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was ever a ruler on a large scale. In intellect he was immensely
superior to Washington; in integrity, immeasurably below him. For
one thousand years no king in Christendom has shown such greatness,
or gives us so high a type of manly virtue. He never dissembled. He
sought nothing for himself. In him there was no unsound spot,
nothing little or mean in his character. The whole was clean and
presentable. We think better of mankind because he lived, adorning
the earth with a life so noble. — Theodore Parker.

In the production of Washington it does really appear as if Nature
was endeavoring to improve upon herself, and that all the virtues of
the ancient world were but so many studies preparatory to the patriot
of the new. Individual instances, no doubt, there were: splendid
exemplifications of some single qualification. Caesar was merciful,
Scipio was continent, Hannibal was patient; but it was reserved for
Washington to blend them all in one, and, like the lovely masterpiece
of the Grecian artist, to exhibit in one glow of associated beauty the
pride of every model and the perfection of every master. As a gen-
eral, he marshalled the peasant into a veteran and supplied by disci-
pline the absence of experience. As a statesman he enlarged the
policy of the cabinet into the most comprehensive system of general
advantage; and such was the wisdom of his views and the philosophy
of his counsels that to the soldier and the statesman he almost added
the character of the sage. A conqueror, he was untainted with the
crime of blood; a revolutionist, he was free from any stain of treason,



2 c 4 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

for aggression commenced the contest, and a country called him to the
command; liberty unsheathed his sword, necessity stained, victory
returned it. If he had paused here history might doubt what station
to assign him, whether at the head of her citizens or her soldiers, her
heroes or her patriots. But the last glorious act crowned his career
and banishes hesitation. Who, like Washington, after having freed
a country, resigned her crown and retired to a cottage rather than
reign in a capitol! Immortal man! He took from the battle its crime,
and from the conquest its chains; he left the victorious the glory of
his self-denial, and turned upon the vanquished only the retribution
of his mercy. Happy, proud America! The lightnings of heaven
yielded to your philosophy! The temptations of earth could not seduce
your patriotism. — Charles Phillips.



ODE FOR WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY.



Oliver Wendell Holmes.



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By special arrangement with Houghton, Mifflin & Co.



THE FLAG CONSECRATES THE BIRTHDAY OF WASHINGTON. 2 tf

SELECTIONS.

Just honor to Washington can only be rendered by observing his
precepts and imitating his example. He has built his own monu-
ment. We, and those who come after us, in successive generations,
are its appointed, its privileged guardians. The widespread republic
is the future monument to Washington. Maintain its independence.
Uphold its constitution. Preserve its union. Defend its liberty.
Let it stand before the world in all its original strength and beauty,
securing peace, order, equality, and freedom to all within its bound-
aries; and shedding light, and hope, and joy upon the pathway of
human liberty throughout the world; and Washington needs no other
monument. Other structures may fully testify our veneration for him:
this, this alone, can adequately illustrate his services to mankind.
Nor does he need even this. The republic may perish, the wide arch
of our ranged Union may fall, star by star its glories may expire, stone
by stone its columns and its capitol may moulder and crumble, all
other names which adorn its annals may be forgotten, but as long as
human hearts shall anywhere pant, or human tongues anywhere plead,
for a true, rational, constitutional liberty, those hearts shall enshrine
the memory, and those tongues prolong the fame, of George Wash-
ington. — Robert C. Winthrop.

American youth know that Washington captured Cornwallis,
made a brilliant retreat after the battle of Long Island and worried and
fretted the British armies into exhaustion during a seven years' war.
They also know that he was President twice and declined to become
President a third time. There are not many who kn6w that the only
time tears were seen in his eyes was at the close of the war, when his
army, encamped upon the banks of the Hudson, was about to be dis-
banded. There were men in his army who were fearful that the ambi-
tions and jealousies of some of those who had been of influence during
the Revolution would attempt to gain great personal power. There
were others who believed that there would be established in America
a constitutional monarchy, modeled after that of Great Britain. The
nation, as we now know it, was a government yet to be created.
17



258



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.



