Copyright
Cincinnati (Ohio).

Annual reports of the officers, boards and departments online

. (page 53 of 96)
Online LibraryCincinnati (Ohio)Annual reports of the officers, boards and departments → online text (page 53 of 96)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


TURMS OP SBRVICB.



* William Neff Elected in

* Elam p. Langdon "

♦James H. Perkins "

* Miles Greenwood "

" Re-elected

* Hudson B. Curtis Elected in

* Thomas J. Biggs "

Re-elected

* William McCammon Elected in

t Charles Thomas "

Re-elected



♦ Charles h. Telford Elected in

♦ Bellamy Storer **

♦John D. Jones **

♦ Alphonso Taft "

♦ William Burnet .• "

♦ George Crawford — **

♦Joseph Ray "

♦ William P. Stratton "

♦ Washington McLean "

♦ Harvey DeCamp "

♦ A. S. Sullivan "

♦James Wise **

♦N. W. Thomas

♦John H. Ewing "

♦James D. Taylor. "

♦ Benjamin T. Dale "

♦ A. M. Taylor **

♦ Nathaniel Harris "

♦ George T. Stedman "

♦ George Keck "

♦ George F. Davis **



1847 Retired in 185 1

1848 " 1852

1848 " 1849

1848 " i8s3

1858 " 1863

1848 " 1865

1848 ** 1851

1855 " 1862

1848 ** 1852

1849 " 1855

1856 " 1858

i860 Died in 1881

1849 Retired in 1849

1849 " 1850

1850 ** 1850

1850 " 1850

1850 " 1852

1851 •' 1854

1851 *' . 1855

1852 " 1854

1852 " i8S3

1852 «• 1858

1852 " . 1855

1852 «* 1852

1853 " i860

1853 " 1858

1854 " 1855

1854 " 1854

1854 " 1866

185s " 1856

1855 *• 1858

1855 " 1859

1855 " 1858



<■ Deceased.



t Died in oflScc.



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



Cincinnati House of Refuge



843



DIRECTORS. TERMS OF SERVICE.

*JOHN B. Warren Elected in 1858 Retired

»G. H. Ketchum " 1858 •*

♦ A. E. Chamberi^ain " 1858 "

*F. H. OEHI.MAN " 1858 **

" " Re-elected 1861

♦Charles Rule Elected in 1859 **



* T. H. Weasner

♦John C. Thorp

* Charles Ross

♦Gassaway Brashears.

* Stephen Bonner

* C. F. Wilstach

*Iy. H. Sargent



1859

1859

1859

i860

1861

1862

1863

** " Re-elected 1873

•Joseph C. Butler Elected in 1863 "

tR. A. HOLDEN ** 1862 Died in

t H. Thane Miller •* 1864 **

♦James M. Johnston •* 1866 Retired

" ** Re-elected 1879

♦John D. Minor Elected in 1868 **

1870

1871

1872 "

1874 Still in

1874 Retired

1876 Died in

1879

1879 Still in

1881 Retired

1881 Still in

1883 Retired

1886



♦James L. Haven

♦ Murray Shipley

♦ W. M. Ramsey

J. Webb, Jr

♦ David Baker

♦ f. h. rowekamp

t A. B. Champion

James Dalton —

♦ Thomas Gilpin

Henry Behrens

♦ George A. Pritchard . .

James Allison

William E. Lewis, M. D.



1888.

** " Re-elected 1892.

Charles L. Doran Elected in 1888.



tP. Poland

Joseph T. Carew. . .

Lawrence Poland.
t Chas. W. Thomas . .

Guy W. Mallon —

W. B. Carpenter . .

R. S. Fulton

D. C. Shears

Thomas J. Peale. . .



1891 Died in

1891 Retired

1893 Still in

1895 Died in

1895 Still in

1895

1896

1901 «•

1901 **



in 1862
1858
1878

1859
1863
1864
i860
1861
1859
1861

1873
1870
1868
1876
1872
1900

1895

in 1871
1883
1879
1874
1874
1879

office.

in 1888
1881
1895

office.

in 1888

office.

in 1886
1892
1891
1892
1891
1892

in 1895

office.
1901

office.



