Copyright
Charles Rufus Skinner.

Manual of patriotism : for use in the public schools of the State of New York online

. (page 8 of 31)
Online LibraryCharles Rufus SkinnerManual of patriotism : for use in the public schools of the State of New York → online text (page 8 of 31)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


As striding from the desk he came,
" Come out with me, in Freedom's name.
For her to live, for her to die?"
A hundred hands flung up reply,
A hundred voices answered, " I."

— T. Buchanan Read.



Be it in the defense or be it in the assertion of a people's rights, I
hail the sword as a sacred weapon; and if it has sometimes taken too
deep a dye, yet, like the anointed rod of the High Priest, it has at
other times, and as often, blossomed into celestial flowers to deck the
freeman's brow. Abhor the sword? Stigmatize the sword? No! for
in the passes of the Tyrol it cut to pieces the banner of the Bavarian,
and through those craggy defiles struck a path to fame for the peasant
insurrectionist of Innspruck. Abhor the sword? Stigmatize the
sword? No! for it swept the Dutch marauders out of the fine old
towns of Belgium, scourged them back to their own phlegmatic
swamps, and knocked their flag and sceptre, their laws and bayonets
into the sluggish waters of the Scheldt. Abhor the sword? Stigma-
tize the sword? NO! For at its blow a giant nation started from
the waters of the Atlantic, and by the redeeming magic of the sword,
and in the quivering of its crimson light, the crippled colonies sprang
into the attitude of a proud republic, — prosperous, limitless, invinci-
ble. — Thomas Francis Meagher.



THE SWORD OF BUNKER HILL.



William Ross Wallace.



Bernard Covert.



Moderate.



mf



=fc:



-y 1 —



i. He lay up - on

2. The sword was brought,

3. '"Twason that dread,



his dy - ing bed ;
the sol -dier's eye
im - mor - tal day,



4. " O, keep the sword " — his ac - cents broke —



His eye

Lit with

I dared

A smile —



was grow - ing

a sud - den

the Brit - on's

and he was




9%



d



-4-

— (Si-



dim,
flame ;
band,
dead —



-ft —



When with a fee
And as he grasped

A cap - tain raised

But his wrin - kled hand



ble voice he called His

the an - cient blade, He

this blade on me, — I

still grasped the bl^de Up




*&T-



Tfrr



-dr




-ff 1"







PP



&



^PP=



E



*



weep -ing son to him: "Weep not, my boy!"

murmured War - ren'sname: Then said, "My boy,

tore it from his hand : And while the glo -

on that dy - ing bed. The son re-mains ;



±7JL



=1



the vet- 'ran said, "I

I leave you gold — But
rious bat - de raged, It

the sword re - mains — Its



^



V:







9fc



-si-.



±3 -



:=t



w



-^—9-




THE SWORD OF BUNKER HILL.




ant - lers bring
mark me now —

free - dom blessed
bless the sire,



/



§feE3



The Sword

The Sword

The Sword

And Sword



&-*-



3=



ppppi



of
of
of
of



Bun
Bun
Bun
Bun



ker

ker
ker
ker



Hill
Hill
Hill
Hill



-a-



-&-







But

I
For,
And




quick - ly from
leave you, mark
boy, the God
twen - ty mil



yon ant - lers bring
me, mark me now —
of free -dom blessed
lions bless the sire,



The Sword
The Sword
The Sword
And Sword



of

of
of
of



Bun -ker Hill'

Bun -ker Hill. 1

Bun - ker Hill.'

Bun -ker Hill.



**



5^



F3



>3- \



^
-&■'






^






■sf-



=t



ANGEL OF PEACE.



Oliver Wendell Holmes.



HE



&~



utz t



!» a J —



-^;



=^3



Matthias Keller.
I 1-



m



i. An - gel of

2. Broth- ers we

3. An - gels of

— A



Peace, thou
meet, on
Beth - le -



hast wan-dered too
this al - tar of
hem, an - swer the



long!
thine
strain



Spread thy white wings to the
Ming -ling the gifts we have
Hark! a new birth-song is



^



: | r :



m



&



:f=P



£=t



§s



1. An - gel of

2. Broth -ers we

3. An - gels of



Peace, thou
meet on
Beth - le -



hast wan-dered too
this al - tar of
hem, an - swer the



long !
thine
strain !



