Charles Sanford Terry.

Bach's chorals (Volume v.3) online

. (page 4 of 19)
Online LibraryCharles Sanford TerryBach's chorals (Volume v.3) → online text (page 4 of 19)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


*t 66 (243) Christ, unser Herr, zum Jordan kam.

The melody of Luther's hymn occurs in Cantatas 7,
176, and the Organ works. There is also a four-part
setting of it among the Choralgesdnge, No. 43.

Nos. 61 to 66 form a group of Catechism hymns.
Bach and Witt (Nos. 219-45), whom he follows, treat
the heads of the Catechism in the customary order.
Bach interchanges Nos. 61 and 62, using the former,
as being more definitive, to introduce the Ten Com-
mandments group.

Penitence and amendment ' Biiss-Lieder (246-270).
*67 (261) Aus tiefer Noth schrei ich zu dir.

The hymn is by Luther. Its familiar melody also is
probably by him. Bach uses it in Cantata 38 as well
as in the Clavieriibung. Witt uses another (1525) tune
(Zahn, No. 4438a).



THE "ORGELBUCHLEIN" 43

*t68 (258) Erbarm' dich mein, O Herre Gott.-

The hymn is by Erhart Hegenwalt. The melody, pro-
bably by Johann Walther, was published with the hymn
in 1524. Bach uses it in the miscellaneous Preludes.
There is a four-part setting of it among the Choralgescinge,
No. 78.

*t69 (286) Jesu, der du meine Seele.

Johann Rist's hymn is set in Witt to a melody pub-
lished in 1662 to Harsdorffer's " Wachet doch, erwacht,
ihr Schlafer." Bach uses it in Cantatas 78 and 105, and
there are three four-part settings of it among the Choral-
gesdnge^ Nos. 185-187.

*t7o (280) AUein zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ.

The hymn is by Johannes Schneesing. The melody
also is attributed to him. It occurs in Cantata 33. There
is a four-part setting of it among the Choralgesdnge,
No. 15.

*t7i (265) Ach Gott und Herr.

The authorship of the hymn is disputed. The melody
is used by Bach in Cantata 48 and among the miscel-
laneous Preludes. A four-part setting of it is among the
Choralgesdnge, No. 3.

*t 72 (283) Herr Jesu Christ, du hochstes Gut.

The hymn is by Bartholomaus Ringwaldt. The melody
occurs in a variety of forms, Witt's being the Tenor of a
four-part setting of the tune "Wenn mein Stiindlein"
(Zahn, Nos. 4484, 4486). Bach uses it in Cantatas 48, 113,
166, 168, and there is a four-part setting of it among the
Choralgesdnge, No. 141.

*t73 (253) Ach Herr, mich armen Siinder.

The hymn is by Cyriacus Schneegass. Its tune is also
known as " Herzlich thut mich verlangen." Bach employs
it in Cantatas 25, 135, 153, 159, 161 and the miscellaneous
Preludes. There are two four-part settings of it among
the Choralgesdnge, Nos. 157, 158.



44 INTRODUCTION

*74 (282) Wo soil ich fliehen hin-

The hymn is by Johann Heermann. The melody Witt
uses is perhaps by Caspar Stieler. Bach uses it in two
Cantatas of the Weimar period, Nos. 163 and 199. The
melody " Wo soil ich fliehen hin," which he uses else-
where, is more correctly styled " Auf meinen lieben Gott "
(see No. 136 infra).
75 (267) Wir haben schwerlich.

The melody of this anonymous hymn is taken by Witt
from a five-part setting in the Gotha Cantional oi 1648
(Zahn, 2099). Bach has not made use of it elsewhere.
*76 (291) DuRCH Adams Fall ist ganz verderbt.
^Tj (292) Es 1ST DAS Heil uns kommen her.

In the Penitential group Bach draws upon Witt's
corresponding section and his "Faith" and "Justi-
fication by Faith " hymns. He begins (Nos. Gj, 68)
with a cry of despair :

Out of the depths I cry to Thee,

Lord, hear me, I implore Thee ;
and

Behold, I was all bom in sin.