* Deceased.



t Died in office.



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



844



Annual Report



SUPERINTENDENTS.



RuFUS Hubbard Elected May i8, 1850.

Aaron P. Rickoff ** February 12, 1853.

H. D. Perry ** August 15, 1854.

Henry M. Jones " June 26, 1856.

♦Abijah Watson " July 27, 1865.

Henry A. Monfort ** April 26, 1866.

John D. Minor " February 27, 1879.

Henry Oi^iver ** June 24, 1880.

^, ^ , r ** November 27, 1890.

t Levi S. Fulton <

I Died April 14, 1895.

James Aluson Elected May 26, 1895.



♦ Deceased.



fDied in office.



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



Cincinnati House of Refuge 845



Report of the Directors.



Cincinnati House of Refuge, ;
December 31, 1901. )

To the General Assembly of Ohio^ the Board of Legislation of Cincinnati^
and the Subscribers to the Cincinnati House of Refuge^ Greeting:

The ftst year of the twentieth century has been marked
by the loss of the President of our Board of Directors, Mr.
Charles W. Thomas, who departed this life November 15,
1901, after a brief illness. In his death we have lost a
faithful and efficient presiding officer, a zealous fellow -
worker, a true friend, and a wise counselor of all in need
or trouble. He devoted his whole time to the work of
our institution, and the progress it has made of late years
is in great part due to him. At a special meeting, held
at the House of Refuge, the following resolutions were
adopted :

" IVhereaSy It has pleased our all- wise God to take to him-
self our beloved president, Charles W. Thomas ; and

" Whereas^ We deem it proper that the Board should ex-
press its sense of sorrow at the loss of a charitable Christian
gentleman, an efficient member, and a devoted president,
who made the success of our institution his lifework and



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



846 Annual Report



dearest ambition, and should extend our condolence to his
bereaved relatives : Therefore be it

^^Resolved^ That we express, on behalf of the Board of
Directors, officers, and inmates of the Cincinnati House
of Refuge our heartfelt sorrow at the loss of a dear friend
and esteemed fellow-worker, and our sincere sympathy with
his family. It is also ordered that these resolutions be
spread on the minutes of the Board, and be published in
^ Our Companion^ and the daily papers, and that a copy
be engrossed and sent to Mrs. E. W. LeCain, the sister of
our deceased president.

John Webb, Jr., Lawrence Poland,

Jamks Dalton, W. B. Carpenter,

Henry Behrens, Guy W. Mallon,

R. S. Fulton, Jas. Allison, Sec'y:'

Aside from this, the year has been a fortunate one for the
House of Refuge, and our endeavors toward the uplifting
and proper training of the children under our care have
been crowned with success.

Bearing in mind that it is not a prison or a place of
punishment, but a home for the little ones who were home-
less or neglected in homes worse than none at all, and that
the delinquencies of that minority who were committed for
some misdemeanor arose usually from their lack of proper
training, we have endeavored to make the discipline mild
though firm, and to instill in the minds of the boys and
girls principles of virtue, true manliness and womanliness,
that they might grow up to be good and useful citizens, a
credit to Cincinnati.

The records of paroled and discharged inmates show that
we have been successful in our undertaking.



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



Cincinnati House of Refuge 847

Each inmate is required to attend school, and to devote
part of each day to learning some useful trade.

Results in the manual training departments have been
gratifying.

Every commitment to the House is personally examined
by a committee of the Board, known as the Committee of the
Month, which spends Wednesday afternoon of each week at
the House, and assigns all new inmates to their proper
divisions. Great attention is also given to procuring suitable
homes and situations, either in the country or city, for the
children ready to leave the institution. The Board takes a
very active interest in this work, and a committee personally
investigates each home before a child is sent to it. The
same care is taken in investigating the children's own homes
before any inmate is released to the care of its parents.