T-TT-&-



-*— P



Spread thy white wings to the
Ming - ling the gifts we have
Hark! a new birth -sons: is



Maestoso, = 76





sun - shine of love !
gath - ered for thee,
fill - ing the sky ! -



Come while our voi - ces are blend - ed in song,
Sweet with the o - dors of myr - tie and pine,
Loud as the storm-wind that turn - bles the main
mf



H=1=F



SI



sun - shine of love !
gath -ered for thee,
fill - ing the sky !-



Come while our voi - ces are blend - ed in song,-
Sweet with the o - dors of myr - tie and pine,
Loud as the storm-wind that turn - bles the main,



fee



^:



-P-S-



ir



^e-



r-



=F=




Words by special arrangement with Houghton, Mifflin & Co.
Music used by permission of Oliver Ditson Company, owners of copyright.



ANGEL OF PEACE.



m



=t



^^



■=\-



f i



=H^S=^



i-



5-



-Sq^JrtS:



4=



Fly to our ark like the storm-beat - en dove!

Breeze of the prai - rie and breath of the sea, —

Bid the full breath of the or - gan re - ply, —



m






^



=F=4



V



F



^



pup



Fly to our ark like the storm-beat - en dove!
Breeze of the prai - rie and breath of the sea, —
Bid the full breath of the or - gan re -ply, —



lr r r



=t



r



Fly to our ark on the

Mead - ow and moun- tain and

Let the loud tern - pest of
ff



-bfi^B



4-



±±



Fly to our ark on the

Mead - ow and moun-tain and

Let the loud tem - pest of

r i — LZr fcEz=t



C^I



^=r=f=



=^=t






J— ;



:t==P



• - 42



t — ri



4=-l



- 5) a— k — \-^-\ — m — a — 1

-*- r^4~-4r-4^ t S«-iH3- =l

-#- -4- -j- -j- "— I \ -4- -w-




wings of the dove
for - est and sea !
voi - ces re - ply,-



-J-4-



=f



Speed o'er the
Sweet is the
Roll its long
mf



far - sounding bil - lows of
fra-grance of myr - tie and
surge like the earth - shak-ing
cres.



song,
pine,
main !



/



5i



t=t



-f=2-



^=E^



wings of the dove,—
for - est and sea!
voi - ces re - ply, —



k )



'?



f



:*i-*:



Speed o'er the
Sweet is the
Roll its long

— 1 I



far - sounding bil - lows of
fra-grance of myr - tie and
surge like the earth -shak-ing
cres.

i



song,
pine,
main !

/



m



*—



4=^



ANGEL OF PEACE.




-ft



Crowned with thine ol
Sweet - er the in
Swell the vast song



3^



ive - leaf gar - land of love, —

cense we of - fer to thee, —

till it mounts to the sky! —



!=3cda



£ =t=t= Ft



E



ir=



Crowned with thine ol
Sweet - er the in
Swell the vast song



ive - leaf gar - land of love, —
cense we of - fer to thee,
till it mounts to the sky ! —



it



=&=



±



=j 1 :



-251-



'4-



:t=F==i



An - gel of
Broth - ers once
An - gels of

ff



S



An - gel of

Broth - ers once

An - gels of

/4- - -



t 1 — 1=

& — » — & —



p



r





-0-: -e- -&-

Peace,thou hast wait - ed too long !

more round this al - tar of thine !

Beth - le - hem, ech - o the strain !

-J



— I— i *



t=



Peace, thou hast wait - ed too long !
more round this al - tar of thine !
Beth - le - hem, ech - o the strain !



^i




^



-H






J?3



-l 4



d=t



3f






S



H-
&S



n



:*= *



-4r-H-



^ -•-



I




PEACE.