My mother conceived me therein.

He adds words of comfort ; Johann Rist's (No. 69)

Jesu, Who, in sorrow dying.
Didst deliverance bring to me ;

and Schneesing's (No. 70)

Lord Jesus Christ, in Thee alone
My only hope on earth I place.

But the mood of despair returns (No. 71):

Alas ! my God ! my sins are gi'eat.
My conscience doth upbraid me,
And now I find in my sore strait
No man hath power to aid me;



THE "ORGELBiJCHLEIN" 4$

and again (No. 72) :

Jesus, Thou Source of every good,
Pure Fountain of Salvation,
Behold me bowed beneath the load
Of guilt and condemnation;

and again (No. 73) :

A sinner, Lord, I pray Thee,
Recall Thy dread decree ;
Thy fearful wrath, O spare me.
From judgment set me free.

There falls (No. 74) a ray of hope :

My heavy load of sin

To Thee, O Lord, I bring ;



From out Thy Side love floweth,
And saving grace bestoweth.

After a final (No. 75) act of contrition, the section

ends with heartening comfort : Lazarus Spengler's

(No. :^6)

He that hopeth in God steadfastly
Shall never be confounded ;

and Paul Speratus' (No. yy)

Salvation hath come down to us
Of freest grace and love.

It is characteristic of Bach's temperament that

the last two hymns, with their message of comfort,

are the only completed movements in the section.

I/oty Cotnmunion Vom Abendniahl des Herrn (308-333).
*t78 (320) Jesus Christus, unser Heiland, Der von uns.

The hymn is by Luther. The tune also is attributed to
him. It occurs in four Organ Preludes, and there is a four-
part setting of it among the Choralgesdnge, No. 206.



46 INTRODUCTION

+ 79 (324) Gott sei gelobet und gebenedeiet.

The hymn is by Luther, and the melody is based on
pre-Reformation material. There is a four-part setting
of it among the Ckoralgesdnge, No. 119.

80 (633) Der Herr ist mein getreuer Hirt.

The hymn is by Wolfgang Meusel. It is set in Witt
to a melody (Zahn, No. 4432a) not used by Bach else-
where. In the Cantatas he invariably sets the hymn to
Decius' "AUein Gott in der Hoh' sei Ehr'" (see No. 53
supra).

81 (319) Jetzt komm ich als ein armer Gast.

The hymn, whose first line also reads, " Ich komm
ietzt als ein armer Gast," is by Justus Sieber (1628-95).
In Witt it is directed to be sung to the melody " Herr
Jesu Christ, du hochstes Gut" (see No. 72 supra). Bach
has not used the hymn's proper melody (Zahn, No. 4646)
elsewhere.

82 (322) O Jesu, du edle Gabe.

The hymn is by Johann Bottiger (1613-72). It is set
in Witt to a melody (Zahn, No. 3892^5) which Bach has
not used elsewhere.

83 Wir danken dir, Herr Jesu Christ, Dass du das

Lammlein.
The hymn is by Nikolaus Selnecker. It is not in Witt.
Bach has not used its melody (Zahn, No. 479 or 480)
elsewhere.
*84 (317) Ich weiss ein Bliimlein hiibsch und fein.

The anonymous hymn is set in Witt to a melody used
by Bach in Cantata 106, and also known as " Ich hab' mein
Sach' Gott heimgestellt."
*t85 (293) Nun freut euch, lieben Christen, g'mein.

Luther's hymn has two melodies. Of the older (1524)
there is a four-part setting among the Choralgesdnge,
No. 261. The second (1529 or 1535) occurs in the Christ-
mas Oratorio, Cantata 70, the miscellaneous Preludes,
and in a four-part setting among the Choralgesdnge^



THE "DRGELBiJCHLEIN" 47

No. 262. The second tune has been attributed to Luther,
and for that reason perhaps Bach preferred it. Witt also
uses it.
*t86 (384) Nun lob', mein' Seel', den Herren.