Services are held each Sunday in the chapel. Addresses
are made by clergymen of all denominations. Great atten-
tion is given to the musical part of the programme. Our
thanks are due to the musical profession of the city who
have been especially kind to us. We are especially indebted
to the Mayor, the Police Judge and Prosecutor, the City and
County Auditors and Treasurers, the Board of Legislation,
the Chief of Police, and the police authorities and 'force of
Cincinnati, Covington, and Newport.

Expenditures have been carefully examined weekly by
the Committee of the Month and monthly by the full Board.
Attention is called to the financial statement hereunto ap-
pended.

For further information in regard to the work of the
House we refer you to the detailed reports of the Super-
intendent, Assistant Superintendent, and heads of depart-
ments.



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



848 Annual Report



Thanking God for the blessings he has so abundantly
poured out on our House during the year just passed, and
in the hope that he will in a signal manner bless and prosper
the coming year, crowning our labors with success and
granting health and happiness to those under our care, we
respectfully submit this report.
For the Board of Directors.

HENRY BEHRENS,

President.



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



Cincinnati House of Refuge



849



Report of the Superintendent.



Cincinnati House of Refuge, i
December 31, 1901.
To the Board of Directors :

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit the following
report and tabulated statements for the year ending December
31, 1901.

Average number of children during the year 428 ; number
of inmates admitted since the opening of the house, October
7» 1850, 12,939; of this number 10,524 were boys and 2,405
girls ; established in permanent country homes, 1,340.



MOVEMENT OF POPULATION AND STATISTICAL
INFORMATION.





Boys


Girls


Total


Number of inmates in the house, December 31, 1900


295


119


414


Number of inmates received during the year 1901


291


87


378


Total number of intnatps durinc^ the vear IQOI


586
270


206


792
360


Paroled, sent to homes, or discharged during year 1901 . .


90


Number of inmates remaining December 31, 1901


316


116


432


Greatest number of inmates at any one time in 1901


336


117


453


Least number of inmates at any one time in 1901


293


no


403


Averflce number of inmates for the vear IQOI


315
274

41


"3

142

29


428
416

12


Averao^e number of inmates for the vear lOOO. ...........


Increased average number of inmates for 1901 as com- )
pared with 1900 J



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



860



Annual Report



SUMMABT.





Boys


i Girls

j 1


Gnud




White


Cord


Totol


White

1


Col'd


Toui!

1


Total


Number remaining Dec. 31, 1900.

Number admitted during the )
year ending Dec. 31, 1901..


227
238


68
53


295
291


1
99

64


20
23


1
119

87 1


414

378


Total


465
216


121

54


586 1 163

270 70

1


43
20


206 \ 792

90 I 360


Number released during the )
year ending Dec. 31, 1901.. )


Number remaining Dec. 31, 1901.


249


67


316


1


23


i
116 |i 432



FOR WHAT CAUSE COMMITTED—

Assault and battery 2

Boarding train in motion , 5

Burglary 3

Carrying concealed weapons 2

Cruelty to animals 1

Drunkenness 2

Disorderly conduct 11

Grand larceny 5

Homeless 56

House-breaking 7

Improper home 26

Incorrigibility 37

Loitering 32

Obstructing street 1

Obstructing railroad track i

Petit larceny 55

Rape I

Recalled from parole 30

Returned from a home 28

Street-begging 2

Taking horse without leave 4

Truancy 8

Vagrancy 8

Without suitable home 51

Total 378

Of the above committed 102 were to await trial.



