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... History of Oswego County, New York online

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1842, by Penfield, Lyon & Co., and was destroyed by fire
in 1853. It was immediately rebuilt by the same firm,
and is still conducted under the same firm-name, although
Mr. J. B. Penfield died July 8, 1873. The mill has six
run of stone, with a capacity for grinding five hundred
barrels per twenty-four hours. Employ seventeen men.
Capacity of elevator, three hundred thousand bushels.

Skenando.\h Mills. — -These mills were purchased by
Penfield, Lyon & Co., in 1852, as successors of Cochrane
& Lyon. They have five run of stone, with a capacity of
nearly five hundred barrels per day. Employ thirteen men.

The Seneca Mills were located at Seneca Hill, four
miles south of Oswego, and were erected in 1847^8, by
M. Merrick & Co. The mill had fifteen run of stone,
with a grinding capacity of twelve hundred barrels per
day. It had a larger capacity than any mill in the United
States at that time. It was destroyed by fire in 1864.

Columbia Mill and Elevator. — A mill was erected
upon the site of this one a number of years prior to 1853,
by Truman Wyman. In the year 1853 it was burned, and
soon after rebuilt by Mr. Wyman. In 1860 it came into
the possession of M. Jlerrick and Jesse Hoyt, the present
proprietors. It has five run of stone, with a grinding
capacity of four hundred to five hundred barrels per day.
Capacity of elevator, two hundred thousand bushels.

Cumberland Mills were erected in 1846, and re-
" modeled and rebuilt in 1866. The original proprietors
were Hatch & Stevens. It was rebuilt by Mollison &
Hastings, by whom it was operated until the spring of
1877, when it come into the possession of 0. H. Hastings
& Co. It has seven run of stone, with a grinding capacity
of five hundred and sixty barrels per day. Employ twelve
men.

Ontario Mills. — In 1866 Mes.srs. Dunn & Cummings
purchased these mills, and continued the business until
1869, when Mr. Cummings purchased his partner's interest,



and has since conducted the business as solo proprietor.
It has six run of stone, with a capacity of six hundred
barrels per day. Employ twelve men.

Atlas Mills. — The present proprietor of these mills,
Mr. J. Dunn, purchased them of Wheeler, Fort & Co. in
October, 1876. They have five run of stone, with a grind-
ing capacity of four hundred barrels per day. Employ
fifteen men.

Oswego City Mills were erected by Mr. Stewart in
1872, and business was commenced by M. B. Place & Co.,
and continued by them about one year, when it pas.sed into
the hands of the present proprietors, Messrs. Wilson,
Stewart & Place. It has four run of stone, with grinding
capacity of two hundred barrels per day. Employ eight
men.

Lake Ontario Mills.- — A mill was originally erected
on the site now occupied by the Lake Ontario mills by
Messrs. Bronson & Morgan in 1828. It stood until 1847,
when it was replaced by a new structure, owned and ope-
rated by Fitzhugh & Littlejohn, who conducted the busi-
ness until the fire of 1853, when the mill was destroyed.
They rebuilt it the following year, and were succeeded in
the ownership of the property by Luther Wright, and he
by Lathrop, Smith & Co., — they successively by Howlett,
Gardner & Co., Howlett, Lathrop & Co., the Oswego Mill-
ing Company, and by the present proprietors, Durston &
Royce. It has seven run of stone, and a grinding capacity
of four hundred barrels per day. Storage for one hundred
and twenty-five thousand bushels of grain.

Northwestern Elevator, Irwin & Sloan, proprietors.
— This elevator was erected in 1864, and destroyed by fire
in 1867. It was immediately rebuilt, and doing business
in the following year. It has a capacity of four hundred
and fifty thousand bushels. Its receiving capacity is eight
thousand bushels per hour. The building is one hundred
and twenty-five by one hundred and thirty-two feet in size,
and nine stories in height. It is covered with corrugated
iron, except the rear walls, which are of brick, and is care-
fully protected from fire internally by water-works so ar-
ranged as to discharge on each floor. It is an immense
establishment, furnished with all the modern improvements
for elevating, is operated by a fine one-hundred horse-power
engine in rear of the main building, and is the largest and
finest elevator on the lake. The elevator has done a very
large Canada business, principally in barley. Messrs. Irwin
& Sloan are the heaviest barley-dealers in the State of New
York, and annually handle over three million bushels of
various kinds of grain.

Marine Elevator was erected in 1862 by Ames, Mol-
lison & Hastings, and the business conducted by them until
1874, when George Ames disposed of his interest to Hast-
ings & Dowdle, the present proprietors. It has a capacity
of one hundred and fifty thousand bushels, and is sixty-six
by seventy feet, and six stories in height.

Corn Exchange Elevator. — This business was com-
menced by Henry Ames in 1862, and conducted by him a
number of years, and subsequently passed into the posses-
sion of A. F. Smith & Co. In 1871 it came into the
hands of the present proprietor, C. C. Morton. Capacity,
two hundred and fifty thousand bushels.




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Cheney Ames was born in Mexico, Oswego County, June
19, 1808,— one of the many sons of Leonard Ames, one of the
pioneers of that county. At the early age of thirteen he was
apprenticed to a hatter, in Delphi, Onondaga county, and
finished his apprenticeship in Cortland, New York. But the
business was distasteful to him, and, as his l



Online LibraryCrisfield. cn Johnson... History of Oswego County, New York → online text (page 45 of 120)