The hymn is by Johann Graumann. The melody, pro-
bably composed by Johann Kugelmann, is used by Bach
in Cantatas 17, 28, 29, 51, 167, Motett i. There are four-
part settings of it among the Choralgesdnge^ No. 269,
270.

Of the nine hymns in the Holy Communion group
only five (Nos. 78, 79, 81, 82, 84) are found in Witt's
corresponding section. The rest are drawn from
other parts of Witt's book or (No. 83) are introduced
from outside it. Bach is working out a "programme"
of his own. The section begins with Luther's " Jesus
Christus, unser Heiland," which Bach used many
years later for the Eucharistic hymn in the Cla-
vieriibung. It is an invitation to the Holy Table :

Christ Jesus, our Redeemer born,
Who from us did God's anger turn,
That we never should forget it,
Gave He us His flesh to eat it.
Who will draw near to that table
Must take heed, all he is able.
Who unworthy thither goes.
Thence death, instead of life, he knows.

No. 79, Luther's " Gott sei gelobet," is a prayer
that the communicant may worthily receive Christ's
Flesh and Blood.



48 INTRODUCTION

No. 80, transferred from another section of Witt's

book, brings the communicant to the Holy Table :

The Lord He is my Shepherd true,
My steps He safely guideth ;
With all good things in order due
His bounty me provideth.

No. 81 is an act of devotion before receiving the

Sacramental Food :

Thy poor unworthy guest, O Lord,
I place me at Thy Table.

No. 82 is an act of thanksgiving after communi-
cating :

From my sins Thy Blood hath cleansed me,
From Hell's flames Thy love hath snatched me.

No. 83 is a grateful invocation of the atoning
Lamb of God.

In No. 84 the worshipper apostrophizes the rich
gift vouchsafed to him.

The last two hymns (Nos. 85, 86), drawn from
other parts of Witt's book, end upon a note of
thanksgiving.

The common weal Von denen drey Haupt-Stdnden

(471-473)-
87 (473) Wohl dem, der in Gottes Furcht steht.

The hymn is by Martin Luther. In Witt it is directed
to be sung to the tune " Wo Gott zum Haus nicht giebt
sein' Gunst." As that melody occurs in No. 88 infra Bach
had in mind to introduce here, perhaps, an older tune
(Zahn, No. 298) associated with Luther's hymn. He has
not used it elsewhere.



THE "ORGELBUCHLEIN" 49

t88 (472) Wo Gott zum Haus nicht giebt sein' Gunst.

The hymn is attributed to Johann Kolross. The
melody, which dates from 1535, belongs also to Luther's
"Wohl dem, der in Gottes Furcht steht." A four-part
setting of it is among the Choralgesdnge, No. 389.

The section does not need comment. Bach in-
cludes in it two of the three hymns allotted by Witt
to " The Three Estates."

Christian life and experience Vom Christlichen Leben unci

IVandel is^ 4-597)-
*89 (694) Was mein Gott will, das g'scheh' allzeit.

Albrecht Margrave of Brandenburg- Culmbach's hymn
and the French melody associated with it occur in Can-
tatas 65, 72, 92, 103, III, 144, and in the St Matthew
Passion.
*90 (514) Kommt her zu mir, spricht Gottes Sohn.

The hymn is by Georg Griienwald. Bach uses the
melody in Cantatas 74, 86, 108.
*9i (299) ICH ruf' zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ.
+93 (531) Weltlich Ehr' und zeitlich Gut.

The hymn is by Michael Weisse. It is set in Witt to
a melody (Zahn, No. 4977) which Bach has not used
elsewhere. There is a four-part setting of the original
melody of the hymn in the Choralgesdnge, No. 351.
*+93 (542) Von Gott will ich nicht lassen.

The melody of Ludwig Helmbold's hymn occurs in
Cantatas 11, 73, 107, and in the Organ Preludes. There
are three four-part settings of it among the Choralgesdnge,
Nos. 324-326.
+94 (525) Wer Gott vertraut.

The first stanza of the hymn is by Joachim Magdeburg.
It is set in Witt to a version of the original (1572) melody
found in Calvisius in 1597. There is a four-part setting
of it among the Choralgesdnge, No. 366.

