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missioned to any foreign nation.

October 3, 1800. — George Bancroft born.
A prominent historian.

October 4, 1777. — Battle of Germantown.

At sunrise on October 4th, Washington, with a large force, surprised the
British at Germantown. " At first his success was complete, but a dense fog
finally frustrated his plans, and, seeing that the day was lost, he ordered a
retreat."

References :

Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.

Battles of the United States. — Dawson.

American Revolution. — Fiske.

1776. — Lossing.

History of the United States.— Bancroft.

October 5, 181 3. — Battle of the Thames.

After Perry's victory on Lake Erie, American forces commanded by Harrison
overtook the British and Indians commanded by Proctor and Tecumseh and
defeated them. Tecumseh was slain and all that Hull had previously lost was
was regained.

References:

Half-Hours with American History. — Morris.
Pictorial Field-Book of the War of 1812. — Lossing.
Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.
Battles of the United States. — Dawson.

October 7, 1765. — Stamp Act Congress.

As a result of the Stamp Act, delegates from all the colonies except Virginia,
North Carolina, Georgia and New Hampshire, met at New York to decide upon
some plan of opposition, and sent petitions to the king and commons. The
unrepresented colonies also sent similar petitions.

References:

Rise of the Republic of the United States. — Frothingham.
Popular History of the United States, vol. III. — Bryant.
The American Revolution. — Fiske.
American History Told by Contemporaries, vol. II. — Hart.



IMPORTANT DATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY. . Ql

Appropriate Selections:

It was in opposing the Stamp Act that Patrick Henry said, " Caesar had his
Brutus; Charles I., his Cromwell; and George III.,"— " Treason, Treason! " cried
his opponents. The orator paused, looked the speaker of the house calmly in
the eyes and finished his sentence — " may profit by their example. If this be
treason, make the most of it."

British Orations. — Adams.

October 7, 1777.— Battle of Saratoga.

Finding that he must either fight or surrender, Burgoyne attempted to cut his
way through the American lines, but in spite of his determined exertions he was
compelled to fall back. The battle of Saratoga is classed as one of the fifteen
decisive battles of the world.

References:
American Revolution. — Fiske.
Battles of the United States.— Dawson.
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.
1776. — Lossing.
History of the United States.— Bancroft.

October 7, 1780.— Battle of King's Mountain.

The British under Ferguson were attacked and defeated at King's Mountain.
The Americans ascended in three divisions on three sides, thus gradually en-
trapping the British, as the fourth side was too steep for retreat.
References:

The American Revolution. — Fiske.

Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.

1776.— Lossing.

King's Mountain and Its Heroes.— Draper.

October 7, 1826.— First Railroad in the United States.

A railroad was put into operation at Quincy, Mass., to transport granite about
three miles to tide-water. Granite sleepers were used, upon which timbers
were placed, and on these flat bars of iron were spiked. The cars were drawn
by horses. This is commonly supposed to be the first railroad in America, but
there is reported to have been an earjier one of unknown date in Pennsylvania.
References:

Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.
American Centenary. — Lossing.

26



4Q2 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

October 9, 1779. — Abandonment of the Siege of Savannah.

General Lincoln, in command of the patriot forces of the South, with the help
of the French fleet, tried to recover Savannah. After a three weeks' siege, an
assault was made. The Americans were repulsed with heavy loss.

References:

Battles of the United States. — Dawson.
American Revolution. — Fiske.
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.
1776. — Lossing.

Appropriate Selections:

Pulaski's Banner. — Longfellow.

October 12, 1492. — Discovery of America.

Christopher Columbus, the discoverer of America, was born in the city of
Genoa, Italy. Believing the earth to be round, he concluded that by sailing
westward he would reach India sooner than by the usual route by way of Egypt
and the Red Sea. Genoa refused his applications for aid, as did also Portugal
and England, but Spain finally came to his assistance. A little over four hundred
years ago, on Friday, the third of August, Columbus sailed from the port of
Palos, in Spain, and ten weeks later, on Friday, the 12th of October, 1492, he
landed at San Salvador, one of the Bahamas.

References :

Students' History of the United States.— Channing.
History of the United States. — Bancroft.
History of the United States.— Hildreth.

Appropriate Selections:

Landing of Columbus. — From Irving's Life and Voyage of Columbus.

