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58 Cumberland University Bulletin

Graduate Courses.



Graduate instruction is offered in all the branches taught
in the College, and is arranged in two courses leading re-
spectively to the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of
Philosophy. In both of these courses at least one year of
residence is required. Students entering upon either of
these courses must pay a matriculation fee of $5, and dur-
ing the year of residence pay the usual college fees, to-
gether with such Laboratory fees as the course selected
may require. On receiving the degree the student will
pay an examination and diploma fee of $25. Candidates
for the ministry are not exempt from any of these fees.

1. Master of Arts. — A.M.

Graduates with the degree of Bachelor of Arts of this
institution, or of other colleges with equivalent courses of
study, will be received as candidates for the degree of Mas-
ter of Arts. One year of resident study will be required.
The student will select from the electives offered in the
College Junior and Senior years enough of subjects to
make eighteen hours a week and to include three of the
following general lines of study: Language, Mathematics,
Science, Philosophy, and English. The candidate must
pass satisfactory examinations on all these subjects of his
study, and present an acceptable thesis on some subject
within the range of his special studies.

Bachelors of Science of this institution and of other in-
stitutions having equivalent courses of study will be ad-
mitted as candidates for this degree, provided they pass
satisfactorilv an examination in Latin and Greek such as



Cumberland University Bulletin 59

is required for admission to the Freshman class, or devote
five hours in the week to the study of Latin and Greek
during their year of residence.

2. Doctor of Philosophy. — Ph.D.

The candidate for this degree must have completed a
course of study equivalent to that required in this Univer-
sity for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He must then pur-
sue, under the direction of the Faculty, a course of study
embracing one major and two minor groups of subjects ;
must pass satisfactory examinations in them, and present
a thesis within the field of the major subject showing
original research.

Bachelors of Science are admitted to this course on the
same conditions as to the course for the degree of Master
of Arts. See above. At least one year of residence at the
University is required. Students may complete the course
in three years, or, if they are well prepared, with two years
of resident study. While large liberty of choice is allowed
to the student, the following grouping of subjects is rec-
ommended :

i. Philology — English, Latin, Greek, Sanskrit, German,
French and Anglo-Saxon Languages — their philological
relations to one another and to the Indo-European family
in general. No student will be allowed to enter upon this
course who has not completed the regular college work in
Latin and Greek.

2. Philosophy — Scottish Philosophy; the Modern Ger-
man, French, English, and American Schools of Philoso-
phy; History of Philosophy; Logic, Ethics, Politics, The-
ory of Government, Sociology, Constitutional Law, Prin-
ciples of Law, and International Law.



60 Cumberland University Bulletin

3. Chemistry — Chemistry: Inorganic, Organic, Physio-
logical, and Agricultural; Qualitative and Quantitative An-
alysis, Blowpipe Analysis, Metallurgy, Assaying, Chemical
Technology, Spectroscopy, Drawing.

4. Natural History and Botany — Biology, Zoology, re-
cent and fossil ; Human and Comparative Anatomy and
Physiology ; Histology ; Embryology ; Botany, recent and
fossil ; Microscopy, Microscopic Animals and Plants ; Phy-
siology; Evolution.

5. Geology and Mineralogy — Geology: Lithological,
Cosmical, Physiographic, Historic and Dynamic; Eco-
nomic Geology, Paleontology, Mineralogy, Crystallography,
Chemistry of Minerals, Blowpipe Analysis of Minerals,
Metallurgy, Drawing' and Sketching.

6. Literature — Prerequisites : A reading knowledge of
the French and German languages, and an elementary ac-
quaintance with the entire range of English and American
Literature. Anglo-Saxon and Middle English ; the Eliza-
bethan, Georgian, and Victorian eras ; the Colonial and
Modern periods of American Literature.

7. History — Greece ; Rome ; the Middle Ages ; Modern
England; Colonial America; the Southern States and Re-
construction ; American Expansion ; Sociology ; Economics.

8. Mathematics — Salmon's Conic Sections ; Advanced
Differential and Integral Calculus; Differential Equations;
Determinants ; Quaternions and Vector Analysis ; Theory
of Probabilities and Least Squares ; Thermodynamics ;
Elementary Mechanics ; Mathematical Theory of Sound ;
Mathematical Theory of Fluid Motion; Electro Magnetic
Theory of Light; Mathematical Theory of Electricity and
Magnetism ; Theoretical Mechanics ; Theoretical Astron-
omy; Practical Astronomy; Celestial Mechanics.



