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Charles Rufus Skinner.

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the buildings in Paris were what you might have expected in Chicago."

No world's exhibition was ever better housed, or more conveni-
ently arranged. As it stood on the day of its formal dedication in Octo-
ber (1892), incomplete, its decoration in progress, with the scaffolding
and building stages still marring the architectural effect, in the midst of
the debris of ten thousand working-men, driving on the work, night

and dav, it was already a sufficient answer to the doubt whether the

(75)



76 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

American genius is equal to the creation of any works except those of
mechanical ingenuity. The distinction of the Columbian Exhibition
is not in its magnitude; it is not that it contains the largest building
ever erected in the world; it is in its beauty, its harmonious grouping,
its splendid landscape and architectural effects. This is best compre-
hended as a whole in the approach from the lake. The view there,
especially at the coming of evening, when the long rows of classic
columns, the pillars and domes, are in relief against a glowing sunset
sky, is a vision of beauty that will surprise most and will appeal most
to those familiar with the triumphs of man's genius elsewhere. The
little city of the lagoon, reflected in the water as distinctly as it stands
out against the sky, seems like some fairy exhalation on the shore, sug-
gesting the long perspective of columns on the desert of Palmyra, the
approach by the sea of Marmora to Constantinople, and the canals and
palaces of Venice as seen from Lido. In its light and airy grace it is
like a city of the imagination. — Charles Dudley Warner, in Harper's
Magazine.

NEW YORK DAY AT THE WORLD'S FAIR.

Due honor to the lands
From which we sprung: all hail the ancient fame

Of kindred hearts and hands!
But we began with all that they had won,

A counsel of protection calls us on;
To do no more than they have done were shame.

'Twere better far, I hold,
To see the Iroquois supreme once more

Among the forests old
From hill-girt Hudson's current, broad and slow,

To where 'twixt Erie and Ontario,
Leaps green Niagara with a giant's roar;

To see the paths pursued
By commerce with her flying charioteers

Tangled with solitude.
The Indian trail uncoil among the trees:

The council-runner's torch against the breeze
Its signal fling — "The smoke that disappears."



THE FLAG WAVES OVER. 77

To have the wigwams rise
By summer-haunted Horicon so fair;

Fruit blooms and grain-gold dyes
Fade from the shadows in Cayuga's tide,

The vineyards fail on Keuka's sun-beat side,
The mill-crowned cliffs of Genesee, made bare;

'Twere more to my desire
To see Manhattan's self laid desolate.
*******



But out on dreams of dread!
In him I put my waking faith and trust,

A king in heart and head
Who masters forces, shapes material things,

Who loves his kind, whose common sense has wings,
The true American, the kindly just,

Full prompt in word and deed,
And ready to make good some human hope

In time of utter need;
To cross at Delaware the ice's gorge,

Or tread blood-bolted snow at Valley Forge,

Or keep at Gettysburg the gun-shook slope!

*******

— Joseph O'Connor.
[From poem read at World's Columbian Exposition on New York State Day.]

Jackson Park, the pride to-day of Chicago, upon whose buildings,
vast and stately, the majesty of the nation descended this morning in
dedicatory services, tells of the resolve to redeem all promises, to realize
all hopes. Hither shall be brought the products of labor and art, the
treasures of earth and sea, the inventions of this wondrously inventive
century, the fruits of learning and genius. The entire globe is astir
in preparation to fill to repletion the palaces we have erected. The
invitation has gone out to the world in all the fullness and warmth of
the heart of this republic, and the nations of the world have harkened
to it as they never did before to a voice calling men to an exposition.
The best that America can bring, the best the world owns, shall soon
be in Jackson Park.

What may be added? I will give reply. What is there more im-
portant, more precious than matter and all the forms in which matter



~8 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

may be invested? Is there not mind? What is there greater than all
the results of the thought — the labor of man? Is there not man
himself, the designer, the maker of his works? Bring hither, then,
mind. Bring men — not merely the millions, anxious to see and to
learn. These do we need; they do not suffice. Bring the men whom
the millions desire to contemplate, and from whom they may receive
valued lessons. Bring the thinkers, the workers, the scholars, the
apostles of action, who have rendered possible or have produced the
marvels which will be housed in Jackson Park, whose dreams make
toward the building up of humanity, whose arms reach out to the
improvement of men along all the lines of human progress. Let
us have the Columbuses of our time. Let us have Parliaments of the
leaders of men convoked from all lands under the sun. In this manner
is your exposition complete in all its parts, truly representative of the
age and truly great. You have matter and men; you have the works
and the workers. In men far more than in matter you have the highest
products of progress. There is progress only when men grow. In
men you have the potent means to determine the progress of the future.
God has made men the agents of progress. — Right Rev. John Ireland,
D. D., at dedication of World's Columbian Exposition.



