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essential that the qualities as well as the quantities should be main-
tained up to the samples ; and in order that this may be achieved
a special department has been created for the sole purpose of testing
materials and goods of every description. The tests applied are
chemical, microscopical, and mechanical.

The Superintendent has an assis-
tant and a large staff associated
with him, including men with a very
wide knowledge and great skill in
the examination of materials.



THE HOTELS AND
REFRESHMENT DEPARTMENT

The last great administrative
division the seventh is that re-
lating to hotels and refreshments;
and many passengers after or during
a long journey will doubtless regard
the commissariat as of the very
highest advantage and utility, inas-
much as it ministers so much to
their comfort. It is under the
charge of a committee of five
directors and a Manager (Mr.

William Towle), who has his chief offices at the Midland Grand Hotel
in London.

The hotels of the Company are great aids to traffic in providing
accommodation to passengers, and there is great inducement to
travellers to select a route which is well supplied with hotels at large
centres.

The Midland line is unusually fortunate in this respect. It has the
Grand Hotel at St. Pancras, London, the Adelphi Hotel at Liverpool,
the Midland Hotel at Derby, the Midland Hotel at Bradford, the
Midland Hotel at Morecambe, the Queen's Hotel, Leeds, the Midland
Hotel, Manchester, and last, but certainly not least, the Residential
Hotel, Heysham Towers, Heysham, near Morecambe.




MR. W. TOWLE.



344 THE HISTORY OF THE MIDLAND RAILWAY

There are also refreshment-rooms both first and third class at all
large stations on the main lines ; and these rooms are now furnished
with a richness and luxuriance which cannot be surpassed, whilst
the general refreshment accommodation for third-class passengers
especially has developed enormously with advantage to all con-
cerned.

Each of the hotels has a district or local manager, who is responsible
for the working and management of the hotel under his care. The
refreshment-rooms all over the line are also under this department, as
well as the breakfast, luncheon, dining, and sleeping cars.

District inspectors examine and report frequently concerning the
working of the hotels and the refreshment -rooms, and great care is
given to the maintenance of the furniture, fittings, and decorations.

The whole of the foods and drinks supplied by the contractors to
the Company and delivered at the various hotels and refreshment-
rooms are carefully examined by skilled experts, who have to certify
both as to quantity and quality, thus assuring the public of being
supplied with only the soundest and most wholesome refreshments.

The linen used in the sleeping cars is also under the care of this
department.

THE DETECTIVE DEPARTMENT

The Detective Department of the Midland is under the control
of Chief-Superintendent Carr, who has occupied that position for many
years. The duties, it need hardly be said, are of a very varied char-
acter, and frequently call for the exercise of great tact and skill. The
protection of the whole of the Company's property, including its vast
warehouses and stores, as well as the whole of the goods in transit,
in addition to the protection of the Company from frauds of a widely
diversified character, including passengers travelling without tickets, all
come within the scope of this branch of the service.

One of the best stories of fraud on the Midland was told in the
Nottingham Guardian in October, 1849, which we cannot refrain from
quoting :

" A few days ago a woman got in a second-class carriage attached to
a down train for Nottingham. In her arms she carried a ponderous-
looking babe dressed in long clothes, and with its head entirely
concealed through her shawl. Several times during her journey the
half-smothered infant made a noise very like the barking of a dog.
The repetition of these unnatural sounds aroused the sympathy of
an old lady, who remarked, * What a dreadful cold that child's got,
to be sure ! ' The distressed baby's nurse replied that the poor thing
had a severe attack of influenza, which she was afraid would turn



A SUSPICIOUS INFANT 345

to whooping cough. At Nottingham the active ticket-collector opened
the door, and exclaimed rather abruptly, 'Tickets, please.' This
awakened the slumbering object in the woman's arms, and an angry,
but this time unmistakable bark burst forth, to the astonishment of
the official, who lifted up the shawl and exposed the head of one
of the canine species ludicrously wrapped in an infant's long dress.
Extra fare was immediately demanded, which the woman reluctantly
paid, amidst the jeers and laughter of the passengers."