THE DOVE.




DOVE is quite a common sight to children living
in the country — and a great many boys and girls
could write very interesting compositions about
its beauty, its quiet ways, and its contented life.
They could weave into their thoughts, also, that
beautiful story of olden times about the dove that
was once sent forth from an ark, at a time when the whole of the
Earth's surface was covered with water, to see if she could find a
resting place "for the sole of her foot;" and how at first she could
find none, but going forth again, after seven days resting in the ark,
she returned at evening — " and, lo, in her mouth was an olive leaf
pluckt off; " so the people in the ark knew that the waters had abated.
Well, ever since that time, almost, the olive leaf, or branch, has meant
victory — just as the dry land gained a victory over the water,— and
the Dove has been the symbol of Peace — just as peace and happiness
came to the dwellers shut up in the storm-tossed ark on the top of the
mountain. Now what more pleasant celebration can happy children
have, than to read and talk and sing about the glory and prosperity
which comes to a nation that is at peace with all the world? Let us
talk about the sword and cruel war when we must because our country
is in peril; but let the songs of Peace and its praises be ever upon our
lips, until



" The war-drums beat no longer,
And the battle-flags are furled
In the Parliament of Man,
The Federation of the World."
(125)



126 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.



SELECTIONS.

There is a story told
In Eastern tents, when autumn nights grow cold,
And round the fire the Mongol shepherds sit
With grave responses listening unto it;
Once, on the errands of his mercy bent,
Buddha, the holy and benevolent,
Met a fell monster, huge and fierce of look,
Whose awful voice the hills and forests shook.
"O son of Peace!" the giant cried, "thy fate
Is sealed at last, and love shall yield to hate."
The unarmed Buddha looking, with no trace
Of fear or anger, in the monster's face,

With pity said: " Poor fiend, even thee I love."
Lo! as he spake, the sky-tall terror sank
To hand-breadth size; the huge abhorrence shrank

Into the form and fashion of a dove;
And where the thunder of its rage was heard,
Brooding above him sweetly sang the bird;
" Hate hath no harm for love," so ran the song,
And peace unweaponed conquers every wrong! "

— John Grccnlcaf IVhittier.



It is a beautiful picture in Grecian story, that there was at least
one spot, the small island of Delos, dedicated to the gods, and kept at
all times sacred from war. No hostile foot ever sought to press this
kindly soil; and the citizens of all countries here met, in common
worship, beneath the aegis of inviolable peace. So let us dedicate our
beloved country; and may the blessed consecration be felt in all its
parts, throughout its ample domain! The temple of honor shall
be surrounded here at last, by the Temple of Concord, that it
may never more be entered by any portal of war; the horn of abun-
dance shall overflow at its gates; the angel of religion shall be the
guide over its steps of flashing adamant; while within its enraptured
courts, purged of violence and wrong, justice, returning to earth
from her long exile in the skies, with mighty scales for nations as for
men, shall rear her serene and majestic front; and by her side, greatest.



THE FLAG SYMBOLIZED. I2 -

of all, charity, sublime in meekness, hoping all and enduring all,
shall divinely temper every righteous decree and with words of infinite
cheer shall inspire those good works that cannot vanish away. And
the future chiefs of the Republic, destined to uphold the glories of a
new era, unspotted by human blood, shall be " the first in Peace, and
the first in the hearts of their countrymen."

But while seeking these blissful glories for ourselves, let us strive
to extend them to other lands. Let the bugles sound the Truce of God
to the whole world forever. Let the selfish boast of the Spartan
women become the grand chorus of mankind, that they have never
seen the smoke of an enemy's camp. Let the iron belt of martial
music, which now encompasses the earth, be exchanged for the golden
cestus of Peace, clothing all with celestial beauty.— Charles Sumner,
from " The True Grandeur of Nations," an oration delivered before the
authorities of the city of Boston, July 4, 1845.



THE ARSENAL AT SPRINGFIELD.

This is the arsenal. From floor to ceiling,
Like a huge organ, rise the burnished arms;

But from their silent pipes no anthem pealing
Startles the villages with strange alarms.