Cumberland University Bulletin 61



Engineering School.

Established in 1852.



Faculty.

DAVID E. MITCHELL,

President.

A. H. BUCHANAN,

Dean, Engineering.

E. E. WEIR,

Philosophy.

E. E. RICE,

English Literature.

J. S. WATERHOUSE,

Science.

CEARA EAREE,

Modern Languages.

F. J. STOWE,

History.

C. H. KIMBROUGH,

English.



The course of instruction in this school embraces :

1. Civil Engineering.

2. Mining Engineering.

3. Architecture and Design.

4. Geodesy and Topography.

The following four years' course is required for candi-
dates for the degree of Civil Engineer:



62



Cumberland University Bulletin



Program of Studies of the Course in Civil Engineering.

FRESHMAN YEAR.



Solid Geometry.

Algebra.

Descriptive Geometry.

Drawing- and Lettering-.

English Composition.

Rhetoric.



Trigonometry.

Land Surveying-.

Perspective Drawing-.

English Composition.

Rhetoric.

Shades, Shadows, Perspective.



SOPHOMORE YEAR.



Analytical Geometry.

Chemistry.

Chemical Laboratory.

Architectural Drawing.

English.

Strength of Materials.

Higher Algebra.



Calculus.

Organic Chemistry.

Railroad Surveying.

Retaining Walls.

Topographical Surveying.

English.

Determinants.



JUNIOR YEAR.

Mechanics of Engineering. Physics.

Logic.

Political Economy.

Physics.

Stereotomy

Materials of Engineering.

Zoology.

French and German.



Botany.

Ethics.

Mechanics of Materials.

Geodetic Survey.

Adjustment of Observations.

French and German.

Iron Highway Bridges.



SENIOR YEAR.



Roofs and Bridges.

Framed Structures..

Street Railway Roadbed.

Psychology.

Physiology.

Physics.

Mineralogy.

French and German.



Descriptive Astronomy.
Geodetic Astronomy.
Geology.
Sociology.
Sewerage Systems.
Sanitary Engineering.
Coffer Dams.
French and German.



Cumberland University Bulletin 63

Descriptive Geometry — Stereoscopic views of the solu-
tions of the principal problems ; construction in India ink
of all problems, Isometric Projections, and Plane Projec-
tion Drawings.

Shades, Shadows and Perspective — Problems constructed
in India ink.

Railroad Engineering — From Reconnaissance to Con-
struction.

Railroad Alignment — Problems performed in the field,
Setting out Work, Computations of Earth-work, and
Drawing Plans and Profiles.

Drawing — Map and Topographical, in Contours and
Hachures : Ornamentation and Lettering. ( Sample Topog-
raphy from United States Coast and Goedetic Survey
Reports.)

Mechanics of Engineering — Construction of Machines
and Machine Drawing ; Slide-Valve and Link Motion ; Air,
Water and Steam Motors.

Civil Engineering — Materials and Structures, Theory of
Stresses, Stability and Strength of Wood and Iron Girders,
Bridges, Roofs, and Arches. Mechanics and Materials.
Masonry : Retaining Walls, Foundations, Tunnels, etc. ;
Analytical and Graphical Methods of Deducing Stresses.

Stereotomy — Carpentry and Stone-cutting.

Geodesy — Figure Adjustment of Geodetic Surveys, and
Computations for Latitude, Longitude, Altitude, and Azi-
muth of Triangulation points and lines.

Text-books cost about $65.

Tuition, $50 per term of five months.



For further information address A. H. Buchanan, Leba-
non, Tenn.



64 Cumberland University Bulletin

Conservatory of Music.

Established 1903.






Faculty.

DAVID E. MITCHELL,

President.

EUGENE FEUCHTINGER,

Director ; Professor of Piano, Pipe-Organ, Voice Culture,

Theory, and History.

CORDELIA KENT,
Piano, Harmony.

EDNA BEARD,

Violin.

FLOYD POE,
Brass Instruments.



Department at the Lebanon College for Young Ladies.

E. E. WEIR,

President.

ANNETTE HAYDON,
Piano, Theory, and Stringed Instruments.

LENA GRISSOM,
Piano and Theory.

LUCY SHANNON,

Voice Culture, Elementary Theory.

MARY GRISSOM,
Piano.



Cumberland University Bulletin 65



Announcement.



