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CUMBERLAND" UNIVERSITY
QUARTERLY

VOL I AUGUST, 1903 NO. 2



Published June, August, December and March, by
Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn.



The purpose of Cumberland University Quarterly is to
serve as a medium of communication between Cumberland Uni-
versity and its alumni, students, friends and the general body
of scholars engaged in teaching or research. It will contain
reports of the most important acts of the Board of Trustees and
of the Faculty, a record of the most important accessions to the
Library, brief notes relating to the Faculty, students and alumni,
and such other news items as are deemed suitable for diffusing
information in regard to the work of the University and pre-
serving a permanent record of its activities.



NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

THE CUMBERLAND PRESS
1903



V






V



Commencement Week, 1903.

Sunday, May 31— Baccalaureate Sermon, by Rev. E. G. McLean,
D.D., Chattanooga, Tenn.

Monday, June 1 — Law Class Day.

Tuesday, June 2 — College Class Day.

Wednesda3 r , June 3 — Alumni Day.

Thursday, June 4 — Commencement Day. Conferring- of Degrees
by the President. Addresses by President David E. Mitchell,
Dean A. H. Buchanan, Dean J. R. Henry and Dean Nathan
Green.

Calendar, 1903=190U.

August 31-September 2, 1902.. Entrance Examinations.

September 2, 1903 Opening of Fall Term.

October 7, 1903 Opening of Theological School.

December 19, 1903 Beginning of Christmas Holidays.

December 28, 1903 End of Christmas Holidays.

January 13, 1904 Intermediate Law Commencement.

January 16, 1904 Close of First Term.

January 19, 1904 Beginning of Second Term.

May 10, 1904 Theological Commencement.

May 29, 1904 Baccalaureate Day.

June 2, 1904 Commencement Day.

Entrance Examinations.

August 31, 1903, 9-12 a.m Mathematics.

August 31, 1903, 2-5 p. m English and History.

September 1, 1903, 8-10 a.m Modern Language.

September 1, 1903, 10-12 a.m Latin.

September 1, 1903, 2-4 p.m Greek.

September 2, 1903, 2-4 p.m Elementary Science.



Trustees.

ANDREW B. MARTIN, Esq.
Dr. A. F. CEAYWEEE.
EDWARD E. BEARD, Esq.
Judge BENJAMIN J. TARVER.
R. P. McCEAIN, Esq.
Hon. W. R. SHAVER.
JOHN A. LESTER.

HUGH W. McDONNOED, University Treasurer.
Rev. GEORGE W. MARTIN, Endowment Agent.



Board of Visitors to Theological Seminary.

(Elected by the General Assembly.)

REV. T. A. WIGGINTON, Evansville, Ind.
[Term expires in May, 1904.]

REV. W. B. WITHERSPOON, Gadsden, Ala.
[Term expires in May, 1905.]

Ruung Elder W. E. SETTEE, Frankfort, Ky.
[Term expires in May, 1906.]



University Officers and Committees.

Officers of the Board of Trustees.

ANDREW B. MARTIN, President.
Dr. A. F. CEAYWEEE, SeCy. E. E. BEARD, TrEas.

Committee on Entrance Examinations.

A. H. BUCHANAN, Chairman.

w. d. Mclaughlin. f. j. stowe.

Gommittee on TLthletics.

E. E. RICE, Chairman. J. S. WATERHOUSE.

Gommittee on Gollege TLdministration.

A. H. BUCHANAN, Chairman.
ANDREW B. MARTIN. J. R. HENRY.

Gommittee on Buildings and Grounds.

D. E. MITCHEEE, Chairman.
E. E. WEIR. J. V. STEPHENS.

Librarian.

E. E. RICE.

Registrar.

P. M. SIMMS.



University Lecturers,

Rev. J. O. RUST, D.D.,

Pastor of the Edgefield Baptist Church, Nashville, Term.

MARION C. LrAWRANCE,

Field Secretary of the International Committee on Sunday Schools,

Toledo, Ohio.

Hon. HORACE H. BURTON,

United States Circuit Court Judge, Nashville, Tenn.

REV. IRA LANDRITH,

Editor The Cumberland Presbyterian, Nashville, Tenn.

REV. HOWARD W. POPE, D.D.,

Secretary of the Moody Schools, Northfield, Mass.

Rev. SCOTT F. HERSHEY, D.D.,

Pastor First Presbyterian Church, Boston, Mass.

BYRON W. KING, Ph.D.,

Director of the Pittsburg School of Oratory, Pittsburg, Pa.

Dr. O. E. TAYLOR,

Scientific Temperance Lecturer, Boston, Mass.

