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G. M. Branham, Instructor.



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862 Annual Report



Department Reports.



Manual Training.

One of the most important features of which this institution may
feel justly proud, and that around which all others group themselves,
is that of teaching our boys some useful trade or occupation, so that
they may be able to support themselves and supply their own wants
when released from our care.

The lad is terribly handicapped who enters upon the race for a

livelihood without the knowledge of some useful trade, and without

this power of self-support soon meets the stress of hunger and cold;

presently yielding, becomes a tramp or pauper. Hence such training

is given in the useful trades to the inmates during their stay in the

institution.

James Allison, Superintendent,



Printing Department.

I am pleased to state that the Department of Printing is well equipped
for teaching boys the trade. The office contains plenty of material
with which to give the pupil a thorough practical knowledge of com-
position, imposition, and job work. We are well supplied with
presses, both cylinder and job, and every opportunity is given the
young printer to become proficient in all branches and as useful
** all-around man."

A boy to become a good printer must be taught habits of cheerful
obedience and carefulness ; his mind must be centered on his work,
and every thing else is cast aside for the time being. Order and



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Cincinnati House of Refuge 863

cleanliness are essential, and nothing short of the most painstaking
effort will secure for the boys the success they all hope to attain.

At present there are eighteen boys employed, divided into two
classes — morning and afternoon. They set up and print "(?«r Com-
panion " once a month, as well as the blanks and stationery used at
the Home. The boys, as a rule, give evidence of their willingness to
learn and become proficient in the work, as shown in the composing,
make-up, and binding of this report.

Thanking you for your valuable help and advice in my work,
I remain, yours very respecfully,

T. CuMMiNGS, Imiructor,



Sloyd Department.

Number of pupils January i, 1901 44

" ** received since January i, 1901 .... 25

** ** paroled since January i, 1901 24

" ** remaining December 31, 1901 .... 45

In this department — Sloyd — we teach according to the Naas method
of Swedish Sloyd. The course contains 50 models and 58 exercises.
By exercises we mean the use of tools in accordance with definite
rules, desigoed to meet special purposes. The models are arranged
in consecutive order according to their comparative difficulty, and are
the embodiment of the work done in the exercises. All the models
have a practical value; they are made and finished entirely by the
pupils, some of soft, others of hard wood. These models develop the
sense of beauty, and in their construction require the use of all the
necessary tools and the performance of the most important manipula-
tions connected with the wood -work. There is a second course,
composed of 35 difficult exercises in cabinet work and 30 exercises in
wood turning. I have the pleasure of reporting to you that of the
boys who have attended this class, and since been paroled, 15 are
engaged in outside employment These boys are supporting and con-
ducting themselves well, and are making the most of their opportu-
nities. The boys in this class, as a rule, are attentive to their work



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864 Annual Report



and anxious to learn. In addition to our regular work, we built
the pavilion, and placed the institution exhibit in position at the Fall
Festival, which was greatly admired. The month of December was
devoted to making Christmas toys, etc. , the entire product was turned
over to the inmates of the institution.

Thanking you for the interest shown, I am very respectfully,

J. W. DuvALL, Instructor.



Engineer's Report.*

The following report of the Engineering Department for the year
1 90 1 is respectfully submitted.

Battery of three boilers in good condition. Recently inspected by
the official authorities and passed upon favorably.

Both feed pumps in good condition, lately supplied with new piston
rods and packing.

Engines in splendid working order, and rendering efficient service.
Dynamos likewise.

Motors in the different departments are giving general satisfaction,
except one in printing-office, which on account of increased service
is to be replaced by new one of greater capacity.

Machinery and rotary tubs in laundry are in good, practical work-
ing order.



«The Hartford Steam-boiler Inspection and Insurance Company makes the follow-
ing report of the condition of your steam boilers, inspected on the 8th of January
1902, by Inspector F. B. Drury.

THBEX H. T. B0ILBR8, HOUSB OF RBFUOE.

1-2— Ex/emaUy.— Examined while under pressure, and as far as could be seen they
were in good condition, no leaks or defects of any kind showing. Safety-valves free
and loaded to 100 lbs., pressure observed 70 lbs.; gauge-cocks clear: and all other
attachments are in good working order.

3— J/itemaZ<y. — Shell-plates, heads, and tubes, except some very light scale, are
sound, clean, and in good condition. Braces are sound and taut, and all openings
to outside attachments are clear.

£z/enm/<y.— Shell-plates and heads are sound and good. Seams and tube-ends show-
no leakage or corrosion. Settings are in good repair. Steam-gauges correct to five
pounds fast. Safety-valves and all other attachments are in good working order.
Habtfobd Steam-boilbb Inspbction and Insurance Co.
H. M. Lbmon* UwMJuger^ Cincinnati, O.