T. B. c. 4



50 INTRODUCTION

95 (526) Wie's Gott gefallt, so gefallt mir's auch.

The hymn is by Ambrosius Blaurer (i 492-1 564). It is

set in Witt to "Was mein Gott will, das g'scheh' allzeit"

(No. 89 supra). Its proper melody (Zahn, No. 7574) bears

a likeness to the latter. Bach has not used it elsewhere.

*t96 (527) O Gott du frommer Gott.

The hymn is by Johann Heermann. It is set in Witt
to an anonymous melody which Bach uses in Cantatas
24, 71, 164. There is a four-part setting of it among the
Choralgesdfige, No. 282. Elsewhere in the Cantatas Bach
uses a second melody, and for the Partite a third.

Excepting Nos. 89 and 91, the hymns in the
" Christian Life " section are taken from Witt's cor-
responding group. Bach varies Witt's order, but his
own does not indicate a " programme."

In time of trouble Vom Creutz und Verfolgung (598-658).

*97 (606) In dich hab' ich gehofFet, Herr.

The hymn is by Adam Reissner. It is set in Witt to
Calvisius' melody, which Bach uses in Cantatas 52 and
106, the .5"/ Matthew Passion^ the Christmas Oratorio^
and the Organ Preludes.

98 (606) In dich hab' ich gehoffet, Herr (Alio modo).

Witt's tune is that indicated in No. 97 supra.

99 (630) Mag ich Ungliick nicht widerstahn.

The melody (Zahn, No. 8 11 3) of this anonymous hymn
does not occur elsewhere in Bach.
*t 100 (656) Wenn wir in hochsten Nothen sein.
*t loi (601) An Wasserfliissen Babylon.

The hymn and the melody are by Wolfgang Dachstein.
Bach uses the melody elsewhere in the Organ Preludes,
and there is a four-part setting of it among the Choral-
gesdnge, No. 23.
*t 102 (638) Warum betriibst du dich, mein Herz.

The hvmn is attributed to Hans Sachs. It is set in



THE "ORGELBiJCHLEIN" 51

Witt to the ancient tune which Bach uses in Cantatas
47 and 138 and of which there are four-part settings in
the Choralgesdnge, Nos. 331, 332.
103 (639) Frisch auf, mein' Seel', verzage nicht.

The hymn is by Caspar Schmucker. Witt directs it
to be sung to the tune "Was mein Gott will" (see No. 89
supra). Its proper melody is found in the Gotha Cantional
of 1648 (Zahn, No. 7578). Bach has not used it else-
where.

*io4 (604) Ach Gott, wie manches Herzeleid.

The hymn is attributed to Martin MoUer. Witt directs
It to be sung to the tune « Vater unser im Himmelreich"
(see ^^.es supra). In Cantatas 3, 44, 58, 118, 153 Bach
uses another melody for the hymn (see No. 139 infra).
1 105 (605) Ach Gott, erhor' mein Seufzen und Wehklagen.
The hymn is by Jakob Peter Schechs (1607-59). It is
set m Witt to a melody of which there is a four-part
settmg among the Choralgesdnge, No. 2.

106 (723) So wunsch' ich nun ein' gute Nacht.

The hymn is by Philipp Nicolai. It is set in Witt to a
melody (Zahn, No. 2766) which Bach has not used else-
where,

107 (641) Ach lieben Christen, seid getrost.

The hymn is by Johannes G. Gigas. Witt directs it
to be sung to the melody "Wo Gott der Herr nicht bei
uns halt." Bach also associates the two. (See No. 119
infra.) He has not used elsewhere the melody proper to
"Ach lieben Christen."

108 (598) Wenn dich Ungluck thut greifen an.

The hymn is anonymous. It is set in Witt to a melody
(Zahn, No. 499) which Bach has not used elsewhere.
1 109 (552) Keinen hat Gott verlassen.

The hymn is anonymous. It is set in Witt to a re-
construction of the melody of the " Rolandslied," of which
there is a four-part setting among the Choralgesdn^e,
No. 217. ^ '

4—2



52 INTRODUCTION

iio (632) Gott ist mein Heil, mein' Hiilf und Trost.