Cumberland University, with its affiliated schools, has
always been provided with opportunities for music study,
and the work of the past is gratefully acknowledged. The
growth of the University and the increasing demand in the
South for standard academic music study induced the au-
thorities of the University to establish a Conservatory of
Music, organized on the broadest art basis and modeled
after the foremost European institutions. Neither effort
nor expense will be spared to make it a school of highest
ideals, second to none in the high character of its faculty
and among the very first in practical usefulness and results.

Buildings, Recital and Concert Halls.

The Conservatory will, for the present, be fitted out in
Memorial Hall, a description of which is given in the early
part of this catalogue. Large and well lighted teaching and
practice rooms are provided, furnished with superior pianos
and conveniences. Recitals and concerts will be held in
the Chapel, a description of which splendid room is also
to be found in other pages of this catalogue. It will soon
contain a magnificent three-manual pipe-organ and a spa-
cious stage, especially adapted to orchestral and choral
concerts and to oratorios and operatic performances.

There are thus two auditoriums, Caruthers Hall and
the new Chapel, both of which will be utilized by the Con-
servatory.
5



66 Cumberland University Bulletin

Libraries and Reading Rooms.
There are several large Libraries and Reading Rooms
within the several departments of the University. They
are open to our students of music. A musical library is
now being started.

Classification of Students.

We recognize two classes of students — Academic and
Special. Academic students are those who declare their
intention to finish either course for Teachers' Certificate
or the Graduate Course, including the degree of Bachelor
of Music. Special students are those who do not wish to
finish either course, but who may at any time enter the
Academic Course and are entitled to the same privileges as
the Academic students. No examinations are required of
Special students.

Teachers' Certificate.

A student desiring the Teachers' Certificate must pur-
sue the Academic Course for at least one year. He must
pass in the following studies and grades: Piano: Grade 6,
Harmony 2, Theory 2, History 2. Voice Culture: Grade 4,
Harmony, Grades 1 and 3. History or Theory, Grade 2.
Violin: Grade 4, Harmony 1 and 3. History or Theory,
Grade 2. Pipe-organ: Same requirements as for Piano.

Diploma of Graduation and Degree of Bachelor of Music.

At least one year resident study in the Academic Course
is required. The student must pass examination in follow-
ing studies and grades : Piano: Grade 8, Harmony 4, The-
ory 2, History 2. Voice Culture: Grade 6, Harmony 2,
Theory 2, History 2. Violin: Grade 6, Harmony 2, Theory
2, History 2. Pipe-organ: Same as for Piano. (Piano
can be substituted for Theorv.)



Cumberland University Bulletin 67

Compulsory Studies.

All beginners and all others who are not thoroughly
grounded in the elementary branches of sight reading, time
value of notes, time beating, etc., must attend the classes
of elementary Theory. Text-book : J ousse's Musical Cat-
echism.

These classes are free to all music students.

All special students in Piano, Voice and Pipe-organ of
any grade, must take one term in Harmony, and one in
Harmony playing. Voice students can omit Harmony
playing and substitute Third Grade of Harmony. Students
who have studied Harmony elsewhere and can pass satis-
factory examination are exempted from these requirements.

All students must attend the Choral classes, unless valid
excuses can be given. The Choral classes are free to all
music students.

Free Advantages.

Elementary Theory, Choral Classes, Organ Recitals,
Concerts by the Faculty, Students' Recitals, Lectures,
Public Lessons and Demonstrations by the Director, Uni-
versity Libraries, Reading Rooms, and the most important
of all free advantages to our students is

The School of Public Performances.

This school is one of the most valuable features of music
study. Few other schools of like nature afford such un-
limited opportunities for training in this direction. This
feature of our Conservatory, although entirely free to its
students, is worth many times the price of their regular
tuition. It is the feature that brings the largest and quick-
est results in the shortest possible time.



68 Cumberland University Bulletin

What does all the study amount to, if the student cannot
play or sing before friends or a public audience?

Memorizing.

Our students are taught to memorize both technical exer-
cises and pieces. We use as few text-books as possible, not
only because considerable expense is thereby saved to the
student, but also chiefly because entire attention to correct
and supple condition of arms and hands and fingers can be
given, instead of dividing the attention between the music
rack and the keyboard.

Concentration.

We teach concentration from the first lesson to the last.
Mental discipline is our chief element of success. Progress
will be rapid and the student will acquire self-control, ease
and repose in public appearance.

We Claim

That by our methods and system of teaching we make
better players and singers, in much less time, and at much
less expense, than can be done elsewhere. We stand on the
firm ground of long experience and continual and attested
success.

Assistance to Profitable Positions.

