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Appropriate Selections:

The closing scene from William Gordon's History of the Rise, Progress, and

Establishment of the Independence of the United States of America.
Selection from Ramsay's Life of Washington.

December 24, 18 14. — Treaty of Ghent.

About a month after the defeat of the British at New Orleans, news came that
a treaty of peace had been signed at Ghent. "Peace! peace! peace! was the
deep, harmonious, universal anthem. The whole night, Broadway sang its song
of peace; and the next day, Sunday, all the churches sent up hymns of thanks-
giving for the joyous tidings."

References:

Pictorial Field-Book of the War of 1812. — Lossing.
Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.

December 26, 1776. — Battle of Trenton.

The Americans were at this time gloomy and almost despairing of victory;
their army had met defeat, hardship, and discouragement. The British troops
were divided throughout New Jersey, a force of 1,200 being stationed at Tren-
ton. On the night of the 25th, Washington himself led 2,^00 trusted soldiers
to the attack. They crossed the river in a fearful storm; the next morning
marched nine miles to Trenton, through a driving storm, surprised and took the
city. " That victory turned the shadows of Death into the morning."



4I4 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

References:

The American Revolution. — Fiske.

Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.

History of the United States.— Bancroft.

Popular History of the United States.— Anderson.

1776. — Lossing.

Appropriate Selections:

Songs and Ballads of the Revolution. — Moore.

The Battle of Trenton. — Henry Cabot Lodge, p. 260.

December 28, 1835. — Second Seminole war.

As a result of the attempt to remove the Seminole Indians of Florida to lands
west of the Mississippi, war again broke out. On December 28th, Osceola, the
chief, suddenly attacked a house where General Thompson was dining, and
killed five of the party. The same day Major Dade, with over 100 men, was at-
tacked, and all but four men were massacred. The Americans could obtain no
decided victory. Finally, Osceola appeared with a flag of truce, was captured,
and imprisoned. Two months later, the Indians were defeated in a desperate
battle near Lake Okeechobee.

References:

Battles of the United States. — Dawson.
Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.
Our Country. — Lossing.

Appropriate Selections:
Osceola. — Lucy Hooper.

December 28, 1846. — Iowa admitted to the Union.

December 29, 1812. — The Constitution captured the Java.

After a two hours' fight the United States frigate Constitution, Commodore
Bainbridge, captured the Java off the coast of Brazil.

References:

History of the Navy. — Maclay.

History of the Navy of the United States.— Cooper.

Battles of the United States. — Dawson.

Pictorial Field-Book of the War of 1812 — Lossing.

December 29, 1845. — Texas admitted to the Union.



IMPORTANT DATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY. 415

December 30, 1853.— The Gadsden Treaty.

The interests of the United States in a transportation route across the isthmus
of Tehuantepec occasioned extensive diplomatic correspondence between the
United States and Mexico. In addition, the running of the boundary line under
the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo had been attended with difficulties. Both ques-
tions were dealt with in the Gadsden treaty, December 30, 1853. The area ac-
quired from Mexico was 45*535 square miles.

References:
Select Documents of United States History. — Macdonald.



December 31, 1775.— Attack on Quebec.

After a long and hideous march through the wilderness in winter, Arnold
reached the Plains of Abraham with only 550 of his 1,100 men. December 1st,
Montgomery arrived with his force and took command. As their numbers were
small and their field pieces few, a stormy night was selected for the attack.
The advance was made in two divisions, under Montgomery and Arnold, but
early in the conflict Montgomery was killed and Arnold wounded so that the
command fell upon Morgan. In spite of his desperate resistance, he was over-
powered by numbers and forced to surrender, for the town had been warned
of the movement, and had received reinforcements.

References:

The American Revolution. — Fiske.

Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.

1776. — Lossing.

History of the United States.— Hildreth.

January 1, 1831. — First issue of The Liberator.

The Liberator, an abolitionist paper, was started by William Lloyd Garrison.
It had an immense influence against slavery.

References:

Life of William Lloyd Garrison, by his sons.
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.
Old South Leaflets, III., No. I.
United States. — Schouler.

Appropriate Selections:

Selection from Old South Leaflets, No. 79.



416



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.



January i, 1863. — Emancipation proclamation.