Rev. Dr. DuBOSE,
Presbyterian Missionary to China.

Rev. THORNTON PENFIEL,D,
Traveling Secretary of Seminary Y. M. C. A.

Herr EUGENE FEUCHTINGER,
Director of Conservatory of Music, Hiram, Ohio.



University Faculty.

DAVID EARL MITCHELL, A.B.,

President.

NATHAN GREEN, LL.D.,

Dean of Law School and Professor of Law.

ANDREW H. BUCHANAN, LL.D.,
Dean of College Faculty, Professor of Mathematics and Civil Engineering.

william d. Mclaughlin, a.m., ph.d.,

Professor of Latin and Greek.

ROBERT V. FOSTER, D.D.,

Professor of Systematic Theology.

EDWARD E. WEIR, A.M., Ph.D.,

Professor of Philosophy.

ANDREW B. MARTIN, LL.D.,

Professor of Law.

CLAIBORNE H. BELL, D.D.,

Professor of Missions and Apologetics.

WINSTEAD P. BONE, A.M.,

Professor of New Testament Greek and Interpretation.

LAB AN LACY RICE, Ph.D.,

Professor of English Language and Literature.

JOHN VANT STEPHENS, D.D.,
Professor of Ecclesiastical History.

FINIS KING FARR, B.D.,

Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Interpretation.

JAMES S. WATERHOUSE, A.M.,

Professor of Chemistry and Natural Science.

CLARA EARLE, A.M.,
Professor of Modern Languages.

JAMES ROBERT HENRY, A.B., B.D.,
Dean of Theological School. Professor of Practical Theology.



FRANK JAY STOWE, O.M.,
Dean of the School of Oratory, Professor of History

ROBERT W. KEETON, A.B.,

Assistant in Biology.

ROBERT GAMALIEL PEARSON, D.D.,

Professor of English, Bible and Evangelistic Methods.

Judge W. C. CALDWELL, B.S., LL.B.,
Professor of Law.

EUGENE FEUCHTINGER, A.M.,

Director of Conservatory of Music.

CARL SHOWALTER HERTZOG, B.L.,

Professor of Violin.

ELISE HEINRICH TANNER, B.M.,

Principal Assistant in Voice Culture.

NELLIE HAMILTON, B.M.,

Assistant in Conservatory of Music.

MINNIE McCLAIN, A.B., B.M.,

Assistant in Conservatory of Music.

ANNETTE HAYDON, B.M.,

Assistant in Conservatory of Music.

ROSA K. POINDEXTER, B.M.,

Assistant in Conservatory of Music.

LUCY SHANNON, B.M.,

Assistant in Voice Culture.

MARY GRISSOM, A.B., B.M.,

Assistant in Conservatory of Music.

REV. P. MARION SIMMS, A.B., B.D.,
Registrar.

JOSEPH CLAY WALKER,

Assistant Librarian.



Cumberland University

Lebanon, Tennessee.



General Statement.

History.

The history of higher education in the Cumberland Pres-
byterian Church begins with the year 1826, when Cumber-
land College was established at Princeton, Ky. From the
beginning the College was seriously embarrassed by a small
debt and a too meager income; and so year by year the
situation grew worse, as the burden resting on the General
Assembly grew heavier. Finally, in 1842, after fruitless
efforts to life the debt and endow the College, the General
Assembly "appointed a committee to select a suitable loca-
tion for the establishment of a new institution." After in-
vestigation, the committee decided on Lebanon, Tenn. — the
citizens of which agreed to erect a building at a cost of
$10,000 — and, accordingly, in September, 1842, Cumberland
University entered upon its history.

The University was first chartered December 30, 1843,
and the charter was amended at various times thereafter.
The Board of Trustees is local and self-perpetuating. The
election of new members, however, must be confirmed by
the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian
Church.

The Law School was opened in 1847. Its growth from
the start was remarkable, and in 1856 it was considered



10 CUMBERLAND UNIVERSITY

the second in size among the law schools of the country.
By the concurrent action of the General Assembly and the
Board of Trustees the Theological School was established
in 1852.

When the Civil War began, the value of buildings and
apparatus belonging to the University was rated at $50,000,
and the endowment at $100,000. Moreover, the University
was in a most prosperous condition, the number of students
in 1858 — the most successful year — being four hundred and
eighty-one. During the war the University suffered a fate
like that of many another Southern school. The buildings
were burned, the apparatus and library were destroyed, the
endowment was rendered worthless, and many of the trus-
tees and friends lost all hope of reorganization. Notwith-
standing all this, a few faithful ones determined to attempt
the seemingly impossible, and in January, 1866, the Uni-
versity was reopened without buildings, endowment or ap-
paratus. Since the "resurgence from ashes" the University
has had a steady growth. Its buildings are large and com-
modious, its libraries, general and departmental, number
twenty thousand volumes, its apparatus is valued at many
thousands of dollars, and its influence reaches far and wide
through the Union.

