Charles W. (Charles Warren) Brewster.

Rambles about Portsmouth : first series : sketches of persons, localities, and incidents of two centuries : principally from tradition and unpublished documents (Volume 2) online

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EAMBLES ABOUT PORTSMOUTH,

SEC01Sri> SERIES.

SKETCHES

on
PERSONS, LOCALITIES

AND

INCIDENTS OE TWO CENTURIES

PBIXCIPALLY mOM TEADITION AM) CKPt'BLIgHED DOCUMEKTB.



IBy Charles "W. Brewster.
\



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF THE iiUTHOX

BY \VM. n, Y. HACEETT.



PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

TRINTED AKD I'lBLISHRD BY LEWIS W. BREVVSTKP,
rclrlsjno'ilh Joiirnil Oftcf.



k-x.



Entered accoriiing to Act of Congress, in the yeaf 1869, ty

LEWIS W. RREWSTER,

In tbe Clerk's Office d( the District Court of the District of New-Hampsbire.



>y



I>I?,Eir'^CE-



The compilation of tliis Second Series of the Rambles Aboct Poktsmocth was mostly
the worlc of the author, as is stated in the biographical sketch by Hon. Wm. H. Y.
Hackett, his life-long friend, that composes the first chapter. Slight changes in the text
and arrangement were, however, left to the discretion of the editor, who has endeavored to
adhere as closely as possible to the original details of the work, studying in all particulars
to give them in accordance with the judgment and taste of the writer.

The plan of the Second Series is in all respects similar to that of the First. Gratified
by its kind reception, the author continued his Kambles until the closing days of his life
with little if any change in their character. In the Portsmouth Journal, his newspaper,
in which they first appeared, apt writings of others were adopted as part of his series. In
this book credit is due to Mr. John Henry Bowles, of Brooklyn, N. Y. (the Journal's corres-
pendent "E'c-'s'-j jn whole or in part for Rambles 85, 96, 113, 126, 131, 132, 140 and 141,
Others of his interesting productions are omitted for want of room.

LEWIS W. BREWSTER,

PCBTBMOUTH, N. H., Nov. 1, 1£69.



COIN'TEINrTS



RAMBLE. PAGE.

Biographical SIcetch of the Author. 9

84. Site and Associations of the New City Rooms — Brick Market and Jefferson Ilall. 2:?

85. Odiorne's Point — The First House and First Cemetery in New Hampshire 36

8(5. Marquis de Chastellux's Visit in 1782 — French Fleet— Views of Portsmouth, &,c 3S

87. Sketch of Henry Sherburne and Descendants 4i

83. Langdon and Sherburne Families 53

89. Lafayette Road— Langdon Farm— Family Monument— New Rank of American

Nobility 58

90. Atkinson's Silver Waiter— The Record of Deaths in Portsmouth— Lady Went-

worth's Picture, Ac C2

92. Theodore Atkinson's Estate — Will of Susanna, widow of George Atkinson 75

93. Peter Livius the Loj-alist — Building of the North Bridge and Mill— Chief Justice

of Quebec— His efforts to win Gen. Sullivan to the British Cause 78

94. Legislation in Portsmouth in 1699— First Prison — Mark Noble 83

95. The Old Stavers Hotel— The Party— The Daniel Street Apparition— The Dance—

A Fragrant Interruption 86

96. Sketches from an ancient copy of the N. H. Gazette 00

97. Christian Shore— Freeman's Point— The Ham House — Tlie Waterhouse Family 95

98. The Pickering Family 103

99. Pickering House in Vaughan Street— Edward Hart — Gen. Peaboily's Perfidy— Capt.

CuUam, Ac 106

100. More of Pickering's History— CoL Atkinson — Woodbury Langdon — Revolutionary

Incidents Ill

101. Things of 1790 to 1800— Old School Gentlemen— Respect by Youth— Minor Offen-

ces — Prompt Punishment of Criminals — Justice iPenhallow's Impartiality —
First Pavement — Buck-Street Promenade — North and Soulhenders — Smoking
not Allowed— Edward Hart elected Police Officer — His Success, and what pro-
duced it 117