So a company of officers — men having influence — having talked
this matter over, agreed to go to Washington, ask him to accept .the
crown of empire and to promise him the support of the army in thus
establishing a personal throne. When they approached Washington,
he thought that as friends they had come to him for counsel. He
was in a happy frame of mind that morning. The war had ended
victoriously, and he had already been in consultation with Hamilton
respecting the form of civil government which the now free colonies
should undertake.

They offered him the crown in but a single sentence. A few
years before, across the river, Washington, being seated at breakfast,
had been approached by an officer, who told him that Benedict Arnold
had fled after an attempt to betray West Point into the hands of the
British. The news was appalling, for he had admired Arnold's splendid
courage and loved the man. Yet so great was his self-command, so
superb his capacity for controlling emotion, SO' thoroughly had he
schooled himself to face adversity with calmness, that those about
him only saw a look of sad sternness come to his countenance as he
uttered the now historic words, " Whom can we trust? "

But when these officers proposed to him the empire, and tried
to put the sceptre in his hand, Washington broke down. There was
sorrow and there was anger in his countenance and in his manner.
Tears came to his eyes, and, when he dismissed them with a sad gesture
and only a brief word, these men realized that Washington had been
shocked and grieved that it could have entered their hearts that he
could for one moment have regarded an empire as possible, or could
have fought through those seven years that he might himself attain the
throne. In his action Washington not only revealed his moral great-
ness, but made it impossible that a monarchy could ever be established
in the United States.

Fame was too earnest in her joy,

Too proud of such a son
To let a robe and title

Mask our noble Washington.

The fame of Washington stands apart from every other in his-
tory, shining with a truer lustre and a more benignant glory. With



THE FLAG CONSECRATES THE BIRTHDAY OF WASHINGTON. 259

us his memory remains a national property, where all sympathies meet
in unison. Under all dissensions and amid all storms of party, his pre-
cepts and examples speak to us from the grave with a paternal appeal;
and his name — by all revered — forms a universal tie of brother-
hood, — a watchword of our Union. — John Fiske.

No nobler figure ever stood in the forefront of a nation's life.
Washington was grave and courteous in address; his manners were
simple and unpretending; his silence and the serene calmness of his
temper spoke of perfect self-mastery; but there was little in his out-
ward bearing to reveal the grandeur of soul which lifts his figure, with
all the simple majesty of an ancient statue, out of the smaller passions,
the meaner impulses of the world around him. It was only as the
weary fight went on that the colonists learned, little by little, the
greatness of their leader, his clear judgment, his heroic endurance,
his silence under difficulties, his calmness in the hour of danger or
defeat, the patience with which he waited, the quickness and hardness
with which he struck, the lofty and serene sense of duty that never
swerved from its task through resentment or jealousy, that never,
through war or peace, felt the touch of a meaner ambition, that knew
no aim save that of guarding the freedom of his fellow-countrymen,
and no personal longing save that of returning to his own fireside when
their freedom was secured. — Green's " Short History of the English
People."

Washington, from first to last, inspired every one with the idea
that he could be trusted. No one ever suspected him for a moment,
as Caesar, as Frederick, as Napoleon were with reason suspected, —
with a design to use the power committed to him for the furtherance
of his own ambition. Here was a man who thought only of his duty,
who resigned power with far more alacrity than he assumed it, and
who paid the bond of patriotism in full. — Henry M. Tozvle.

Of all the great men in history, Washington was the most invari-
ably judicious. Those who knew him well noticed that he had keen
sensibilities and strong passions; but his power of self-command never
failed him, and no act of his public life can be traced to personal caprice,



260



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.



ambition, or resentment. In the despondency of long-continued fail-
ure, in the elation of sudden success, at times when his soldiers were
deserting by hundreds, and when malignant plots were formed against
his reputation, amid the constant quarrels, rivalries, and jealousies of
his subordinates, in the dark hour of national ingratitude, and in the
midst of the most universal and intoxicating flattery, he was always
the same calm, wise, just, and single-minded man, pursuing the course
which he believed to be right, without fear, or favor, or fanaticism;
equally free from the passions that spring from interest and from the
passions that spring from imagination. Washington never acted on
the impulse of an absorbing or uncalculating enthusiasm, and he valued
very highly fortune, position, and reputation, but at the command of
duty he was ready to risk and sacrifice them all. He was, in the
highest sense of the words, a gentleman and a man of honor, and he
carried into public life the severest standard of private morals. —
William E. H. Lccky, from " The History of England in the Eighteenth
Century."

