Clinton Monument Association of the State of New Y.

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1871



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1971



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nr«Kf,«,<» U!CT^p?r«JL SURVEY




.CiOV



OUR LITTLE TOWN



We like to live in a little town,

Where the trees meet across the street;
Where you wave your hand and say "Hello"

To everyone you meet.
We like to stand for a moment

Outside the grocery Store,
And listen to the friendly gossip

Of the folks that live next door.



For life is interwoven

With the friends we learn to know.
And we hear their joys and sorrows

As we daily come and go.
So we like to live in a little town,

And care no more to roam ;
For every house in a little town

Is more than a house — it's home.




LUFFS



YESTERDAY

and
TODAY



1871 - 1971



Published by
JONES PUBLISHING COMPANY

Ralph J. & Leah 0. jones
Bluffs, Illinois 62621



Centennial Program - July 10 & 11

SATURDAY, JULY 10, 1971

11;00 A. Mo BIG PARADE (Cash & Trophy Prizes to be Awarded)

11:00 A. M, BAR-B-Q PORK & CHICKEN ALL DAY FEED

1:00 P. M. ANTIOCH MOUNTAIN MEN BALL & MUSKET SHOOT

(Merton Pond Pasture East of Bluffs)

2:00-6:00 P. M. GERMAN BAND ENTERTAINING DOWNTOWN

2:00-6:00 P. M. BLUFFS CENTENNIAL HORSE SHOW

(Valleyview Subdivision south part of Bluffs)

2:00 P. M. Introduction on Stage at Lewis Park of Dignitaries

2:30 P. M. PARADE TROPHIES AWARDED ON STAGE

3:00 P. M. GLASGOW KITCHEN BAND

3:30 P. M. CENTENNIAL DRESS CONTEST ON STAGE

4:30 P. M. CHILDREN'S CONTESTS IN LEWIS PARK

(Frog, Turtle, Pie Eating Contests)

6:00 P„ M. GREASED PIG CONTEST (Valleyview Subdivision)

7:00-8:30 P. M. PAGEANT IN LEWIS PARK (Bluffs past history)

8:30 P. M. LOCAL TALENT SHOW

9:00-12:00 P. M, FREE TEEN DANCE at School Parking Lot

10:00 P, M, BEARD CONTEST (Trophies & Judges)

SUNDAY, JULY 11, 1971

11:00 A. M. PUBLIC WORSHIP SERVICE IN LEWIS PARK

11:30 A. M. LUNCH SERVED AT MEDICAL CENTER

1:00-3:00 P, M. CLOWN BAND & ENTERTAINMENT LEWIS PARK

2:30-4:30 P. M. CHILDREN'S CONTESTS AT SCHOOL GROUNDS

(Bicycle, Tricycle, Potato, Three-Legged, Sack Races,
Greased Pole, Jumping Rope, Baseball Throw, Broad
Jump, Marble, Horse Shoe Pitching Contests)

-2-






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BLUFFS CENTENNIAL COMMITTEES






GENERAL COMMITTEE:

John Allen, Ray Schnitker, June Bracken, Vema Oakes
Leah Jones, June Nunes, Charles Neubauer, M.L.Pond

FINANCE COMMITTEE:

Ray Schnitker, Wilbur Westermeyer, F.J. Muntraan,
J , A . Knoeppel

PUBUCITY COMMITTEE:

I. D. Mueller, Donald Kilver



HORSE SHOW COMMITTEE:
Oral Woosley

CHILDREN'S CONTEST COMMITTEE:

Bernard Goetze, Raymond Joe Graves

MISS BLUFFS CENTENNL^L COMMITTEE:

Margaret Watson, Joy Schnitker, Wilma Westermeyer

PARADE COMMITTEE:

June Nunes, Jeannie Nevins, Verlin Rolf, John R.
Brockhouse, Oral Woosley, Francis "Hank" Gregory