Chicago, January in, 1902. Joseph M. Glbason, SptcialL AffoU.



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Cincinnati House of Refuge 865

The heating and lighting system is now practically without defect,
and giving better satisfaction than at any fgrmer time, there being no
complaints from any part of the House as to question of smooth work-
ing, heat, or light.

All our tools are in good condition. We have a stock of pipes and
fittings on hand sufficient to meet present needs.

All electric wires, switch-boards, lamps, and other appurtenances
of the lighting service of house and premises have recently undergone
inspection, and were reported upon favorably.

The smoke nuisance has been reduced to the minimum by recent
appliances and careful stoking, under the immediate supervision of the
engineers in charge,

A class of twelve boys, average age seventeen, have received in-
struction in this department during the year.

The engine-room and boiler-house have been newly painted, and
the entire plant maybe safely reported as being in first-class condition.

James Dokes, Engineer.



Shoemaking.

Boys* Soudan calf, U. S. Army regulation pattern, stand'd last, .pairs, 526

Boys' glazed kid balmorals, tipped " 60

Girls' chrome glazed kid, common-sense, lace ** 180

Girls' chrome glazed kid, common-sense, Oxfords, lace " 62

Boy's cork-sole shoe, with 2-inch cork lift for crippled boy i

Boy's cork-sole shoe, with 3-inch cork lift for crippled boy i

Boy's shoe with ankle supporters, built for weak ankles pair» '

Cloth upper shoes made for convalescent invalid ** i

Total number of boys' and girls' shoes issued during the year. . . ** 790

Boys' shoes repaired ** 3,404

Girls' shoes repaired ** 721

Average number of boys employed in class pupils, 17

Average time of boys employed in class months, ^)4.

Average age of boys employed in class years, 17

Colored boys employed in class pupils, 6

It has been our constant endeavor to teach the trade in its various
details, and the boys have been prompt and painstaking in receiving
such instruction. The result is the handsome and substantial shoes



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866 Annual Report



which have been turned out. We can look back and see the steady
advances made through the year, and we hope for still better results
in the year to come. All we now need is improved machinery, which
you have kindly promised in the near future. The general deport-
ment has been like the interest in their work, always of the best.

We thank you for the many helps and assistance you have extended
us in many ways, without which we could not have been so successful.

W. G. Hill, Instructor,.



Bakery.

Number of boys enrolled January i, 1901 3

Number of boys paroled 5

Number of boys received 5

Number of boys enrolled December 31, 1901 3

Six hundred barrels of flour were used with the following output :

46,000 loaves of bread, three pounds each;
18,000 loaves of bread, one pound each;
3,600 loaves rye bread, one and a half pounds each;
10,000 rolls;
2,000 cup cakes;
6,000 small cakes;
1,800 pies;

5,000 pieces of cinnamon cake;
15,000 pieces of corn bread;
200 bushels of baked beans;
250 bushels of baked potatoes;
15,000 pounds of roast beef;
1,400 pounds of roast turkey;
425 pieces of pound-cake.

All the boys discharged from this department have secured good
positions as bakers, and are doing well.

John Brknnig, Instructor,



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Cincinnati House of Refuge 867



Tailoring.

I present herewith my seventh annual report of the Tailoring

Department :

Uniform coats 210

Uniform pants 687

Bob caps 250

Caps with visors 150

Shirts 337

Drawers 335

Overalls 109

Overall jackets 45

Aprons .' 125

Coats 939

Trousers 1,615

Overalls 80

Aprons 57

Average number of boys employed, 24 ; average age of boys em-
ployed, 14.

During the year six boys have gone out, who are now working in
tailor-shops and earning their own living.

I thank you for your kindly consideration at all times.

Joseph F. Burke, Instructor,



House-Carpentry, Painting, and Glazing.

Activity in this department continues. On an average sixteen boys
have been employed during the year. For the first five months the
entire time was taken up in general repair work about the buildings
and premises, under the supervision of Mr. Meyers. Since June ist,
a sample frame and window having been approved by the Superin-
tendent and House Committee, the boys have been divided into two
classes and employed in making new frames and sash for the north
and south wings of main building, 290 being required. Of these, 244
have been completed, properly glazed, and wood-work given three
coats of white lead and oil. The majority have been put in position,
taking the place of old and wornout sash placed in the building some
fifty years ago. By the first of March the old sash will have been
entirely removed and new ones substituted. This change will effect a
great saving in heat and convenience, and add very much to the



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868 Annual Report



comfort of the inmates. The work has proved a most excellent train-
ing for the boys, having been all wrought by hand without the aid
of machinery of any kind. They are now, without any previous
training, familiar with the uses and sharpening of tools, and proficient
in measuring, rip and cross sawing, squaring and joining, mortise and
tenon work, and the rudiments of painting and glazing. Many of
them have shown marked skill and mechanical ability. All have been
earnest in the work in an honest effort to learn, and the results have
been very gratifying to their instructor.