102. The Hart Family— Quint and the Wolf. 123

103. The Sheafe Family ; 120

104. James Sheafe -Jay's Treaty— The EffigioB— The Riot— The Arrest— The Trium- t

phal Procession, <fec 133

105. Insurrection in New Hampshire, 1786 138

106. The Cutts Family 143

107. Residence of Richard Cutts— Capt. Thomas Leigh's Sea Adventure— William

Bennett, the Hostage— His Fate 147

108. The Cutts and Penhallow Cemetery on Green Street 151

109. The Residence of Dea, Samuel Penhallow 153

110. The Old Clock— The Four George Jaffreys— The Jaffrey House 156

111. Rev. Samuel McCIintock, 160

1 12. Sketch of Newcastle 166

113. Newcastle Reminisences of Forty-Five Years Ago 174

114. The Court Martial at Fort Constitution in 1814— The Providential Witness 177

115. Fort Constitution— The Explosion in 1809 18i

116. The Sparhawk Family 185

117. Centennial Celebration, 1823— The Parchment Unrolled 188

118.' The Yellow Fever of 1798 lO'i

119. Old Land Proprietors— The March Farm— The Family 193

120. Incendiary Sketches— Pilgrim Day— The Great Fire of 1813— The Incendiary 201

121. Central Portsmouth previous to the Great Fire— Portsmouth Pier— New-Hamp-

fhlre Hotel— Jacob Sheafe's — Daniel Webster's— North side of Buck Street—
The Haunted House 207



CONTENTS.



ItAMELE. PAGE.

1J2. Central Portsmouth before the Great Fire— Kicholas Eoiisselet— The MiiFei-.ni—

Sailor Anecdote, Ac 214

123. Central rortsmoiith before the Great Fire — Nicholas Roneselet's Courtship — The
eocMiiric .losiah Shackford— His UnpnralIeUed Feat of crossing the Atlantic
alone— The Founder of Portsmouth, Ohio 218

124 Central Portsmouth before the Fire of 1813— North Side of Buck Street 223

12j. Central Portsmouth before the Fire of 1813.— James Sheafe's Residence — Abrar

ham Isaac, the Jew— Jonathan M. Sewell, the I'oet 229

126. Central Portsmouth before the Fire of 1813. — Stories of Escapes, Rescues, Ac-. . . 233

127. Btnte Street in 1703— Drown Family— Dr. Lyman Spalding— Capt. Peter Coues —

Samuel E. Coues 239

123. Seizure of Arms and Powder at Fort 'William and JMary— The finale of Provincial

Government in New Hampshire 218

129. The Navy Yard 254

130. Capt. Daniel Fernald—ReBidenne— Ownership of the Navy Yard— War Adven-

tures—Diddling the Spencer 74— Putting a British Frigate on the rocks 258

131. Shapley's Island— Small Pox Parties— Incidents and Pastimes 203

132. The Old Spring Market— The Neptune and River Nymphs of the Piscataqua. . . . 270

133. A step over the River— The Celebrities of Kittery in former days — The Spinney

Family 2S2

134. Our Wharves— Privateering—The Portsmouth Record 285

135. Our Wharves— West-India Trade— Capt. Gilman— Admiral Nelson— Emperor of

Russia. &c 290

136. The Old Welch House on Bridge Street— Johnny Cunningham 294

137. John Simes and his Descendants 290

138. Toppin Maxwell—" Commodore " Mifflin 298

139. My Brother Bob 307

140. The Brick School House in State-Street— Teachers, former and recent— School

Dramatic Exhibitions— Struck by Lightning 31G

141. School-House Hill— School Books— Amusements— Slides— Mrs. Maloon's Shop—

The Catastrophe- Parson Walton's Meeting-House— Services- The Beloved
Disciple , ■■ 326