PROGRAM COMMITTEE:

Margaret Freeman, Faye Kilver, Ruby Bridgman

PAGEANT COMMITTEE:
June Moorr

TEEN-AGE DANCE COMMITTEE:

Brenda Nobis, Larry Christa, Beverly Bonham

IvfUSKET- SHOOT:

Francis "Hank" Gregory

SOUND SYSTEM COMMITTEE:
M. L. Pond

ELECTRICIANS:

Tom Dickens, Earl Lovekamp, Joe Graves

STAGE COMMITTEE:

Fran Pond, Bev Neubauer, Geraldine Whorton

PROGRAM SEATING COMMITTEE:

Robert Bangert, Harold Morris, Jim Welch, Nimrod Funk

FOOD COMMITTEE:

Vema Oakes, June Brackett, Mildred Allen, Mary Dunham

MEAT PREPARATION COMMITTFE:

Charles Neubauer, Carl Warfel, Harold Kilver, LeRoy
J. Vortman, J. W. Freeman, Tom Brackett, M. L. Pond,
Harold Frohwitter, Harold Bridgman, Erwin Weiss, Bob
Albers, William Merris, Edward Dunham, Norris Whorton,
Jack Moore, Danny Likes, Wendell Brackett, Bob Christa,
Merle Scott, Clyde Taylor, c.O. Mueller, K.W. Bridgman

ICE CREAM STAND:

Trinity Lutheran Church



DINING ROOM COMMITTEE:

Ronald Gilman, Oliver Chambers, Delbert Mueller,
Delbert Reed, Don Savage, Ralph Sturgeon, Carl Burns,
Vincent Berry, Don Collison, M. J. Baulos, Bert Cham-
berlain, Bill Chambers, Dave Orchard, Clyde Baulos

ICE COMMITTEE:

Wayne Lirtig, James Bailey

HAMBURGER STAND:

Dale Buhlig, Laine Comerford, Harold Graves, Leonard
Nevins, Robert Engelbrecht, David Pond, Earl Tash, Fred
Bamett, Carroll Sears, Verlin Rolf, Wilbur Mathews, Jack
Bamett, Glen Leamons,Cleatus Coates, Tom Goldsborough,
Earl Benton, Ralph Hubbert, Larl Mueller, Norris Mer-
riman, Willie Tranbarger, Allan Vortman, Keith Prunty,
Richard Martin, Charles Berry, Bob Brown, John Nortron,
Roy Freesen



COUNTRY KITCHEN:

Scott County Home Extension

CRAFTS:

Mildred Allen, Mary Ann Morris

LIBRARY ART SHOW:

Geraldine Whorton, Frances Lawshe

WOOD COMMITTEE:

Byron Littig, Harvey D. Andres, Russell Collison, Jr.

CLEAN-UP COMMITTEE:

John Brown, Raymond Christison, Russell Albers, Paul
Vannier, Orville Chapman, Melvin Christison, Russell
Vortman, Jim Baird

TENTS AND HAULING

Robert Smith, Gary Bangert, Virgil Huseman, Richard
Hutton, Virgil X'ortman, Larry Beddingfield, Clifford
Hoots, L. J. Kunkel, William Nunes

TRAFFIC CONTROL COMMITTEE:

Harold Arnold, Mike Wise, Donald Smith, Howard Buhlig,
Neil Parker, Lee Buhlig, Howard Barrett, Harold Bedding-
field, Robert Bailey, Raymond Arnold

COMMERATIVE SOUVENIRS:

Betty Gregory, Fran Pond, Beverly Neubauer, Rev.M.D.
Goldsborough, Harold Oakes

HOSPITAUTY COMMITTEE:

John Allen, Harold Oakes, Fran Baulos

CENTENNLAL BALL COMMITTEE:

Mr. and Mrs. William Nunes, Mr. and Mrs. Gary Vortman,
Mr. and Mrs. Karl Engelbrecht, Mr. and Mrs. Don Savage