The hymn is anonymous. It is set in Witt to a melody
by Bartholomaus Gesius (Zahn, No. 4421) which Bach
has not used elsewhere.
1 1 1 (599) Was Gott that, das ist wohlgethan, Kein einig.
The hymn is by J. Michael Altenburg. Witt directs it to
to be sung to the tune "Kommt her zu mir, spricht Gottes
Sohn" (see No. 90 supra). Its proper melody is in the
Gotha Cantionaloi 1648 (Zahn, No. 2524). Bach has not
used it elsewhere.
*II2 (550) Was Gott thut, das ist wohlgethan, Es bleibt
gerecht.
The hymn is by Samuel Rodigast. Its melody is used
by Bach frequently in the Cantatas and in the "Three
Wedding Chorals."
*tii3 (553) Wer nur den lieben Gott lasst walten.

The section "In Time of Trouble" contains seven-
teen hymns, four of which (Nos. 106, 109, 112, 113)
are not in Witt's corresponding group. Bach also
disturbs Witt's order. He deliberately selects N o. 97,
a fervent expression of faith, to begin it. The suc-
ceeding eight hymns (Nos. 99-106) indicate moods
of distress and despair, culminating in No. 106, with
its hopeless cry :

Farewell, vain, worthless world, farewell !
Farewell to friends, farewell to life !

Then the mood changes. The last seven hymns
breathe courage and assurance, and Bach ends with,
perhaps, his favourite consolatory hymn, Georg
Neumark's " Wer nur den lieben Gott " :
Think not amid the hour of trial
That God hath cast thee off unheard.



THE "ORGELBUCHLEIN" 53

(a) The Church Militant Von der Christlichen Kirchen und

Worte Go ties (476-497).

*ii4 (480) Ach Gott, vom Himmel sieh darein.

The hymn is by Martin Luther. It is set in Witt to
the original melody. Bach uses it in Cantatas 2, jj, 153.
tii5 (481) Es spricht der Unweisen Mund wohl.

The hymn is by Martin Luther. There is a four-part
setting of its proper melody (attributed to Luther) among
the Choralgesdnge, No. 92.
*t 116 (482) Ein' feste Burg ist unser Gott.

The melody of Luther's hymn occurs in Cantata 80
and the Organ Preludes, and there are two four-part
settings of it among the Choralgesdnge, Nos. 74, 75.
*tii7 (483) Es woll' uns Gott genadig sein.

The hymn is by Martin Luther. Its melody occurs in
Cantatas 69 and 76, and there are two four-part settings
of it among the Choi'algesdnge, Nos. 95, 96.
*ii8 (485) War' Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit.

The hymn is by Luther. The melody, attributed either
to him or to Johann Walther, is used by Bach in Can-
tata 14.
*t 1 19 (486) Wo Gott der Herr nicht bei uns halt.

The hymn is by Justus Jonas. Bach uses its melody
in Cantatas 72)^ 114, and 178, and there are four-part
settings of it among the Choralgesdnge, Nos, 383, 385,
388.
*ti20 (479) Wie schon leuchtet der Morgenstern.

The hymn is by Philipp Nicolai, to whom also the tune
is attributed. Bach uses the melody in Cantatas i, 36, 37,
49, 61, 172, and an Organ Prelude. There is a four-part
setting of it among the Choralgesdnge, No. 375.

{b) God's Holy Word.
*i2i (610) Wie nach einem Wasserquelle.

ThehymnisbyAmbrosius Lobwasser(i5i5-85). Louis
Bourgeois' melody, to which it is set in Witt, occurs in



54 INTRODUCTION

Cantatas 13, 19, 25, 30, 32, 39, 70, 194. "Ainsi qu'on oit
le cerf bruire" is its original title. In German hymnody
it is known as "Freu' dich sehr, O meine Seele."
*I22 (477) Erhalt' uns, Herr, bei deinem Wort.

The hymn is by Luther. Bach uses its melody in
Cantatas 6 and 126.
123 (520) Lass' mich dein sein und bleiben.