142. TheOIdSouth Church 332

143. The Old Bell Tavern 339

144. Witchcraa in Portsmouth and Newcastle— Death of Molly Bridget— Stone Throw-

ing Devils ot Newcastle 343

145. The Former Men of Portsmouth— Ancient Furniture 354

146. The Episcopal Church Yard 35t)

147. The Oldest House in our State 853

148. The Dead Elm on South Road .' 360

363



149. Fifty Years in a Printing Oface— Our Own and the World's Progress.



IN3DEX OF :]SrA.]MES



All the names used in the Rambles aro intended to be printed in this index, except the
following lists :
For those engaged in the Centennial Celebration, 1823, seepages 139 and 190.
For list of Master Taft's ?>cholars, see pages 319 and 320.
For list of " The former men of Portsmouth," see page 355.

Abbott. 71 240;329 3G5

AbercroDibie, 124

Adams, 24 72 92 101 202

230 304 320 33j 352

354 366 871 374
Akernian, 15 224 3-13 365
Alberiz, J84



Alden, 174 351 354
Alleo. 66 128 161
Amazeen, 317 352 353
Aodrev i. 227
An l! OSS, 56
Anil able, 79
.jipplcun, 63 77 IS5 1S3



Arnold, 94 I Badffer, 113

Arundel, 55 Bailey, 173 to 1S2 367

Atkinson, 49 50 62 77 112i Biinbrid^e, 32a

185 191,219 253 357 Kainprylde, .16

Audubon, 10 Bincrofl, 353

Austin, 90 tianfield, 58 la 60

Aycra, 201 I Bar! er, 353



iKDEJt;



fiirefnni, Jil 352

Birnu BCG

Baruuiii. S>4

barnl 1,49 37 60 263

b:iri7, 2.-0

Hirsa .lee. 280

i;ass, 50 22j

liarileli, II 12 16 31 182 M

see

Deck, 224

Helclier, 60 125 144 S62
Britour, 179
Belkna)!, Ill
Bell, 171 223 3D6
llellmint. M
Beautlt. 14b to 150
Berry, 196
Eerthier, 92
Bcrtiiullel, m
Biilenhani. 223
Biieluw. 93
Billiujs. 27 367
Bcr^, 40 41
B shop 3o6
Klaisdell, 77 240 270
B.ay 302
Muni, 110 242
Jiol.i, 45
B'liiapar'e, 92 371



B)



,351



.. rland, 144

E'Tlliwick 59

Biurne. 320

Bo.vles.27 90 93 136 233 263

277 316 •Ml 367
I) .vd. 137 21*5

JiraL-kell, 42 44 105 195 1S6
Brail. V, 115
Br.y 69 71 73
Bre'vs^er, 9 to 21 52 60 99

100 109 201 341. 33-1

366
B-iar, 146
Brhrii. 201
B.'idiel, 344
Briefly. W
Bruivn, 49 159 250 286 287

335 341 35S 367
Bruce, 230
Bruuiuicl, 256
Biiclian.io 371
Ji-icuminisier, 39 195 259 31S

3€fi
Bur'oyne. S2 163
Burke, 114
Buruet 362
I'urr, 161

Burroughs, II 358 30*
Built-r, 45 143
tall, 153 294 366
( amubell, 324
Carr, 2t6
Carter, 32 271
Caswell, 339
CiNdb-.iirne 224
Chidwick 341
I haniberlajn, 105

< hanibers, 65 73
C'haniperaoone, 146
Chandler, 215 272
C'larllnn. 45
Chase, 146 201 202 209 31'. |

321
Chastellux, 38
C'hauncey, 136
Cheever, 31
Cheney, 68
Cheslev, 72
Childs, II
Chiprann, 188
Chrisiie. 226 310
Cilley, 142

