Copyright
Cumberland Univ..

Cumberland University Bulletin (Volume 1922) online

. (page 6 of 8)
Online LibraryCumberland Univ.Cumberland University Bulletin (Volume 1922) → online text (page 6 of 8)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


diminished seventh; Czerny, School of Velocity, Books I and II; Heller,
selections from Opus 45, 46 and 47; Bach, two-part inventions; sonatas by
Mozart, Haydn, etc.; modern compositions by Schumann, Schubert, Ru-
binstein, MacDowell, etc.

1&. Scales, Arpeggi and technical studies continued; Czerny, School of
Velocity, Books III and IV; Geller, continuation of la; Bach, two-part in-
ventions continued; sonatas and modern compositions.

2a. Scales and Arpeggi as in Freshman year, but in quicker tempo;
technical studies by Hanon; Cramer, selections from "50 Selected Studies";
Czerny, selections from "The Art of Finger Dexterity"; Bach, three-part
inventions; sonatas by Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven; modern composi-
tions by Schumann, Chopin, Raff, Rubinstein, Tschaikowsky, Chaminade,
etc.

2b. Continuation of 2a.

3a. Scales, Arpeggi and technical studies continued; Clementi, Gradus
ad Parnassum; Moscheles, Etudes; Bach, Wohltemperierte Klavirchord;
Beethoven sonatas; compositions by Schumann, Chopin, Rubinstein,
Moszowski, etc.

Zb. Continuation of 3a.

4a. Scales and Arpeggi in rapid motion; Czerny, School of the Virtuoso;
Bach, Wohltemperierte Klavirchord; Chopin, Etudes; concertos by Mo-
zart, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Grieg, etc.; compositions by Chopin, Schu-
mann, Liszt, etc.

VOICE CULTURE

la. Breathing, tone placing, enunciation; Abt, Singing Tutor, Parts I
and III; scales, intervals, Arpeggi; easier Solfeggi.

lb. Continuation of la with the addition of easy songs.

2a. Scales and Arpeggi continued; Abt, Singing Tutor, Parts II and IV;
exercises for the development of flexibility; Solfeggi by Vaccai, Lamperti,
etc.; Concone, "50 Lessons"; songs by Franz, MacDowell, etc.

2b. Continuation of 2a.

3a. Scales, Arpeggi, etc., continued; Solfeggi by Concone, Marchesi,
Randegger, etc. ; songs by Schubert, Schumann, Rubinstein, etc.

36. Continuation of 3a.

4a. Scales, Arpeggi and Solfeggi continued; songs by Schubert, Schu-
mann, etc.; Arias from oratorio and opera.

46. Continuation of 4a.



Cumberland University Bulletin 63

VIOLIN

la. Wohlfart, Studies, Op. 45, Book II; Kayser, Op. 20, Book II; pieces
by Singalee, Danola, etc.

lb. Continuation of la.

2a. Sevoik, "School of Bowing- technic"; Kayser, Op. 20, Book III;
Mazas, Op. 36; pieces by de Beriot, Raff, Mitel, etc.; Violin Classics, Books
I, II, III and IV.

2b. Continuation of 2a.

3a. Scale studies by Sitt; Etudes by Kreutzer; sonatas by Haendel,
Gade, Grieg, etc. ; pieces by Wieniawski, Vieuxtemps, etc.

3b. Continuation of 3a.

4a. Etudes by Fiorillo, Rode, etc. ; Concertos by Rode, Viotti, Spohr,
de Beriot, Ries, etc. ; pieces by modern composers.

Preparatory to the above course, several years (according to the age
and ability of the student) must be devoted to position of body, manner of
holding the violin and bow, ear-training and tuning; Berthold Tours In-
structor, Wohlfart, Op. 45, Book I; Kayser, Op 20, Book I; major and
minor scales; pieces by Borowski, Demuth, Dancla, Tours, Hollander, etc.

THEORY OF MUSIC

HARMONY

la. Text: Heacox and Lehmann, "Lessons in Harmony," Part I.
lb. Text: Heacox and Lehmann, "Lessons in Harmony," Part II.
2a. Text: Heacox and Lehmann, "Lessons in Harmony," Part III.
2b. TexH;: Heacox and Lehmann, "Lessons in Harmony," Part IV.
2c. Text: Elson, "Theory of Music."

COUNTERPOINT

3a. Text: Goetschius, "Elementary Counterpoint."
3b. Text: Goetschius, "Applied Counterpoint."

ANALYSIS

4a. Text: Cutter, "Harmonic Analysis."
46. Continuation of 4a. Composition.