Arise! 'tis the day of our Washington's glory;

The garlands uplift for our liberties won.
O! sing in your gladness his echoing story,

Whose sword swept for freedom the fields of the sun.

Not with gold, nor with gems, but with evergreens vernal,
And the banner of stars that the continent span,

Crown, crown we the chief of the heroes eternal,
Who lifted his sword for the birthright of man.

— Hezekiah Butter worth.

When the storm of battle blows darkest and rages highest, the
memory of Washington shall nerve every American arm, and cheer
every American heart. — Rufus CJwatc.

It was not character that fought the Trenton campaign and car-
ried the revolution to victory. It was military genius. It was not
character that read the future of America and created our foreign
policy. It was statesmanship of the highest order. Without the great
moral qualities that Washington possessed his career would not have



THE FLAG CONSECRATES THE BIRTHDAY OF WASHINGTON. 2 fa

been possible; but it would have been quite as impossible if the intellect
had not equalled the character.

There is no need to argue the truism that Washington was a
great man, for that is universally admitted. But it is very needful
that his genius should be rightly understood, and the right under-
standing of it is by no means universal.

His character has been exalted at the expense of his intellect, and
his goodness has been so much insisted upon both by admirers and
critics that we are in danger of forgetting that he had a great mind
as well as high moral worth. — Henry Cabot Lodge.

With the sure sagacity of a leader of men, Washington at once
selected, for the highest and most responsible stations, the three chief
Americans who represented the three forces in the nation which alone
could command success in the institution of the government. Hamil-
ton was the head, Jefferson was the heart, and John Jay was the con-
science. Washington's just and serene ascendancy was the lambent
flame in which these beneficent powers were fused, and nothing less
than that ascendancy could have ridden the whirlwind and directed the
storm that burst around him.— George William Curtis.

Washington's appointments, when President, were made with a
view to destroy party and not to create it, his object being to gather
all the talent of the country in support of the national government;
and he bore many things which were personally disagreeable in an
endeavor to do this.— Paul Leicester Ford.

Men are beginning to feel that Washington stands out, not only
as the leading American, but as the leading man of the race. Of men
not named in Sacred Scripture, more human beings this day know
and honor the name of George Washington than that of any other
of the sons of men. — Charles F. Deems.

An Englishman by race and lineage, Washington incarnated in his
own person and character every best trait and attribute that have
made the Anglo-Saxon name a glory to its children and a terror to
its enemies throughout the world. But he was not so much an



2 5 2 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

Englishman that, when the time came for him to be so, he was not
even more an American; and in all that he was and did, a patriot so
exalted, and a leader so wise and great, that what men called him when
he came to be inaugurated as the first President of the United States
the civilized world has not since then ceased to call him — the Father
of his Country. — Right Rev. Henry C. Potter.

There is Franklin, with his first proposal of Continental union.
There is James Otis, with his great argument against Writs of Assist-
ance, and Samuel Adams, with his inexorable demand for the removal
of the British regiments from Boston. There is Quincy, and there
is Warren, the protomartyr of Bunker Hill. There is Jefferson,
with the Declaration of Independence fresh from his pen, and John
Adams close at his side. There are Hamilton and Madison and Jay
bringing forward the Constitution; but, towering above them all is
Washington, the consummate commander, the incomparable Presi-
dent, the world-renowned patriot. — Robert C. PVinthrop.

CARMEN BELLICOSUM.

In their ragged regimentals
Stood the old Continentals,

Yielding not,
When the grenadiers were lunging,
And like hail fell the plunging

Cannon-shot;

When the files

Of the isles,
From the smoky night encampment, bore the banner of the rampant

Unicorn,
And grummer, grummer, grummer rolled the roll of the drummer,

Through the morn!