APPENDIX



THE MIDLAND RAILWAY INSTITUTE

THE Midland Railway Institute at Derby, which was opened on
February i5th, 1895, * s really an organisation of old standing,
but for many years the quarters allotted to it were altogether in-
adequate for the amount of business carried on in its name. It had




READING ROOM, MIDLAND INSTITUTE, DERBY.

long outgrown in point of membership and other respects the accom-
modation originally provided for it, and with the extension of the
frontage of the railway station an opportunity was seized of erecting, on
adjacent property possessed by the Company, a structure of sufficient
magnitude to comply with present-day necessities.

Its objects are well in keeping with the educational spirit of the
age, the mental culture and social comfort of the members being
provided for in a comprehensive manner. The building comprises
a library with shelving capacity for 14,000 to 16,000 volumes, a com-

347



348 THE HISTORY OF THE MIDLAND RAILWAY

modious newsroom, magazine and writing-room, three classrooms,
chess and card room, billiard-room with three tables, lecture and concert
hall capable of seating upwards of five hundred people, coffee-room,
and other facilities. The structure covers an area of 960 square yards.
It is built of pressed red brick with terra-cotta dressings, and provided
with electric light throughout, which in the concert hall is so arranged
as to permit of various stage effects. The concert hall is perhaps the
most elaborate part of the interior of the building, and is certainly one
of the finest in Derby.

There are 2,300 members of the Institute, there are over 13,000
volumes, with an annual issue of between 60,000 and 70,000, while
140 different publications are taken.

UNDERTAKINGS ACQUIRED BY THE MIDLAND

The following thirty-two undertakings, which were originally carried
out or authorised by separate and independent companies, have at
various dates since the formation of the Midland Company in 1844
been vested in and become incorporated as part of its system :

Date of vesting.

Ashby Canal and tramways . ... 1846

Barnoldswick . . . ... 1899

Bedford and Northampton . . 1 885

Birmingham and Gloucester . . . . 1846

Birmingham West Suburban . ... 1875

Bristol and Gloucester . . ... 1846

Cheltenham Station . . ... 1895

Chesterfield and Brampton . . . .1871

Cromford Canal . . . . 1871

Dore and Chinley . . . 1888

Dursley and Midland Junction . ... 1882

Erewash Valley . . ... 1845

Evesham and Redditch . ... 1882

Kernel Hempsted . . . . . 1886

Hereford, Hay, and Brecon . ... 1886

Keighley and Worth Valley . . . 1881

Kettering, Thrapston, and Huntingdon . . . 1897

Leeds and Bradford . . . . . 1851

Leicester and Swannington . ... 1846

Manchester, Buxton, Matlock, and Midlands Junction . 1871

Manchester South District . . . 1877

Mansfield and Pinxton . . ... 1848

Midland and South Western Junction (old) . . 1874

North Western (Little) . . . . .1871

Oakham Canal . . . . . 1846

Redditch . . . ... 1874

Sheffield and Rotherham . .1845

Stonehouse and Nailsworth . . 1886

Swansea Vale . . ... 1876

Tewkesbury and Malvern . ... 1876

Wolverhampton and Walsall . ... 1876

Wolverhampton, Walsall, and Midland Junction . . 1874



UNDERTAKINGS ACQUIRED 349



JOINT RAILWAYS

The following is a list of the nineteen undertakings which have been
bought or made jointly by the Midland and other Companies :

Miles.

29^ Ashby and Nuneaton Line (Mid. and L. & N.W.).

6 Bristol Port Railway and Pier (Mid. and G. W.).

ij Carlisle Goods Traffic Committee (Mid., Cal., G. S.W., and

L. & N.W.

9 Clifton Extension (Mid. and G.W.).

125 Cheshire Lines (Mid., G.C., and G.N.).

2| Enderby Branch (Mid. and L. & N.W.).

9f Furness and Midland (Mid. and Furness).

5 Halesowen (Mid. and G.W., jointly worked).
4| Norfolk and Suffolk (Mid., G.N., and G.E.).

Si North & South Western Junction (Mid., L. & N.W., and N. Lond.).

6} Otley and Ilkley (Mid. and N.E.).

C Peterborough, Wisbech, and Sutton ^
l88< Bourne and Lynn > Mid. and G.N.