< ;as.;en, 12
Clapham, 280
C app, 110

Clark, 10 52 224 343 351 352

356
(lay 374
CI ive.^, I!0
Cliflm. 66
C!oii;h 362
Ccchran |i0 168 249 252

253 321



Cnfl-u, 49 93 293
Co.5Xe8liall, 2.S7

Co»;SMeIl. 75
Colbath, 20d 207
tioiby, 101
Coleujan. 74 104
Coleridge, 277
Cook, 351
Cooper, 287
Colion, 97 127
Coues, 240 to 247
Cowhcld, 45
Craiiie, 60
CranliflJ, 157
Cra.vlord, 144 374
^rockelt, 1 2
Cronnvell, 145
Crooker, 179 180
Cullaiii, 1(jO lOS 109
Cuni.igiiam, 295
Currier, 12 lOi 224
Curbing, 75 228
Cusluian, 12



Iloyl, 66250
HuUbanl, .56 59 68
Hughes, 2Sil
Hull, 204 261 202 32S
Humphreys, 7b 77 2U3
Hui.kuis, 73
hunt, :a3
}-Juulres=, 209
Huske, 64 67
liuiLhiugs, 113



Cult, 48 49 69 70 97 I42to 133 Gilpin, 370

cul:5, .2 31 117 142 to 149 1 228 291 292

192 195 248 342

Cutlei , 12 31 77 107 108 183 Goddard, 231 366

194 195 200 268 317 ,G:itf, 124



Friiik, 297

Frosl, 64 69 146 171 258

Frye, 343

FultoD. 371

Furbsr, 104

furbish, 271

Fuibisher S9

Furniss, 225

Fursell, iiO

Ga?e, 250 232

Gains, 26 27 99 100 195 207 Huichinis, 71

339 355 366 367 Uuichii.gson, 123

Gambling. 65 74 144 151 191 Huzzy 351
Gardner. 224 259 295 357 i Irving, 251
Gcddis, 209 Isaacs, 208 230

Gee, 111

G^rrish, 145 201 240 366
Gibbius, 45 51 to 53 HI
Gibbons. 53 57 71
Gibson, 52

Gibbi, 127 to 129 365
Gillelt, 279 280

12 49 65 73 92 141



Jackson, 10 49 91 93 97 !(«
135 196 199 209 215 222
223 246 26326a 269 31 J
334 338 343 366 371
374

Jaffrey, 49 64 68 69 70 117
128 I36 10 159 191 2L0
332 367



363 366
Cultiug 12
Daiuerre 371
Dal'by, S3
U' Allemagne. 92
llaoie, 91 223 224
Uiniel, 61 69 144
Uarii.iK, 164
Uarlmouth, 251 233
Davenport, lh2 228 229
Uavidson, 184
Davis, 222
Uiy, 2r5
D. an 366

Dearborn. 11 28 386
Usering. 131 251
Uelande, 212
DeiVIovau, 244
Ueunelt, 101 196 254 260
Uod^e. 328
iioig, 91



Goldiu.ith, 176
Goldthwaile. 57 60
Goodrich, 126 lib
Goodwin, 16
Gorges, 111



James, 272
>24 335 .lauvriD, 106 157 230
i, lS-6 187
Jay. 134 135 371
Jelfirson,29 .
Jetlrics. b. - 69 70 159

b, 44 57 59 155 341
351



Gruld, 272
Gove, 2* 60
Grace, 232
Grafforlh, 144 316
Grant 374

Graves, 144 250 253
Gray, 1 1 226 292
Green,-£3 94
Greenleaf,
340
Oregon-. 224
Griff<s.'334
Griffin, 239
Gross, 144
Grouard, 25
Grow. 105



JohLtOu, 196 212 241 371
Joues,7j 77 109 226 23u 297
G itham. 100 325 326 340

Jose, 67
Keese, 67
Kelley, 111
Keunard, 16
Keoney. 67
Kettle, 241
KiOiball, 320
King, 75 76 185 365
116 137 155 285 Kneill, 112