HISTORY OF MUSIC

2a. Text: Pratt, "History of Music," or Dickinson, "The Study of the
History of Music."

EXPENSES FOR TERM
PIANO COURSES

WITH THE DIRECTOR

First, second and third years (two private lessons each week) $40.00

Fourth year (two private lessons each week) 45.00



64 Cumberland University Bulletin

First, second and third years (one lesson each week) 25.00

Fourth year (one lesson each week) 30.00

PIANO

WITH THE ASSISTANT

First and second years (two private lessons each week) 30.00

First and second years (one private lesson each week) 20.00

VOICE CULTURE

WITH THE DIRECTOR

First, second and third years (two private lessons each week) $40.00

Fourth year (two private lessons each week) 45.00

First, second and third years (one lesson each week) 25.00

Fourth year (one lesson each week) 30.00

VIOLIN COURSE

First, second and third years (two private lessons each week) $30.00

Fourth year (two private lessons each week) 35.00

THEORETICAL SUBJECTS, PRACTICE, DIPLOMA, ETC.

Harmony, History, Counterpoint or Analysis $10.00

(Free to all students in the regular course, either Music or Aca-
demic.)

Piano rent, one hour's daily practice, per month 1.00

Diploma fee 5.00

Special catalogue will be sent upon application to Director or Registrar.



SCHOOL OF COMMERCE

PRELIMINARY STATEMENT

The School of Commerce of Cumberland University has been organized
to meet the ever-growing needs of our new industrial South and commercial
America.

Every year finds us increasing our industrial activities and adding to our
commercial prestige and power. Moreover, the wide scope and exacting
methods of modern business have united in demanding exceptional efficiency
of all who engage in business pursuits. Cumberland recognizes these con-
ditions, feels her responsibility as a great education institution, and proposes
to give in her School of Commerce and affiliated schools that general and
special training which will prepare its graduates for leadership in the new
professions — Accounting, Salesmanship, Administration, Advertising.

Mr. J. Gordon Wootton has been elected Director of the School of Com-
merce and Mr. James N. Bujac, Associate. Both of these gentlemen are
excellently equipped for the work. Mr. Wootton is a native of North Car-
olina and has acquired his education in the following institutions: Sharp
Institute and Normal, Smithdeal College, Columbia University, Bowling
Green Business University, and Cumberland University Law School. He
has been a successful teacher in North Carolina, New Jersey and Massachu-
setts. Mr. Wootton has also had extensive business experience: first, as
private and public accountant; later, as salesman and publicity man.

Mr. Bujac comes to us from Texas. He has had superior training in
The Wharton School of Commerce and Finance, University of Pennsylvania,
Simmons College, and Cumberland University Law School. He, too, has
had successful experience both as a teacher and in various business positions
as accountant, auditor, credit and office manager.

COURSE OF STUDY

Our regular four-year curriculum, leading to the degree Bachelor of
Science in Commerce, immediately follows. Applicants for admission to
this course are required to furnish the usual college-entrance credentials.
Students will be admitted to such standing as their previous education war-
rants, which may be to the Freshman class or to advanced standing.

B. S. (COM.) CURRICULUM
Freshman Year
First Term Second Term

subjects hours subjects hours

Bible 2 Bible 2

English 3 English 3

Foreign Language. 3 Foreign Language 3

Mathematics (Com'l.) 5 Mathematics (Com'l.) 5

Accounting ^ 4 Shorthand and Typewriting 4



66



Cumberland University Bulletin



Sophomore Year



First Term

Bible 2

English 3

Foreign Language 3

Industrial and Commercial
Geography 5

Advanced Shorthand and Type
writing 4



Second Term

Bible 2

English 3

Foreign Language 3

Trade and Transportation 3

Economics 3

Advanced Accounting 3



Junior Year



First Term

subject hours

English Literature 2

Foreign Language 3

Economics 3

Salesmanship 3

Business Law 3

Office Organization and Man

agement 3



Second Term
subject hours

English Literature 2

Foreign Language 3

Psychology 3

Advertising 3

Business Law 3

History and Government 3



Senior Year



First Term
subjects hours

Banking and Investments 4

Auditing and Systematizing 3

Public Speaking 3

History and Government 3

Elective . 3



Second Term
subjects hours
Business Organization and Ad-
ministration 4

C. P. A. Problems 3

Sociology 3

History and Government 3

Elective 3



SHORT COURSE

For the benefk of students who desire to prepare for some specific posi-
tion in as short a time as possible, a special curriculum has been arranged :

SPECIAL COMMERCIAL CURRICULUM



SUBJECTS HOURS

Bookkeeping and Elementary
Accounting 5

Business Penmanship 5

Commercial Arithmetic 23^

Business Law 2^

Commercial Geography 2j/£

A Certificate of Proficiency is granted to those who complete the above
curriculum, and worthy students are assisted in securing employment.