( Eastern and Midlands

82 Port Patrick and Wigtownshire (Mid.,Cal.,G. S.W.,and L. & N.W.).
42 Severn and Wye (Mid. and G.W.).

28f Sheffield and Midland Railway Cos. Committee (Mid. and G.C.).
94} Somerset and Dorset (Mid. and L. S.W.).
19} Swinton and Knottingley (Mid. and N.E.).

6 Tottenham and Forest Gate (Mid. and L.T. S., joint control).

4| Tottenham and Hampstead Junction (Mid. and G.E., jointly worked
and largely owned).



MIDLAND RAILWAY DIVIDENDS



MIDLAND COUNTIES.


NORTH MIDLAND.


BIRMINGHAM AND DERBY
JUNCTION.




Dividend
for
Half-
year.


Per
cent,
for
Year.




Dividend
for
Half-
year.


Per

cent,
for
Year.




Dividend
for
Half-
year.


Per

cent,
for
Year.


1841 June .


2 10
200


4


1841 June
Dec.


200

IO


3j


1840 June .
Dec. .


I O O

o 15 o


if


1842 June .
Dec. .


I 10
I 10


3


1842 June
Dec.



12 6


2f


1841 June .


I 2 6
I 2 6


2*


1843 June .
Dec. .


i 4 o

240


3t


1843 June
Dec.


10

o o


3i


1842 June .
Dec..


12
100


If


1844 June. 226


1844 June . 2 o


1843 June .


050
i 8 o


m


THE DIVID


END SINCE THE AMAI


1844 June, i 6 8




.GAMATION




Dividend
for
Half-
year.


Per

cent,
for
Year.




Dividend
for
Half-
year.


Per

cent.
for
Year.




Dividend
for
Half-
year.


Per

cent,
for
Year.


1844 Dec. .


300




1868 June .
Dec..


2 10

2 17 6


5|


1891 June .
Dec. .


2 17 6
3 10 o


6f


1845 June .
Dec..


300
3 i3 o


*i*


1869 June .
Dec..


2 17

3 5 6


6*


1892 June .
Dec. .


2 12 6

3 7 6


6


1846 June .


3 10 o
3 10 o


7


1870 June .
Dec. .


ma


1893 June .
Dec. .


2 7 6

I 10


3&


1847 June .


3 10 o
3 10 o


7


Dec. .


1871 June .
Dec. .


35

3 J 5


7


1894 June .
Dec. .


2 7 6
2 17 6


5j


1848 June .
Dec..


300

10


si


1872 June .
Dec. .


3 10 o
3 IS o


7i


1895 June .
Dec. .


200

3 2 6


5i


1849 June .
Dec. .


IO O

5 o


2|


1873 June .
Dec. .


ll-\6k


1896 June .
Dec. .


2 10

3 10 o


6


1850 June .
Dec. .


IS o
5 o


2


1874 June .
Dec. .


2 15

35


6


1897 June .
Dec. .


2 12 6

35


5*


Dec..


5
7 6


n


1875 June .
Dec. .


300
300


6


1898 June .
Dec. .


2 12 6

350

2 17 6
300


S3


Dec. .


12 6


3l


1876 June .
Dec. .


2 10

2 17 6


si


1899 June .
Dec. .


si-


1853 June .
Dec. .


12 6 <, 1
12 6 3l"


1877 June .
Dec. .


2 10

2 17 6


51


1900 June .
Dec. .


2 12 6




Dec. .


17 6


3*
3|


1878 June .
Dec. .


2 10

2 17 6


51


1901 June .
Dec. .








*5
17 6


Dec. .


1879 June .
Dec. .


2 10

3 2 6


51


1902 June .
Dec..






1856 June.l o o
Dec. . | 26


4i


1880 June .
Dec. .


300
3 2 6


6i


1903 June .
Dec..






1857 June .
Dec. .


2 6
IO


4f


1881 June .
Dec. .


2 15 O
326


si


1904 June .
Dec..


1858 June .
Dec..


2 6
15


4


1882 June .
Dec. .


2 15

3 6


51


1905 June .
Dec. .






1859 June .
Dec. .


12 6

3 o o


5J


1883 June .
Dec. .


2 15

3 a 6


si


1906 June .
Dec. .






1860 June .
Dec..


350

3 10 o


6|


1884 June .
Dec. .


10

17 6


si


1907 June .
Dec. .






1861 June .
Dec.


3 2 6
3 10 o


6f


1885 June .


7 6

15


si


1908 June .
Dec. .
1909 June .






1862 June .
Dec.


2 IS

350


6


i886-June .



