a broken heart,
aching in its last moments at the recollections of the loved and left,
beyond the sea? was it some or all of them united that hurried this
forsaken company to their melancholy fate? And is it possible that
neither of these causes, that not all combined, were able to blast this
bud of hope! Is it possible that from a beginning so feeble, so frail, so
worthy not so much of admiration as of pity, there has gone forth a
progress so steady, a growth so wonderful, a reality so important, a
promise yet to be fulfilled so glorious! — Edward Everett.



LEXINGTON AND CONCORD.




HESE are memorable places on the map of Ameri-
can history. For the brave stand a few colonial
farmers there made against trained British regu-
lars was the opening fight of a Revolution, a strug-
gle for independence, which never ceased nor
slackened until England gave up the contest at
Yorktown, seven years later.
This fight at Lexington and Concord was fought April 17, 1775.
Even yet, that is a great day in New England, and kept with more
ceremony and enthusiasm than the Fourth of July. Let me tell you
what the boys in Lexington do on that day: Early in the morning
they rise up, hurry into their clothes and march away to Concord, over
the very ground the soldiers trod a century and a quarter ago. On
their march, they pass by many places where now are memorial tablets,
telling what was done here and there along the whole line of their
journey. Who cannot see what a vividness and sense of reality this
early morning march, year by year, must give to these young patriots?
But if New York children cannot actually travel on foot from Lexing-
ton to Concord, playing soldier, they may, in imagination, walk along
the avenue of History, seeing by the roadside the inscriptions and
memorials which History herself has put there, that the Nation may
keep in mind the dangers and hardships endured by the men of olden
time, that they might secure to themselves and their posterity the

blessings of independence.

(169)



I7 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.



SELECTIONS.

CONCORD HYMN.

By the rude bridge that arched the flood,

Their flag to April's breeze unfurled,
Here once the embattled farmers stood,

And fired the shot heard round the world.

The foe long since in silence slept;

Alike the conqueror silent sleeps;
And Time the ruined bridge has swept

Down the dark stream which seaward creeps.

On this green bank, by this soft stream,

We set to-day a votive stone;
That memory may their deed redeem,

When like our sires, our sons are gone.

Spirit, that made these heroes dare

To die, and leave their children free,
Bid Time and Nature gently spare

The shaft we raise to them and thee.

— Ralph Waldo Emerson,

THE REVOLUTIONARY ALARM.

Darkness closed upon the country and upon the town, but it was
no night for sleep. Heralds on swift relays of horses transmitted the
war message from hand to hand, till village repeated to village, the
sea to the backwoods, the plains to the highlands, and it was never
suffered to droop till it had been borne North and South and East
and West, throughout the land. It spread over the bays that receive
the Saco and the Penobscot ; its loud reveille broke the rest of the trap-
pers of New Hampshire, and, ringing like bugle notes from peak to
peak, overleapt the Green Mountains, swept onward to Montreal, and
descended the ocean river till the responses were echoed from the cliffs
at Quebec. The hills along the Hudson told to one another the tale.
As the summons hurried to the South, it was one day at New York,
in one more at Philadelphia, the next it lighted a watch-fire at Balti-
more, thence it waked an answer at Annapolis. Crossing the Potomac



THE FLAG RECALLS. ^

near Mt. Vernon, it was sent forward, without a halt, to Williamsburg.
It traversed the Dismal Swamp to Nansemond, along the route of the
first emigrants to North Carolina. It moved onward and still onward,
through boundless groves of evergreen, to Newbern and to
Wilmington.

" For God's sake, forward it by night and day/' wrote Cornelius
Harnett, by the express which sped for Brunswick. Patriots of South
Carolina caught up its tones at the border and despatched it to Charles-
ton, and, through pines and palmettos and moss-clad live-oaks, farther
to the South, till it resounded among the New England settlements
beyond the Savannah. The Blue Ridge took up the voice and made
it heard from one end to the other of the valley of Virginia. The
Alleghanies, as they listened, opened their barriers that the " loud
call " might pass through to the hardy riflemen on the Holstein, the
Watauga and the French Broad. Ever renewing its strength, power-
ful enough even to create a commonwealth, it breathed its inspiring
word to the first settlers of Kentucky, so that hunters who made
their halt in the valleys of the Elkhorn commemorated the nineteenth
day of April, 1776, by naming their encampment " Lexington." \\ ith
one impulse the Colonies sprung to arms; with one spirit they pledged
themselves to each other, " to be ready for the extreme event." With
one heart the continent cried, " Liberty or death! " — George Bancroft.

It was a brilliant April night. The winter had been unusually
mild, and the spring very forward. The hills were already green; the
early grain waved in the fields; and the air was sweet with blossoming
orchards. Already the robins whistled, the blue-bird sang, and the
benediction of peace rested upon the landscape. Under the cloudless
moon, the soldiers silently marched, and Paul Revere swiftly rode,
galloping through Medford and West Cambridge, rousing every house
as he went, spurring for Lexington, and Hancock, and Adams, and
evading the British patrols who had been sent out to stop the news.
Stop the news! Already the village church bells were beginning to
ring the alarm, as the pulpits beneath them had been ringing for many
a year. In the awakening houses lights flashed from window to
window. Drums beat faintly far away and on every side. Signal guns



IJ2



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.



flashed and echoed. The watch-dogs barked, the cocks crew. Stop
the news! Stop the sunrise! The murmuring night trembled with the
summons so earnestly expected, so dreaded, so desired. And as, long
ago, the voice rang out at midnight along the Syrian shore, wailing
that great Pan was dead, but in the same moment the choiring angels
whispered, "Glory to God in the highest, for Christ is born!" so, if
the stern alarm of that April night seemed to many a wistful and loyal
heart to portend the passing glory of British dominion and the tragical
chance of war, it whispered to them with prophetic inspiration, " Good-
will to men: America is born!" — George William Curtis, from the
oration delivered at the centennial celebration of Concord fight.



THREE CHEERS FOR THE OLDEN TIME.

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A shout went up, and a peal of joy Rang out on the win - 'try blast, my boys.

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Like them we'll boast of the land we love, And her proud flag stream-ing high, my boys ;
The grass is green where they calm-ly rest. Those vet - 'rans true and brave, my boys ;



Online LibraryCharles Rufus SkinnerManual of patriotism : for use in the public schools of the State of New York → online text (page 10 of 31)