It is not possible to individually recognize everyone who
has worked toward a successful Centennial Celebration. The
above Committees are appreciative of the help they have
had from the many un- listed individuals and groups.




editorial venture,
unlike anything else the
Centennial group,
has done,
this booklet represents
hours of labor,
and the support of
many,
many people.
We take this opportunity to
recognize, with sincere
appreciation,
those who have answered our request
for pictures, and are grateful to
the individuals and firms who
have allowed us the privilege of using their
names in this booklet. We sincerely urge that as you
read this booklet, you will recognize
these people
and will patronize them
as the ones who have made
this publication
possible.




Betty Reed, Leah Jones, Norma Pmnty, Dee Littig
Ralph ]. Jones
-:- Centennial Book Staff -:-

Errors of ommission, typgraphical errors, misspellings and oversights will be rectified and acknowledged in the
next Centennial booklet to be published in the year 2071 . Please contact us at that time the PUBLISHERS



BLUFFS BOOSTER DAY JUNE 13 AT CARDINAL BALLPARK




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^ 1"?? BRBBB BSFHI



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Sunday, July 13th davmed bright and sun-shiny, and nearly 300 citizens of Bluffs trekked to St. Louis to attend BLUFFS
BOOSTER DAY" at the Cardinal ballpark. Although the Pittsburg Pirates defeated the Cardinals 8-4, the Bluffs fans had an
outstanding day, as Mayor John Allen pitched the first three balls in a pre-game ceremony, to 'Miss Centennial" Nancy
Whorton, while Ray Schnitker, President of the Bluffs Civic Club and Manager of Bluffs Faimers Grain, served as catcher.
A brief resume of Bluffs was flashed on the lighted recognition board, as Jack Buck, Cardinal announcer, read the scriot.
and Bluffs was mentioned several times over the radio to thousands of listeners at different times during the afternoon. It was
indeed, a day to long remember.




Miss CentenniaT Contestants and Escorts





1

i


11 ^f




Merle Traw and Joni Brockway Dale Buhlig and daughter

Cathy



Thomas Dickens and daughter, James Hendricks and daughter
Violet Sandra

FIRST RUNNER-UP SECOND RUNNER-UP






JP


i ^^HI^H Y


1 i




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_ , ,, ■ J • » D;f, William Nunes and daughter

Robert Hutton and sister Rita p la



Neil Parker and daughter
Suzanne



Francis Placke and daughter
Marilyn






LeRoy Pond and daughter
Leslie



Mr. and Mrs. Norris Whorton and daughter Nancy
QUEEN



Gerald Schmitz and sister,
Pamela



-6-



Bluffs Centennial Queen - 1971




"MISS CENTENNIAL- NANCY WHORTON

Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Norrls Whorton of Bluffs
Kancy w%m named "Miss CentrnnUl" at the Bail held June 5, 1971



Hall



^ toa Waml, Wta Kr«<T



.7-



1871 BLUFFS, ILLINOIS 1971




How does one begin to write a complete history of Bluffs
with so many unknowns? Undoubtedly, many of the events
prior to 1871 would be of significant interest to the history
of Bluffs.

Where there are now no Indians
whatsoever, there once were Indians
without number, game without limit,
timber so dense sunlight barely filter-
ed through. It is not known precisely
how long ago the red man first came
to this area, but the first record of
man, comes with an ancient and un-
known people who came to be known
as the "Mound Builders" for great
earth works of various kinds were con-
structed with intelligence and and by the combined labor of
a very large number of persons in this vicinity.

.The next recognized tenants were called "Illinois Indians"
which was a confederacy composed of five separate tribes
called the Kaskaskias, Cahokias, Tamaroas, Peorias and
Mitchigamies, and they ranged from north to south in this
country, although it was never proved that they located a
permanent type village in this area.