12 6


4f






1863 June .
Dec.


2 17 6
3 10 o


6f


1887 June .
Dec. .


2 6

12 6


4f


1910 June . 1
Dec. .1




Dec..


3 17 6


7f

1 f O


1888 June .


5 o ri.
o o 04


1911 June .
Dec..






Dec.


3* 10 o | Of


1889 June .
Dec. .


12 6

3 7 6


6


1912 June
Dec.






1866 June
Dec.


300
326


6i


1890 June .
Dec. .


2 15

3 10 o


6i


1913 June .
Dec.






1867 June
Dec.


2 15
2 15


si







350



MIDLAND DIVIDENDS 351

From the table of dividends it will be observed that since the
amalgamation the returns to the shareholders have varied from the
low-water mark of 2 per cent, in 1850 to 7 j per cent, in 1864. During
the fifty-six completed years, for each ;ioo share there has been paid
in dividends the sum of ^307 8s., or an average of slightly less than
5^ per cent, per annum for the whole period, namely $ 9.?. ^d.

THE COAT OF ARMS

The fearful and wonderful creature perched on the top of the
Midland Railway Company's coat of arms, painted on the passenger
carriages and what not, is known as a wyvern, a sort of winged
serpent, which, like the dragon, griffin, griffon, unicorn, etc., never
existed outside the Heralds' College. The buck or deer within the
park palings represents the town or "by" of the deer Derby; on
the right hand the castle and ships are the arms of the city of Bristol ;
and on the left are those of Birmingham. The arms of Lincoln are
depicted under the deer, with Leeds on the right and Leicester on the
left. On the seal of the Company Nottingham is represented instead
of Bristol. The dolphin is on the left, the salamander on the right,
and the wyvern on the top of the shield. At the time of the Saxon
Heptarchy Leicester was the capital of Mercia, and the wyvern was
the crest of the Mercian kings. The wyvern is a quartering of the
town arms of Leicester, and was adopted as the crest of the Leicester
and Swannington Line, out of which sprang the present Midland
Railway. Hence its forming an important part and parcel of the
Midland Company's coat of arms.




INDEX



Abney, William, 99.
Abolition of second class, 201-205.
Accountant's Department, 309-311.
Adie, W. E.. 297, 298.
Administrators of Midland Railway,

257-345-
Administration of Midland Railway,

257-345.

,, chart, 259.

Ais Gill, 212.

Alleyne, Sir G. J. N., 182.
Allport, Sir James, 72, 136, 160, 162,
163, 175, 178, 205, 209, 215, 260,
280-284.

Alton Grange, 12, 47, 48.
Amalgamation, 67-72.
Ambergate, 51, 90, 129, 160, 163.
American train, 206.
,, cars, 206-208.
,, engines, 106, 107, 246, 249.
Ampthill Tunnel, 175.
Ashby Canal, 25, 92, 94, 98-104, 126,

^55, 348.

,, Tramway, 25, 98-104.
Ashby and Nuneaton Line, 92, 126,

195, 349-
Ashchurch, 92.
Ash wood Dale, 169.
Askern, 118, 141, 192, 223.

B

Bagworth, 4, 12, 22, 102, 103.

,, incline, 17, 102.
Barnoldswick Line, 230, 348.
Barlow, W. H., 72, 74, 140, 167, 178-

186, 326, 328.
Bath, 92, 125, 228.
Beale, Samuel, 72, 140, 157. 260, 264,

271, 272.

Beaumont, Sir George, 25.
Bedford and Northampton Line, 125,

158, 348.
,, and Hitchin, 125, 153-158,

1 86.

,, to London, 174-186.
Bell, Fox, 32, 35, 40, 72, 74, 260, 307.
Bell Hotel, Leicester, 6, II, 25, 102.
2 A



Berkeley Junction, 197.
Birmingham, 76.