The hymn is by Nikolaus Selnecker. In Witt it is
directed to be sung to "Ich dank' dir, Heber Herre" (see
No. 144 infra), or "Ich freu' mich in dem Herren" (Zahn,
No. 5427). Neither the latter nor the hymn's proper
melody is used by Bach elsewhere.

While Witt's corresponding group illustrates pro-
miscuously " The Christian Church " and " God's
Word," Bach prefers to treat the two ideas separately.
Hence, the section contains two parts : {a) " The
Church Militant," Nos. 114-120; and (d) "God's
Holy Word," Nos. 1 21-123. I" the first part, with
one important modification, Bach follows Witt's
order. He begins (No. 114) with Luther's version
of Psalm 12, the fourth stanza of which sets forth
the Church's mission :

Grant her, O Lord, to keep the faith
* Amid a faithless nation,

And keep us safe from sinful scathe
At length to reach salvation.
Though men their part with Satan take,
No powers of Hell can ever shake
The Church's sure foundation.

To the taunt (No. 115; Luther's Psalm 14), " The
fool hath said in his heart. There is no God," the



THE "ORGELBUCHLEIN" 55

Church (Luther's Psalm 46) (No. 116) answers con-
fidently :

A stronghold sure our God is He.

In No, 1 17 (Luther's Psalm 67) the Church prays
for the enlargement of her bounds :

That Thy way may be known on earth,
Thy grace among all nations.

Nos. 1 1 8 and 119 (two versions of the 1 24th Psalm)
picture the Church militant and victorious :

Our help on God's own name doth stand,
Who hath made heaven and earth.

The last hymn (No. 120) is a vision of the risen
Church glorious, the Spouse of Christ.

The second part is prefaced appropriately ( No. 121)
by Psalm 42, wherein the Church declares her longing
for the pure waters of God's Word. In No. 122 she
prays for grace to remain constant. No. 123 ex-
presses the same thought ; but, as is so often the case
with Bach, in an intimate and personal manner.

In time of War Um Friede (498-513).

124 (498) Gieb Fried', O frommer, treuer Gott.

The hymn is by Cyriacus Schneegass. Witt directs it
to be sung to the melody " Durch Adams Fall" (see
No. 76 supra). Its proper melody is in the Gotha
Cantional of 1648. Bach has not used it elsewhere.
*I25 (499) Du Friedefiirst, Herr Jesu Christ.

The hymn is by Jakob Ebert. Its melody, by Bartho-
lomaus Gesius, is used by Bach in Cantatas 67, 116,
and 143.



56 INTRODUCTION

*I26 (502) O grosser Gott von Macht.

The hymn is by Balthasar Schnurr. Its melody,
attributed to Melchior Franck, is used by Bach in
Cantata 46.

In the above group Bach picks out the three best

known hymns from Witt's larger selection.

Death and the Grave Vom Sterben und Begrdbnissen

(659-742).
*ti27 (678) Wenn mein Stiindlein vorhanden ist.

The hymn and its melody are by Nikolaus Herman.
Bach uses the tune in Cantatas 15, 31, 95, and there are
four-part settings of it among the Choralgesdnge, Nos.
353-355-
ti28 (697) Herr Jesu Christ, wahr Mensch und Gott.

The hymn is by Paul Eber. Witt sets it to a tune
(Zahn, 340c) which Bach has not used elsewhere. In
Cantata 127 he uses a melody by Louis Bourgeois.
Among the Choralgesdnge, No. 146, there is a four-part
setting of another melody, doubtfully attributed to
Eccard, to which also the hymn was sung.
ti29 (661) Mitten wir im Leben sind.

Luther's version of the antiphon " Media vita in morte
sumus." There is a four-part setting of its melody among
the Choralgesdnge, No. 252.
ti3o (660) Alle Menschen miissen sterben.