On the first of January, 1863, President Lincoln issued his memorable procla-
mation, declaring free all the slaves within the borders of the States at war
with the general government. By this measure, more than three millions of
slaves were declared free. On the same day Galveston was taken; and the
naval force before the place was captured, destroyed, or dispersed by the Con-
federates.

References:

Old South Leaflets; General Series, No. II.
Story of the Civil War. — Ropes.
Life of Lincoln. — Morse.

Appropriate Selections :
Boston Hymn. — R. W. Emerson.
Charles A. Dana. — p. 280.

January 1, 1879. — Resumption of specie payments.

During the Civil war, Government notes were greatly depreciated and gold
became a marketable product. At the close of the war, however, the price
gradually declined; and on the first of January, 1879, the government and the
banks resumed specie payments, gold and silver once more coming into general
use.

January 1, 1899. — Nassau county erected from territory of Queens.

January 2, 1776. — First Continental flag.

It was composed of thirteen stripes and the union of the crosses of St. George
and St. Andrew.

References:

Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.
The American Revolution. — Fiske.
A Brief History of the Flag.— See p. 5.

January 3, 1777. — Battle of Princeton.

Washington's small force was confronted at Trenton by Cornwallis and a
large army. As a battle seemed full of peril, Washington broke camp in the
night, deceiving his enemy by keeping his camp-fires burning, and at sunrise
met the British forces near Princeton. At first the Americans gave way, but
Washington, with a select corps, routed the enemy. The British loss was about
400 men, while the American loss was not. more than thirty.



IMPORTANT DATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY. 417

References:

The American Revolution.— Fiske.

Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.

Popular History of the United States.— Anderson.

1776. — Lossing.

History of the United States.— Bancroft.

Appropriate Selections:

Washington at Princeton.— Miss C. F. Orne.

January 4, 1896. — Utah admitted to the Union.

January 8, 181 5.— Battle of New Orleans.

Jackson, in command of the American troops at New Orleans, had raised a
line of defense extending a mile in front of the forces, while the Mississippi was
on his right flank, and a jungle on his left. The British under Pakenham made
an advance, but volley after volley was poured upon them until they had to flee.
Pakenham was slain and 2.000 of his men were killed, wounded, or taken pris-
oners. The Americans had seven killed and six wounded.

References :

Half-Hours with American History.— Morris.
Pictorial Field-Book of the War of 1812 — Lossing.
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.

Appropriate Selections:

Dirge for a Soldier.

Battle of New Orleans.— Thomas Dunn English.

Selection from Paxton's Life of Andrew Jackson.

January 11, 1757. — Alexander Hamilton born.

A statesman and leader of the Revolutionary period, and during the forma-
tion of the Constitutional period.

Selection from:
The Federalist.

January 17, 1706. — Benjamin Franklin born.

Selections from:

His Autobiography.

27



4i8



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.



January 17, 1781. — Battle of the Cowpens.

At the Cowpens, the British under Tarleton attacked the Americans com-
manded by Morgan. After a severe battle, the British were completely routed,
losing about eight hundred men, while the American loss was about eighty.

References:

Battles of the United States. — Dawson.
Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.
The American Revolution. — Fiske.
1776. — Lossing.

Appropriate Selections:

Selection from " Life of Nathaniel Greene." — George W. Greene.



January 18, 1782. — Daniel Webster born.

Selections from:
The Reply to Hayne.
Speech on the Fugitive Slave Law.

January 19, 1809. — Edgar Allen Poe born.
Selections:

The Raven.
The Bells.

January 26, 1837. — Michigan admitted to the Union.

January 27, 1789. — Ontario county erected from territory of Mont-
gomery.

January 29, 1861. — Kansas admitted to the Union.

January 29, 1850. — Compromise of 1850.

The compromise measures proposed by Clay, January 29, 1850, consisted of
four acts providing for " The organization of territorial governments for New
Mexico and Utah without mention of slavery; the establishment of the boundary
of Texas; the abolition of the slave-trade in the District of Columbia; and the
surrender to their masters of slaves escaping to free states." The last measure
was known as the Fugitive Slave Law.



IMPORTANT DATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY. 4I9

References:

United States. — Rhodes.

The United States of America, 1765- 1866. — Channing.

Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.

Select Documents of United States History. — Macdonald.

Johnston's Orations.

February 2, 1848. — Treaty of peace signed at Guadalupe Hidalgo

(Close of the Mexican war.)