Knight. 46 52 72 74 97 144



ISl

Ladd, 145 188 230 247 318
l.ai;hton,«56 59 24u 297
Lake. 152

i.akenian, ',X> 209 366
Lauagai), 225
Lang, S3 334



Dow, 214 362

Downing, 64 65 67 71 74 106

Drake, 196 359 iHackett. 12 104 138 141 310 Laugdon 41 42 46 to 60 73

trisco, 335 _, „„ .„J 320 j 116 123 134 14S IM6

Drown, 15 31 114 132 133 136 Haines. IS6 359 241 334 335 338 366

ISO l!-2 224 240 to 214 u^ie, 50 317 321 'Langf-.rd, 28

Dudley, 57 128 " '" "" "" "^ '"■ ■ ■ -



Hall, .57 59 00 66 109 184 L.rkin, 93

I lt9 20U 209 357 lliislney, 261
iHalliburtnn. 366 h
jllim, 9 96 98 101 156 202

224 306 329 366 367
Hammond. 145
Hancock- 27 302

II and y 286
Hardy, ICO

195 211 293 320

Harrison. 371 374 ,

Hart, 106 to 108 122 tol25 Livermoie, 134 135 140 155
130 147 153 134 2S6| 150 334 335

334 335 Livius, 7a to 83

Harvey, 144 310 Llovd, 71

Hiiicl:, 230 l>icke, 313 353

Hathaway. 320 ! I,ngjiu». 65

Haven, '1 12 93 127 179 181 Long, 12 93 147 209 245
188 192 203 215 to 2:6 Lord, 24 114 231 340 366
292 363 355 366 | Lovering. 178

212 217 233 262 274 Haves, 99 310 Lowe, 153 209 2 H

283 2-5 288 297 333 Hehdeis-m, 90 130 132 223 Lowell, 146



Dush.-iii. 44

Dwighi, :i31

Eis^nian. 15 310

Kiton, 74 127 223

Kd wards, 203 225

hlliol. 69 144 146 246

Elwyn, 12 58

Kmerson. 72 129^130 192 337 Hai

Emely, 335

Biidicot, 53

fclvans, 60

Falivan. 104

Fairbanks. 93

Farmer. Ill

Felt, 353

Fenton. 252

Feroald. 11 15 50 59 98 19i



Lavoisier. 214

Lear, 46 52 53 56 59 68

Leach, 259

I-eaviit, 291

Leigh, 93 148 149 150

Lesvcy, 279

Lilbiy, 239

Lincoln, 61 371

Little



335 366
Fillmore 371
Fisher, 24 154^231
Filch, 335
Fitzgerald, 16 366
Flagg. 100 193
Flanders. 271
Folsorn. 195 250 366
F .rd. 229

Foss. S9 to 101 1C9 340
Fourcrov. 244
Fowle, '90 91 95
F.anklin, 327
Freeman. 12-62 191
Frenionf. 374
Frcuow, is



Hicks 99

Hieiinson, 127

Hill, IS 37 60 110^236 365

366
Hilliard, 85
H.lton. 36 75
Hirst, 72
Hizeures. 41
llobbs, 75
H rl^es. 1^
Mnes. 145
Holmos, 219
Holvoke. 188
H"rnv 221 225
I ll-in'on, 331



Hone, 1 15



Lowd, 343 367
I Lunt, 297
I Lyman, 118 182

MacCobb, 57 60

.M icDonough. 251

Macklin.339

Macpheadris. 65

Madisnn. 327 311

Maouiii;. 135 137 155 209 339

337
Ma.'ch. 61 71 196 to 200 339

340 344
Mirinei. 176 272 283
.Mirsh. 130 292 337
Marshall, 136 170 219 233



INDEX.