The hymn is by Johann Georg Albinus. It is set in
Witt to a melody by Jakob Hintze (1622-1702), of which
a four-part setting (with variations from Witt's text) is
among the Choralgesdnge, No. 17. In Cantata 162 and
No. 131 infra Bach uses two other melodies.
131 (660) Alle Menschen mussen sterben (Alio modo).
Bach's melody here is not Witt's.
*ti32 (722) Valet will ich dir geben.

The hymn is by Valerius Herberger. The melody, by
Melchior Teschner, occurs in the St John Passion,



THE "orgelbuchlein" 57

Cantata 95, and the Organ Preludes. There is a four-
part setting of it among the Choralgesdnge, No. 314.
133 (733) Nun lasst uns den Leib begraben.

The hymn is by Michael Weisse. It is set in Witt to
a melody (Zahn, No. 352) which Bach has not used
elsewhere.
*t 134 (719) Christus, der ist mein Leben.

The melody of this anonymous hymn is used by Bach
in Cantata 95, and there are four-part settings of it
among the Choralgesdnge^ Nos. 46, 47.
*ti35 (698) HerzUch lieb hab' ich dich, O Herr.

The hymn is by Martin Schalling. The melody occurs
in Cantatas 149, 174, and the St John Passion. There is
a four-part setting of it among the Choralgesange,
No. 152.
*i36 (695) Auf meinen Heben Gott.

The hymn is attributed to Sigismund Weingartner.
Bach uses its melody in Cantatas 5, 89, 136, 148, 188,
and two of the Organ Preludes ("Wo soil ich fliehen
hin ").
137 (680) Herr Jesu Christ, ich weiss gar wohl.

The hymn is by Bartholomaus Ringwaldt. Witt
directs it to be sung to the tune " Herr Jesu Christ,
du hochstes Gut" (see No. 72 supra). Its proper melody
(Zahn, No. 4525) is not used by Bach elsewhere.
*ti38 (684) Mach's mit mir, Gott, nach deiner Giit'.

The hymn is by Johann Hermann Schein. Witt
directs it to be sung to the melody " Wie soil ich doch
die Giite dein'." The latter, actually, is Schein's own
melody to his hymn, and is used by Bach in Cantatas
139, 156, and the St John Passion. There is a four-part
setting of it among the Choralgesdnge, No. 237.
*ti39 (703) Herr [O] Jesu Christ, mein's Lebens Licht.

The hymn is by Martin Behm. Its melody is generally
associated with the hymn "Ach Gott, wie manches
Herzeleid," and is used by Bach for it in Cantatas 3, 44,



58 INTRODUCTION

58, 118, 153. Among the Choralgesdnge, No. 145, is a
four-part setting of another melody to which also the
hymn was sung.
140 (720) Mein' Wallfahrt ich vollendet hab'.

The hymn is by Ludwig von Hornigk (d. 1667). Witt
directs it to be sung to the tune " Was mein Gott will "
(see No. 89 supra). Bach has not used its proper melody
(Zahn, No. 5704«) elsewhere.
ti4i (743) Gott hat das EvangeHum.

The hymn is by Erasmus Alberus. There is a four-part
setting of its melody among the Choralgesdnge, No. 116.
142 (744) Ach Gott, thu' dich erbarmen.

The hymn is by M. R. Miintzer. Its melody (Zahn,
No. 7228a) is not used by Bach elsewhere.

- In the above section all but the last two hymns
(Nos. 141, 142) are taken from Witt's corresponding
group. But they are arranged in Bach's order and
with a definite design. Nos. 127-129 are prayers of
the soul facing death, calm and confident. Nos. 130,
132, and 133 place us at the graveside. Nos. 134-
140 breathe over the dead clay the assurance of a
future life. Nos. 141 and 142 proclaim the Last
Judgment and the day-dawn of Eternity.

Morning hymns M or gen - Gesdnge (4 1 0-429).
*i43 (419) Gott des Himmels und der Erden.

The hymn is by Heinrich Albert. Witt directs it to be
sung to the melody " Freu' dich sehr, O meine Seele."
In the Christmas Oratorio Bach sets the hymn to
Albert's own tune.


1 2 4 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Online LibraryCharles Sanford TerryBach's chorals (Volume v.3) → online text (page 4 of 19)