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Charles Warren Stoddard.

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GIFT OF
MICHAEL REESE




Carles

ll/arr<?Q

Stoddard



tWANAN LIFE

j Jelters From |ow [otitudes.




f'Q'T illPOrir nf PhniOD T itDPOtn^O J No - 31 - A P ril 1894 - Issued monthly. $6.00 a yoar.
' LlUldiy Ul UlUJlbu Lntjldllllu IKntcrcd as second-class matter at Chicago.'

, NCELY, PUBLISHER, CHICAGO & NEW YORK.



NEW PUBLICATIONS OF F. T. NEELY.



How TO Live.
WHAT TO EAT.



DISCHARGE YOUR DOCTOR! THEWAYTOC . O .
DR. CARMN'S

Universal Receipt 5ol<

and Family Physician.

UC linD I JU CIIITinil This wonderful compendium of practic

mCmUnlML kUIIIUIfi information, pertaining to every branch
Social and Domestic Economy, embraces all that every mother and housekeep
need know. It giv^s general rules in regard to the proper selection of food, t
best manner of preparing same, what should and should NOT be used und
certain conditions, and all based on the excellent medical instructions also give

NO FAMILY SHOULD BE WITHOUT IT.



DA!IIA/I VAIIM RADIAN Dill* This book is so arranged, writtr

nGuUCO I OUl UOCTOT BIIISi and illustrated, that it saves many tim
its cost to the purchaser every year. The best treatment in the world, within tl
reach of all. The purchaser of Dr. Carlin's Physician invests his money at 1,(
per cent interest. Ind^x of symptoms. Index of Diseases. List of Medicim
their properties, how to prepare them, and how to administer them.



AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION IS WORTH A POUND OF CURE."
IT WILL SAVE MANY TIMES ITS COST IN ONE YEAR.

If your child is sick, consult it. If you are worn out, it suggests a remedy,
you want to start a g-arden, it tells you how. If vour husband is out
sorts, it will tell you what he needs. If you need help in your cookin
nothing is better. If anything- goes wrong in your household affairs, O
Doctor Carlin Knows All About It, and explains so you can make no mistat

The work is voluminous in all its details, and written in such a way as to
readily understood by all. Any case of ordinary sickness is fully treated, a:
such remedies suggested as are easily obtainable and at small cost.



PADI IN N f 'ds no indorsement. Born in Bedford, England. '.

UmiLlll nOQUlred a reputation second to no physician in th
country, which is a grand record. His grandfather, father, and several brothe
iiiiiient doctors, indicating a peculiar fitness of the family in this directio
His practical knowledge was of wide scope, much of which he has embodied
this tfreat, and Indispensable book.



Bound in Handsome Cloth, Gilt Side and Back. Regular Subscripts
Price, $5.00. Orders Solicited. Special Terms to Agents.

F. T. NEELY, Publisher,

CHICAGO



HAWAIIAN LIFE

BEING
LAZY LETTERS FROM LOW LATITUDES



BY



CHARLES WARREN STODDARD

/*

AUTHOR OF "SOUTH SEA IDYLS," "MARSHALLED. A FLIGHT INTO
EGYPT," "THE LEPERS OF MOLEKSI," ETC.



F. TENNYSON NEELY

CHICAGO NEW YORK

1894






v



Copyright by
CHARLES WARREN STODDARD

1894



TO

POLO, BUD, MOMONA, AND THE KID,
OF STAG-RACKET .BUNGALOW

HONOLULU, HAWAII,

THIS SOUVENIR OF THEIR SOMETIME PAL,
WITH HIS ALOHA!



CONTENTS.