Departments.

The departments of the University as at present organized
are as follows :

1. The School of Liberal Arts with

a. Undergraduate Courses.

b. Graduate Courses.

2. The Law School.

3. The Engineering School.



Quarterly 11

4. The Theological School.

5. The School of Oratory.

6. The Conservatory of Music.

Each of these departments has a separate faculty, organ-
ization and management, but all are under the direction of
one Board of Trustees and one Chancellor.

Buildings.

The University building is occupied by the Literary, En-
gineering, and Theological Schools. It is a large structure,
three stories high, and is situated on a beautiful elevation
in the center of a campus of some forty-five acres. It con-
tains more than fifty rooms, specially designed and adapted
for college and university work. The University chapel,
which occupies the rear portion, has just been finished in
the most elegant style. There is perhaps no other college
chapel in the South so richly and handsomely adorned.

Caruthers Hall, situated on West Main street, contains
the law lecture rooms, two society halls, the University
library and the large auditorium for the general meetings
of the students and for University exercises.

Divinity Hall, situated farther out on West Main street,
and once the home of the Theological Department, has been
thoroughly renovated, and is now used as a dormitory and
refectorv.

The New Dormitory.

The contracts were let in the spring for a dormitory to
be erected near the main entrance of the campus. The
building, which is now well under way, is to be 156 by 50
feet, four stories high, with seventy-five rooms arranged
as single apartments, and in suites of two and three rooms.



12 ClJMBEELAND UniYEBSITY

It will be constructed of pressed brick and stone, finished
within with hardwoods, and supplied with all modern con-
veniences — steam heating, electricity, baths and closets on
each floor, and elevator. The dining-room and kitchen will
occupy the upper floor. The cost of board per month,
except for those who have suites, will be $13. This in-
cludes room rent, table fare, and use of the privileges of
the building.

The Law Library.

The fifteen thousand volumes composing the old Univer-
sity library, which for many years has occupied a large
room in Caruthers Hall, have been distributed among the
various departmental libraries. The famous "Murdock"
collection of books and pamphlets valued at many thousands
of dollars, has gone to its permanent quarters in the new
annex to the Theological library, while the many volumes.
in law, history, politics, etc., have for the most part been
retained to form the nucleus of a new Law library, which
has recently been opened. The room formerly occupied by
the University library has been renovated and arranged to
suit the purposes of the Law Department. This recently
established library has some three thousand or more vol-
umes, and this number will be increased from year to year.
It is very conveniently located with reference to the mem-
bers of the Law Department, being in the same building.

The Mitchell Library.

This library was the gift of Mr. David E. Mitchell (now
President of the University), while still an undergraduate.
It occupies a large and well lighted room on the ground
floor -of the University building, and thus is within easy



Quarterly 13

reach of the literary students. It is handsomely equipped
with sectional book cases, elegant tables, a cabinet mantel,
etc., and at present contains some two thousand one hundred
volumes. Since it was opened more than a year ago it has
proved of the utmost service to the students, and, in fact,
may be said to form the most useful and needed equipment
the college department has recently acquired.

Hale Reference Library.

This library was established for the exclusive use of the
Theological Department through the liberality of Mrs. E.
J. Hale, of Morristown, Tenn., in memory of her husband,
Dr. E. B. Hale. It occupies a room on the second floor of
the new building; is handsomely furnished, and contains
about one thousand one hundred volumes. The annex to
the Hale library comprises several thousand volumes form-
erly deposited in the general library, and among them the
valuable "Murdock" collection.

Gifts to the Libraries.

The following books and periodicals have been received
gratis by the various departmental libraries since the pub-
lication of the last catalogue: Four hundred and thirty
volumes from the United States Government printing office,
dealing with a great variety of subjects.

Hallam's "Middle Ages," four volumes, by Rev. H. W.
Reed, Baird's Mills, Tenn.

Shedd's "Sermons to the Natural Man," by a friend.

Leibnitz's "Discourse on Metaphysics and Monadology;"
Kant's "Prolegomena to Any Future Metaphysics;" Des-
cartes's "Meditations and Extracts from the Principles of
Philosophy." The three by L. L. Rice.



14 CUMBEELAND UnIVEESITY

"Hosea Ballou," by the Universalist Publishing House,
Boston, Mass.