Earnest students of average ability should complete the combined book-



SUBJECTS HOURS

Shorthand 5

Typewriting 5

Business English 2)^

Business Machines and Effi-
ciency Devices 2J/£



Cumberland University Bulletin 67

keeping and secretarial course within ten months, or two school terni3 of
five months each.

EFFICIENT METHODS

The School of Commerce is closely affiliated with the College of Arts
and Sciences. Students in Commerce at Cumberland will thus have the
advantage of superior training both in the special subjects of commerce and
in the general subjects of culture. This correlation is essential, if our grad-
uates are to be qualified to achieve large success in the modern business pro-
fessions. Moreover, in order to make the training intensely practical, pro-
vision has been made for the following extra-curricula activities :

1. Special lectures by men and women who have attained distinction in
particular fields of commercial effort.

2. Visits to the offices and shops of large firms and corporations where
different processes and systems will be studied.

3. A cooperative business-training plan, whereby advanced students are
to spend a part of each term acquiring practical experience and efficiency,
with remuneration.

This latter plan is made possible by special arrangement with the ad-
ministrative office of the University, together with banks of Lebanon and
leading representative concerns and corporations both in Lebanon and
Nashville. The School is particularly fortunate in its proximity to and affil-
iations in Nashville, where are located some of the nation's great industrial
organizations and commercial enterprises.

EXPENSES

Tuition fee per term of five months, $50.00
Books and Supplies per term, approximately, $10.00
Contingent fee, per term, $10.00.
Board in University Boarding Club, per term, $70.00
Board in private families, per month, $25.00 to $30.00
Room rent, per term, University Dormitory, two in a room, each, $25.00.
Students matriculated in the University who desire instruction in
only certain subjects in the School of Commerce should confer with the
Director concerning tuition fee for partial courses, lecture and recitation
hours, etc.

WHEN TO ENTER
Students should enter as nearly as possible on the opening of each term.
Those entering later will be required to make up such portions of the course
as have been passed over by the class.

Further information in regard to the School of Commerce will be gladly
furnished. Address inquiries to

J. Gordon Wootton, Director,
School of Commerce, Cumberland University
Lebanon, Tennessee.



SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM



A course in Journalism was created in response to the need of a few stu-
dents who wished to enter the field of active journalistic work. In 1922 the
course was extended to the various branches of work, such as: News Stories,
Feature Articles, Editorials, and Journalistic Style.

The administration now announces the organization of a Special School
of Journalism as a permanent department of the University. We believe
that good theory precedes practice, consequently, splendid text books by
the leading authorities on special subjects are used for intensive study.
This work is supplemented by actual training on the staff of college publi-
cations and other newspapers which have large circulation. The thorough-
ness and scope of the work will be a guarantee of excellent training and
development for this worthy profession.

Mrs. Mary Stahlman Douglas has been secured as dean of the school.
She is a graduate of one of the best universities and a journalist with prac-
tical experience on the staff of one of the South's leading newspapers.

FOUR-YEAR COURSE LEADING TO B.A. DEGREE
Freshman Year



First Term

HOURS

Bible 2

English Composition 3

(1 hour Newspaper English)

Foreign Language 3

Mathematics 5

Typewriting 5

Standards of Journalism 1

News Reporting 2



Second Term

HOURS

Bible 2

English Composition 3

(1 hour Newspaper English)

Foreign Language 3

Mathematics 5

Typewriting 5

Standards of Journalism 1

News Reporting 2



21



21



5 hours Typewriting not credited on degree.
Sophomore Year



First Term

hours

Bible 2

English and Literature 3

Foreign Language 3

American History 3

Economics 3

News Reporting 2

Special Feature Article 1



Second Term

hours

Bible 2

English and Literature 3

Foreign Language 3

American History 3

Sociology 3

News Reporting 2

Special Feature Article 1



17



17



Cumberland University Bulletin



69



Junior Year



First Term

hours

English Literature 3

(Elizabethan Drama)

Civil Government in U. S 3

Science 5

American Politics 1

A Study of Modern Drama 2

Elective 3



Second Term



hours
_,_ 3



English Literature

(Shakespeare)

Constitutional History of U. S. 3

Science 5

Editorial Writing 1

Dramatic Criticism 2

Elective 3



17
Senior Year



17



First Term

hours

Elective 2

English Literature 3

(Novel)

European History 3

History of Philosophy 3

American Newspaper 1

(History and Influence)

Newspaper Editing 2



Second Term

hours

Elective 2

English Literature 3

(Short Story)

European History 3

Ethics 3

American Newspaper 1

(Problems and Policies)

Newspaper Editing 2



14



14



PREPARATORY SCHOOL

ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL CORPS

JOHN ROYAL HARRIS, D.D.