Ah! what a sound will rise, how wild and dreary,
When the Death-angel touches these swift keys!

What loud lament and dismal Miserere
Will mingle with their awful symphonies!

I hear even now the infinite fierce chorus,
The cries of agony, the endless groan,

Which, through the ages that have gone before us,
In long reverberations reach our own.

On helm and harness rings the Saxon hammer.

Through Cimbric forest roars the Norseman's song,
And loud, amid the universal clamor,

O'er distant deserts sounds the Tartar gong.



I2 g MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

I hear the Florentine, who from his palace
Wheels out his battle-bell with dreadful din,

And Aztec priests upon their teocallis

Beat the wild war-drums made of serpent's skin.



The tumult of each sacked and burning village;

The shout that every prayer for mercy drowns;
The soldiers 1 revels in the midst of pillage;

The wail of famine in beleaguered towns;

The bursting shell, the gateway wrenched asunder,

The rattling musketry, the clashing blade;
And ever and anon, in tones of thunder,

The diapason of the cannonade.

Is it, O man, with such discordant noises,

With such accursed instruments as these,
Thou drownest Nature's sweet and kindly voices,

And jarrest the celestial harmonies?

Were half the power that fills the world with terror,
Were half the wealth bestozved on camps and courts,

Given to redeem the human mind from error,
There were no need of arsenals or forts:

The warrior's name would be a name abhorred!

And every nation that should lift again
Its hand against a brother, on its forehead

Would wear for evermore the curse of Cain!

Down the dark future, through long generations,
The echoing sounds grow fainter, and then cease;

And like a bell, with solemn, sweet vibrations,
/ hear once more the voice of Christ say, "Peace! "

Peace! and no longer from its brazen portals
The blast of War's great organ shakes the skies!

Hut, beautiful as songs of the immortals,
The holy melodies of love arise.

— H. W. Longfellow.




THE EAGLE.



HIS, surely, is true: If you have ever seen an Eagle
shut up in a cage, deprived of the power to fly, and
no scream of triumph ever issuing from his throat, it
must have given you a faint idea of the forlorn and
unhappy plight of any human being when deprived of

liberty, pining away in hopeless captivity.

If you have ever watched that same bird flying high and strong,

or have seen him perched upon some tall cliff or crag, rejoicing in the

upper air, and gazing with unblinking eyes upon the sun, — you have

seen a fine illustration of the joys of Freedom.



SELECTIONS.

THE EAGLE.
Bird of the broad and sweeping wing

Thy home is high in heaven,
Where wide the storms their banners fling,

And the tempest clouds are driven.
Thy throne is on the mountain top;

Thy fields — the boundless air;
And hoary peaks that proudly prop

The skies, thy dwellings are.

*******

And where was then thy fearless flight?

" O'er the dark, mysterious sea.
To the lands that caught the setting light,

The cradle of liberty.
There on the silent and lonely shore,

For ages I watched alone,
And the world, in its darkness, asked no more

Where the glorious bird had flown.



But then came a bold and hardy few,
And they breasted the unknown wave;

I caught afar the wandering crew,

And I knew they were high and brave.

9 (129)



130



MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

I wheeled around the welcome bark,

As it sought the desolate shore;
And up to heaven, like a joyous lark,

My quivering pinions bore.

And now that bold and hardy few

Are a nation wide and strong;
And danger and doubt I have led them through,

And they worship me in song;
And over their bright and glancing arms

On field, and lake, and sea,
With an eye that fires, and a spell that charms,

I guide them to victory."

— James Gates Pcrcival.

THE AMERICAN EAGLE.