I. FROM A CUPOLA 7

II. IN A HAMMOCK 13

III. ON A MAKAI VERANDA 17

IV. THROUGH THE MOSQUITO FLEET

AND AT A HULA-HULA 22

V. BY THE SEA 27

VI. UP THE VALE OF NUUANU 31

VII. AFLOAT 35

VIII. ASHORE 42

IX. A SABBATICAL MATINEE , 48

X. A POI-FEED 52

XL KAPENA 56

XII. THE COLONIAL TRANSIT 61

XIII. DAY OF REST 65

XIV. HIGHWAYS 69

XV. BY-WAYS 74

XVI. IN THE MARKKT-PLACE 79

XVII. AMONG THE WREATH MAKERS. 83
5



CONTENTS



XVIII. FROM A STUDIO 86

XIX. FETES AND FURIES gi

XX. SIESTA 96

XXI. WITH ALOHA! 103

XXII. How THE KING CAME HOME... 106

XXIII. IN A SUMMER SEA 120

XXIV. A VILLAGE AND A HALF 136

XXV. IN AND OUT OF EDEN 150

XXVI. THE LAND OF CANE 165

XXVII. UP HALEAKALA 181

XXVIII. AFTERGLOW 193

XXIX. ON THE REEF 208

XXX. PLANTATION DAYS 239

XXXI. THE DRAMA IN DREAM-LAND... 262



HAWAIIAN LIFE

OR

LAZY LETTERS FROM LOW LATITUDES
I.

FROM A CUPOLA.
HAWAIIAN HOTEL, HONOLULU, H. I.

r^\O you remember, dear C , the day
when you and I sat alone in this glass
house and heaved a stone at civilization, busi-
ness, worry, and the world in general? We
heaved it fearlessly, for we were above the
tree-tops and out of reach; even had our vic-
tims deigned to retaliate we might have still
shouted defiance, for were we not prepared
to withstand a siege in the cupola with ample
rations of champagne and cigarettes?

You had dropped in upon us, as is your
7



8 HAWAIIAN LIFE

wont at intervals while vibrating 'twixt the
Australasian colonies and the California coast,
and in the few hours we spent together we
rediscovered the little kingdom, and restored
it, for a time at least, to its original and beau-
tiful barbarism.

Do you remember one silver strand of spi-
der-web that chanced to catch our eye? It was
stretched due east and west overhead in the
cupola, and we called it the Tropic of Can-
cer; and weaving a Puck's girdle of this filmy
fabric, we fled in imagination over sea and
shore in the very ecstasy of circumnavigation.
How we laughed to scorn the ignorance of
those who know us not, and reviled the ama-
teur geographer who vainly confounds us with
Tahiti, or sweeps us away toward New Guinea
and the uttermost parts.

Following our air-line eastward, we tripped
on the tail of Lower California, plunged
through the heart of Mexico into the Carib-
bean Sea, dashed across Cuba, and were lost
in the Atlantic; then we returned for a sea-
son, but rested only long enough to roll a fresh
cigarette, when we took wing for the Orient
and such an Orient! Through the solitary



FKUlvi A CUPOLA 9

sea, crossing the track of Laputa, the "Flying
Island," just escaping Luggnagg sorrowfully
enough, for "the Luggnaggers are a polite and
generous people," says Gulliver we saw
Hong Kong, Calcutta, Mecca, and, beyond
the Red Sea, the Nile waters and the meas-
ureless sands of Sahara.

What a rosary we strung on that glimmer-
ing thread. And then we held our breath
for a moment, when we thought how above
us and below us rolled the everlasting deep
from pole to pole.

O Hawaii! Hawaii Nei! Cinderella among
nations; a handful of ashes on a coral hearth
slowly fructifying in the sun and dews of an
eternal summer. How lonesome you are and
how lovely! and how we who have known
you and departed from you come back again
with the love that is yours alone. At least,
C - and I do, don't we?

You are t'other side o' the line now, old fel-
low, on the edge of that great continent which
is as yet not half explored ; the kangaroo is
your playmate and the serpent your bed-fel-
low; do you ever think of us who have no
game more majestic than the mosquito?