Mirslon, 154 310 ,

Mar.iii, 79 90 263
Wir<yn, 53 56
Masoii, 12 31 53 78 HI 154

155 15S 159 168 199 260
Massena, 92
Massey, 297
Mdlher, 53 345 346
Malthew, 269
Msul, 331

Maxwell, 298 to 303 307
May, 83
May nard, 227
McCliniock, 160 to 163 193

209 296
McDaniels. 184
Mclmosh,366
Mclnlyre. 93
McNeil, 227
McPhededris, 69
Mel Cher, 91 227 366
Mendum. 11 71 219 296 297

363
Meserve. 65 72 79 124 226 239
Metlin, 367
Middlelnn, 45
Miffliu. 304 to 307
Miller, 11 12 298 303
Mills, 148 1-19
Milchell. 77 184
Moffall, 146 192 215 218
Montgomery, 162 164 192
Monroe, 371
Alo'jdy, 157 354
Moore, 64 70 91 HI 144 146

196
Morrell, 56 59
Morrison. 296
Morse, 317 343
Mnrtegues, 41

Moses, 46 99 196 203 242 340
IMoultnn, 24
Mnuntford, 224
Mowatt, 187
MuJje, 28S
Mussel. 168
Neil, 93, 226,T227 228
Xele, 51

Nel sou, 99 291 292 325
Nrwrnarch, 65 73 192 339
Nichols, 2;4 259
Nnble, 85 93 18S 194 297
Niirris, 60
North. 90

Nutter, 201 212 227 297
(toell, 12
Odiorne. 35 36 37 49 64 65

68 69 73 146 196 216
Odiin, 64 63 73
Orcutt, 1.36
Orne, 185

I'acker. 65 66 73 104 196
}'aribh, 320
Parker, 90 150 186 194 296

297
Parrott,166
Parry, f 3 209 226 297
Parsons, 72
)'artinglon, 304 342
Payne, 194
Pavsnn, 320

Peahody,107 116 188 259 291
Pearse, 69

PeirsoD. 64 70 I

Peavy, 297 |

Peduzzi, 367
Peirce, 12 49 56 59 64;66 68

to 70 196 199 200 310

335 357 371



Pcmberton, 144

Peiiha.low, 33 47 74 90 118

119 143 146 151 to 154

157 191
Perkins, 1(14 144
Purry, ,328
Pepperell, 64 69 71 73 101

185 186 192
Pett;?rew, 53
I'hilbrick, 59
Philpot, 328
I'hiiis, 144
Pickerine, 36 60 74 103 to

115 125 130 184 193

196 210 232 242 336

340 361
Pierrepoint, 210
Pike. 66 225
Piiikham, 115
Plaisted, 67 217
Plumraer, 64 65 101 194 223

280
Polk, 371
Ponieroy, 93 227
Porter, 185 328
Potter, 117 209 320 343
prescott, 188
Prince, 186
Pritcliard. 343 367
Purccll, 49
Putnam, 178 188
Quincy. 67 145
Quint, 124 224
Rand, 170 198
Randolph, 352
Rea. 343 367
Bedford. 66
Reding. 11 365
Heed 136 241
Reid, 287
Ri-uiick, 194 272
Revere, 92 248
Rice, 195 231 366
Rinje, 64to63 74 104 110 337
Rioms, 39 41

Robinson, II 211 343 380
Rochambeau, 38
Rosers, 49 65 192 335 366
Rollins, 104 335
Ropes, 77 1S5
Rousselet, 215 to 218 223
Rowe. 343
Rowland, 140
Royal I, 186
Ruck, 74
Rundlett, 93
Ruspert, 39 43
Russell, 145 194 235
Rust, 145,
Rymes, 49 64 66 357

Salter, 334

Saltonslall, 145

Sandeman, 243

Sands, 57

Schaffer, 279

Schuvler, 80

Scott, 374

Scrivener. 146

Seavey. 59 60 105 129 130



196

Seaward, 97 212 225 239
Serat, 217

Sewell. 30795 231 to'.233
Shackford, 74 219 to 223 240
Shakespeare, 324
Shannon, 73'