,, and Derby Junction Rail-

way, 2, 62-66, 67-72,
74, 1 06.

,, and Gloucester, 65, 92

95, 105-115, 348. , ; j
,, Camp Hill, 105, 108.

,, West Suburban, 196, 348.

,, Curzon Street, 63, 106,

108, 113, 114.

,, Lawley Street, 65, 66,

109, 301.

,, New Street, 66, 114, 195,

197.

Block signalling, 51, 52, 331-334.
Bourne, 228.

,, and Lynn, 227.
Bournemouth, 228.
Bradford, 48, 116-123, 224.
Brancker, P. W r ., 72, 145.
Brecon and Merthyr, 200.
Bristol and Gloucester Line, 92, 95,
1 10, 348.

,, Port Railway, in, 349.

,, and Birmingham, 105-115, 128,

125.

Broad gauge, 68, 288.
Brown, G. N., 307.
Brunei, I. K., 17, in.
Budget express, 137-139.
Bugsworth Viaduct, 168.
Burton-on-Trent, 102, 103, 104, 129,

177.

Bury, Edward, 29, 30, 39, 107.
Butterley Iron Company, 182, 185.
Buxton, 164.



Caledonian, 215, 216.
Cambridge, 158.
Canals

Ashby, 25, 98-104, 348.

Berkeley, 1 06.

Charnwood Forest, 3, 4.

Coventry, 98.

Cromford, 1 60, 171, 348.

Erewash, 3, 31.

Leicester, 3, 31.



354



INDEX



Canals (continued)

Loughborough, 3, 31.

Oakham, 81, 84, 92, 94.
Carlisle Station, 210, 215.

,, Goods Traffic Committee, 216,

349-

Carr, Mr., 344.
Carriage Department, 336.

,, Superintendent, 339.

,, Scotch Joint Stock, 216, 220,

221.

works, 251-256.
Carriages, types, illustrated, 21, 24,
65, 113, 138, i6S, 171, 207, 215,

220, 221, 253, 275.

Carslake, Sir John, 190, 191.
Cavendish, Hon. G. H., 161.
Chairmen, List of, 263, 264.
Charles, A. L., 306, 307.
Charnwood Forest, 3.
Cheltenham, 105, 108, 109, 113, 125.

,, Station, 348.

,, and Gloucester Tramway,

105, 106.

Cheshire Lines, 172, 173, 349.
Chesterfield, 53, 92, 94, 229.

,, and Brampton Line, 348.

Clarke, P., 280.
Clay Cross, 40, 51, go, 92, 94, 126.

,, ,, Tunnel, 52.
Clayton, T. G., 339-341.
Clifton Extension, 349.

,, Suspension Bridge, 326.
Coalville, 15, 102, 141.
Coat of arms, 351.
Cook, Thomas, 45, 46.
Contours, 115, 173, 213, 230.
Coventry, 195.
Cowburn Tunnel, 230.
Cromford, 161.

,, Canal, 160, 171, 348.
Crossley, J. S., 215, 326.

D

Darfield, 92.
Dawson, Pudsey, 147.
Derby, 80, 91, 131.

Station, 38, 55, 56, 69, 71, 74.
,, Locomotive Works, 234-243.

Carriage ,, 251-256.

Signal ,, 330-335-

Derbyshire coalfields, 4, 191, 192.
Detective Department, 344, 345.

,, Superintendent, 344.
Dicey, Thomas E., 72.
Dining cars, 207.
Directors of Midland, 260.
Dividends, List of, 350, 351.
Doncaster, 92, 142.
Dore and Chinley, 228-230, 348.
Dorset Line, 228.
Doughty, James, 309.
Dudley, 195.



Duffield and Wirksworth Line, 163,

171.

Duncombe, Colonel, 222.
Dursley and Midland Junction, 348.



East Lancashire, 219, 220.
Eastern and Midlands Line, 86.
,, Counties Railway, 158.
Edge-rail-way, 99, 126.
Electrical Department, 335.
Ellis, Edward Shipley, 18, 102, 204,

205, 214, 215, 222, 260, 264, 273,

274, 283.
Ellis, John, 4-8, 27, 30, 47, 68, 73,

112, 120, 132-135, 14, J 45> IS 1 !