Landing of Columbus. — Robertson.

First Voyage of Columbus. — Joanna Bartle.

Character of Columbus. — Irving.

Chauncey M. Depew, p. 162.

Columbus Day, p. 157.

October 13, 1812. — Battle on Queenstown Heights.

References:

History of the Second War with England.— J. H. Headley.
Pictorial Field-Book of the War of 1812 — Lossing.
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.
Battles of the United States — Dawson.



IMPORTANT DATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY.



403



October 16, 1859. — John Brown's Raid at Harper's Ferry.

John Brown took an active part in the Kansas troubles. An ardent aboli-
tionist, he formed plans to liberate the slaves. Collecting a small, well-armed
force, he suddenly seized the arsenal at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, October 16,
1859. After a desperate resistance, he was captured, tried, and executed. The
event was of the utmost importance in the development of the Civil war.

References:

Life of John Brown. — F. B. Sanborn.

History of the United States. — Schouler.

Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.

History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850. — Rhodes.

Appropriate Selections:

The Battle-Cry of Freedom.

October 17, 1777. — Surrender of Burgoyne.

As a result of the Battk of Saratoga, Burgoyne was forced to surrender, for"
he was hedged in without provisions by the patriot forces.

References :

American Revolution. — Fiske.

1776. — Lossing.

Half-Hours with American History. — Morris.

Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.

Appropriate Selections:
Surrender of Burgoyne. — Anderson's United States Reader.
Burgoyne's Surrender. — George William Curtis.

October 18, 1831. — Helen Fiske Hunt Jackson born.

Selections from:
Ramona.
A Century of Dishonor.

October 19, 1781. — Surrender of Cornwallis.

Cornwallis, shut up in Yorktown, attacked by sea and land, was compelled to
surrender. This virtually ended the Revolutionary war, although nearly two
years elapsed before the final treaty of Paris.

References:
The American Revolution. — Fiske.
Popular History of the United States.— Anderson.
Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.
1776. — Lossing.



404 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

Appropriate Selections:

Selection from Holmes' Annals of America.

Yorktown. — Whittier.

The Battle of Yorktown. — See p. 179.

October 22, 1776. — Execution of Nathan Hale.

References:

The Two Spies.— Lossing.

Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.
Popular History of the United States. — Anderson.
History of the United States. — Plildreth.

Appropriate Selections:
A Brave Man's Death. — Anonymous.
Nathan Hale. — Frances Miles Finch.
The Ballad of Nathan Hale. — Anonymous.
" I regret that I have but one life to give to my country." — Capt. Nathan Hale.

October 25, 1812. — The United States captured the Macedonian.

The frigate United States, Commodore Decatur, compelled the Macedonian
to surrender after a two-hours' action west of the Canary Islands.

References:

History of the Navy. — Maclay.

History of the Navy of the United States. — Cooper.

Pictorial Field-Book of the War of 1812. — Lossing.

October 28, 1776. — Battle of White Plains.

As Washington's forces on Harlem Heights were so strong, Howe determined
to gain his rear. But Washington, informed of Howe's movements, crossed the
Harlem River to meet him, and at White Plains a severe battle was fought. The
Americans were driven to the hills of North Castle, whither the British dared
not go.

References:

Battles of the United States.— Dawson.

Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.

American Revolution. — Fiske.

Battles of the American Revolution. — Carrington.

History of the United States. — Bancroft.

October 28, 1886. — Bartholdi's Statue of Liberty Enlightening the
World, the gift of the French people, was formally unveiled in
New York Harbor.



IMPORTANT DATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY. 405

October 30, 1753. — French and Indian war.

The French having seized three British traders, and built forts on the land
of the Ohio Company, an association formed under a royal grant to trade with
the Indians, Governor Dinwiddie of the Virginia Colony selected George
Washington, then about twenty-two, to carry a letter of remonstrance to the
French commandant — the first public service of importance performed by
Washington.

References:

History of the United States. — Anderson.
History of the United States. — Hildreth.
History of the United States.— Bancroft.
School History of the United States. — Lee.
America, vol. V. — Winsor.

Appropriate Selections:

Incidents of Washington's Journey. — Lossing.

October 31, 1864. — Nevada admitted to the Union.

November 1, 1683. — Original counties of New York established.