By the treaty with Mexico, February 2, 1848, all the territory north of the
Rio Grande, New Mexico and California was ceded to the United States;
$15,000,000 was to be paid for the acquired territory and debts due from Mexico
to American citizens should be assumed by the United States.

References:

Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.
United States Reader. — Anderson.

February 5, 1823. — Yates county erected from territory of Ontario.

February 6, 1778. — Treaty between the United States and France.

The alliance with France therein made insured the final independence of the
United States.

References:

The American Revolution. — Fiske.

American History Told by Contemporaries. — Hart.

Half-Hours with American History. — Morris.

1776. — Lossing.

Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.

February 7, 1791. — Rensselaer county erected from territory of Albany.
Saratoga county erected from territory of Albany.

February 8, 1690. — Schenectady destroyed.

The troubles between England and France led to war in the colonies between
the English and French. On February 8, 1690, the first attack "vas made by the
French and Indians. Albany was to be the place of attack, but the Indians
chose Schenectady and the French followed. They quietly entered the town
at midnight with no resistance, as the palisades were deserted, massacred many
of the inhabitants and burned the town.

References:
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.



420 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

February 8, i860. — Organization of the Confederacy.

On the 8th of February, a congress, composed of delegates from all the
seceding states, except Texas, met at Montgomery, and four days later organ-
ized a government by the adoption of a Provisional Constitution, assuming
the title, Confederate States of America. On the 9th, this congress elected
Jefferson Davis President of the Confederacy, and on the 18th, Texas being
represented, he was duly inaugurated.

References:

Popular History of the United States.— Anderson.
School History of the United States.— Lee.
Bird's Eye View of Our Civil War. — Dodge.
Confederate States. — Davis.

A p propria te Selections :
Davis' Address. — Bennett, in Moore's Personal and Political Ballads.
Jefferson Davis. — Cornwall, in Moore's Personal and Political Ballads.

February 11, 1847. — Thomas Edison, the inventor of the phonograph,
born.

February 12, 1809.— Abraham Lincoln born.

The Birthday of Abraham Lincoln. — p. 269.
Theodore Frelinghuysen. — p. 271
Ralph Wajdo Emerson. — p. 274.

February 14, 1859. — Oregon admitted to the Union.

February 1 5, 1898. — Battle-ship Maine blown up in Havana Harbor.

In 1895 occurred one of the numerous insurrections in Cuba against Spanish
rule. In a short time people were forced to recognize the fact that this time
the Cubans were determined to win their liberty. Affairs went from bad to
worse and the Spanish cruelties towards the Cubans, and finally towards the
Americans in Havana, led to the United States sending the battleship " Maine "
to Havana as a protection in case of further atrocities. Spain was unduly
suspicious, and the effects of its corrupt system of government were shown in
the blowing up of the Maine and the killing of two hundred and sixty-four men
and two officers, in the fancied security of a friendly harbor.

References:

The War with Spain.— Henry Cabot Lodge.

Appropriate Selections:
The Maine.— p. 198.



IMPORTANT DATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY

February 16, 1791.— Herkimer county erected from territory of Mont-
gomery.

Otsego county erected from territory of Mont-
gomery.

Tioga county erected from territory of Mont-
gomery.

February 16, 1 807.— Frigate Philadelphia destroyed at Tripoli by
Decatur.

The Tripolitans were accustomed to capture merchant ships of different nations,
and make slaves of their crews. Even the tribute money no longer restrained
them and different expeditions were sent against them. In one of these, Com-
modore Preble's frigate, Philadelphia, was captured and fitted up by the
Tripolitans. Shortly afterwards, Stephen Decatur was sent to destroy the ship.
At night he succeeded in entering the harbor unseen, boarding the Philadelphia,
overcoming the Tripolitan guard, and destroying the vessel. A treaty of peace'
was made June 4, 1807.

Appropriate Selections:
See p. 237.

References:
History of the Navy.— Maclay.

History of the Navy of the United States.— Cooper.
Popular History of the United States.— Anderson.
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.

February 17, 1865.— Evacuation of Charleston.

Sherman, having halted at Savannah only long enough to refit his army, was
again in motion by February 1st. On the 17th he captured Columbia, com-
pelling the Confederates by this achievement to evacuate Charleston.
References:

Story of the Civil War.— Ropes.