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



Cincinnati House of Refuge 851



NATIVITY—

Cincinnati 213

Ohio (exclusive of Cincinnati ) 56

Alabama 2

Georgia 3

Illinois 2

Indiana n

Kansas i

Kentucky 55

Maryland i

Michigan ; 2

M ississippi i

Missouri 2

New Mexico 1

New York 2

North Dakota i

Pennsylvania 5

Tennessee 7

Virginia 1

West Virginia . . . .' i

Wisconsin i

Canada i

Germany 3

Ireland 2

Italy I

Russia •. . . I

Syria ^ . . i

Total 378

PARENTAGE—

American 201

Negro 77

English 5

German 74

Irish 14

Italian 2

Prussian . ... 2

Russian 2

Syrian i

Total 378



OF THE CHILDREN RECEIVED-

Both parents living 217

Orphans 36

Had no father 69

Had no mother 48



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



852 Annual Report



Had stepfather 14

Had stepmother 6

Whose father drank 102

Whose mother drank 36

Both parents drank 21

Were committed on complaint of police 243

Were committed on complaint of father 16

Were committed on complaint of mother 71

Were committed on complaint of citizens 13

Were committed on complaint of S. P. C. A 35

Admitted they used liquor 30

Admitted they used tobacco 64

Admitted they used profane language 186

Could not read 65

Could not write 65

Could read in First Reader 52

Could read in Second Reader 57

Could read in Third Reader 68

Could read in Fourth Reader 78

Could read in Fifth Reader 32

Could read in Sixth Reader 26

AGES WHEN ADMITTED—

Six years and under 35

Seven years 12

Eight years 15

N ine years 23

Ten years 38

Eleven years 19

, Twelve years 28

Thirteen years 2^

Fourteen years 63

Fifteen years 48

Fifteen to sixteen years 59

Total 378

Average age when admitted twelve years and one month.

RELEASED—

To Police Court 102

To homes 44

Paroled to parents and friends 165

Died 3

Discharged 46

Total 360

The average time inmates remained in the institution was one year six
months and two days.

The average time prisoners committed to await trial have remained was
less than eleven days.



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



Cincinnati House of Refuge



853



NUMBER OF TIMES ARRESTED—

Had not been arrested 323

Had been arrested once 41

Had been arrested twice 8

Had been arrested three times ... 6

Total 378



MOVEMENT OP POPULATION EACH MONTH.



January . . .
Februaiy •

March

April

May

June

July

August . .
September,
October.. .
November
December .

Totol . . .



-admitted-



Boys



o



Girls



13
10
21
22

«4
II

17
14
28

53
12

23
238



o

o



3
3
7
4

2

3

5

10

3

10

I

2

53



16

>3

28
26
16

14
22

24
31
63
13
25
292



4

4
4
4
5
3
7
4
8

3
6
12

64



4

2
2

32



g



6
6
9
5
7
3
8

5'
9
7
8

14

87



•d



O



22

>9
37
31
23
17
30!
29
40
70
21
39
378



-RELEASBD-



B0T8



Girls



14
9
19
22
18
II

12

23

7
46

13
22

216






•d
£
o



I
2
2

3
6

4
6

9'

I
10

4
6

54



15
II
21
25
24
15
18
32

8
56
17
28

270



4

5.

6

4

3.

9.

3
10

6.

4

4
12

70



•d

c

s



5
5

II
6
3
9
7

12
6
6
6

14

90



20
16
32

27
24
25
44
14
62

23

42

309



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



854



Annual Report



NUMBER OF CHILDREN IN INSTITUTION

AT END OF EACH FISCAL TEAB.



Years



September 30,



December 31,



1851.
1852.

1853.
1854.
1855.
1856.
1857.
1858.
1859.
i860.
1861.
1862.
1863.
1864.
1865.
1866.
1867.
1868.
1869.
1870,
1871.
1872.

1873.
1874.
1875.
1876.

1877.
1878.

1879.
1880.
1881.
1882.
1883.
1884.
1885.
1886.
1887.
1888.
1889.
1890.
1891.
1892.
1893-
1894.
1895.
1896.

1897.
1898.
1899.
1900
1901.