10 HAWAIIAN LIFE

Here, as you know, the noblest victim of the
chase is the agile flea; now and again, though
rarely, appears that chain of unpleasant cir-
cumstances, the centipede; or perchance the
devil-tailed scorpion, whose stroke is by no
means fatal, reminds us that nothing can
touch us further. And indeed, but for these
foreign invaders this life were almost too
Edenesque. The marvelous temperature,
which is never hot and never cold; the rich
and variable color; the fragrance so intense
after a shower, when the ginger and the Jap-
anese lily seem to distil perfume drop by drop;
the tinkle of gay guitars; the spray-like notes
dashed from shuddering lute-strings; the irre-
proachable languor of a race that is the in-
carnation of all these elements this is quite
as much as man wants here below latitude
2\ IS' 23" north; longitude 157' 48' 45"
west; and all this he has without the asking.
What if the impertinent minas perch upon the
roof and fill the attic with strange noises?
What if they infest the groves at twilight, and
deluge the land with cascades of silvery sound?
They are a pert bird, that has rid the king-
dom of its caterpillars, and now they propose



FROM A CUPOLA I 1

to luxuriate for the rest of their natural
lives.

I think it was the war-whoop of a mina
perched upon our window-sill that called our
attention to old Diamond Head Leahi is the
Hawaiian name for that fine promontory
which at that moment was glowing like a live
coal; it was the picture of the ideal red-hot
volcano with the smoke rubbed out; there
was a strip of beryl sea beyond it, and at its
feet a great plain, shaded by feathery algaroba
trees; this was framed in the sashes on- one
side of the cupola.

On another side mountain peaks buried
their brows in clouds that wept copiously so
sentimental was the hour of our communion;
forests of the juiciest green drank those show-
ers of tears; Tantalus the lofty one and his
brother peaks never looked more sublime.

Turning again, we saw the sunburnt hills
beyond Palama, and the crisp cones of small
volcanoes, and more sea, and then the ex-
quisite outline of the Waianae Mountains, of
a warm, dusty purple, and with a film of
diffused rainbows floating in the middle dist-
ance.



12 HAWAIIAN LIFE

There was but one other window left; it
opened upon a sea stretching to the horizon
and mingling with the sky; a shore fringed
with tapering masts and the crests of sentinel
palms, and beneath us the city submerged in
billowy foliage, through which the wind stirred
in gusts and eddies.

Our experience was ended our experience
bound in green and gold: the green of the
grassy hills and the gold of the sunset sea. We
had monoplized the cupola to the despair of
those guests who fly to it as to a haven of rest;
but there was no further thought of monopoly
in our minds, for the afterglow was over-
whelming, and already from the cool corri-
dors of the caravansary a caravansary that
in its architecture reminds one of Singapore
sweetly and silently ascended the incense of
the evening meal. . . .



if.

IN A HAMMOCK.
HAWAIIAN HOTEL, HONOLULU, H. I.
S, m y friend, it hangs in the same corner
of the top veranda, and swings to-day as
it swung the day when you lay in it under a
fleecy wrap and a be-butterflied Japanese par-
asol.

It has its vicissitudes, this hammock. Some-
times it is a pale invalid who retires into it as
into a chrysalis, and is rocked to and fro in
the wind; then the sympathetic and the socia-
ble gather about it and subject the patient
to the smoke-cure of course "by special
command" or the mint-julep cure, or to bits
of frivolous converse thrown in between the
numbers of a matinee-reception-concert at
the Princess Regent's, or a band night at
Emma Square. Sometimes a bewildered
guest from the colonies or elsewhere rolls into
it and sleeps with all his might and main.
13



14 HAWAIIAN LIFE

Sometimes a whole row of children trail their
slim legs over the side of it which is all that
saves them from being compared to peas in a
pod. But to-day I inhabit with a pencil and
lap-tablet, and nothing but a convulsion of
nature shall drive me hence.