157, 158, 260, 263, 268-271.
Elstree Tunnel, 175.
Enderby Branch, 349.
Engineers-in-Chief, List of, 326.
Erewash Valley, 3, 37, 90, 92-94, 126,

144, 348.

Estate Agent. 335.

Evesham and Redditch Line, 159, 348.
Excursion trains, 42-45, 57.



Finance Department, 306-311.
Fitting Shop, Derby, 241.
Fitzwilliam, Earl of, 87, 154.
Forth Bridge, 216-219.
Furness Railway, 150.

,, and Midland Line, 349.



Gauges, Battle of, 106, in, 114, 115.
General Management, 279, 280, 295-

297.

,, Managers, List of, 280-288.
Glasgow and South Western, 216.
Glenfield, 12, 24, 25.
,, Tunnel, 15.
Gloucester, 92, 105, 336.
,, Station, 291.

Glyn, George Carr, 47, 55, 60.
Goods Department, 295-301.
Grand Junction, 106, 161.
Grantham, 150.
Great Central, 192, 223, 224.
,, Eastern, 188, 228.
,, Malvern, 92.

,, Northern, 68, 80, 141, 143, 146,
150, 151, 154, 172, I74 I75>
190, 203.

,, Western, 68, 105, 110, 197-200,
203.

H

Halesowen Line, 92, 95, 349.
Hampton, 36, 62-65, 125.
Harborough, Lord, 81-86, 91, 92, 94.
Harpenden, 159.



INDEX



355



Harringworth Viaduct, 225.
Hellifield, 149, 219, 220.
Hemel Hempsted, 159, 348.
Hendon, 189.
Hereford, 198.

,, Hay, and Brecon Line, 197-

200, 348.

,, Barton Station, 197-200.
,, Moorfields, 197-200.
Heygate, W. U., 219, 260.
Heysham Harbour, 149, 231-233.
Heyworth, James, 67.
High Peak Railway, 160.
Hitchin, 92, 95, 174.
Hodgson, Isaac, 102.
Hotel Superintendent, 343.
Hotels, 75, 121, 233, 343, 344.

,, List of, 343.

Hudson, George, 48, 60, 68, 71, 73,
76, 78-80, 91, 93, 117-123, 127,
130-137? 154, 215, 260, 263-268.
Hull, 223.

Hutchinson, W. E., 40, 42, 73, 210,
211, 260, 264, 272.



Ilkley Bridge, 325.
Ingleton, 147-149.
Institute, Derby, 347, 348.
Ireland, Midland route, 220, 221
Isle of Man, 150.



J
Jessop, William (senior), 98, 99, 160.

,, 21, 22, 32, 33, 37.
Johnson, S. W., 227, 244, 245, 312-

322, 323-

Johnston, A., 326.
Joint lines, 261, 262.
,, Committees, 261, 262.

K

Keighley and Worth Valley Line, 348.
Kentish Town, 186.
Kettering, 153.

,, Thrapston, and Huntingdon
Line, 158, 348.

,, and Manton, 223.

,, and Nottingham, 224.
King, His Majesty Edward VII., 217-

219.

Kirtley, Matthew, 72, 74, 317-321.
Knottingley Curve, 135.



Lancashire and Yorkshire, 142, 149,

171, 203, 211.

Lancaster and Carlisle, 147, 148, 209.
Langdon, W., 335.
Langley, A. A., 326.



Langley Mill, 3.

Leeds, 48, 55, 118, 119, 129, 141, 142,

224.
,, and Bradford Line, 116-123,

130, I44-M7, 348.
,. Hunslet Lane, 48, 54. 55, 117,

142.

,, Wellington Street, 117, 144.
Leicester, 80.

,, and Rugby Line, 38, 77.
Station, 40, 41, 337, 339.
,, to Birmingham, 195.
,, and Swannington Railway, 2,
3, 12, 91, 101,
104, 125, 128,

154, 155, 348.
,, Register, 10.
Seal, ii.
,, Directors, 1 1.
,, permanent way,

15-17.