President

MRS. Y. P. WOOTEN, A.M.

Principal,

Instructor in Mathematics.

JAMES E. BELCHER, A.M.,
Instructor in Latin and Science.

MARGARET CAMPBELL, A.B.,

Instructor in English

WILLIAM D. YOUNG, A.M.,

Instructor in History

ALICE BONE, A.B.,

Instructor in Modern Languages.

MABLE C. JONES,
English and Education

SARA FAKES, B.S.,
Public Speaking and Expression.

Violin

ETHEL BEYER
Piano

MARY THOMPSON BURKE

Home Economics

J. GORDON WOOTTON, B.C.S., LL.B.
Commercial Course



72 Cumberland University Bulletin

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1923-1924

ORGANIZATION

The Preparatory School of Cumberland University is a department of
the University, but is entirely distinct and separate in management and con-
trol from that of the College of Arts. Like the College, it is coeducational.
A standard high school course is offered, covering a period of four years.

EQUIPMENT

The Preparatory School has at its disposal large and comfortable rooms
on the second floor of Memorial Hall, the main University building. The
entire Reference Library of 3,000 volumes is available for use. Also the
various University laboratories are used when the need arises. Apparatus
for a full laboratory course is provided in the sciences taught in the de-
partment.

DORMITORY FOR BOYS

Boys who come to the University to attend the Preparatory School, and
board, will be assigned rooms in a section of the boys' dormitory. A teacher
of the Preparatory Department will room near this section and see that no
disorder occurs at any time. Students will be required to be in their rooms
after 7 p.m., unless excused by the teachers in charge. Any other restric-
tion deemed necessary by the Faculty for providing proper facilities for
study and good conduct will be imposed.

DORMITORY FOR GIRLS

The girls' dormitory is a large, comfortable residence near the campus.
One of the teachers is in charge. Every effort to guarantee the most whole-
some and most attractive environment will be made. Adequate advantages
and economy, together with exceptionally good influences, will be provided.
Prospective patrons of the school can be assured of our ability to provide an
ideal home for their daughters. More definite announcements concerning
the details of arrangements will be furnished upon application.

LITERARY SOCIETY

Students are required to take an active interest in literary and debating
societies. This training is considered important in the student's develop-
ment.

ATHLETICS

Athletics for both boys and girls, wholesome in form and moderate in
amount, receive the hearty endorsement of the Faculty. The girls will be
required to join in a class in physical culture under the direction of a com-
petent instructor. The advantages of clean, manly sports are recognized;
they are made an instrument for good in the all-round development of the



Cumberland University Bulletin 73

students and of the proper school spirit. Not only is work provided in the
gymnasium, but students will have the opportunity to participate in foot-
ball, basketball, baseball, tennis and track work. The University has an
excellent athletic field, of which the Preparatory students have the full
benefit.

CHRISTIAN INFLUENCE

The students of the Preparatory School are encouraged to take an ac-
tive part in the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. They are urged to attend
regularly church services and Sunday School in one of the churches of the
town. The denominations represented in Lebanon are the Presbyterian,
Methodist, Baptist, Cumberland Presbyterian and Christian.

DISCIPLINE

All young men and women who come to the University Preparatory
School to board will be required to live in sections assigned them in the Col
lege dormitories. They will be under supervision as stated above.

The school work begins at 8:30 a.m. and closes at 3:00 p.m., with an hour
for noon recess. Each student is assigned a seat in the study hall and is
required to be there in his place for study when not attending a recitation.
Work missed because of absence from class must be made up to the satis-
faction of the teacher. Absences will be followed up closely. Written ex-
cuses from parents will be required of those who attend from home. Board-
ing students who fail to attend any of the required exercises of the school
will become objects of discipline unless satisfactory reason for such absence
can be shown. All regulations which affect the University in general apply
to the Preparatory Department.

REPORTS

In order that parents may know how well their children are progressing
in their studies a report will be mailed them each month. A report will
also be sent at the end of each semester. The semester report is recorded in
the office of the Registrar of the University and becomes a part of the stu-
dent's record at the institution.