The breeze is blowing fresh from the mount-
ain, the health-giving trade-wind. I can look
right up the green glade which is the gateway
to Tantalus, and see the clouds torn to shreds
across the wooded highlands. Have been
watching a crew of men-o'-wars-men, in dazz-
ling white duck trousers climbing the brown
slopes of Punch Bowl; watching the mango
trees where the mangoes hang like bronze
plummets; the monkey-pods are in bloom, and
their tops resemble terraced gardens; now
and again the kamani sheds a huge leaf as big
as a beefsteak, and as red also; but what are
these splashes of color to the Ponciana Regia
it is a conflagration! The Bourgainvillea %
a cataract of magenta blossoms that looks like
artificial leaves just out of a chemical bath,
obtrudes itself at intervals; it is the only crude
bit of color in a landscape where the majority
of the trees are colossal bouquets at one sea-



IN A HAMMOCK l 5

son or another. The hibiscus is aglow with
flowers of flame the most of the year, and the
land is overrun with brilliant creepers, even
to the eaves of the hotel where the birds quar-
rel and call noisily from dawn to dusk. But
why particularize? All this you know; all
this you saw when your end of the veranda
was curtained and set apart, a nook for
loungers in a land where all mankind lounges
a portion of the day; where it is not consid-
ered indelicate for a merchant to pose in the
midst of his merchandise guiltless of coat and
vest, for his respectability is established beyond
question, and his bank account a patent fact;
where ladies drive in morning dishabille, and
shop on the curbstone without alighting from
their carriages, and where any of them may
pay an evening call unbonneted and unat-
tended.

Now those sailor boys are perched upon
the rim of Punch Bowl, like a row of penguins;
the distant mountains are glossed with frag-
mentary rainbows, and there are unmistak-
able symptoms of an afterglow.

Through verdant vistas I catch glimpses of
the cavalcade that always enlivens this hour,



1 6 HAWAIIAN LIFE

and down the shaded avenues that lie be-
tween the hotel cottages troop the returning
guests; she who has rocked at her doorway
the Venetian blinds thrown wide apart all
day, involved in the toils of the Kensington
stitch, has passed within doors to smooth her
ribbons before dining; a card-party in the
middle distance surely it could not have been
whist has broken up with much show of good
feeling; children are pelting one another with
flowers among the balconies, to the dumb
horror of a coolie in white raiment and despair.

I hear a piano in the distance, and recall a
voice that is stilled; and I feel, all at once,
that the transfusive air is throbbing with light
the light that is as fleeting and as fascina-
ting as a blush; "the light that never was on
sea" but I spare you the rest of the quota-
tion; the light that at any rate transfigures
all things, beautifies all things, glorifies all
things, and makes this hour the most exquis-
itely sentimental and pathetic of the four and
twenty.

The light, by Jove! that has gone out while
I've been endeavoring to wind up this lazy
scrawl.



Y



III.

ON A MAKAl VERANDA.

HAWAIIAN HOTEL, HONOLULU, H. I.

OU wonder how we kill time in the trop-
ics, dear boy? We never kill it; we
never get quite enough of it, and murder were
out of the question. Time with us flows softly
and swiftly, like a river, and we drift with it.
It were vain to struggle against this stream;
those who attempt it die young and pass out
of memory; but we who drift without rudder
or compass find the first light of dawn flaring
up into the zenith before we are aware, and
anon it is flickering in the west, and day is over
and gone. We may not have made any vis-
ible effort; we certainly have not hurried our-
selves, but you will find upon investigation
that we have accomplished fully as much as
you would were you here with your high-pres-
sure engine in full blast.

When evening comes we repose. Repose
1?



I 8 HAWAIIAN LIFE

is not to be thought of in your country; we
repose mightily. The shops are shut up after
dark, nearly all of them; why should business
transactions be extended into the night when
they can just as well be accomplished during
the day, and in a very few hours of the day?
You are probably at this moment pitying the
poor salesman on some down-town business
street, or trying to sit out some play at the
theater, or boring yourself at the club, or
wondering what you can do next to fill up the
hours until bedtime. Alas for you and the
likes of you!

At the present writing my friends are chat-
ting upon the Makai veranda that is the
veranda on the seaward side of the hotel.
Troops of people are constantly arriving and
meeting, with mutual compliments; the veran-
das are speedily filled, so are the settees upon
the lawn, where foreigners and natives in great
numbers are swarming like bees and buzzing
like them.