Then with eyes to the front all,
And with guns horizontal,

Stood our sires;
And the balls whistled deadly,
And in streams flashing redly

Blazed the fires;

As the roar

On the shore,



THE FLAG CONSECRATES THE BIRTHDAY OF WASHINGTON. 2 6\

Swept the strong battle-breakers o'er the green-sodded acres

Of the plain;
And louder, .louder, louder cracked the black gunpowder,

Cracked amain!

Now like smiths at their forges
Worked the red St. George's

Cannoniers;
And the " villainous saltpetre "
Rung a fierce, discordant metre

Round their ears;

As the swift

Storm-drift,
With hot sweeping anger, came the Horse Guard's clangor

On our flanks.
Then higher, higher, higher burned the old-fashioned fire

Through the ranks!

Then the old-fashioned colonel
Galloped through the white infernal

Powder-cloud;
And his broadsword was swinging,
And his brazen throat was ringing

Trumpet loud.

Then the blue

Bullets flew,
And the trooper jackets redden at the touch of the leaden

Rifle-breath;
And rounder, rounder, rounder, roared the iron six-pounder.

Hurling death!

— Guy Humphrey McMaster.
(This stirring poem was written when the author was only nineteen years old.)



GOD SPEED THE RIGHT.



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I



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.
THE FLAG BLESSES

THE

BIRTHDAY OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

(Feb. 12, 1809.)

Quotations In Prose and Poetry.

Selections Song, The Man for Me.

Selections Song, Laus Deo.

(267)




THE BIRTHDAY OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

T is indeed necessary that children, in so far as they are

capable, should know the theory of our government, and

the great events that, like milestones, have marked its

course. But, after all, theories and abstract facts never

can take such hold upon the minds of children — upon

memory and imagination — nor stir them to such a sense of their

country's worth — as can the history, the life, of a great man. It

will be difficult to make the little folks understand the causes, direct

or indirect, which led to the Civil War of '61. Indeed, who of us who

are older and trained to teach are competent to tell all the influences

that ended in that terrible struggle? But what child can fail to know

and feel the real greatness of the personality and life of Abraham

Lincoln? He was what we may call a boy's man — having that sense

of humor, that spirit of fun which appeals so irresistibly to boys, —

yes, even to " boys of larger growth." Let much be made, therefore,

in any celebration of Lincoln's birthday, of those incidents, so strange,

so fascinating, which marked his early boyhood in his cabin home —

of the trials which beset his youth-time, his wonderful skill in political

debate — his perilous journey to the city of Washington, there to be

inaugurated President of the United States — his care for the soldiers

in the field and the poor black men in slavery in the South, — and, at

length, his martyr death. (Just here might come in a study of " The

Negro " in our history.) Fear not to blend with all, the stories which

made him as well known as his statesmanship — indeed, which were,

many of them, illustrations of the very spirit and philosophy of

statesmanship.

(269)



2 yo MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

QUOTATIONS.

A man born for his time. — Morrison R. Waite.

Abraham Lincoln was the genius of common sense. — Charles Dudley Warner.

His constant thought was his country and how to serve it. — Charles Sumner.

A name that shall live through all coming time,
Unbounded by country, by language, or clime.

— C. P. Corliss.

Washington was the father, and Lincoln the savior of his country. — Henry L.

Dawes.

The typical American, pure and simple. — Asa Gray.

The plain, honest, prudent man, — safe in council, wise in action, pure in
purpose. — John C. New.

Patriot, who made the pageantries of kings
Like shadows seem, and unsubstantial things.

— R. IV. Dale.

Lincoln was the purest, the most generous, the most magnanimous of men. —
Gen. IV. T. Sherman.

His career closed at a moment when its dramatic unity was complete. — Governor
Andreiv, of Massachusetts.

Abraham Lincoln was worthy to be trusted and to be loved by all his country-
men. — Gen. Howard.

He lives in endless fame,
All honor to his patriot name.

— H. C. Ballard.

He stands before us and will so stand in history as the Moses of this Israel of
ours. — Charles Lowe.

A man of great ability, pure patriotism, unselfish nature, full of forgiveness
for his enemies. — Ulysses Simpson Grant.



THE FLAG BLESSES THE BIRTHDAY OF LINCOLN. 2 yi

Kind, unpretending, patient, laborious, brave, wise, great and good, such was



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