Battles and Leaders of the Civil War.— Davis

Bird's Eye View of Our Civil War.— Dodge.

February 22, 1732.— George Washington born.

See p. 243.

February 22, 1819 — Florida ceded to the United States.

When Jackson was sent to Florida to repress the Seminole Indians, he found
that they were incited to hostilities by certain people there, and so invaded the
country. Trouble with Spain was feared as a result, but all difficulties were
finally settled by the treaty signed at Washington, February 22, 1819, when



422 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

Spain agreed to sell Florida to the United States for $5,000,000. Florida did
not actually come into the possession of the United States, however, until two
years later.

References:

Narrative and Critical History of the United States.— Winsor.
Students' History of the United States.— Channing.
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.

February 22, 1819. — James Russell Lowell born.
See p. 153.

February 22, 1865. — Occupation of Wilmington.

The active operations of 1865 began with the reduction of Fort Fisher, the
main defense of Wilmington, by General Terry, and Admiral Porter's fleet.
Wilmington was occupied by the Federal troops a few days after the capture
of the fort.

References:

Story of the Civil War. — Ropes.

Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. — Davis.

Bird's Eye View of Our Civi,l War. — Dodge.

February 23, 1798. — Rockland county erected from territory of Orange.

February 23, 1821. — Livingston county erected from territory of

Ontario and Genesee.
Monroe county erected from territory of Ontario
and Genesee.

February 23, 1847. — Battle of Buena Vista.

With less than five thousand men, General Taylor was attacked at Buena
Vista by a Mexican force nearly four times as large, under Santa Anna. After
an all-day's determined contest, the Mexicans were driven in disorder from the
field.

References:

Half-Hours with American History. — Morris.
Popular History of the United States. — Anderson.
Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.
Our Country. — Lossing.
History of the Mexican War. — Mansfield.

Appropriate Selections:

The Angels of Buena Vista. — Whittier.



IMPORTANT DATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY

February 25, 1868.— Impeachment of President Johnson.

In the summer of 1867, President Johnson requested the resignation of Sec-
retary of War Stanton, who refused to resign. Johnson suspended him in
accordance with the provisions of the Tenure-of-Office Act. When the Senate
met it refused to agree with this suspension. The President then removed
Stanton from the office and gave the portfolio to Thomas. In March, 1868,
articles of impeachment were presented by the House at the bar of the Senate.'
The result of the trial was the acquittal of the President.
References :

Students' History of the United States.— Channing.

February 25, 179 1.— First United States bank was chartered by Con-
gress.

It went into operation with a capital of $10,000,000, the government subscrib-
ing $2,000,000, and individuals $8,000,000.

References :

Select Documents of United States History.— Macdonald.
Popular History of the United States.— Anderson.
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.
School History of the United States.— Lee.

February 27, 1807.— Henry W. Longfellow born.
See p. 152.

March 1, 1799.— Essex county erected from territory of Clinton.

March 1, 1816.— Oswego county erected from territory of Onondaga.

March 1, 1867.— Nebraska admitted to the Union.

March 3, 1802.— St. Lawrence county erected from territory of Clinton.

March 3, 1845.— Florida admitted to the Union.

March 4, 1719.— Vermont admitted to the Union.

March 4, 1861.— First inauguration of President Lincoln.
References:
Life of Lincoln. — Morse.
Abraham Lincoln.— Hadley and Hay.
Lincoln. — Herndon.



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.
424

Appropriate Selections:

Inauguration of Lincoln.— Greely, in American Conflict.

The Constitution and the People.— Lincoln, from his Inaugural Address.

March 4, 1885.— Letter postage reduced to two cents per ounce.

March 5, 1770. — Boston Massacre.

In a collision between the citizens of Boston and some of the British soldiers
stationed there, three or four citizens were killed and others wounded. The
event aroused the strongest feelings against British tyranny, although the sol-
diers probably fired into the mob only to preserve their lives.

References:
The American Revolution. — Fiske.
Students' History of the United States.— Channing.

Appropriate Selections:

The Boston Massacre. — Hawthorne.

March 7, 1788.— Clinton county erected from territory of Washington.
March 7, 1809.— Schenectady county erected from territory of Albany.
March 8, 1799.— Cayuga county erected from territory of Onondaga.

March 9, 1862.— The Monitor and the Merrimac.