It is Monday evening; the customary open-
air concert is about to take place; in the il-
luminated kiosque Professor Berger and his
clever native lads are adjusting their instru



ON A MAKAI VERANDA 19

ments; the avenues leading to and from the
hotel are lined with flambeaux, the verandas
are also lighted, and the gathering of youth and
beauty pardon me, it is quite the thing for
Honolulu society to do the open-air concerts,
and therefore I will go farther I will add and
of fair women and brave men, together with
groups of ministers, commissioners, naval
officers, etc. ; the multitudes who prefer to
lounge about under the trees, the native pop-
ulace that seems to pasture upon the sward,
the soft air, the moonlight sifting through
leafy canopies all this is quite enchanting,
and it never losss its charm.

The band plays delightfully; applause fol-
lows; the audience is attentive and apprecia-
tive, especially the native portion, for the
Hawaiians are passionately fond of music, and
they have not learned the art of conversing
audibly to a musical accompaniment.

An English brougham approaches ; a portly
gentleman alights; it is Kalakaua in citizen's
dress; he is graciously received with the scrap-
ing of chair legs for the veranda is crowded ;
and much fluttering of fans for the ladies are
en masse.



2O HAWAIIAN LIFE

Later in the evening I hear the suggestive
popping of corks a sweet reminder; cigar-
ettes have burned unceasingly does it recall
the Champs Elysees? A brief shower sweeps
over us, but it is only sufficient to cool the' air;
we don't even deign to notice it.

Now the band boys sing a plaintive refrain,
andante, sotto vocc, etc., etc.; wonderfully
pleasing are these self-taught singers, and
quite without the affectations of the more cul-
tivated; down one of the side streets passes
a troop of troubadours strumming a staccato
measure that dies away in the distance like a
shower of sparks. A delicious waltz reels out
from the kiosque,and the parlor is at once filled
with dancers encore, encore, it is a night for
music and mirth! In the intervals of silence,
I hear the click of billiard-balls and the huzzas
of the victors; and now approaches a troop
of horse; ladies in native costume bestride
them; a few gentlemen escorts, unusually
dusky in the dusk, await the pleasure of the
chief horsewoman, who anon gallops away
Whist! a princess, beguiled by the latest hit
of Lecocq, paused for a moment in the moon-
light, and then vanished away.



ON A MAKAI VERANDA 21

But a truce to this, my boy; you must be
already asleep, as I shall be a few moments
hence, for the Makai veranda is now thunder-
ous with the footsteps of departing guests.



IV.

THROUGH THE MOSQUITO FLEET AND A
HULA HULA

HAWAIIAN HOTEL, HONOLULU, H. I.

/^AMERADO! It is not necessary for you
to remind me of our cruise in the Mos-
quito Fleet; every returning moon revives a
memory that age cannot wither nor custom
stale; but did I tell you of the origin of the
name that will long be associated with a very
central yet very secret quarter of this beauti-
ful burg? -Well, in the beginning was the
kalo-patch. Nothing can be prettier than a
well-kept kalo-patch; a lake full of calla-lilies,
deflowered, might resemble it; when seen
from a little distance, and especially from a
height, a disk of burnished silver, across which
green-enameled arrow-headed leaves in high
relief are set apart in lozenge pattern, could
not be more attractive; but the trail of the
mosquito is over them all.

There was a time when the narrow, paths



THROUGH THE MOSQUITO FLEET 23

that ran between the kalo-patches in the quar-
ter of which I write led from one grass house
to another; grass houses, like mushrooms,
crop up almost anywhere, but especially be-
side still waters; and so it came to pass that
a little village like a toy Venice sat watching
its reflection in the unruffled waters of the
kalo-patches, and the voice of the multitudin-
ous mosquito in that vicinity was like a chorus
of buzz-saws; the place was known to Jack
ashore as the Mosquito Fleet, and therein his
feet went astray with alacrity and the charm-
ers that charmed never so wisely.