The Kickapoos, who were sometimes called Prairie In-
dians, finally occupied this portion of the State, and were
the last Indians in possession of Scott County. These were
the Indians with whom the first settlers here had to contend
with, and at whoSe bloody hands they suffered many outrages.
They had an implacable hatred of the Americans, which
they retained after they had been compelled to cede their
hunting grounds to the hated race. When they were removed
from Scott County and Illinois they retained their animosity
to such a degree that they — or at least a portion of them -
went to Mexico to get out of the jurisdiction of the United
States. Many artifacts concerning the Indian way of life
have been found by souvenir hunters during the past years.

While the Indians were the actual occupants of Scott
county, yet France claimed it and asserted sovereignty over
it from June 14, 1671 to the time she yielded her claim to
Great Britian by the Treaty of Paris, February 16, 1763.
The English occupation of Illinois country continued from
1763 until General George Rogers Clark, with his brave
little army of colonial forces took forcible possession of it
in 1778, acting under a commission from Virginia, who
then asserted claim to it and Scott County. On Dec. 23,
1783 the General Assembly of Virginia ceded this land to
the general government, who in turn designated it as the
State of Illinois on Feb. 3, 1809.

Various counties were then named by the existing gov-
ernor and Scott County was,, at times, a part of Madison
County, Greene county, Morgan county, and finally on
February 16, 1839 we came into our own, and became of-
ficially Scott County.

For about the next thirty or so years, settlers began to
enter Scott county, seeking a place to make their homes.
Many tales have been told regarding old-time families who



stayed and helped make our end of the county what it is to
date, with decendents still living here.

John Piper, a far-seeing type settler, first entered a plat
of land at the county seat on August 10, 1829, intending to
build a town. This town was named "Deerfield" and has
since disappeared from the tax books. It was laid out by
John Piper and James B. Currey, and contained 150 lots, 75
feet wide and 150 feet long. Numerous streets and alleys
and a public square. Elk street and Buck street, running the
long way of the town, were each 100 feet wide. Other
streets were 66 feet wide. It was located on land lying im-
mediately north and northwest of the present village of Bluffs,
and possibly may cover a portion of the same land. It was
out of existence long before the village of Bluffs was thought
of, and the latter is not in any sense the successor, or out-
growth of the former.

Bluffs, which in the plat was named "Bluff City, " was
laid out by Henry Oakes. It was surveyed and the plat was
made by W. W. Chapman, deputy county surveyor, June
24, 1871. This plat and the accompanying deed dedicating
the streets to the public for highways, and the surveyor's
explanation, were recorded on page 188, 189 and 190 of
Book R of Deeds in Scott County, July 13, 1871. Sometime
later, we can not state when, the name of the place became
Bluffs, by which name it appears in the official Postal Guide,
The name had been changed before January 10, 1884, on
which day the first addition was made thereto, by the name
of Bluffs.

The original plat of Bluffs, Illinois, contains sixty-eight
numbered lots and two lots designated, respectively as A and
B. These lots are fifty feet wide and one hundred and fifty
feet long, except Lots 33, 34, 35, 36 and A and B, which
are irregular in shape and of different sizes. This original plat
is situated on the West half of the Northwest Quarter of Sec-
tion fifteen in Township Fifteen Range Thirteen, which was
entered by John Piper, August 10, 1829.

The first addition to Bluffs was made by Charles Oakes,
January 10, 1884. It was surveyed and platted by C. B.Lewis,
surveyor and civil engineer. It is situated adjacent to and on
the East side of the original town, and contains sixty-one
numbered lots, and two lots not numbered. One of these was
marked "D. Richards, " and was the ground on which the
Richards Hotel stood. The other lies immediately South of
it and is marked "Meehan's lot" on the plat. Full lots are the
same size of the lots in the original town. Lots 12, 13, 14,
27, 28, 32, 56, 57 and the two unnumbered lots are irregu-
lar in shape and of odd sizes. The record of this addition can
be found on page twenty-four of Miscellaneous Records A.