CENTENNIAL HYMN.



John Greenleaf Whittier
Maestoso.



John Knowles Paine.
It




i. Our fa - thers' God, from

2. Here, where of old by

3. For art and la - bor

4. Oh, make Thou us, thro'



out whose hand The

Thy de - sign, The

met in truce, For

cen - turies long, In



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4



4



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fa - thers
beau - ty
peace se

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fall
spake
made
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like
that

the
in

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Words hy special arrangement with Koughton, Mifflin & Co.
Music used by permission of Oliver Di rsoN Company, owners of copyright.



THE FLAG WAVES OVER. gj

New York has built two houses at the Fair. One is the palatial
structure before us, a fitting representation of the dignity and opulence
of the Empire State. The other is an humble structure at the opposite
end of the park destined to show how a workingman and his family
may be enabled to live with due regard to the requirements of sanitation
and healthful nutriment. The house in which we stand has been one
of the sights of the fair. It has been a matter of pride to every New
Yorker visiting Jackson Park that the headquarters of his state were
so beautiful, so commodious, and so popular. He' has found here the
conveniences of a club, the educating influence of a museum, and the
rest and refreshment of a summer villa. The true attitude of the people
of New York toward this Exposition has nowhere been more fitly rep-
resented than in the superb proportions and princely magnificence of
this their State house of call. But if this be New York's idea of the
regal attire which befits her as a guest at the table of nations, the other
edifice — the model workingman's home — is no less typical of her
care for the welfare of the lowly, and her sense that the qualities that
go to make her great are those which are nourished in the homes of the
toilers. — Roswell P. Flower, at World's Columbian Exposition, New
York State Day.

PROGRESS.

O Progress, with thy restless eyes,

Sleepless as fate and tireless as the sun,
The mighty mother of the world's emprise —

Here, where we bring the treasures thou hast won,
Bend thou thine ear and list to our acclaim.

Stay thy imperial march by land and sea,
While we this temple, vocal with thy name,

We dedicate to thee!

Whatever here shall show mankind

That, spite of history's lying page,
Not buried in the years behind,

But forward lies the golden age;
Whatever here shall worthiest stand,

The boon of ages yet to be,
Best fruitage of the brain or hand,

We dedicate to thee.



g2 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

Whatever here shall truest teach

How round the world may wiser grow
The clearer eye, the wider reach,

The rule of heaven here below;
Whate'er makes Learning's torch more bright,

Or wides the boundaries of the free,

The jewels of our empire's might,

We dedicate to thee!

— William H. McElroy.

[At dedication of New York State Building, World's Columbian Exposition.]



MANY FLAGS IN MANY LANDS.



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THE CONSULATE.

*HE word " consulate " is taken from the Latin and, with
Americans, refers to the building in which any man ap-
pointed by our government transacts, in any foreign port,
or town or city, such business affairs of the government
as may be entrusted to him. Always, except in very
small places, the office is filled by American citizens, perhaps resid-
ing abroad, but more commonly leaving home for the express pur-
pose of representing our country and its interests in foreign lands. But
the Consul — for by that name is he called — has a more sacred duty
to do — that of protecting any American citizen who may be in danger
in a foreign land. Then the flag flying over the Consulate seems to
demand protection for any and all its citizens seeking its shelter. Even
more, — it often protects men of other nationalities. When a Mr. Poin-
sett was our Minister to Mexico from 1825 to 1829, the Mexicans, in
a rage, sought the lives of certain European Spaniards. The Spaniards
fled to the Consulate; the Mexicans pursued, and were about to at-
tack the building, when Mr. Poinsett unfurled the Stars and Stripes,
and standing beneath its folds saved his own life and that of the
frightened Spaniards.

SELECTION.

Moral influence is good, but it is also a good thing to have some-
thing material behind it. A missionary who recently arrived in this
country, from Turkey in Asia, mentioned the following experience:

" I left," he said, the " town of in the morning. In the

afternoon of that day it was attacked by the Kurds, and several hundred
of the inhabitants were slaughtered. When I reached the seaport, in-
tending to take the steamer on the way to America, I was told by the
local authority that I could not have a permit to embark, for he was
commanded to detain a person answering to my description until fur-

(85)



86 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

ther orders. I explained to him the necessity of my taking the steamer,
and the great inconvenience of delay. He expressed his regret, but
declared his inability to allow me to proceed. Presently the steamer
sailed without me, and I had to wait another week.

