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Charles Rufus Skinner.

Manual of patriotism : for use in the public schools of the State of New York online

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May its lustrous stars fade never,

Till the stars shall pale on high:
While there's right the wrong defeating,
While there's hope in true hearts beating,

Truth and freedom shall not die.

As it floated long before us,
Be it ever floating o'er us,

O'er our land from shore to shore:
There are freemen yet to wave it,
Millions who would die to save it,

Wave it, save it, evermore!

— Dexter Smith.

All nature sings wildly the song of the free,

The Red, White, and Blue float o'er land and o'er sea:

The White, in each billow that breaks on the shore,

The Blue, in the arching that canopies o'er

The land of our birth in its glory outspread,

And sunset dyes deepen and glow into red:

Day fades into night and the red stripe retires,

But stars o'er the blue light their sentinel fires;

And though night be gloomy, with clouds overspread,

Each star holds its place in the field overhead.

When scatter the clouds and the tempest is through,

We count every star in the field of the blue.

— Anonymous.



THE FLAG MAKES SACRED JUNE FOURTEENTH. 315

It is the flag of history. Those thirteen stripes tell the story of
our colonial struggle, of the clays of '76. They speak of the savage
wilderness, of old Independence Hall, of Valley Forge, and Yorktown.
Those stars tell the story of our nation's growth, how it has come
from weakness to strength, until its gleam, in the sunrise over the
forests of Maine, crimsons the sunset's dying beams on the golden
sands of California. — 5. L. Watcrbury.

The stars of our morn on our banner borne,

With the iris of Heaven are blended,
The hands of our sires first mingled those fires,

By us they shall be defended!
Then hail the true, the Red, White, and Blue,

The flag of the " Constellation: "
It sails as it sailed, by our forefathers hailed,

O'er battles that made us a nation.

******
Peace, peace to the world, is our motto unfurled,

Tho' we shun not a field that is gory:
At home or abroad, fearing none but our God;

We will carve out our pathway to glory 1

— Thomas Buchanan Read.

In radiance heavenly fair,

Floats on the peaceful air
That flag that never stooped from victory's pride:

Those stars that softly gleam,

Those stripes that o'er us stream,
In war's grand agony were sanctified:

A holy standard, pure and free
To light the home of peace, or blaze in victory.

— F. Marion Crawford.

Washed in the blood of the brave and the blooming,

Snatched from the altars of insolent fees,
Burning with star fires, but never consuming,

Flash its broad ribbons of lily and rose.

*****

God bless the flag and its loyal defenders,

While its broad folds ever the battle-field wave,
Till the dim star-wreath rekindle its splendors,

Washed from its stains in the blood of the brave!

— Oliver Wendell Holmes.



316



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

THE AMERICAN FLAG.
When Freedom, from her mountain height,

Unfurled her standard to the air,
She tore the azure robe of Night,

And set the stars of glory there.
She mingled with its gorgeous dyes
The milky baldric of the skies,
And striped its pure, celestial white,
With streakings of the morning light:
Then, from his mansion in the sun,
She called her eagle bearer down,
And gave into his mighty hand
The symbol of her chosen land.



Flag of the free heart's hope and home!

By angel hands to valor given!
Thy stars have lit the welkin dome,

And all thy hues were born in Heaven.
Forever float that standard sheet!

Where breathes the foe but falls before us,
With Freedom's soU beneath our feet,

And Freedom's banner streaming o'er us?

— 7. Rodman Drake.

Thou lofty ensign of the free.

May every land thy glory know,
And every freeman cling to thee,

While breezes 'mid thy folds shall flow.
May hand, and heart, and hopes, and zeal,

Be ever by thy form inspired,
And, should it shake the commonweal,

May every soul by thee be fired,
Each patriot heart discern amid thy form,
A beacon star in the battle storm.

— I. C. Pray, Jr.



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From Levermore's " Academy Song Book." Published by Ginn & Co. By permission.



THE FLAG MAKES SACRED JUNE FOURTEENTH. 379

Every nation has its flag. Every ship in foreign waters is known
by the colors she shows at her peak. When we were colonies of Eng-
land, we sailed and fought under her flag. We finally rebelled ; it was
nothing less; and to England our George Washington was merely a
leading rebel. We were thirteen little States, fringed along on the
Atlantic coast, with the unbroken forest behind us, and among the
great family of nations we had neither place nor name. We had to
fight to obtain due respect from all the great old nations who were
looking on. Of course, we had no flag; we had to earn that too.
Our army at Cambridge celebrated New Year's Day, January i, 1776,
by unfurling for the first time in an American camp the flag of thirteen
stripes. On the 14th of June, 1776, Congress, which met then in
Philadelphia, settled upon our style of flag. " It shall have," said
they, "thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; and the union of the
States shall be indicated by thirteen stars, white, in a blue field, repre-
senting a new constellation." They followed up the adoption of a
flag by a Declaration of Independence; and then we went to fighting
harder than ever, and France acknowledged our independence, and
helped us to make England acknowledge it. Afterward it was decided
to add another star for every new State as it joined the Union. So
that the constellation, as it is now, with forty-five stars in it, has grown
a good deal from the original thirteen. But the stripes still remain
the same in number, to remind us of the first little band of States
" who fought it out " against Great Britain. — Kate Foote.