The second addition to Bluffs was made by Charles Oakes
Nov. 12, 1889. The surveying and platting were done by the
same C. B. Lewis who did the first addition.lt contains thirty-
six lots, each fifty feet wide and one hundred and fifty feet
long. There is nothing about the plat or the surveyor's ex-
planation, from which anyone can tell where this addition
is situated. The plat is recorded on page 130 of Miscellan-
eous Record A.



-8-



Founder of Bluffs





HENRY OAKES, SR.

September 3, 1848 - December 30, 1920



EMELINE RICHARDSON OAKES

November 14, 1848 - October 26, 1886



Henry Oakes, Sr. was bom September 3, 1848 on a farm situated where Bluffs now stands,
the son of Henry and Mary (Green) Oakes. His father was bom in Scioto county, Ohio, Sept.
3, 1817, and early in life came west and settled in the present Bluffs neighborhood and
there married Miss Mary Green. She was a native of England and was bom March 14, 1826.
They were the parents of six children, of which Bluffs' founder, Henry Oakes, Sr., was the
third child.

Our founder was educated in the neighborhood where he was born and raised, and on Sept.
28, 1870, was married to Miss Emeline Richardson, who lived at the Point near Jacksonville.
To this union three children were bom: Henry Oakes, Jr. (Oct. 15, 1873), Estella Castle
(Jan. 10, 1876), and Royal Oakes (Oct. 24, 1881). Mrs. Oakes passed away Oct. 26, 1886.
Mr. Oakes was married to Miss Mary E. Thompson Dec. 28, 1887, and to this union was
bom - Emeline (Oct. 11, 1889) and Helen (Nov. 20, 1899).

In the spring of 1871 Mr. Oakes laid out the town of Bluffs, and later platted an addition to
the original tract. In 1881, in company with his brother, Charles Oakes, he embarked in
the grain business, under the firm name of H. & C. Oakes. They had their principal office
in Bluffs, and a branch office at Riggston, Illinois. Aside from his interests in the grain
business, he was a farmer and stock feeder.

Mr. Oakes was highly respected as one of Bluffs' leading citizens and a true Democrat, and
was noted as being depended upon at all times to stand manfully by the town of his creation.
He had faith in the futtue of the town at the time he set apart the twenty acres of his farm
for town purposes, and its growth and development has fully justified that faith.



The third addition to Bluffs was also made by C. Oakes.
It was surveyed and plat made by James M. Brown, county
surveyor of Scott County, on March 23, 1892. This addition
contains 56 lots and is situated on a part of the East half of
the North-west quarter of said Section 15, immediately
South of and adjacent to the second addition. These lots
are 50 feet wide and 150 feet long, except lots 8, 9, 19,
20, 40, 41 and 45, which are not rectangular and are
various sizes. The fact the Norfolk & Western Railroad runs
diagonally through Bluffs and the first and third additions
thereto accounts for the fact that some of the lots are not
regular in shape and size.

Although Bluffs is the second town in population and in
volume of business in Scott Coimty, nevertlieless, it enjoys
the distinction of being the youngest in years. The first
town laid out in Scott County was Exeter (June 18, 1825),
with the following towns and dates thereafter:
Columbus - July 12, 18?S Williamsport - Aug. 1, 1825
Naples - Aug. 8, 1825 Winchester - March 19, 1830

Manchester - Nov. 1, 1831 Geneva - Feb. 11, 1832
Morgantown - July 27, 1835 Bridgeport - Apr. 2, 1836
Glasgow - June 22, 1836 Jefferson - Aug. 2, 1836

Bloomfield - Sept. 14, 1836 Oxville - Mar. 25, 1837
Deerfield - May 6, 1837 City of Brussels- July 15, 1837

New Albany - Apr. 2, 1838 Merritt - Mar. 22, 1870
Alsey - Sept. 1870 Riggston - Feb. 2, 1871