Boys


Girls


121


41


169


52


136


51


137


35


181


40


203


36


\l\


38


47


218


38


181


30


172


21


179





239


39


248


54


248


48


211


37


193


27


160


34


145


54


182


43


173


42


«75





149


45


181


48


200


40


214


40


197


53


154


46


172


49


190


59


187


74


245


69


247


63


233


62


264


77


282


70


187


83


225


83


216


85


242


73


268


73


269


85


297


106


293


116


249


ic6


279


139


304


124


304


140


256


139


295


119


316


116



Totals



162
221
187
172
221
239
233
234
256
211

193
210
278
302
296
248
220
194

199
225
215
226
194
229
240

254
250
200
221

249
261

3>4
310
295
341
352
270
308
301
3»5
341
354
403
409

355
418
42S
444
395
414

432



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



Cincinnati House of Refuge 855

The foregoing exhibits are from our book records, and
are correct in every particular. As a matter of general
information I beg to state that the success of the institution
is deeply involved in every inmate that leaves its portals.
Boys and girls of working age are found suitable employ-
ment before leaving the home. They are afterward required
to report monthly, and a record is kept of the progress made.
This we find has a salutary effect in keeping them in touch
with the home until they become self-supporting and able to
provide and care for themselves. We continue to have good
reports from many former inmates who are now doing
successfully for themselves. Some are engaged in different
mechanical trades, some are trustworthy clerks in public and
private business houses, many have joined the army and
navy, and it is a great satisfaction to know that the majority
have become useful men and women, and good, upright
citizens.

The order and decorum among the children of all classes
has been uniformly satisfactory and gratifying, thus furnish-
ing evidence that the system of government is judicious and
salutary. The children are taught to regard the institution
as their home while here and its oflBcers as their friends, and
in the majority of cases feelings of -attachment and confidence
are the results of the kindly intercourse thus existing.

With sincere thanks for uninterrupted kindness and con-
tinued forbearance on the part of the Board individually and

collectively,

I am very respectfully,

JAMES ALLISON,

Superintendent,



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



856



Annual Report



Report of the Secretary.



Cincinnati House of Refuge, December 31, 1901.
To the Board of Directors :

Gentlemen, — Herewith is presented a statement of the finances
for the year ending at date:



DEBIT.

To balance In City Treasury Deoember 31, 1000

To balance cash on hand December 31, 1900

To cash from taxes received bv City Treasurer 1901

To cash from counties for maintenance of inmates

To cash from subscriptions to " Our Companion," sales of old
iron, barrels, etc



CREDIT.

By vouchers audited and paid during year 1901 .
By balance in City Treasury December 31, 1901. .
By balance cash on hand December 31, 1901



SUMMART.



Appropriation for the year 1901.

Expenditures for the year 1901

Deficiency in receipts for the year 1901.
Balance in City Treasury



CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES.



Salaries

Provisions

Clothing

Furnishing

Fuel and light ,

Hospital

Schools

Siables

Improvements and repairs .

Oltfce

Contingencies

ManualTraining-school




$65,364 45



66,000 00



166,000 00



17,064 33

17,614 47

3,539 67

2.928 81

5,671 83

448 76

3^39 82

760 99

4.499 96

185 55

4.016 30

5.399 93



65,269 95

2 74

91 76



165,364 45



65.269 94

7/7 31

2 75



866.000 00



$65. 269 94



Respectfully submitted. JAMES ALLISON, 6^r>-



REPORT OF THE AUDITING COMMITTEE.

To the Board of Directors of the Cincinnati House of Refuge :

Gentlemen, — We, the undersigned committee appointed bj the Board
to audit the books of account of the House of Refuge, find them correct on
examination, and commend their admirable neatness.
Respectfully submitted,

Lawrbnck Poland,
John Webb, Jr.



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



Cincinnati House of Refuge 857



Report of the Visiting Agent

AND COMMITTEE ON HOMES FOR CHILDREN.



Cincinnati House of Refuge,
December 31, 1901.

Board of Directors of Cincinnati House of Refuge :

Gentlemen, — The following report of the parole system
of this institution for the year 1901 is respectfully sub-
mitted :

Number under supervision December 31, 1900 664

Number paroled during year 165

Number placed in homes during year 44

Number dropped on coming of age, etc 204

Number recalled during year 30

Number returned from a home 28

262

Number under supervision December 31, 1901 611

Number reported in person or by letter doing well. . 559
Number reported not doing well 52

Total 611

It will be seen by the foregoing figures that less than nine
per cent of those on parole are not conducting themselves as
they should, while the conduct of ninety-one per cent is
satisfactory.