Shapley, 56 59 93 209 209
iSliiw, 230 2S6 287 288



iSheafe, .36 67 90 93 105 106
I 126 to 136 193 194 204

' 210 226f228 to 230 292

293 "357 838 36C
Sheldon, 28
Shepherd, 23
Shjpway, 143
Slierburne, 44 to 59 60 64 to

73 152 192 201 202

209 212 214 219 239

357
Sherive, 212
Sherman, 314
Shillaber, 304 307 to 315
Sliores. 222 223 B66
Shoriridge, 43 44
Stiurllert, 333 335 336 338
Mber, 41
Sigournev, 165
Simes, 10 11 110 207 225 226

296 297 298
Simpson, 57 60 07
Sinclair, 266
Sise, i27
Slade, 64 67

Slnper, 46 51 52 56 144 151
Smart, 286

Smith, II 12 65 66 72 13
139 202 204 211 244 320
Snell, 320
Solley, 64 68 69 70
Somerby. 307
Sowersby, 366
Spaldins, 183 244 245 246
Sparhawk. 76 77 78 93 185

l!>6 187 192
Spinney, 99 274 278 282 283

234
Spofford, 68
Stark, 113
Stavers, 85 135 226
Stevens, 2!4 320 323
Stewart. 202
Still, 229
Stone, 104 366
Stoodley, 75 212 366
Storer, 57 59 60 209 263 306
Story, 325 366
Stover 112
Stow, 332

strong, 73 333 to 336
Sullivan, 50 57 60 79 81 140

141 155 156 169 219

250
Sumner, 92

TafI, 10 31 316 318 321
Tailor, 66
Tappan, 318 321
Tarllon, 227
Tash, 65 72
Tasker. 320
Taylor 49 371 374
Telherlv, 32.1^
Thatcher. 127 123
Thomas, 92 242'
Thompson, 12 42 166 193
Thornton, 113
Tilton, 341, 343
Tomson, 36
Toppaii, 74 242
Towiisend, 2h6
Treadwell, 69 90 242 366
Trecnihie. 70
Tredick, 126 136 230
Trefethen, 136^170 184
Tripe, 223
Tripyear, 272
Trunibull. 162
Trundy,.ll



Tjckerman, 99 367
Turell,10 II 227 272 279 383

1 urner, 186 317

I vler, 188 371
Usher, 69
Van Huren, 371 374
Varney,72
Varrell,209 211 212
Vassell, 144
Vandreuil, .39 to 43
Vaughan, 6-1 69 71 144 to 14 7

160 152 153) 191 195
Victor, 324

Yealon, 136 203 223 239
Voung, 100

Wadleigh, 365

Wamwright 200

Walbach, 276 179 to 234

Walden, 135

Waldron. 64 66 70 71 72 143
145 153 191 366

Walker. 12 64 68 128 256 209
337 338 342

Wallingford, 65 75'

Walls, 143

Walton, 64 60 129 330 331
345 347 350 353 367

Wannerton, 111

Ward, 185

Warner, 46 65 117 122 235

Warren, 91 160

VVashington. .50 92 114 133 163
169 [232 361

Walerhouse, 98 to 102 117 284

Waters, 116

Watkins, 73

Watson, 286 289

Weare, 60 100 |

Webb, 127

Webster, 31 113 203 210 360
374

Weeks, 105 196 358 to 36G

Welch, 228 294 295

Weld, 45 54

Wendell, 47

Wentworth, 30',41 42- 44 46
49 50 54 60 62 to 69
71 to 75 90 93 112 116
119 129 131 154 155
190 191 199 203 219
243 248 251 253 263
316 357 362

Westbrnok. 64 68 71

Whreler, 227

Wherren,272

Whidden,59 60153 1S6

Whipple. 41 93 112 113 146
192 210 L'SO

White, 12 60 374

Whitefield, 127

Whtibam, lf4

Whyddon. 56

Wibiid, 64 66 191

Wildes, 366

Wiggin, 197 325

Willard, 131

Williams. 53

Willis, 112 114 115

Wilson, 64 70

Windmill, 156

Winklev, 59 74 99 144 J

Winn, 217 239

Winslow, 77 185

Winlhrop, 63 55

Wise. 335

Woodbury, 12 31 37 ' !