Bluffs - June 24, 1871

Bluffs may be the youngest town in Scott county, but its
history furnishes unquestioned evidence of business enter-
prise and determination on the part of those citizens who
helped to build it up and make it the second town and the
hub of things in the Northwest part of the county. Henry
Oakes, proprietor of the original town and Charles Oakes,
proprietor of the three additions thereto, are sons of Henry
Oakes, Sr. , who lived a long time and died where his son
Henry lived. The 80 acres of land on which the original
homestead stood was entered in two parcels. Cephas Sim-
mons entered the North forty of it Jan. 6, 1836, and Stanton
Merris entered the South forty July 7, 1836.

Other early settlers deserve recognition with its early
history. Among these was David VanGundy, father of 'Squire
Adam VanGimdy 3°d progenitor of the VanGundy family.
He entered 80 acres on Sept. 10, 1831, and on this site he
built a home and a mill, which was a useful thing in those
days. It was propelled by water furnished by the stream
which comes down from Neeleyville - one branch of Wolf
Rim Creek. Across this stream, quite a distance above the
mill, a dam was constructed which collected the water and
preserved a supply to furnish the motive power for the mill.

Benjamin Green, on May 27, 1833, entered 80 acres of
land. Here Mr. Green lived and prospered many years and
reared a family. He was the father of the late John W.Green
and grandfather of of William H. Green, Benjamin Green,
Harvey Green and grandfather of Henry and Charles Oakes.

On May 24, 1831, Jacob Bradbury entered the 80 acres
on which Stonewall Sawyers and his father, Jackson Sawyers
resided for about 50 years.

On May 26, 1840, John Atchinson Jr., entered 80 acres
on which the late Judge John Green long lived and upon
which he ended his days.

There was also land entered by Daniel M. Piper, Nancy
M, Heath, James B. Curry, Jesse McKee, Debora Bloyd
and Samuel L. Osbom in the early 1800's.



Bluffs was organized as a town, Dec. 17, 1883. The first
board of officers elected was Adam VanGundy, president;
James Linkins, clerk; Charles Oakes, John H. Pieper, J. E.
Arundel, W, G. Pine and W. C. Carver, trustees; Henry
Oakes, treasurer.

April 15, 1884, the election of officers resulted in the
choice of Charles Oakes, president; James Linkins, clerk;
J. H. Pieper, Daniel Finley, Jas. N. Shore, J. H. Carver,
A. Brady, trustees.

1885 - Chas. Oakes, president; J. H. Carver, J. H. Pieper,
Daniel Finley, J. N. Shore, A.Bradley, Trustees;C. T. Chance,
Clerk.

1886 - President, Chas. Oakes; trustees, W. C. Carver,
Wm. McCullom, Geo. W. Gilliland, J. H. Carver, Daniel
Finley; C. T. Chance, clerk.

1887 - President, Daniel Finley; trustees, Wm. McCul-
lum, Chas. Doyle, J. N. Shore, W. C. Carver, David
Richards; clerk, H. A. Bruno.

1888 - President, J. C. Lewis; trustees, C. J. Doyle, J.
N. Shore, Henry Oakes, James Hale, J. D. Rodgers, Jas.
Wolford; clerk, A. L. Garrison. During this municipal year,
Jan. 15, 1889, most of the ordinances of the village were
adopted.

1889 - President, Alfred Bloyd; trustees, J. D. Rodgers,
James Hale, J. M. Wolford, J. N. Shore, Henry Oakes,
Jasper Sawyers; clerk, C. T. Chance.

1890 - President, Henry Oakes; trustees, Thos. O'Brien,
J. E. Arundel, W. C. Carver, Pat Quinlan, J. M. Wolford,
Jasper Sawyers; clerk, W. H. Brady, but he did not serve,
and on May 21, W- McCulliun filed bond as clerk and served,

1891 - President, John Meehan; trustees, Wesley Sullens,
E. A. Cleveland, John Northcutt, Wm. H. Garrison, J.E.
Arundel, Pat Quinlan; clerk D. E. Little.