,, opening, 20-31.
and Burton, 92, 141.
and Bedford, 101, 153.
Canal, 3.

and Hitchin, 95, 153-157.
Leicestershire Coalfields, 3, 195.
Lickey Incline, 105-107, 113.
Liddell, Charles, 85, 102.
Lifford, Lord, 145.
Lincoln, 76, 78-80, 87, 124.
Liverpool, 172, 173.

,, and Manchester Railway,

2-5-
party, 34, 36, 47, 51, 68,

120, 130, 141, 144.
,, Exchange Station, 219.
Locomotive Works, 234-243.

,, construction, 243-250.

,, Department, 312-323.

,, Superintendents, List of,

317.

Locomotives, Early, 18, 19, 26, 31,224.

,, details, 247.

,, types, illustrated, 18, 19,

26, 31, 59, 61, 64, 104,

107,136, 137,240,249,

275,302,313,315,319,

324-

London, Chatham, and Dover, 189.
,, and Birmingham Line, 38, 47,

63, 77, 78, 93. 106.
,, King's Cross, 78, 79, 134, 156,

157, 174, 175, 178.

Euston, 77, 134, 145, 174.

St. Pancras, 156, 175-186.

Tilbury, and Southend, 175.

Chatham, and Dover, 175.

District, 187-190.

Victoria, 189.
London and North-Western, 92, 125,
129, 135, 146, 153, 156, 158, 161,
163, 171, 174, 193-197, 203, 209.



356



INDEX



London and North -Western proposed
amalgamation, 146, 151, 152.

London and North- Western and Mid-
land, etc., Railway, 196.

London and York Line, 68, 118.

Long Lane Hotel and Station, 28.

Longitudinal sleepers, 17, 115.

Loughborough, 37.

,, Navigation, 3.

Lydney and Lydbrook, 197.

Lynn and Fakenham, 227.

M

M'Callum, P. S., 335.
M'Donald, J. A., 233, 326, 328, 329.
Manchester^ 95, 135, 160-173.

,, Buxton, Matlock, &c.,

Line, 92, 95, 96, 129,
161, 171, 348.
Ancoats, 168, 171.
South District, 172, 348.
London Road, 167, 168,

172.

and Leeds, 90, 141.
Central Station, 172.
Victoria Station, 219.
and Crewe Line, 160, 161.
Sheffield, and Lincoln-
shire, 167, 172, 192,
203, 222, 223.
Malvern, 125.
Mangotsfield, 228.
Mansfield, 92, 94, 127.

,, and Pinxton Line, 32, 126,

348.

,, plateway, 33, 124, 127.
Map of Midland, 258.
Market Harborough, 153, 156, 195.
Marple, 220.
Masborough, 52, 124.
Matlock, 163.
Melton Constable, 228.
Melton Mowbray, 80, 81-86, 223.
,, ,, and Nottingham Line,

224.

Methley, 142, 143.
Metropolitan, 178, 186, 189.

,, District, 187.

Mid-Wales, 198.
Midland Railway, 2, 73, 77.

,, ,, Companies amalga-

mated, 2, 67-72.

,, ,, earliest portions, 2.

,, Counties Railway, 2, 32-46,

67-72, 74.
and South- Western Junction,

348.

, , and London and North- Western
(proposed amalgamation),
146, 151, 152.
,, and Great Northern, 190, 222,

227.
,, and Sheffield, 192.



Midland and Great Western, 197, 348.

,, and North-Eastern, 223.
Miller's Dale, 164, 165.
Mineral Department, 302-305.
Moon, Sir Richard, 203.
Moorsom, Captain, 106.
Morecambe, 147, 231.
Morley, Sir Isaac, 215.
Morrall, G., 342.
Mugliston, W. L., 288, 289.

N
Neath, 198.

,, and Brecon, 198, 200.
New Mills, 167, 173.
Newark, 80, 93, 94.
Newcombe, W. L., 280.
Newton, William L., 72.
Noble,J., 280.

Norfolk and Suffolk Line, 228.
Normanton, 124, 142, 223.
North British, 211, 216.

,, Eastern, 203.

,, London Incline, 156.



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