The Christian Observer, Louisville, Ky.

The Christian Evangelist, St. Louis, Mo.

Religious Telescope, Dayton, Ohio.

The Christian Advocate, Nashville, Tenn.

The Lutheran Observer, Lancaster, Pa.

The Outlook, New York.

The Evening Banner, Nashville, Tenn.

The Gospel Advocate, Nashville, Tenn.

The Methodist Review, Nashville, Tenn.

The Reformed Church Review, Lancaster, Pa.

The Cumberland Presbyterian, Nashville, Tenn.

The Texas Church Helper, Fort Worth, Texas.

Sunday School Work, Nashville, Tenn.

The Philippine Review, New York.

The Emerson College Magazine, Boston, Mass.

The American Economist, New York,

The Advocate, of Peace, Philadelphia, Pa.

Sunset: A Magazine of the Border, San Francisco, Cal.

Philadelphia Presbyterian.

Presbyterian Banner.

The Literary Digest.

The Nation.

The Cumberland Presbyterian Quarterly.

The American Messenger, New York.

Chemical Laboratory.

The Chemical Department has at its command a number
of rooms in the University building. In addition to the
general lecture room there are laboratories for general and



Quarterly 15

analytic work, well equipped with desks, furnished with
gas and water, and apparatus for students ample for the
courses offered. The stock of chemicals is representative,
containing all the common compounds for experimental
work, and many rare and curious substances. The labora-
tories are being better equipped each year, water and gas
being the latest additions.

Museum of Natural History.

The museum of natural history, though hampered for
lack of room, embraces an excellent collection which would
make a very creditable showing in more commodious quar-
ters. There are several hundred fossils and casts of notable
fossils, a working set of minerals, a fine collection of rocks
furnished by the government, a goodly number of alcoholic
specimens, and a very valuable collection of five hundred
species of Japanese shells, including many duplicates. It is
the desire of the curator of this department to make the col-
lection as large and representative as possible; accordingly,
friends of the University will confer a great favor by send-
ing to the Professor of Natural Science any specimens they
may secure.

Physical Laboratory.

The Department of Physics has at its command a suite
of rooms on the first floor of the University building.
While not handsomely provided for as yet, this department
has apparatus worth many hundreds of dollars, and is add-
ing to its stock each year.

Gifts or bequests to the department will be gratefully
received.



16 Cumberland University

Astronomical Observatory.

The University has no astronomical observatory, though
it possesses a good reflecting telescope, a very fine transit,
and some other instruments of minor importance used by
the classes in astronomy. It is earnestly hoped that some
friend or alumnus will supply the means necessary to the
erection of a small observatory — an addition greatly needed.

Nisbet Biological Laboratory.

This recently established laboratory is the gift of a for-
mer student of Cumberland, Mr. Frank Watkins Nisbet,
a very successful young business man of St. Louis, Mo.
It was founded in memory of his father and mother, Mr.
and Mrs. Watkins F. Nisbet, formerly of Evansville, Ind.,
for many years prominent members of the First Cumberland
Presbyterian Church of that city. The laboratory is equip-
ped with the best microscopes made, provided with all suit-
able eye pieces and objectives, mountings of various kinds,
tables, chairs, and, in fact, all other necessary paraphernalia.
Mr. Nisbet's generous gift has made oossible for the stu-
dents methods of work and research not open to them here-
tofore.

Discipline.

The University lays upon the student two general re-
quirements. The first is embraced in the motto, "Semper
praesens, semper paratus." Continued absence from clase
and neglect of lessons are offenses for which the student
may be admonished or suspended.

The second requirement is that he shall deport himself
as a good citizen and a gentleman. In definition of this
requirement, the Trustees, by special action, have declared



Quarterly 17

the following as special offenses for which the student may
be indefinitely suspended : "Intoxication, gambling, visiting
drinking and gambling houses, acting riotously on the
streets, and disturbing, by unseemly conduct, religious, lit-
erary or educational meetings of citizens or students."

Chapei Service.

In the interest of the college students a brief chapel
service is conducted each day by some member of the
Faculty. At these services the simple truths of Christianity
are stressed, the formation of right habits insisted on, the
temptations peculiar to college men pointed out, and the
worth of manly character emphasized. While attendance
on chapel service is not compulsory, the members of the
Faculty strive to secure regular attendance on the part of
all students.

Churches.

There are four churches in Lebanon, representing as
many denominations, that hold regular weekly services.
All students are urged by the Faculty to attend faithfully
the services held in the church of their choice.

Young Men's Christian Association.