Stream, Old Glory, bear your stars

High among the seven;
Stream a watchfire on the dark,

And make a sign in Heaven!
Out upon the four winds blow,

Tell the world your story:
Thrice in heart's blood dipped before

They called your name Old Glory!

When from sky to sky you float,

Far in wide savannas,
Vast horizons lost in light

Answer with hosannas.



320



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM,

Symbol of unmeasured power,

Blessed promise sealing,
All your hills are hills of God,

And all your founts are healing.

Still to those, the wronged of earth,

Sanctuary render:
For hope, and home, and Heaven they see

Within your sacred splendor!
Stream, Old Glory, bear your stars

High among the seven:
Stream a watchfire on the dark,

And make a sign in Heaven!

— Harriet Prescott Spofford.

THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER.

Oh, say, can you see by the dawn's early light
What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming,

Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight,
O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming?

And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air,

Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there:

Oh, say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave

O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave?

On that shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep,
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep,

As it fitfully blows, now conceals, now discloses?
Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
In full glory reflected, now shines on the stream:
Tis the star-spangled banner — Oh, long may it wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!
*******
Oh, thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand

Between their loved homes and the war's desolation!
Blest with victory and peace, may the heaven-rescued land

Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation.
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just;
And this be our motto: " In God is our trust; "
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave!

— Francis Scott Key.



THE FLAG MAKES SACRED JUNE FOURTEENTH.



321



SALUTE THE FLAG.

Off with your hat as the flag goes by!

And let the heart have its say:
You're man enough for a tear in your eye

That you will not wipe away.

You're man enough for a thrill that goes

To your very finger tips —
Ay! the lump just then in your throat that rose,

Spoke more than your parted lips.

Lift up your boy on your shoulder high,

And show him the faded shred;
Those stripes would be red as the sunset sky

If death could have dyed them red.

Off with your hat as the flag goes by!

Uncover the youngster's head;
Teach him to hold it holy and high

For the sake of its sacred dead.

— H. C. Bunner.

OLD FLAG FOREVER.

She's up there, — Old Glory, — where lightnings are sped;

She dazzles the nations with ripples of red;

And she'll wave for us living, or droop o'er us dead, —

The flag of our country forever!
She's up there, — Old Glory, — how bright the stars stream!
And the stripes, like red signals of liberty, gleam!
And we dare for her, living, or dream the last dream,

'Neath the flag of our country forever!
She's up there, — Old Glory, — no tyrant-dealt scars,
No blur on her brightness, no stain on her stars!
The brave blood of heroes hath crimsoned her bars.

She's the flag of our country forever.

— Frank L. Stanton.

THE BANNER OF THE STARS.
We'll never have a new flag, for ours is the true flag,
The true flag, the true flag, the Red, White, and Blue flag.
Hurrah! boys, hurrah! we will carry to the wars
The old flag, the free flag, the Banner of the stars!
And what tho' its white shall be crimsoned with our blood?

And what tho' its stripes shall be shredded in the storms?
To the torn flag, the worn flag, we'll keep our promise good,

And we'll bear the starry blue flag with gallant hearts and arms.

2i — R- IV. Raymond.



3 22 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

The flag of a nation is the sign of its sovereignty. The American
flag is but the historic parallel of older nations, and yet it stands alone
in this — that from the day it was first unfurled in the breeze it has
stood for manly independence and a people's government. It has
never been sullied by ignoble conquests, and it has been glorified by
the proudest possible service in the cause of human freedom.

And it is a curious fact that it is the oldest flag among the great
nations of the world in its characteristic present form. Most of the
older nations have modified the design of their flags within a hundred
years, while ours remains unchanged.

What splendid memories cluster about this beautiful flag! What
heroic deeds have made immortal the gallant volunteer heroes who
have defended it through ail its perils and triumphs of over 120 years,
as it has floated in the van of the march of American progress and
civilization on this continent! — Albert D. Shaw, Commander-in-Chief
(1899- 1 900) G. A. R.