Bird of Columbia! well art thou

An emblem of our native land;
With unblenched front and noble brow,

Among the nations doomed to stand;
Proud, like her mighty mountain woods;

Like her own rivers wandering free;
And sending forth from hills and floods

The joyous shout of liberty!
Like thee, majestic bird! like thee,

She stands in unbought majesty,
With spreading wing, untired and strong,

That dares a soaring far and long,
That mounts aloft, nor looks below,

And will not quail, though tempests blow

The admiration of the earth,
In grand simplicity she stands;

Like thee, the storms beheld her birth,
And she was nursed by rugged hands;

But, past the fierce and furious war,
Her rising fame new glory brings,

For kings and nobles come from far
To seek the shelter of her wings.
And like thee, rider of the cloud,
She mounts the heavens, serene and proud,
Great in a pure and noble fame,
Great in her spotless champion's name,
And destined in her day to be
Mighty as Rome, more nobly free. — C. W. Thompson.



Thomas Buchanan Read.

Martial style.



WHERE THE EAGLE IS KING.

William F. Hartley.








-i



m



m



-+-



#



-^ —



i. Where sweeps round the moun - tains the cloud on the gale, And streams from their

2. I mount the wild horse with no sad - die or rein, And guide his swift

3. When A - pril is sound - ing his horn o'er the hills, And brook- lets are



i



^EEH



^e3e3



Azm



9^#=£



*



s



-• - w



z* *"



zfc



t=r



3=P



it



"#-!-



foun-
course
bound



tains leap
with a
ing in



in

grasp

joy



■HP •' r V V

to the vale, — As fright-ened deer leap when the storm with his

on his mane: Thro' paths steep and nar - row, and scorn - ing the

to the mills, — When warm Au- gust slum-bers a - mong her green




^= ^



3*



Z*



-?-



=1



f-N—



*i— "



P



g



pack Rides o - ver
crag, I chase with
leaves, And har - vest



the steep in the wild
my ar - row the flight
en - cum - bers her gar



±



1*-=*-



*r ?



^#^i



r



tor - rent's track, — Ev'n
of the stag ; Through
ners with sheaves, When the



Zt



3



pr-b^



^r



^r



Words by permission J. B. Lippincott Company; Music, Houghton, Mifflin & Co.



WHERE THE EAGLE IS KING.



m







*



iE



^



£



there my free home is; there watch I the flocks Wan-der white as the
snow - drifts en - gulf - ing, I fol - low the bear, And face the gaunt

flail of No - vem - ber is swing - ing with might, And the mil - ler De -




1



J 1 -



^



i V



^r—$



^—$ 1 1-



?



^-?



T



m



m



*=¥



foam is on stair - ways of rocks ;
wolf when he snarls in his lair,
cem - ber is man - tied with white,-



^#



Se - cure in the gorge there in

And watch through the gorge there the

In field and in forge there the




3h*



m



&=■*



w



~=t 3r



i— -$



3T



±



^



3



i



P



free - dom we sing,
red pan - ther spri.ig,
free - heart - ed sing,



And laugh at King George, where the Ea - gle
And laugh at King George, where the Ea - gle
And laugh at King George, where the Ea - gle



king,
king,
king.



i



THE FLAG SYMBOLIZED. 133

THE GRAY FOREST EAGLE.
********
An emblem of freedom, stern, haughty, and high,
Is the Gray Forest Eagle, that king of the sky.
When his shadows steal black o'er the empires of kings,
Deep terror, — deep, heart-shaking terror, — he brings;
Where wicked oppression is armed for the weak,
There rustles his pinion, there echoes his shriek;
His eye flames with vengeance, he sweeps on his way,
And his talons are bathed in the blood of his prey.

O, that Eagle of Freedom! when cloud upon cloud
Swathed the sky of my own native land with a shroud.
When lightnings gleamed fiercely, and thunderbolts rung,
How proud to the tempest those pinions were flung!
Though the wild blast of battle rushed fierce through the air
With darkness and dread, still the eagle was there;
Unquailing, still speeding his swift flight was on,
Till the rainbow of peace crowned the victory won.

O, that Eagle of Freedom! age dims not his eye.
He has seen earth's mortality spring, bloom, and die!
He has seen the strong nations rise, flourish, and fall,
He mocks at Time's changes, he triumphs o'er all;
He has seen our own land with forests o'erspread,
He sees it with sunshine and joy on its head;
And his presence will bless this his own chosen clime,
Till the Archangel's fiat is set upon time.