Academic students can rely on our assistance to secure
for them profitable positions. The Director has placed a
large number of his students in very remunerative posi-
tions. There are now more offers for competent teachers
than students to fill them. It is merely a question of — are
you qualified?



Cumber land University Bulletin 69

Talks and Lectures.

By the Director on: "How to be a Successful Student,
a Successful Teacher;" "How to Get Large Classes and
Hold Them;" "The Musician's Success in Public Life;"
"Success in Society, in Church, in the Home;" "Financial
Success as a Musician;" "How to Gain and Hold the Re-
spect of the Public;" etc., etc.

Oratorio Society.

An Oratorio Society of several hundred voices is to be
organized for the purpose of producing the master oratorios
and operas and to give our voice students the opportunity
to appear as soloists.

A Word about Our Piano and Voice Methods.

The playing of Paderewski, Bloomfield-Zeisler, and the
many other great piano artists, all of them students of the
celebrated Leschetizky, of Vienna, has long ago decided
the matter of a pre-eminent piano method. The Leschetizky
method has been taught by our Director for many years.
His students have been praised and accepted as possessing
the true Leschetizky method. This method is simple and
natural ; no efforts are wasted, nothing is overlooked, noth-
ing can be added. The Leschetizky method will be taught
to all students of the piano; with it goes an absolute as-
surance that nothing better can be had anywhere in the
world.

Those students who desire more experience after gradu-
ating with us will be accepted also in the artist classes of
Madam Bloomfield-Zeisler, teacher of the Bush-Temple
Conservatory of Music, Chicago, 111. They will also be
accepted by Herr Felix Dreyschock, Royal Prussian Pro-



70 Cumberland University Bulletin

fessor of Music at Berlin. Also by Madam Steppanoff, late
with Leschetizky, of Vienna. The Leipzig Conservatory
and the Stuttgart Conservatory, of Germany, are also open
to them. Moritz Moskowski, of Paris, France, will accept
our graduates, and similar opportunities will be offered to
them in voice, violin and organ.

The old Italian school of singing is still the best for
singers. Modern science, however, has discovered new
facts. These new discoveries we have made our own, mas-
tered them, and they place us in a position to do much
more for the voice than has been possible heretofore. We
guarantee a beautiful voice to our students who will faith-
fully practice what we teach. Some very important exer-
cises will be disclosed to our voice students, most of them
known onlv to a verv few teachers in America.



Courses of Study.

1. Piano.

The Graduate Piano Course is divided into four years
of two terms each. It is expected that one grade will be
finished each term, thus making it a course of eight grades.

Beginners and those who have no correct technical
foundations can choose between the two following courses,
A and B :

In Course A, students are formed into classes of four;
they will receive two full hour lessons each week in the
Leschetizky method of Piano Technic. Besides the two
class lessons each student will receive one private half -hour
lesson in which pieces only are studied ; in thus separating
the mechanical from the musical they will get considerably



Cumberland University Bulletin 71

more attention and should advance very rapidly in their
technic.

In Course B the student gets two private lessons, in
which technic and music are taught individually.

Grade I. — Selections from the following studies to suit
individual taste and requirement will be taught: National
Graded Course, Grade i. Koehler, Op. 151. Epler, Op.
41. Friedrich, Op. 262. Gurlitt, Op. 102, four hands.
Easy and pretty pieces.

Grade II. — Continuation of technic study, Leschetizky
method. Bertini, Op. 100. Heller, Op. 47. Lambert's
systematic course of studies, Book 1. Pieces of easier
execution.

Grade III. — Lambert's Book 2. Heller, Op. 47. Lecoup-
pey, Op. 26 — 15 Studies for Mechanism. Schumann, Op.
15 and 68. Sonatinas, pieces of all styles. James H. Rog-
ers, The Development of Velocity, Op. 40.

Grade IV. — Lambert's Book 3. Heller, Op. 45. Lecoup-
pey, Op. 26. Bertini, Op. 29. Sonatinas and easy sonatas,
etc., continued. James H. Rogers, The Development of
Velocity, Op. 40.

Grade V. — Lambert's Book 3. Heller, Op. 45 or 46.
Czerny-Pfe'ifTer Studies, Book I. Bach, two-part inventions.
Pieces, etc., by classic and modern composers.

Grade VI. — Czerny-Pfeiffer Studies, Book II. Heller,
Op. 16, Book 1 or 2. Cramer-Bulow, 50 Studies. Pieces,
etc., by classic and modern composers.

Grade VII. — Cramer-Bulow Studies, or Czerny-Pfeiffer.


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