Nine boys have been paroled from this class, furnished with the
necessary tools for beginners, and are now earning their own liveli-
hood.

G. L. Emmons, Instructor.



Report of the Gardener and Florist.

The new greenhouses and conservatory have given good satisfac-
tion. The increased room has given us a better chance for growing
and potting, and every inch of space has been used to advantage.
The heating has proved satisfactory, without being forced, even in the
coldest weather, and we hope by early spring to be able to make a
better showing in variety of plants and flowers for lawn decoration
than ever before. Our work during the winter months consists mainly
of propagating and cultivating the newest varieties for this purpose.
The lawns, roadways, and shrubbery about the place have been well
cared for. All our tools are in fair condition.

We have grown during the year, from seed and cutting, over 15,000
plants and flowers of every variety. During the year fourteen boys
have received instruction in flower-culture and landscape gardening.
They have shown an earnest effort to learn. Outside positions have
been secured for four, who are doing well ; six have been released to
their homes and four remain. All have been willing workers and
good boys. I wish to express my gratitude to you for kindly advice
and support, which have been of great assistance to me in my work.

Fred. Klinge, Gardener.



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Cincinnati House of Refuge 869



School Reports.



The school organization consists of six divisions for boys and three
for girls, beginning with the Kindergarten, the remainder being classi-
fied, as nearly as circumstances will allow, according to the advance-
ment of the pupils. With the limited time at our disposal, we do not
attempt to give a superficial instruction in a large number of studies,
but aim to impart a thorough knowledge of a few necessary branches.
Instruction is given in reading, writing, spelling, geography, mental
and written arithmetic, and general instruction in morals and manners.
Scholars are promoted from grade to grade, as their advancement in
their studies appear to justify, and are incited in this and other ways
to exert .themselves to their own improvement. Each class comes
under the immediate tuition of the teacher, and is a heart-to-heart
work, little dependence being placed in any monitorial system of
instruction. The results attained compare favorably with those of
similar grades in any of our public schools. An exhibit of school-
work is on permanent exhibition in the building, and open for inspec-
tion at all times. Every inmate is required to attend school ; there
is no such thing as ** playing hookey." The small children in the
Kindergarten and primary grades attend both morning and afternoon
classes ; the boys of working age one half of each day, the remaining
half day being devoted to instruction in our manual training depart-
ments learning some useful trade. The girls, in addition to their
school-work, are taught plain sewing and receive practical instruction
in general domestic service in every department of the House, as will
be observed in the Matron's report.

James Allison, Superintendent,



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870 Annual Report



Girls' School.

kindergarten and primary grade.

The following is a report for the past year of the First Division
Girls' School and Kindergarten, ending December 31, 1901.

First Division Girls* School —

Number enrolled January i, 1901 38

Number received during the year 14

Whole number enrolled 52

Number transferred 2

Number withdrawn 10

Number remaining January i, 1902 40

Kindergarten —

Number enrolled January i, 1901 16

Number received during year 9

Number withdrawn 12

Number remaining January I, 1902 13

The studies are reading, writing, arithmetic (oral and written),
spelling, language, and composition. The pupils have made good
progress, and I feel greatly encouraged.

The little ones in the kindergarten classes have attained good
results, and show marked improvement. I thank you for the kindly
interest always manifested in our school.

Helen M. Mirrielees, Teacher,



SECOND AND THIRD DIVISIONS.

I am pleased to submit the following report for the year 1901.

Second Division Girls, Average Age 12 Years —

Number enrolled January i, 1901 29

Number entered during the year 17

Number withdrawn during the year 22

Number remaining , 24



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Cincinnati House of Refuge 871

Third Division Girls, Average Age 15 Years —

Number enrolled January i, 1901 40

Number entered during the year 21

Number withdrawn during the year 22

Number remaining 39

The following subjects have been taught during the past year:
Reading, writing, arithmetic, spelling, geography, history, composi-
tion, language, and physiology.

The girls have shown an interest in the work and have made
steady progress.

K. B. KoBELSPERGER, Teochcr,



Boys' Schooi.,



ROOM ONE.