Albany, Dutchess, Kings, New York, Orange, Queens, Richmond, Suffolk,

Ulster, and Westchester.

November 1, 1889. — Washington admitted to the Union.

November 2, 1889. — North Dakota admitted to the Union.
South Dakota admitted to the Union.

November 3, 1794. — William Cullen Bryant born.

His " Thanatopsis," 1817, marks the first date in our true American poetry.

Selections:

Thanatopsis.
Forest Hymn.
Antiquity of Freedom.

November 7, 181 I.— Battle of Tippecanoe.

In the troubles prior to the war of 1812, the British again excited the Indians
to make war upon the American frontier. General Harrison took measures
against them, and at Tippecanoe was treacherously attacked by the Prophet, a
brother of the Indian leader. After one of the most desperate battles ever fought
with the Indians, the Americans repulsed them with heavy losses.



406



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.



References:

Battles of the United States. — Dawson.
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.
Our Country. — Lossing.

November 7, 1814. — Seizure of Pensacola.

During the war of 1812, the Spaniards at Pensacola allowed the British to

take possession of their forts and fit out expeditions against the United States.

General Jackson, with 3,000 men, marched to Pensacola, seized the town, and
forced the British to leave.

References:

Pictorial Field-Book of the War of 1812.— Lossing.
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.

November 8, 1889. — Montana admitted to the Union.

November 11, 1778. — Massacre at Cherry Valley.

A party of Tories and Indians fell upon Cherry Valley, and killed or carried
away captive many of the inhabitants.

References:

The American Revolution. — Fiske.-

Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.

1776. — Lossing.

History of the United States.— Bancroft.

November 12, 1824.— Orleans county erected from territory of Genesee.

November 15, 1777. — Articles of Confederation.

The representatives of Congress entered into the Articles of Confederation,
November 15, 1777. The Confederacy was to be " the United States of
America;" each state was to retain its sovereignty and independence. The
states were united for their common defence.

References:

American Revolution. — Fiske.
History of the United States.— Bancroft.
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.
1776. — Lossing.



IMPORTANT DATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY. ^ y

November 16, 1776.— Capture of Fort Washington by the British.

After the battle of White Plains, Howe sent a force of Hessians to attack Fort
Washington. They captured it with a loss of 1,000 men while more than 2,000
American prisoners were taken.

References :

The American Revolution. — Fiske.

Battles of the American Revolution. — Carrington.

Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.

November 19, 1863. — Dedication of the National Cemetery at Gettys-
burg.

One of the most interesting events of the year 1863 was the dedication of the
National cemetery at Gettysburg. It took place in the presence of a vast con-
course of visitors, and an oration was delivered by Edward Everett. The brief
address of President Lincoln on that occasion was especially admired for
the touching pathos of its sentiment and the simple beauty of its diction.
Of all his utterances this is undoubtedly the most expressive of the purity and
loftiness of his character.

Appropriate Selections:

National Cemetery at Gettysburg — Address at National Cemetery at

Gettysburg. — Edward Everett.
Lincoln's Gettysburg address, p. 337.

November 23-25, 1863. — Battle of Chattanooga.

When Thomas took command of the army after the battle of Chickamauga,
he was obliged to shelter his army in Chattanooga, where Bragg blockaded it.
Meanwhile Grant with the combined armies west of the Alleghanies, Sherman's
corps, and Hooker, with a detachment from the army of the Potomac, arrived
at the scene of action. The Confederate center was carried by assault; Lookout
Mountain was cleared in the " battle above the clouds; " all the strong Confeder-
ate positions were taken, and Bragg's army completely routed.

References:

Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. — Davis.
Bird's Eye View of Our Civil War. — Dodge.
Popular History of the United States. — Anderson.

Appropriate Selections:

Midnight on Missionary Ridge. — Captain A. C. Ford.
Missionary Ridge. — Brevet Lieut.-Col. Martin L. Bundy.



4o8



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.



November 24, 1832. — Nullification Act.

The cotton-growing states objected to the tariff of 1828, which was to encour-
age and protect the manufacture of certain articles in America by imposing a
heavy duty upon imports. South Carolina openly opposed the law; a convention
ordained that the tariff law was null and void, and that if the government should
attempt to enforce. South Carolina would secede from the Union. Soon, how-
ever, quiet was restored by a compromise bill providing for the gradual reduction
of the duties.