The history of our country is grandly illustrated in our Stars and
Stripes. New stars have been added to its field of blue as new States
have been admitted into our Union. It had its origin in the era of
Washington, when our republic was established, and it had its greatest
trial in the epoch of Lincoln, when the mightiest civil war of the world
tested its power and vindicated its supreme control and command over
the discordant elements arrayed in deadly and brave attempt to destroy
it. To-day this flag stands for no one party or section, but floats over
the whole country, one and undivided, without sectional hates, united
in the bonds of universal liberty and in the sentiments of an inspiring
American civilization. It is the proud sign of peace among ourselves
and with all the world. — Albert D. Shaw.

Our beautiful flag is surrounded by touching memories and asso-
ciations. Its bright stripes and fair stars are perishable, but the senti-
ments it teaches, like the spirit of liberty, can never die. " These shall
resist the Empire of decay, when time is o'er and worlds have passed
away." Let it be treasured as one of the greatest inspiring factors in



THE FLAG MAKES SACRED JUNE FOURTEENTH. , 2 ,

the blessed work of science and art here devoted to the uplifting of the
youth of our land along the plane of peace and happiness, and may it
inspire coming generations to

Stand by the flag! Its folds have streamed in glory,

To foes a fear, to friends a festal robe;
And spread in rhythmic lines the sacred story,

Of Freedom's triumphs over all the globe.

Stand by the flag! On land and ocean billow,

By it our fathers stood, unmoved and true;
Living, defended; dying, for their pillow,

With their last blessing, passed it on to you.

Stand by the flag! All doubt and treason scorning,

Believe, with courage firm and faith sublime,
That it will float until the eternal morning

Pales in its glories all the lights of time.

— Extract from address presenting flag to the Brooklyn Institute of
Arts and Sciences, from Albert D. Shaw.



HATS OFF!

Hats off!

Along the street there comes

A blare of bugles, a ruffle of drums,

A flash of color beneath the sky:
Hats off!

The flag is passing by!

Blue and crimson and white it shines,

Over the steel-tipped, ordered lines.

Hats off!

The colors before us fly;

But more than the flag is passing by.

Sea-fights and land-fights, grim and great,
Fought to make and to save the State;
Weary marches and sinking ships;
Cheers of victory on dying lips;



3 2 4



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

Days of plenty and years of peace,
March of a strong land's swift increase:
Equal justice, right and law,
Stately honor and reverent awe;

Sign of a nation, great and strong

To ward her people from foreign wrong;

Pride and glory and honor, all

Live in the colors to stand or fall.

Hats off!

Along the street there comes

A blare of bugles, a ruffle of drums;

And loyal hearts are beating high:
Hats off!

The flag is passing by!

— H. H. Bennett.

MONTEREY.

We were not many, we who stood
Before the iron sleet that day;
Yet many a gallant spirit would
Give half his years if but he could
Have been with us at Monterey.

Mow here, now there, the shot it hailed

In deadly drifts of fiery spray,
Yet not a single soldier quailed
When wounded comrades round them wailed

Their dying shout at Monterey.

And on, still on our column kept

Through walls of flame its withering way;
Where fell the dead, the living stept,
Still charging on the guns which swept
The slippery streets of Monterey.

The foe himself recoiled aghast,

When, striking where he strongest lay,
We swooped his flanking batteries past,
And braving full their murderous blast,
Stormed home the towers of Monterey.



THE FLAG MAKES SACRED JUNE FOURTEENTH. 325

Our banners on those turrets wave,

And there our evening bugles play;
Where orange-boughs above their grave,
Keep green the memory of the brave

Who fought and fell at Monterey.

We are not many, we who pressed

Beside the brave who fell that day;
But who of us has not confessed
He'd rather share their warrior rest

Than not have been at Monterey?

— Charles Fenno Hoffman.



THE TWO FLAGS.

On leaving England a few years ago Miss Willard saw from the
hansom in which she was riding along Piccadilly the London omnibus,
with its English flag at the front, whereupon there came into her mind
the words: " With its red for love, and its white for law, and its blue
for the hope that our fathers saw of a larger liberty." This was pen-
ciled at the moment, and on the train en route for Southampton to
take the steamship for New York, Miss Willard wrote the accompany-
ing lines, leaving them as a goodbye tribute in the hand of her friend,
Lady Henry Somerset:

The eyes that follow thee, old flag, are fond,

A Western heart leaps up thy folds to greet,
A Saxon's eyes confess the sacred bond

As England's standard flutters down the street,
With its red for love, and its white for law,

And its blue for the hope that our fathers saw
Of a larger liberty.