The following is the annual report of Room One, Male Depart-
ment, for the year ending December 31, 1901 :

Pupils in attendance January i, 1901 69

Received during the year 35

Withdrawn during the year 43

Remaining December 31, 1901 61

The following subjects have been taught in this room during the
past year : Reading, writing, arithmetic, spelling, geography, history,
composition, language. The boys have shown an interest in the
above subjects, and the results obtained have been good.

Mary E. Brits, Teacher,



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872 Annual Report



ROOM TWO.

I beg to submit the following report of Room Two for the year
ending December, 1901 :

Number enrolled January 1, 1901 42

Number received since " 39

Whole number enrolled 81

Number withdrawn by transfer 31

Number withdrawn by parole 24

Number remaining January i, 1902 26

Reading, writing, arithmetic (oral and written), spelling, language,
geography, and history are the subjects taught. All have shown an
interest in their work, and are progressing nicely.

Mabel K. Moore, Teacher,



ROOM THREE.

I respectfully submit the following report of Room Three, Male
Department, for the year ending December 31, 1901 :

Number enrolled January i, 1901 56

Number entered during the year 42

Number withdrawn 41

Number remaining 57

The majority of this class are colored, ranging from six to seven-
teen years. Subjects taught : Reading, writing, arithmetic, spelling,
language, and geography. The boys are earnest in their efforts to
take advantage of the opportunity offered them, and the progress
made is very gratifying. Thanking you for kindness and encourage-
ment, I am very respectfully,

Mrs. J. W. DuvALL, Teacher,



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Cincinnati House of Refuge 873



ROOM FOUR.

The following is the report of Room Four during the five school-
months I have had it in charge :

Number enrolled June i, 1901 33

Number received since . . . - 11

Whole number enrolled 44

Number withdrawn 9

Number remaining January i, 1902 35

The following subjects have been taught: Reading, writing,
arithmetic (oral and written), spelling, geography, and composition.
The little boys have made steady progress, and are ever willing and
ready for new ideas and knowledge.

Ethel Stevens, Teacher.



ROOM FIVE.
The following is the report of Room Five for 1901 :

Number enrolled since January i, 1901 43

Number entered since January ist 11

Number received by transfer 9

Number transferred 20

Number withdrawn 8

Number remaining 35

The studies of this room are spelling, reading, writing, arithmetic,

geography, and history. It has been, I think, a successful and

pleasant year's work, and we hope for still greater improvement

throughout the new year.

Mrs. J. A. Burnett, Teacher.



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874 ' Annual Report



FIRST DIVISION BOYS PRIMARY GRADE.

The following is the report of the First Division Primary Grade,
beginning September i, 1901 (the date I took charge), and ending
December 31, 1901.

Number enrolled September i, 1901 46

Number received since 18

Number withdrawn S

Number enrolled December 31, 1901 56

The progress made by the little boys is very encouraging. They

have pursued their studies with earnestness and sincerity. The

older boys especially have worked with a will and have made steady

progress.

Grace E. Moore, Teacher.



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ANNUAL REPORT



CINCINNATI HOSPITAL



1901



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BOARD OF TRUSTEES



CINCINNATI HOSPITAL.



C. R. HOLMKS, M. D.,

Term Expires May 2, 1909.

PRESCOTT SMITH,

Term Expires May 1, 1901,.
A. B. ISHAM, M. D.,

Term Expires May 1, 1905.

P. S. CONNER, M. D.,

Term Expires May i, 190G.

JAMES D. PARKER,

Term Expires May 1, 1907.
OFFICRRS OF THE BOARD.

PRESCOTT SMITH President

A. B. ISHAM, M. D., ... Fife-President.
JAMES D. PARKER, .... Secretary.



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MEDICAL STAFF.



President G. A. FACKLKR, M. D.

Vice-President B. K. RACHFORD. M. D.

Secretary ARCH. I. CARSON, M. D.

Librarian P. 8. CONNER. M. D.

Consulting Physician :
J. C. MACKENZIE. M. D.
Consulting Surgeon :
P. 8. CONNER, M. D.
Consulting Oculists:
C. R. HOLMES, ill. D. S. C. AYRES, M. D.

Consulting Obstetrician and Gymecologist :
C. D. PALMER. M. D.
Physicians :
JOSEPH EICHBERG. M. D. E. W. MITCHELL. M. D.

•GEO. A. FACKLER, M. D. OLIVER P. HOLT, M. D.

Neurologists :
H. H. HOPPE, M. D. FRANK W. LANGDON, M. D.