1892 - President, S. F. Shore; trustees, John Northcutt,
J. W. Sullens, Geo. Thorn, James Hale, A. F. Masterson,
H. H. Crews; clerk, S. W. Rodgers.

1893 - President, Chas. F. Tonn; trustees, Alfred Bloyd,
J. N. Shore, Geo. Thorn, Chas. Bloyd, A. Masterson, Wm.
Fuss; clerk, Wm. McCullum.

1894 - President, Henry Oakes; trustees, A. Bloyd, Chas.
Bloyd, Wm. Fuss, Wm. H. Green, Monroe Taylor, J. N.
Shore; clerk, Wm. Griggs, License granted to three saloons,
pool rooms, etc.

On Nov. 13, 1883, an election was held in Bluffs to pass
on the question of incorporating under the general law, elec-
tion resulting in 56 votes on the question - 46 for and 10
against. The result of this election was sanctioned by, and
went through all the necessary forms of law before County
Judge James Callans, on Nov. 15, 1883, but was never
spread on the books of record of the village of Bluffs until
July 1894, when Wm. Griggs was clerk. Why this was never
done imtil Griggs' administration as village clerk was never
known.

1895 - President, D. E. Little; trustees, Wm. Fuss, Wm.
Green, Monroe Taylor, H. H. Crews, Henry Knoeppel,Wm.
B. Smith; clerk, Wm. Griggs. This administration marked
the "era of "battle royal" against boot-leggers, which con-
tinued for some time.

1896 - President, Chas. Oakes; trustees, H. H. Crews,
Henry Knoeppel, Wm. B. Smith, J. C. Lewis, John M.
Davis, Wm, Griggs; clerk, Chas. R. Hale, Under this ad-
ministration no liquors were sold "xcept under druggist's
permit, but a club room was in^ .porated and did a thriv -



-10-



CONGRATULATIONS



BLUFFS




on your
100th anniversary



You were 41 years old when CIPS began providing electric service
here. That was in 1912. The Boston Red Sox took the pennant and the
world series, China became a republic and the Titantic sank, after
colliding with an iceberg. William Howard Taft was president, Charles
S. Deneen was Governor of Illinois and W^orth won the Kentucky Derby
in the 38th run for the roses.

In 1912, the average annual use of electric service by a Bluffs
home was 179 kilowatt hours. Today, the average is more than 35 times
as much.

While the use of electricity in Bluffs continues to increase year
after year, the unit cost has been going down. In fact, the average cost
per kilowatt hour of electricity today is lower than ever.

To meet the growing requirement for electric service. . . now and
in the future. . . we at CIPS are constantly planning ahead so that ample
power will always be available to the homes, businesses and industries
in Bluffs and the other communities we serve,

M

CENTRAL ILLINOIS RUBLIC SERVICE CON^RANY



-11-



ing business until it was conclusively proven that it was
nothing more nor less than a saloon - on a "sly or dark
order" and it was closed by the board of trustees.

1897 - President, Chas. Oakes; trustees; J. C. Lewis,
John Davis, James Campbell, D. E. Little, Wm. Griggs,
Wm. Smith; clerk, Chas. Hale. The subject of electric
lights was agitated, but "we are still in the dark '.

1898 - this was a straight license and anti-license fight.
President, John Knoeppel; trustees, D. E. Little, James
Campbell, Wm. Smith, Wm. McCullum, Jas. Wolford,
H. D. Kilpatrick; clerk, Chas. Hale; police magistrate, F.
C. Shore. Under this administration the board levied a tax
of S16CX), a little over half of which was used for laying


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Online LibraryClinton Monument Association of the State of New YBluffs ; yesterday and today, 1871-1971 → online text (page 1 of 21)