— Alfred B. Street.

THE EAGLE.

He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
Close to the sun in lonely lands,
Ring'd with the azure world, he stands.

The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;
He watches from his mountain walls;
And like a thunderbolt he falls.

— Alfred Tennyson.



! 3 4 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

Many years ago, a white-headed eagle was taken from its nest
when only four months old, and sold to a Wisconsin farmer for a
bushel of corn. The bird was very intelligent, and attracted the atten-
tion of a gentleman, who purchased and presented him to the Eighth
Regiment of Wisconsin, then preparing to go to the front. The eagle
was gladly received, and given a place next to the regimental flag.
For three years he followed the " Live Eagle Regiment/' being near
its flag in thirty battles.

This majestic bird was always moved and most demonstrative at
the sound of martial music. He shared all the battles of the regiment,
but no drop of his blood was ever sacrificed. Vainly did rebel sharp-
shooters aim at his dark figure, conspicuously " painted on the crimson
sky; " he seemed to bear a charmed life; and his loyal comrades almost
looked up to him as their leader, and with pride believed in him as a
bird of good omen. He was named " Old Abe," sworn into the ser-
vice, and proved to be every inch a soldier, listening to and obeying
orders, noting time most accurately, always after the first year giving
heed to " attention," insisting upon being in the thickest of the fight,
and when his comrades, exposed to great danger from the terrible fire
of the enemy, were ordered to lie down, he would flatten himself upon
the ground with them, rising when they did, and with outspread pin-
ions soar aloft over the carnage and smoke of the battle. When the
cannons were pouring forth destruction and death, above the roar and
thunder of the artillery rose his wild, shrill, battle-cry of freedom. He
was always restless before the march to the encounter, but after the
smoke of the battlefield had cleared away he would doff his soldier-
like bearing, and with wild screams of delight would manifest his joy
at the victory; but if defeat was the result his discomfiture and deep
sorrow was manifested by every movement of his stately figure, but
drooping head. — Adapted from M. S. Porter.




THE SHIELD.

'OW great was the reliance of the Roman soldier upon
his shield! With it, he warded off the arrows of his
enemies aimed at his body; holding it over him, like
a roof, he sheltered his head from storms of mis-
siles hurled at him from higher places. But woe be
to him, if his shield was not strong enough to with-
stand the weapons dashed against it!

Recall, also, the command of the Spartan mother to her soldier-
son: " My son, return with your shield or upon it." That meant
that the soldier was to win the victory if possible; if not, was to give
up his life in defense of his country, and be borne home upon his shield
as a pall of honor.

So, Our Country is a shield of Law and Justice, giving to every
citizen its sure and safe protection. May that shield never be so
weak that it cannot withstand the attacks of any and every foe!

On the other hand, every citizen should be as a shield for his
country — trying to win right victories for her, or ready, if need be, to
die for her, like the Spartan soldier of old.

SELECTIONS.

THE TRUE PATRIOT.

E'en when in hostile fields he bleeds to save her,

'Tis not his blood he loses, 'tis his country's;

He only pays her back a debt he owes.

To her he's bound for birth and education,

Her laws secure him from domestic feuds.

And from the foreign foe her arms protect him.

She lends him honors, dignity, and rank,

His wrong revenges, and his merit pays;

And like a tender and indulgent mother,

Loads him with comforts, and would make his state

As blessed as nature and the gods designed it.

— William Cowper.
(135)



I3 6 MANUAL OF PATRIOTISM.

I do not know how far the United States of America can inter-
fere in Turkey, but American citizens are suffering in Armenia, and
so far as American citizens are concerned, I would protect them there
at any cost. We have given no assent to the agreement of European
nations that the Dardanelles should be closed; and if it were necessary
to protect American citizens and their property, I would order United



Online LibraryCharles Rufus SkinnerManual of patriotism : for use in the public schools of the State of New York → online text (page 8 of 31)