Thou art the mother flag of destiny,

Our banner of the spangled stars is trine;

Cromwell was sire of Washington and we

Claim the same cross that blazons thy ensign.

With its red for love, and its white for law,
And its blue for the hope that our fathers saw
Of a larger liberty.



. 26 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

O, holy flags, bright with one household glow,

Together light the highway of our God
Till the dear cross of Christ to men shall show

That stripes and stars both mark the path he trod,
With their red for love, and their white for law,

And their blue for the hope that our fathers saw
Of a larger liberty.

The long march of the nations shall be led

By these two flags — till war and tumult cease
Along the happy highway where shall tread

The brotherhood of labor and of peace,
With their red for love, and their white for law,
And their blue for the hope that our fathers saw
Of a larger liberty.

— Miss Frances E. Willard.

Wherever civilization dwells, or the name of Washington is known,
it bears on its folds the concentrated power of armies and navies, and
surrounds the votaries with a defense more impregnable than a battle-
ment of wall or tower. Wherever on earth's surface an American
citizen may wander, called by pleasure, business, or caprice, it is a
shield, securing him against wrong and outrage. — Galusha A. Grow.



MY COUNTRY, 'TIS OF THEE.



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MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.
SELECTIONS

IN

PROSE AND POETRY

ON

Patriotism. Liberty.

Declaration of Independence. Union.

Constitution of the United Citizenship.
States.



The Nobility of Labor.
(329)




PATRIOTISM.

efforts to cultivate the spirit of loyalty and patriotism
can, we believe, be more beneficial in their influence or
lasting in their results than those which are directed to-
wards the rising generation which is preparing for the
duties of citizenship. Whatever can be done to create in
the minds of the young an enthusiastic devotion to their country
will contribute much to the well-being of the republic. We believe
that the cultivation of this spirit should form a necessary part of every
system of education. But it seems especially fitting that efforts of
this kind should be made in connection with that part of our educational
system which is supported by the public. Our public schools are an
essential part of the American system. In them are being trained the
reserve forces of our country; and they afford the best field, not only
for diffusing an intelligent knowledge of our institutions, but also for
cultivating that deep, patriotic impulse without which no nation can
long exist. — From Report of Committee, New York Department, G. A. R.,
on "The Teachings of Civics and History." — Prof. W. C. Morey,
Chairman.

The one who would appreciate the greatness and true significance
of American civilization must understand the sources of its develop-
ment, the conditions of its growth, and the process of its evolution.
He must imbibe the spirit of liberty, which in great measure prompted
the colonization of this land. He must study the foundations of our
local governments as they were laid by the early colonists, and follow
these pioneers of the new world through the vicissitudes of their indus-
trial, religious and political life. He must understand the nature of
those constitutional rights to which they tenaciously clung and from
which arose the majestic fabric of our free institutions. He must be

translated to the days of 1776 and comprehend the great questions

(331)



- 2 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

involved in the War of Independence. He must enter into the strug-
gles which attended the formation of the Constitution. He must
understand the terrific issues which culminated in the Civil War, and
the political principles which by that war became established. He
must, in fine, see in the successive stages of our history the progressive
growth of a great republic, stretching from ocean to ocean, which is
at once democratic, representative and federative, " an indissoluble
Union of indestructible States." To eliminate emotion from the study
of our country's history would be as difficult as to repress the feeling
of awe when contemplating the grandeur of its natural scenery. There
are elements of greatness and sublimity in the expanding life of our
nation which cannot fail to touch the soul of any sympathetic student.
— Report, G. A. R., as above.

The kind of patriotism which we, as survivors of the Civil War,
would seek to promote and foster in the young is not a spirit born
of discord and strife, but a sentiment inspired by the love of our com-
mon country, and a desire that all its citizens may be bound together
by the possession of common rights and the recognition of common
duties. It was for the preservation of the Union and the integrity of
American institutions that we once fought, and it is for the same
objects that we would still continue to labor. We are proud of the
records of the war for the Union, but we are more proud of the Union
which that war made perpetual. Not in the humiliation of the men
who were defeated, but in the vindication of the principles which were
triumphant, do we most sincerely rejoice. " With malice towards
none, but with charity for all," we would maintain the unity and the
honor of our great republic, the supremacy of its laws, and the spirit
of absolute loyalty which must everywhere form an element of the
truest citizenship. With all due respect for the bonds of local interest
and the obligation of party ties, we believe in a patriotism which is not



Online LibraryCharles Rufus SkinnerManual of patriotism : for use in the public schools of the State of New York → online text (page 20 of 31)