P. R. Costello,

Ass't SupU and Visiting Agent ^

John Webb, Jr.,

Lawrence Poland,

Henry Behrens,

T. J. Peale,

Committee,



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



858 Annual Report



Report of the Matron.



We have under our care and supervision —

In the First or Kindergarten Family — White 50

Colored 4



In the Second Division — W hite 19

Colored 4



In the Third Division— White 23

Colored 16



54



39



Total number in girls' department 1 16

Total number employed in kitchen, laundry, sewing-
rooms, and general housework 77

For care 39



Total 116



GARMENTS MADE IN SEWING DEPARTMENT—

Gowns 164, night robes 184 348

Skirts 227, aprons 324 551

Towels 627, pillow-cases 277 904

Bibs 40, table-cloths 76 1 16

Dresses 489, girls' garments 139 628

Sheets 424, bolsters 32 456

Napkins 84, combines 180 ; 264

Miscellaneous 900



Total 4,167

LAUNDRY—

Clothes repaired Pieces 29,496

Washed ** 574.892

Ironed " 243,687

I thank you for your kindness and help in my department
during the year just closed, and hope God will help us in our
efforts in the year to come.

Respectfully,

MARY DEVINNEY,

Matron,



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



Cincinnati House of Refuge 859



Report of the Physician.



Cincinnati, O., December 31, 1901.

To the Board of Directors :

Gentlemen, — Subjoined please find report of the
Medical Department for the past year.

In the early part of the year we had a few cases of
chickenpox and the diseases incident to cold weather.
During the summer there was little sickness. We had no
cases attributable to the intense heat which prevailed, our
small children being remarkably well. This favorable con-
dition was no doubt due to the special care given by the
officers, and particularly to the daily bathing of all inmates —
a very great labor where so many are to be cared for.

Early in the autumn measles developed suddenly in
different parts of the House, showing that it was not com-
municated from the children, but was probably introduced
from outside. A large number of cases occurred, but all
recovered.

For the first time in many years scarlet fever developed,
three cases appearing. Thorough disinfection was resorted
to, the affected children immediately removed from the
House, and there was happily no extension of the disease.
As usual, a number of cases of continued fever occurred.
There has been no serious accident during the year.

The excellent condition of the House, consequent upon
recent improvements, is a source of much gratification.



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



860 Annual Report



I am pleased to express my gratitude to the Superinten-
dent and all the oflScers for the prompt and eflScient aid
in caring for the children ; also to the City Hospital and
Children's Hospital for courtesies extended us.

The following inmates died during the year : March 22,
Lena Lane, eleven years old, from typhoid fever ; July 6,
Weston GoflF, eleven y^ars old, from meningitis; Novem-
ber 5, Edward Moss, three years old, from Bright's disease,
following scarlet fever.

Very respectfully,

WM. H. TAYLOR,

Physician House of Refuge,



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



Cincinnati House of Refuge 861



Report of Military Instructor



To the Superintendent:

Sir,— The following is a brief report of what has been accomplished
by military training pursuant to your orders, May i, 1901. When the
weather was favorable the drills and parades have taken place as
directed, except that every other morning the drills have been with
rifles. I feel justified in stating that during the past year the parades
have been better and more perfect, from day to day, giving evidence
that the boys are interested in the work.- The early morning drill,
alterhating with rifle and calisthenic exercises, has probably accom-
plished more than we are able to judge at the present time. It is
likely that many boys now here, and hundreds of those who have left
the home, owe their present good health and almost perfect physical
condition to these drills and exercises. The average attendance
was 220.

The battalion participated in the Fall-Festival parades, and were
highly commended by the officials and public for their general appear-
ance and soldierly bearing.

The prospects for the future are bright. We havfc plenty good
material to work with, and the foundations are being laid for the
building of many good, strong men.

Respectfully submitted,



Online LibraryCincinnati (Ohio)Annual reports of the officers, boards and departments → online text (page 53 of 96)