Cuyler Reynolds.

Genealogical and family history of southern New York and the Hudson River Valley : a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the building of a nation (Volume 2) online

. (page 49 of 95)
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ter of Tudge John Lawrence and Sarah (Nic-
oll) Smith. Mrs. Smith was a granddaughter
of Jacob Clinch. Mr. and Mrs. Butler estab-



250



SOUTHERN NEW YORK



lished a home at St. James, Long Island, situ-
ated on Stony Brook Harbor, and known as
"Bytharbour". Children: Lawrence Smith;
Charles Stewart, mentioned below ; Susan L.,
married Francis C. Huntington, son of the
Rev. William Reid Huntington, former rector
of Grace Church in the City of New York.

(V) Charles Stewart, son of Prescott Hall
and Cornelia Stewart (Smith) Butler, was
born in the City of New York, December 3,
1876. He received his preparatory education
at St. Paul's School, Garden City, Eong Is-
land, and at St. Mark's School, Southborough,
Massachusetts. Later he went to Harvard
College, from which he was graduated in 1899,
attending later the Harvard Law School, and
the New York Law School. He was ad-
mitted to the New York bar in 1903, and has
since been in practice, having an office at No.
32 Nassau street. In 1908 he formed a part-
nership with William M. Seabury which was
terminated in 1910, by Mr. Seabury going west
for his health. In 1903 Mr. Butler joined
Troop A of Squadron A, and has remained
a member ever since except for a brief period.
He has always been a Republican in politics,
and an Episcopalian in religion. He is a
member of the Downtown, University, Har-
vard, Seawanaka and Church clubs.



The Wait family is of French ori-
WAIT gin, and the name was spelled

Wight. They were among the
earliest settlers of the Isle of Wight, and were
obliged to surrender the island to the Romans




in the year 43. Though the name was found
in other counties of England, the ancestors
of the American branch were identified with



Somersetshire, where Samuel Wait was a gen-
tleman of good position and estate.

(II) Samuel (2), second son of Samuel
( I ) Wait, of Somersetshire, England, was,
according to the English law of primogeniture,
left to his own resources when his elder
brother. Thomas, came into the estate. En-
tirelv dissatisfied with this arrangement, Sam-
uel Wait, whose means exceeded $50,000. emi-
grated to America in 1821, and settled iri New-
burg, New York, and later in Montgomery,
Orange county. New York, where he purchas-
ed a farm of one hundred and forty-eight acres
near Neelytown, afterwards purchasing other
farms and becoming a large property owner.
The early part of the nineteenth century saw,
in England, that great religious awakening led
liy the Wesleys, which gave rise to what is
known in this country as the Methodist Epis-
copal church. Among the converts made by
that great and ardent spirit, John W'esley, was
Samuel Wait, who like many another threw
himself heart and soul into the movement and
became one of that great army of lay preach-
ers tlirougfh whom the faith was spread. He
brought his religious enthusiasm with him to
the new country, and was the founder of the
Methodist church at Montgomery, in which
place he resided until his death. He married,
prior to leaving Somersetshire, England,
Mary Walsh of that countv. Their sons
were: Edward, Samuel, John, W'illiam.
Thomas, the two first named having been im-
porters of cattle and sheep, importing the first
.Southdown sheep in America, and the third
having been a large real estate owner in New-
burg. Their daughters were : Mary, married
Charles Downing, of Newburg. New York,
the noted pomologist; Emma, married a Mr.
Bradbury, a broadcloth manufacturer of Ly-
ons. Connecticut ; Flora, married a Mr. Bagg,
a planter and slave holder of Kentucky; Sarah,
married a Mr. Smith, of Montgomery, New
York.

(III) Thomas, son of Samuel (2) and
Mary fWalsh^i Wait, was born in Newbur?,
New York, 1S21, died at Montgomery, New
York. T903. He married, in 1846. Mary, born
in 1826, daughter of Johannes Mould, of
Montgomery, New York, and granddauprhter
of Christofel Mould, of revolutionary fame
Fourteen children were born to them, nine of
whom lived to mature years: Martha, mnr-
ried Chauncev Brooks ; Charles D., married




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'V



YORK



jur ; Man

urge W., II.
Mcd Ira C

1, Wesley,

■-.d Frank Jl .
\iina, unmarriea.

'-\'^eslev Wait. ?o''



jlia Kidd ;
married
further ;

t Holland,



of Thomas and
tt the old
Orange
,Mv\ 11. ,K, vj.i)' ._j, I ■ His early
HI was gained at one of the many ex-
ri\ate boarding schools on the Hud-
home. After he left school he
York City and therr- *ortk up the
icine and di
onths' stud;
, .e college ]



Online LibraryCuyler ReynoldsGenealogical and family history of southern New York and the Hudson River Valley : a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the building of a nation (Volume 2) → online text (page 49 of 95)