" Day after day passed, bringing only politeness and promises.
The Consul telegraphed to Constantinople, but the telegram had to
pass through the hands of the Government, and my name was pur-
posely so muddled that the Minister could only telegraph back, ' I have
received your communication, but cannot make out to whom it refers.'
At last the Consul managed to get word to the commander of the gun-
boat, which was lying about sixty miles off. Next morning, looking
<out on the Mediterranean, I saw the smoke of an approaching steamer.
As it came nearer, I said to myself, ' Why, that looks like one of the
White Squadron.' Presently I saw at her fore-peak the Stars and
Stripes. She anchored in the port, and the commander called on the
local authority, and said to him, ' I have come to inquire into the case

of Mr. .' The local magistrate, with great urbanity, said, ' Oh,

that is all right. His papers are in order, and he can go at any time.'
The commander replied, ' I am very glad of it, for otherwise I should
have been compelled to demand him.' "



THE LAND.

HE land, your geographies tell you, makes up a large
part of the earth's surface. And I am sure all chil-
dren know that the extent of land, in this " Coun-
try of Ours," as Benjamin Harrison calls it, is very
great; very great also the stretches of sea-coast
hemming in the land. But the larger the land the

worse for the people, unless on every part of it

on every mountain, in every valley — there is en-
joyed the order and protection which the flag represents. In
olden times beacon-fires on hill-tops were the signals for free-
men to rally to their country's aid. Let ours be the better, more
inspiring, signal of the waving flag!




SELECTIONS.

I remember reading a short time ago about a Celtic regiment,
called the Black Watch, which had been gone from home for many
years, and when it landed again upon the shores, the men immediately
kneeled down and kissed the sands of Galway. That's the kind of
patriotism we want now-a-days; the patriotism that loves the soil upon
which we tread, that loves the air that surrounds us here in America,
that loves the stars and stripes because they represent this great re-
public; the kind of patriotism that not only seeks to defend our in-
stitutions, but seeks to elevate our manhood and womanhood.— Anon.

(87)



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.



LOVE OF COUNTRY.



Breathes there the man with soul so dead,
Who never to himself hath said,

" This is my own, my native land! "
Whose heart hath ne'er within him burned,
As home his footsteps he hath turned,

From wandering on a foreign strand!
If such there breathe, go, mark him well I
For him no minstrel raptures swell;
High though his titles, proud his name,
Boundless his wealth as wish can claim,
Despite those titles, power, and pelf,
The wretch, concentred all in self,
Living, shall forfeit fair renown,
And, doubly dying, shall go down,
To the vile dust from whence he sprung,
Unwept, unhonored, and unsung.

— Sir Walter Scott.



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OUR OWN DEAR LAND.



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From Levekmore's " Academy Song Book," Ginn & Co., Publishers, by permission.



THE OCEAN-GUARDED FLAG.



James Riley.



L. V. H. Crosby.
Air, "Dearest Mae."







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3. Its stripes of red, e - ter - nal dyed with heart-streams of all lands; Its



fe




flashed o'er Mon- mouth's blood - y fight,

nev - er did that en - sign yield

white, the snow-capped hills that hide



and

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it Mc - Hen - ry's sky; It

hon - or to the foe; Its

storm their up - raised hands; Its




bears up - on its folds of flame to earth's re - mot - est wave The
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names of men whose deeds of fame shall e'er in - spire the brave,
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Words by permission of Cassgll & Co., Limited.




THE SEA.

SEA, with all its perils and shipwrecks, seems to
have had little of terror for the hardy seamen
of America. In every war in which we have
fought, their skill and courage have been
shown. And not only ships of war, but ships
of trade have run the gauntlet of the waves.
But battle-skill and commercial supremacy
count for little unless the flag flies from the masthead of every ship and
brightens every harbor and haven into which our ships enter. In
ancient times, the galley-prows bore figures of heathen gods and
heroes. Better far, the adornment of that flag which stands for the
living manhood and immortal valor of our sailor lads!



SELECTIONS.



THE SHIP OF STATE.



Thou too, sail on, O ship of state!
Sail on, O Union, strong and great!
Humanity, with all its fears,
With all the hopes of future years,

Is hanging breathless on thy fate!
We know what Master laid thy keel,
What Workman wrought thy ribs of steel,

Who made each mast, and sail, and rope,
What anvils rang, what hammers beat,
In what a forge and what a heat,

Were shaped the anchors of thy hope!
Fear not each sudden sound and shock,
'Tis of the wave and not the rock,
Tis but the flapping of the sail,
And not a rent made by the gale!
(01)



g 2 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

In spite of rock, and tempest's roar,
In spite of false lights on the shore,
Sail on, nor fear to breast the sea,
Our hearts, our hopes, are all with thee!
Our hearts, our hopes, our prayers, our tears,
Our faith, triumphant o'er our fears,
Are all with thee — are all with thee!