The members of the Faculty take pleasure in commending
the good work done by the College Young Men's Christian
Association, which for many years has held before the stu-
dent body the standard of Christian manliness. Cumber-
land University has the honor of having organized one of
the first college associations in the United States. This
association, especially since its reorganization after the war,
has been one of the strong religious forces of the University.
2



18 Cumberland University

Societies.

Connected with the University are three literary societies.

The Philomathean Society. — This society was organ-
ized in 1854. Motto: "Nihil Sine Lahore."

The Heurethelian. — This society was organized in
1854. Motto: 'Tuaide rbv Qzbv. D>o)dt czwj-ov"

The Caruthers Society. — This society was organized
in 1890. Motto : "Esse Quant Videri Malim"

These societies all have commodious and well furnished
halls, and hold their meetings every Saturday evening dur-
ing the scholastic year. They also give public exhibitions
from time to time in Caruthers Hall.

Athletics.

Believing that athletics is an essential feature of college
and university life, the members of the Faculty co-operate
with the student body in the effort to promote a healthy
athletic spirit, and to maintain the standing of the Univer-
sity in the annual inter-collegiate contests. The Athletic
Association, which is under Faculty direction, has the over-
sight of all local and inter-collegiate baseball and football
games, field sports, etc. Professionalism is entirely ex-
cluded, and no student is permitted to take part in any
public contest who is conditioned in his studies. During
the winter months basketball is among the favorite means
of indoor recreation, while regular gymnastic training is
given to all students who care for it.

The Oratorical Association.

The University holds active membership in the Inter-
Collegiate Oratorical Association of Tennessee, an organi-
zation of four years' standing, and one that during its brief



Quarterly 19

history has been effective in raising the standard of oratory
in the several colleges represented. Once during these four
years Cumberland's representative was honored by receiving
first place in the contest.

The Cumberland Weekly.

An important agency connected with the work of the
University is The Cumberland Weekly, a periodical con-
trolled and edited by the students of the University, sub-
ject to the Faculty's direction. It serves as the University
mirror, reflecting all matters of interest relating to athletics,
literary societies, the Young Men's Christian Association,
and the various departments of the institution, which by its
influence have been brought into close fellowship.

The Phosnix.

The students of the University publish every spring a
handsome annual called The Phoenix. It is a large volume
beautifully illustrated and bound, containing half-tones of
all student organizations and members of the Faculty, in
addition to reading matter of a humorous and serious cast.
The Phoenix is a source of pleasure and pride to all who
are in any way connected with the University. The Phoenix
for the current year contains nearly three hundred pages,
and is said by the publishers to be one of the handsomest
college annuals ever published in the South.

Boarding.

The cost of board per week ranges from $2.25 to $3.75.
This includes room rent, fuel and lights. Many of the best
homes in Lebanon are open to student boarder's, who thus
are brought directly under the moral and refining influences



20 Cumberland University

of Lebanon society. The Divinity Hall Club, which has
been very successfully operated the past year, has reduced
the cost per month to about $8. The cost of living in the
new dormitory now being erected on the campus will vary
from $13 to about $16 per month, depending on the size
and location of rooms.

Degrees.

At least one year of resident study is necessary for the
acquirement of a degree, and the candidate must be present
on Commencement Day. The diploma fee of $5 must be
deposited with the Treasurer at the beginning of the stu-
dent's last term. If for any cause the degree is not con-
ferred, this fee will be refunded.

The degrees conferred by the University are as follows :

( Bachelor of Arts, A.B.

1. Collegiate J Bachelor of Science, B.S.

( Bachelor of Oratory, B.O.

2 University i M aster of Arts, A.M.

2. UNIVERSITY I Doctor Qf p hilosophy> p hD>

( Bachelor of Laws, LL.B.

3. Professional J Bachelor of Divinity, B.D.

( Civil Engineer, C.E.

Fees.

All term fees must be paid in advance. No one will be
recognized as a student until his matriculation certificate
has been signed by the Dean of the Faculty to which he
recites. In exceptional cases only shall students be permit-
ted to have" any part of their fees refunded. In cases of
protracted sickness or providential occurrences requiring



Quarterly 21

long absences, it is customary to give the student credit on

his fees for another term by such an amount as may be

deemed proper; and if he cannot return, he may transfer

his right to another.

For amount of fees and expenses, see under different

schools.

Saloons.

By enactment of the State Legislature, followed by local
legislation, all saloons in the town of Lebanon were closed
on June I, 190 1. The injury which the University has suf-
fered, directly and indirectly, by the presence of saloons in
Lebanon, is incalculable ; and though the moral sentiment
of the community has always been overwhelmingly opposed
to this evil, and though frequent efforts have been made


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