The kalo, as you know, was long since
pulled and beaten and eaten in fistfuls of suc-
culent poi\ the patches have been filled in and
sodded over, and the grass houses have given
place to miserable wooden shanties, but the
original crookedness of the lane that led to
destruction is preserved. The way is not
broad; on the contrary, it could hardly be
narrower, but many there be who go in
thereat as we went once upon a time to spy
out the land, and take note of one of the most
unique quarters in Honolulu.

What a worm i' the bud it is! the church-



24 HAWAIIAN LIFE

going bells toll over it; the rear walls of highly
respectable residences bear upon it; it is
within the shadow of the palace of the late
Princess Ruth, the last of the Kamehamehas;
and Emma Square, with its mimosas and
palms, matinee music and applause, actually
faces it. But what of all this? If you were
alone at the mouth of the mysterious path
that winds through the Mosquito Fleet, 'tis so
evasive you would unconsciously turn from it,
would you not?

We made accidental entrance on one occa-
sion, and traversed what appeared to be a
cul-de-sac ; at the last moment we were shifted
as if by magic into a passage hardly broader
than our shoulders, and twenty paces long.
Suddenly a diminutive village sprang up about
us; we felt like discoverers, and wandered
jubilantly about among houses with strips of
gardens nestling between them, and all fitted
together like the bits of a Chinese puzzle.
Now it was quite impossible to be certain of
anything; for the lane, which seemed without
beginning and without end, turned unexpected
corners with bewildering frequency, and
though we succeeded in threading the peril-



THROUGH THE MOSQUITO FLEET 25

ous mazes, the wonder is that we did not
stumble into windows that opened upon us or
through doors that blocked the way. We
met no one in that narrow path; had we done
so one or the other must needs have backed
out, or vaulted the fence beyond which it
were not seemly to penetrate.

There was music, as there always is music
where two or three natives are gathered to-
gether the chant, half nasal, half guttural,
such as the mud-wasp makes in his cell, re-
lieved by the boom of the agitated calabash
which reminds me:

Not many moons ago came an ancient mari-
ner. He had seen the world, and was
aweary; but a hula-kula had never gladdened
his eyes; so a hula was at once appointed in
a dingy house off from one of the joints of the
labyrinth in Mosquito Fleet.

It was a long low room, dimly lighted;
male musicians squatted on the floor against
the wall; female dancers posed in front of
them; lamps were ranged before their feet
like footlights; the ancient mariner and his
companions reclined upon musty divans at
the other end of the room.



26 HAWAIIAN LIFE

There is nothing more exhilarating than
the clang of gourds, half a dozen of them,
tossing in the air and being beaten by savage
palms; and this to the running accompani-
ment of voices 'that are precipitated by the
concussion of savage throats. You mark its
effect upon the Jmla dancers as the evening
wanes; the tireless hands and feet, the quiv-
ering limbs, the convulsions that succeed one
another with ever-increasing violence; the
extraordinary abdominal gyrations; the semi-
nude gymnastical rivalry that ultimately
plunges the dancers into paroxysms that far
outstrip the sensuous ecstasies of the whirling
dervish but it is quite impossible to describe
a hula; moreover, the improprieties are mute
according to law after 10 P. M., and by that
time the room we occupied was like a sweat-
box; windows and doors packed full of
strange, wild faces, and the frequent police
gently soothing the clamoring populace with-
out, who, having eyes, saw not, which is prob-
ably the acme of aggravation. But there we
drew a line, and lo! it was a perfectly straight
one. , .



V.

BY THE SEA.
WAIKIKI BY THE SEA, HONOLULU, H. I.

/V/I y DEAR YOUNG FRIENDS When you have
reached the mature years which make
the easy life of the tropics my chief joy, you
will begin to realize that there is something
quite as satisfactory as the celebrated domes-
tic hearth or the prospect of promotion in the
army, and that is a bachelor bungalow at
Waikiki.

That it is within easy drive of the capital
is not enough; that it is within a stone's throw
of the park and the race-track, where one
may secretly speed one's trotter before day-
break by merely turning over in bed, as it
were, is not enough; that the telephone re-


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