References:

United States. — Rhodes.

United States. — Schouler.

Half-Hours with American History. — Morris.

Select Documents of United States History. — Macdonald.

Appropriate Selections:
Johnston's Orations. — vol. IV.

November 25, 1783. — Evacuation Day.

On November 25, the British army left New York, while Washington and
Governor Clinton took possession. It was a scene of public festivity.

References :

Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.

1776. — Lossing.

Critical Period of American History. — Fiske.

November 29, 1802. — Ohio admitted to the Union.

November 29, 181 1. — Wendell Phillips born.

Selections from :

Toussaint l'Ouverture.
The Lost Arts.

December 2, 1823. — Monroe Doctrine.

Napoleon's triumph in Spain led to revolts in the Spanish Colonies in America;
another so-called " Holy Alliance " had been suggested to consider aiding Spain
to reduce the Colonies; and Russia had claimed part of the Pacific coast of North
America. Finally Great Britain proposed that England and the United States
should unite in a declaration against European intervention in America. The
proposal was declined. In his annual message, Monroe stated the policy known
as the Monroe Doctrine: "America for Americans."



IMPORTANT DATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY.



409



References:



Select Documents of United States History.— Alacdonald.
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.
Students' History of the United States — Channing.

December 3, 1 818.— Illinois admitted to the Union.

December 4, 1682.— Establishment of the Quaker colony in Pennsyl-
vania.

Actuated by a desire to found a colony where civil and religious liberty might
be enjoyed, and where the people might dwell together in peace, William Penn
obtained from Charles II. a tract of land west of the Delaware and called it
Pennsylvania. After several conferences with the Indians, he met them beneath
the wide-spreading elm at a place now called Kensington, a part of Philadelphia,
where he made his famous treaty of peace and friendship with the Redmen —
a treaty " never sworn to and never broken."

References:

School History of the United States.— Lee.
Ha'f-Hours with American History.— Morris.
History of the United States.— Hildreth.

Appropriate Selections:

Penn's Treaty with the Indians, in Anderson's United States Reader.

December 4> 1783.— Washington took leave of his officers and gave up
the active command of the American army.
References:

Popular History of the United States.— Anderson.
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.
Our Country. — Lossing.

Appropriate Selections:

Washington's Address to the Officers of the Army.

December 10, 18 17.— Mississippi admitted to the Union.

December 10, 1898.— Treaty of peace signed between Spain and the
United States.

The Commissioners of both governments met in Paris in October and ex-
changed their powers. The negotiations then begun, lasted until December
10, when the treaty was signed. The Americans did th-.ir work among hostile
nations, in a way which added another triumph to the annals of American
diplomacy.



4I0 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

References:

The War with Spain.— H. C. Lodge.

Appropriate Selections :
The Peace Conference and the Moral Aspect of War.— North American Re-
view, October, 1899.

December 11, 1777. — Washington's army went into winter quarters at
Valley Forge.
References:

Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.
The American Revolution. — Fiske.
History of the United States. — Bancroft.
1776. — Lossing.

Appropriate Selections:
Selections from the Life of General Greene. — Greene.
Selection from Irving's Life of Washington.

December n, 1816. — Indiana admitted to the Union.

December 13, 1862. — Battle of Fredericksburg.

Led by General Burnside, their new commander, the Union army crossed
the Rappahannock, the design being to march against Richmond by the route
from Fredericksburg. Fredericksburg was taken December 13, but, after a
disastrous attempt to carry the works behind the city, the river was recrossed.
The horror of Fredericksburg Jed to Burnside's deposition from the command
of the army of the Potomac.

References:

Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. — Davis.
Bird's Eye View of Our Civil War. — Dodge.

Appropriate Selections:

Wanted — a man. — E. C. Stedman.

Fredericksburg. — W. F. H., in Richard Grant White's Poetry of the War.

December 14, 1799. — Death of Washington.

References:

Popular History of the United States. — Anderson.
Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.
Our Country. — Lossing.

Appropriate Selections:
The Half-Masted Flag.— p. 25.



IMPORTANT DATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY. 4II

December 14, 18 19.— Alabama admitted to the Union.

December 16, 1773.— Boston tea-party.

