Cuyler Reynolds.

Genealogical and family history of southern New York and the Hudson River Valley : a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the building of a nation online

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ISAAC I'LATT.
indf-r iif Newspaper cif Which I'cmKhkeepsie Eagle is Successor.



GENEALOGICAL



AND



FAMILY HISTORY

OF

SOUTHERN NEW YORK

AND THE

HUDSON RIVER VALLEY

A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a
Commonwealth and the Building of a Nation



COMPILED UNDER THE EDITORIAL SUPERVISION OF

CUYLER REYNOLDS

Curator of The Albany Institute and Historical and Art Society, since 1898; Director of

New York State History Exhibit at Jamestown Exhibition, 1907; Author of

Albany Chronicles," "Classified Quotations," etc., etc.



VOL. Ill



ILLUSTRATED



NEW YORK

LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY

19 14




/^^






PUBLISHERS' NOTE

In addition to Mr. Cuyler Reynolds, Supervising Editor, the publishers would
', high moral courage,
an open, cheerful, frank manner. Erect, martial,



SOUTHERN NEW YORK



1017



authoritative as he was, I still liked him. for to
me he was kind, always asked about our family.
His whole person bespoke manliness. No one look-
ing on him would suspect him of meanness, either
in thought, word or deed. He was eminently suc-
cessful in business, and his wealth, at length, out-
stripped that of his great rival. His party also
triumphed, and he became the first man of the place,
in position and influence. If thus fortunate in these
respects, he was even more so in his family. He
had ten children, four sons and six daughters; all
reached maturity, and constituted a comely group.
All the daughters married, save one, and the sons
were among the handsomest men of their time.
Only one son, Rufus H. King, of Albany, took upon
himself the honors of wedlock. They all possessed
that happy balance of good sense, good feelings,
good looks, and good manners, which insure success
and respectability in life.

General King's original house stood on the
northern slope of a small swell of ground,
midway between the two extremities of the
main street, and was located on the western
side, about one mile north of the Presbyterian
church. It attracted attention in later years,
because it stood out as a fine type of country
residence ; was always glistening in fresh
white paint, and was a large, roomy, two-
story edifice. The grounds about it were
neatly kept. It is said of it by the old inhabi-
tants, long after the general passed away вАФ
"wealth and respectability in the full tide of
successful experiment were as readable in its
appearance as if it had been so written in
front, like the designation of a railway sta-
tion."

General Joshua King married Anne Inger-
soll, of Ridgefield, Connecticut. She was the
youngest daughter of Rev. Jonathan Inger-
soll, the minister of the First Congregational
Church of Ridgefield, and of a family as
prominent before and since then as that of
the King. He was an able preacher, a de-
voted pastor and a most amiable man. He
was a Yale graduate, and came from Milford
to be ordained in 1740. For a great inany
years he fulfilled his duties with ability, and
engrafted himself in the affairs of the people,
so that when he died he was universally es-
teemed, and people spoke of him as one of
fine mind and good heart. Although some
years before his death he suffered a shock
of palsy, he continued to act, for his mind
was clear, until he died at Ridgefield, Octo-
ber 2, 1778, in his sixty-fifth year, having
served forty years in the ministry. The King
and Ingersoll houses were side by side, hence
the intermarriage was not surprising.



(II) Rufus Howard King, son of General
Joshua and Anne (Ingersoll) King, was born
at Ridgefield, Connecticut, November 30,
1794, died at his home in Albany, New York,
July 9, 1867, and was buried in the Albany
Rural Cemetery. He was educated at Master
Stebbins' Academy in his native place. It
was then commonly spoken of as the "Up-
town School," because there was another in
the western end, or what was called "down-
town." The students at the Up-town Semin-
ary felt they were going to one which was
much superior to any other, and Master Steb-
bins, when young King and "Peter Parley"
attended, was a man of long body, well de-
scribed as being a lanky pedagogue, with
short legs, a swaying body, stooping shoul-
ders, silvery hair falling in well-combed rolls
over his coat collar.

Although brought up at the homestead in
Ridgefield, he decided to leave there in 1814,
when reaching his majority; but his brother,
Hon. Joshua Ingersoll King remained, and in
1849 represented the eleventh district in Con-
necticut, living a long life and always a leader



Online LibraryCuyler ReynoldsGenealogical and family history of southern New York and the Hudson River Valley : a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the building of a nation → online text (page 1 of 89)