The Merrimac, which had been sunk at Norfolk by the Union commander at
the beginning of the war, had subsequently been raised by the Confederates,
cut down almost to the water's edge, covered with a plating of railroad iron,
and named the Virginia. On the 8th of March she steamed out from Norfolk
to Hampton Roads, and destroyed the United States vessels Cumberland and
Congress. During the night the Monitor, a newly invented floating battery,
commanded by Lieutenant Worden, arrived from New York, and on the fol-
lowing day, the 9th, encountered the Virginia (Merrimac), and disabled her.

References:

Old South Leaflets, III., No. 3.
Battles and Leaders of the Civil War.— Davis.
Bird's Eye View of Our Civil War.— Dodge.
School History of the United States. — Lee.

Appropriate Selections:

The Merrimac and the Monitor. — Estvan.

The Cumberland. — Longfellow.

The Monitor and the Merrimac— John W. Draper.



IMPORTANT DATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY. ^ 2 $

March 9, 1893. — Cleveland recalls Hawaiian annexation treaty.

Toward the close of Harrison's administration a revolution broke out in the
Hawaiian Islands. The more intelligent inhabitants deposed Queen Liliuaka-
lani, established a republican form of government, and then sent commissioners
to the United States to propose annexation. A treaty was agreed upon, but,
before the Senate had time to vote upon it, Harrison's administration came to a
close and Grover Cleveland was elected President. One of the first acts of his
administration was to withdraw the treaty from the Senate, and to announce
the United States' protectorate to be at an end in Hawaii.

References :

History of the American Nation. — McLaughlin.
American Congress. — Moore.

March 10, 1797. — Delaware county erected from territory of Ulster
and Otsego.

March 11, 1808. — Cattaraugus county erected from territory of Genesee.
Chautauqua county erected from territory of Genesee.
Franklin county erected from territory of Clinton.
Niagara county erected from territory of Genesee.

March 12, 1772. — Montgomery county (first known as Tryon county)
erected from territory of Albany.
Washington county (first known as Charlotte county)
erected from territory of Albany.

March 12, 1813. — Warren county erected from territory of Washington.

March 15, 1781. — Battle of Guilford Court House.

Greene, in command of the Americans, took up his position at Guilford Court
House, where he was attacked by the British. Although the result was un-
favorable to the Americans, it left Cornwallis in so disabled a condition that he
was forced to retreat from the field of victory.

References:

Popular History of the United States. — Bryant.

1776. — Lossing.

American Revolution. — Fiske.

Appropriate Selections:

Selections from Life of Nathaniel Greene. — Greene.

Character of General Greene. — Alexander Hamilton, found in Anderson's
United States Reader.



6 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

March 15, 1798. — Oneida county erected from territory of Herkimer.

Chenango county erected from territory of Tioga and
Herkimer.

March 15, 1820.— Maine admitted to the Union.

March 17, 1776. — British evacuated Boston.

After the fortifications of Dorchester Heights were completed, Howe, instead
of attacking the American forces, evacuated Boston. Washington was rewarded
with the first gold medal struck in the United States. " Hostibus Primo
Fugatis."

References:

Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.

America, vol. VI. — Winsor.

The American Revolution. — Fiske.

History of the Siege of Boston — Frothingham.

History of the United States.— Hildreth.

Half-Hours with American History.— Morris.

March 18, 1796. — Steuben county erected from territory of Ontario.

March 21, 1806. — Madison county erected from territory of Chenango.

March 24, 1804. — Seneca county erected from territory of Cayuga.

March 25, 1800. — Greene county erected from territory of Albany and
Ulster.

March 27, 1809.— Sullivan county erected from territory of Ulster.

March 27, 18 14. — Defeat of the Creek Indians.

The massacre at Fort Mimms aroused the country against the Indians, and
Generals Jackson and CofTee went into the country of the Creeks to avenge
the massacre. A thousand Indian warriors made a final and desperate stand at
the Horseshoe Bend of the Tallapoosa river, but were completely defeated by
Jackson's force of three thousand men.

References :

Pictorial Field-Book of the War of 1812. — Lossing.
Popular History of the United States.— Bryant.
Battles of the United States. — Dawson.

March 28, 1805. — Jefferson county erected from territory of Oneida.
Lewis county erected from territory of Oneida.



IMPORTANT DATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY. ^ 2 J

March 28, 1806. — Broome county erected from territory of Tioga.



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