The East India Company sent several shiploads of tea to the Colonies. The
colonists, however, refused to pay the tax, in spite of the extremely low price of
the tea, and at Boston, December 16, 1773, a small band of men disguised as
Indians, boarded the ships and threw the tea overboard. The action shows the
strict adherence to principle which characterized the colonists.

References:

Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.

The American Revolution. — Fiske.

Rise of the Republic of the United States.— Frothingham.

American History Told by Contemporaries, vol. II.— Hart.

Appropriate Selections:

" It is not, Mr. Moderator, the spirit that vapors within these walls that must
stand us in stead. The exertions of this day will call forth events which will
make a very different spirit necessary for our salvation. Whoever sup-
poses that shouts and hosannas will terminate the trials of the day enter-
tains a childish fancy. We must be grossly ignorant of the importance and
value of the prize for which we contend; we must be equally ignorant of
the power of those who have combined against us; we must be blind to that
malice, inveteracy, and insatiable revenge which actuates our enemies, pub-
lic and private, abroad and in our bosom, to hope that we shall end this
controversy without the sharpest conflicts,— to natter ourselves that popular
resolves, popular harangues, popular acclamations, and popular vapor will
vanquish our foes. Let us consider the issue. Let us look to the end. Let
us weigh and consider before we advance to those measures which must
bring on the most trying and terrific struggle this country ever saw."—
Josiah Quincy, Jr.

December 17, 1807.— John Greenleaf Whittier born.
See p. 152.

December 18, 1867.— Abolition of slavery in the United States.

A resolution of Congress, proposing an amendment to the Constitution,
abolishing slavery, having been approved by three-fourths of the states, slavery
was declared constitutionally abolished.

December 19, 1675. — Attack on the Narragansett Fort.
References :

Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.
Popular History of the United States. — Anderson.



4I2 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

Appropriate Selections:

The Indian Hunter. — Longfellow.

Death and Character of King Philip, from Irving's Sketch-Book.

December 20, i860. — Secession of South Carolina.

After an exciting canvass, in i860, in which the slavery question was the
all-absorbing topic, the election resulted in favor of Abraham Lincoln, the can-
didate of the Republican party. When it became known that the party opposed
to the further extension of slavery had been successful, public meetings were
held in South Carolina to bring about a secession of that State from the Union;
and, on the 20th of December, i860, an ordinance of secession was passed by a
state convention held in Charleston. Six days later, hostilities commenced
which led directly to the great Civil war.

References:

Bird's Eye View of Our Civil War. — Dodge.
Division and Reunion. — Wilson.
Story of the Civil War.— Ropes.
United States. — Rhodes.
Confederate States. — Davis.

Appropriate Selections:

In American Orations. — Johnston.

Brother Jonathan's Lament for Sister Caroline.— O. W. Holmes.

The Ordinance of Nullification. — Edward Everett.

December 21, 1864. — Occupation of Savannah.

Having destroyed Atlanta, September 2, Sherman made his memorable march
through Georgia to the sea coast and occupied Savannah, Dec. 21, 1864.

References:

Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. — Davis.
Bird's Eye View of Our Civil War. — Dodge.
Story of Our Civil War. — Ropes.
Students' History of the United States. — Channing.
Civil War in America. — Lossing.

Appropriate Selections:

Sherman's March to the Sea — Wm. T. Sherman in Half-Hours'" with Ameri-
can History. — Morris.

December 22, 1620. — Landing of Pilgrims.

The first permanent settlement in New England was made at Plymouth by a
small band of pilgrims, dissenters from the Church of England, who fled from
their own country to find religious freedom.



IMPORTANT DATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY. ^

References:

Popular History of the United States. — Anderson.
History of the United States. — Hildreth.
History of the United States. — Bancroft.

Appropriate Selections:

The Pilgrims. — Everett.

Landing of the Pilgrims. — Southey.

Settlement of Plymouth. — Palfrey, in History of New England.

The Pilgrim Fathers. — Pierpont.

The Landing of the Pilgrims. — p. 163.

John Boyle O'Reilly. — p. 167.

Landing of the Pilgrims. — p. 167

December 23, 1783. — Washington resigned his commission to Congress.
References:

Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.

Rise of the Republic of the United States. — Frothingham.

Critical Period of American History. — Fiske.



Online LibraryCharles Rufus SkinnerManual of patriotism : for use in the public schools of the State of New York → online text (page 26 of 31)