ACCREDITED RELATIONS

The Preparatory Department of Cumberland University is a member of
the Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the Southern States.
This relation, which is dependent upon the maintenance of a high standard
in the school, is in itself a guarantee of efficiency. Students from schools
on the list of the Southern Commission can enter practically every college
in the nation without examination. It is becoming the custom in the more
progressive states for medical boards and other examining bodies which
license college graduates to enter the various professions, to insist that they
must have graduated in the beginning from an Accredited School before
they entered College.



74 Cumberland University Bulletin

Students in the Preparatory School will be influenced to enter Cumber
land University for their college course as soon as they have completed their
high school work. But patrons having other plans will find Cumberland
University Preparatory School a desirable place to send their children for
preparatory instruction.

REASONS WHY CUMBERLAND UNIVERSITY PREPARATORY DE-
PARTMENT OFFERS SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR COLLEGE
PREPARATION AND FOR TRAINING IN SECONDARY COURSES
OF INSTRUCTION:

1. Its thorough instruction under teachers who are splendidly trained
for their work and are personally interested in each student in their classes.

2. Its student companionship of earnest, ambitious young people who
will give the student congenial associations during his course.

3. Its distinctive Christian atmosphere of culture and refinement; also
the privileges of the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. in which each student is
urged to participate in Christian activities.

4. The best chances for recreation and social life on a sane and reason-
able basis.

5. Excellent athletic privileges in various fines of sport.

6. Healthful surroundings in comfortable, well-equipped buildings on a
large, beautiful campus.

7. Incentives to hard work and satisfactory accomplishment, and many
encouragements to effort on the part of students of determination and
purpose.

8. The school has recognized standing, being a member of the Southern
Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools.

9. Low rates — $60.00 for tuition and contingent fee for the year.

10. The inspiration of life here among fellow students, all working to-
gether in harmony for one great purpose — self-development — and yet
working independently as individuals according to taste and talent, is in-
estimable and worth every effort and even sacrifice on the student's part as
he plans for the coming year.

ADMISSION

Boys and girls of good moral character who are prepared for high school
work will be admitted to the school. Certificates or letters of dismissal from
former teachers should be brought by students.

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

Sixteen year units are required for graduation, including four units in
English, two in history or history and social science together, of which at
least one unit must be in history, two in algebra and one in plane geometry,
and one in upper grade science, either physics, chemistry or advanced biology



Cumberland University Bulletin



75



NUMBER OF SUBJECTS

Ordinarily a pupil will take subjects amounting to 4 or 4H credits. A
pupil averaging 90% may be permitted to take 5 credits. A senior may be
permitted to take as many as b l /2 credits if he needs that many to enable
him to graduate, but in no case may a senior take more than 5H> credits.

The list of credits given for different courses follows:



English 4 units

Ancient History 1 unit

Modern History

(either course) 1 unit

American History 1 unit

English History 1 unit

Civics }/l unit

Economics 1 3^ units

Latin 4 units

French 2 units

Spanish 2 units

Algebra 2 units

Plane Geometry 1 unit

Solid Geometry Y2 unit

Trigonometry Y2 unit

Physics 1 unit

Chemistry 1 unit



Biology 1 unit

Botany 1 unit

Zoology 1 unit

Physiography Y unit

Commercial Arithmetic. Y2 unit

Bookkeeping 1 unit

Typewriting and

Stenography 2 units

Commercial Geography H unit

Domestic Art l l A units

Domestic Science 2 units

Education 1 unit



76 Cumberland University Bulletin

COURSE OF STUDY

ENGLISH

Traditional English and Business English

Above the first year, the pupil may, if he chooses, substitute "Business"
English for "Traditional" English. The distinction between the two are
discussed under the head Reading.

Reading

All pupils take the same course in English throughout the first year.
Above the first year the pupil has a choice between reading in the Traditional
English and the Business English. In Traditional English, what may be
called artistic literature predominates, supplemented by a wider general
reading. In Business English the wider general reading (including reading
bearing on business activities and everyday life) is predominant, supple-
mented by literature of the artistic type.

Reading Lists

College entrance requirements for 1923-1925 are considerably changed.
We have altered the main group of books accordingly, including everything
in the new requirements and relegating everything not in the new require-
ments to the more optional lists.

Required List

Teachers will make the choice from the required list.

Pupil's Choice

The allotment of reading for each pupil is a credit of ten points per term.
These lists will be furnished pupils who desire to read in vacation time and
the reports and credits can be given in term time. The object is to get the
pupil to find the books he individually likes and become interested in reading


1 2 3 4 6 8

Online LibraryCumberland Univ.Cumberland University Bulletin (Volume 1922) → online text (page 6 of 8)