Surgeons:
N. P. DANDRIDGE. M. D. E. W. WALKER, M. D.

JOSEPH RANSOHOFF, M. D. JOHN C. OLIVER, M. D.

Orthopaedic Surgeons :
A. H. FREIBERG, M. D. C. E. CALDWELL, M. D.

Dermatologists :
A. RAVOGLI, M. D. C. S. EVANS, M. D.

Laryngologists and Aurists:
S. E. ALLEN, M. D. J. W. MURPHY, M. D.

Oculists :
ROBERT SATTLER. M. D. D. T. VAIL, M. D.

Obstetricians and Gynecologists :
WM. H. TAYLOR, M. D. G. M. ALLEN. M. D.

CHARLES A. L. REED, M. D. JOHN M. WITHROW, M. D.

Patdiatrists :
ALLEN C. POOLE, M. D. B. KNOX RACHFORD. M. D.

Pathologists :
H. W. BETTMANN, M. D. ARCH. I. CARSON, M. D

Dentists:

H. C. MATLACK, M. D. W. D. KEMPTON, M. D.

Neuro' Pathologist :

DAVID 1. WOLFSTEIN, M. D.

Clinical and Pathological Laboratory and Museum :

JOHN E. GREIWE, M. D., Director.

WILLIAM H. CRANE, M. D. ALFRED FRIEDLANDKR. M. D.

JAMES W. ROWE, M. D. HORACE J. WHITACRE, M. D.

A. B. DEVERS, M. D. FRANK E. FEE, M. D.

Physician to the Branch Hospital :

BENJ. F. LYLE, M. D.

Kesident Physiciani

O. P. COE, M. D.

Internes :



F. C. VOGEL, M, D \ C. 8ATER, M. D \

O, P. COE, M. D \ Term Expires T. J. BECK, M. D I TVrnt Expi

A. L. GUSTETTER, M. D ( May 10, 190t, C. R. McCLURE, M. D. . Y Nov. W,
F. H. LAMB, M. D ) H. L. WOODWARD, M. D J

i

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ISut



C. B. CONWELL. M. D.

S. E. NEWMAN,M.D....x -, ^ ^. ^ .^ ,^
E. M. BAEHR, M. D.... > ^"^* ^'>*"'" ^^^ ^^' ^^
C. F. HEGNER, M.D...



Annual Report of Cincinnati Hospital



Cincinnati, January i, 1902.

To his Honor the Mayor of the City of Cincinnati :
Sir, —

I have the honor herewith to transmit the report
of the Cincinnati Hospital for the year ending December
31, 1901.

Very respectfully your obedient servant,

P. S. CONNER, M. D.,

Secretary Board of Trustees.



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880



Annual Report



Report of the Superintendent.



ji, 1901 j



Cincinnati Hospital,
Cincinnati, O., December 31

To the Honorable Board of Trustees:

GENTI.EMEN, — I have the honor to submit herewith the
Forty- first Annual Report of the Hospital.





Public
Patients


Infants


Private
Patients


Totml




M.


F.


M. 1 F.


M.


F.




Number remaining Dec. 31, 1900
Number admitted


245
3,165


2,061


4

A


3

4
47


5
142


I

too


4IS

5.475

no


Number born .,










Total number treated


3,410


2,218


70
64

4
~68"

' 2


54

48

4


147


lOI


6.000


Number discharged


2,769

355


1,900

"57


126
14



6


4,998
540


Number died


Total


3.124


2,057


52


140


97


5.538




Number remaining Dec. 31, 1901


286


161


2


7


4


462



Largest number of patients in the Hospital on any one day
during the year

Smallest number of patients in the Hospital on any one day
during the year

Daily average number of patients

Average number of days in the Hospital of patients discharged.

Average number of days in the Hospital of patients who died .

Total number of days* treatment given during the year

Gross cost per patient per day

Net cost per patient per day

Cost deducting earnings, improvements and repairs



5«»

336

4«7

34.62

3«"5
152,205
$1.0032
0.96
0.8874



Of those who died during the year 133 were brought to
the Hospital in a dying condition, and died within twenty-
four hours after their admission. Deducting these, and
leaving the Branch Hospital out pf calculation, the death-
rate for 1 901 was 5.18 per cent,



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Cincinnati Hospital 881



FINANCIAL STATEMENT.

Annual appropriation for 1901 133,000 00

Special appropriation for 1901 10,000 00

$143,000 00

Expenditures —

For maintenance 90,099 19

For improvements and repairs 10,898 73



Online LibraryCincinnati (Ohio)Annual reports of the officers, boards and departments → online text (page 54 of 96)