— Henry Wadsivorth Longfellow.



ADMIRAL FARRAGUT.

During the Civil War it was an easy thing in the North to support
the Union, and it was a double disgrace to be against it. But among
the highest and loftiest patriots, those who deserved best of the whole
country, were the men from the South who possessed such loyalty and
heroic courage that they stood by the flag and followed the cause of the
whole nation, and the whole people. Among all those who fought in
this, the greatest struggle for righteousness, these men stand pre-
eminent, and Farragut stands first.

He belongs to that class of commanders who possess in the highest
degree the qualities of courage and daring, of readiness to assume great
responsibility and to run great risks.

As a boy he had sailed as a midshipman, and he saw the war of
1 812, in which, though our frigates and sloops fought some glorious
actions, our coasts were blockaded and insulted, and the Capitol at
Washington burned, because our statesmen and people had been too
short-sighted to build a big fighting navy; and Farragut was able to
perform his great feats on the Gulf coast because in the Civil War we
had ships as good as any afloat.

No man in a profession as highly technical as the navy can win
great success unless he has been specially brought up in and trained
for that profession, and has devoted his life to the work. Step by step
Farragut rose, but never had an opportunity of distinguishing him-
self in his profession until, when he was sixty years old, the Civil War
broke out. He was made flag-officer of the Gulf squadron; and the
first success that the Union forces met with in the southwest was
scored when one night he burst the iron chains stretched across the



THE FLAG WAVES OVER. 93

Mississippi, swept past the forts, sank the rams and gunboats that
sought to bar his way, and captured New Orleans.

In the last year of the war he was permitted to attempt the cap-
ture of Mobile. All he wanted was a chance to fight. He possessed
splendid self-confidence, and utterly refused to be daunted by the
rumors of the formidable nature of the defences against which he was
to act. " I mean to be whipped or to whip my enemy," he said, " and
not to be scared to death."

The attack was made early on the morning of August 5. Every
man in every craft was thrilling with excitement. For their foes who
fought in sight, for the forts, the gunboats, and the great ironclad
ram, they cared nothing; but all, save the very boldest, dreaded the
torpedoes — the mines of death — which lay, they knew not where,
thickly scattered through the channels. Farragut stood in the port
main-rigging of the Hartford, close to the main-top, lashed to the mast.
As they passed the forts, Farragut heard the explosion of a torpedo
and saw the monitor Tecumseh, then but five hundred feet from the
Hartford, reel violently, lurch heavily over, and go down head-fore-
most. This was the crisis of the fight, and the crisis of Farragut's
career. The column was halted in a narrow channel, right under the
fire of the forts. A few moments' delay and confusion, and the golden
chance would have been past, and the only question would have been
as to the magnitude of the disaster. Ahead lay terrible danger, but
ahead lay also triumph. The other ships would not obey the signal
to go ahead, and the admiral himself resolved to take the lead. Back-
ing hard, he got clear of the others and then went ahead very fast.
A warning cry came that there were torpedoes ahead. " Go ahead,
full speed," shouted the admiral, and he steamed forward. The cases
of torpedoes were heard knocking against the bottom of the ship; but
they failed to explode, and the Hartford went through the gates of
Mobile Bay. Within three hours the Confederate flotilla was destroyed,
the bay was won, and the forts around were helpless.

Farragut had proved himself the peer of Nelson, and had added
to the annals of the Union the page which tells of the greatest sea-fight
in our history. — Hon. Theodore Roosevelt, adapted from " Hero Tales.''



94



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

UNFURL OUR STANDARD HIGH.

Unfurl our standard high!

Its glorious folds shall wave
Where'er the land looks to the sky,

Or ocean's surges lave!
And when, beneath its shade, the brave,

With patriotic ire,
Combat for glory or the grave,

It shall their hearts inspire
With that chivalric spark which first
Upon our foes in terror burst!

Unfurl the stripes and stars!

They evermore shall be
Victorious on the field of Mars —

Triumphant on the sea!
And when th' o'erruling fates decree

The bolt of war to throw,
Thou, sacred banner of the free,

Shall daunt the bravest foe;
And never shall thy stars decline
Till circling suns have ceased to shine.

— Owen Grenliffe Warren.



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

GROUP IV.
THE FLAG IS SYMBOLIZED

BY

1. The Liberty Cap Song, The Liberty Cap.

2. The Liberty Bell Song, The Liberty Bell.

( The Sword (War) Song, The Sword of Bunker Hill.

( The Dove (Peace) Song, Angel of Peace.

4. The Eagle Song, Where the Eagle is King.

5. The Shield Song, Battle Hymn of the Republic.

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