Woodward. 203 207 239

Wyat I, 203 242 333



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF THE AUTHOR

PEEPABED AT THB BEQUEST OP HIS FAMILY,

BY TV^rL.LLA.:M: H. Y. H^CKETT.



I.\ offering to the public the second and concluding volume of
the " Rambles about Portsmouth," it has been thought appro-
priate to accompany it with a sketch of the life and character of
the Author. This idea was suggested by the circumstance that
the finishing of this volume and the close of his life were con-
temporaneous. This volume not only comprises his last work ;
but his last days, so far as his failing strength would allow,
were occupied and solaced by a careful revision and prepara-
tion of it for the press.

Charles Warren Brewster was born September 13, 1802, in
Portsmouth, in the house on Islington Street, a few rods north of
that in which he died. He was the son of Samuel and Mary
(Ham) Brewster, and a descendant of Elder William Brewster,
who came over in the Mayflower.

Few have exemplified better than ^Ir. Brewster, in life and
conversation, the principles and character of his distinguished an-
cestor. Few have ever more fully embraced, and lived by, those
precepts — religious and political — which made Elder Brewster
and his associates exiles from home, and the founders of a great
nation. Few have more firmly and successfully shaped for
themselves a life and character independent of surrounding circum-
stances. So much did his life spring out of inward principles, that
he was to some extent unmoved by the enterprises and fashions of
the times in which he lived and labored. It was, perhaps, owing
to this circumstance that his life was what is usually regarded as
an uneventful one. Although it was one of ceaseless and syste-
matic toil, it was wanting in that restless and expansive activity
which have made or marred so many fortunes. He always had
his home in one and the same spot, — rarely went abroad ; and
this turn of mind, in connection with the regularity required and
2



10 RAMBLES ABOUT TORTSMOUTH.

formed by the publication of a weekly journal, centered and in-
tensified his interest in his occupation, his home and town. It was
because he did not roam abroad, that he rambled so perseveringly
and so satisfactorily at home. It was because he lived so entire-
ly by the inward light, that he avoided those foibles which check-
er, and those enterprises which modify, the lives of most men.
It was because he delighted and to some extent lived in the past,
that the public are favored with this and the preceding volume.
It was because in his tastes and aspirations he was unlike most
men, and sought a fact as resolutely as he would adhere to a
principle ; because he hesitated at no toil which would establish
a date, or illustrate a character ; because he would take as
much pains to authenticate an anecdote as Audubon to find anew
bird, — that we have an accurate and trustworthy account of the
men and events of past times — a work which will inseparably con-
nect the name of Charles W. Brewster with the history of Ports-
mouth and the State.

I applied to the schoolmates of Mr. Brewster for some ac-
count of his boyhood and youth. One of them replied, that it
" was so even that there was nothing to relate, except that he
was better and more sedate than the other boys." Another said:
" His boyhood was as even and regular as his subsequent life."
He first attended the school of "Aunt Betsey" Lakeman, a well
known teacher of young children, sixty years ago. He then at-
tended the North School, taught by Deacon Enoch M. Clark,
and subsequently the school taught by Mr. Taft, in what was
then calleil the Brick School-house, on State Street. The last
school he attended was that of the late Henry Jackson, in 1817.

Having completed, under the tuition of Mr. Jackson, his school
education, in his sixteenth year, on the 16th day of February,
1818, he began to learn the business of a printer in the office of
the "Portsmouth Oracle," then published by Charles Turell,
and his connection with that paper continued from that day
until his death, — a period of more than half a century. At



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