D. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) Hurd.

History of Middlesex County, Massachusetts : with biographical sketches of many of its pioneers and prominent men (Volume 2) online

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V-' ^! . •■■■■:-

1 ■-;..



HISTORY



OF



MIDDLESEX COUNTT



MASSACHUSETTS,



WITH



! 1 ()! r 1 ; A P l-[ re A i . SKE]TCHES



I IF MANY OK ITS



Pioneers and Prominent Men.



illMl'II.KD ISI>Kl: TICK Si:i»F.KVISIliX i)F



I < I i \ \ M ! I ' ' \ I I I I ; [ >



VOL. II.



I Xj XjTJ S T K. ^^T E ID .



I'H 1 L.\ I)ELPHI.\:

.r. w . 1. 1 ; w I s A- ( • < >.

1 N il .



( 'opi/riqht, I.V'U.
liY J. \V. LKW IS Sc ('(».

All !:inf'l< lifterrM.



PRESS or

JAS. B. RnnOEBB PaiNTINO COMPANY.
PHII.AnP.LrHlA.



kEF

I no^x



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CONTENTS OF VOL. II.



CITIES AND TOWI^S.



CHAPTER I.

LOWEXL 1

Early History.

CHAPTER n.

Lowell — {Continued) 16

The Tuwn of Lowell.

CHAPTER III.
Lowell— (Con^'ntterf) 26

City of Lowell.

CHAPTER IV.

Lowell— ( Conlinued) 50

Hayora.

CHAPTER V.

Lowell — (Continued) 58

Politics.

CHAPTER VL

Lowell — [Continued) 64

Baaka.

CHAPTER VII.

Lowell— fCona'nuerf) 71

MnDufacnirea.

CHAPTER Vin.

Lowell — (Continued) 112

Scboola.

CHAPTER IX.
Lowell — (Continued) 126

Ecclesiastical History.

CHAPTER X.

Lowell — (Continued) 179

Military.

CHAPTER XI.

Lowell — (Contintud) 188

The Freag.

CHAPTER XII.

Lowell — (Continued) U'o

Medical.



CHAPTER XIII.

Lowell — ( Conlinued) 222

Societies.

CHAPTER XIV.

Lowell — ( CoTtlinued) 231

Miscellaneous.

CHAPTER XV.
Chelmsfi-bd 239

Early History.

CHAPTER XVI.
Chelmsford — (Continued) 249

lodiao History — FreDcb aod lodiao Wars — War of the ReTo-
lutioo— Shays' BebellioQ — War of the Rebellioo.

CHAPTER XVII.

Chelmsford — (Conlinued) 259

Educational History.

CHAPTER XVIII.
Chelmsford — (Continued) 264

Manafactnreo.

CHAPTER XIX.
Chelmsford — {Continued) 269

MlscellaDeoua.

CHAPTER XX.

Dracut 276

Early Hlstoiy.

CHAPTER XXL

DRA.CVT— (Continued) 278

Indian History.

CHAPTER XXEL

Dractjt — (Continued) 284

ClTil and Docnmentary History.

CHAPTER XXm.

Dbacut — (Continued) 290

£ccleela«ticai and EducationaL

CHAPTER XXrV. ,.;^

DnxcuTr— (Continued) .i..5?lL

Jterolotlonary.War.



CONTEXTS.



' CHAPTER XLIII.

300 CdsckRD— {Continued) jS-l

Ci'nrurJ Fight— Brunt and Strife .if Revoluticiri.

CHAPTER XLIV.

CoscoRD—iConlinufd) .-,37

Prtigrees and Prosperity aa u Shire-town and ;i Literur) Ceiitie



CHAPTER XXV.

Dr.\cdt— ( Continued)

Shaj-8' Eebellion and MiBcellaneous.

CHAPTER XXVI.

Dracvt— (Continued) 3]g

War of the Kebellion— ManufactureB— BiograpliicaL

CHAPTER XXVII. i — Celebratioii»-3Ioui.ii,eut6-Hebrll,„n

• „, - ^-^ CHAPTER XLV.

The Beginnings. -v^j . .

CHAPTER XXVIII. | courts, School*. t«deti.s, I>„n.tiun». etc.

BiLLEKICA— (Ct)n(m»ed) p.og ,

The Indians and Indian Wara. CHAPTER XL VI.

Co.N'CORD— (Con(ini/C(/)

Professional and Official I'lti^ens— Coiirlusi.-n



(iu:',



CHAPTER XLVII.



CHAPTER XXIX.

BiLLERlcw — i Continued) .332

IteligioiiB lljotory.

CHAPTER XXX. : Lincoj-n ,112

Rtl.LKRIC.A. — [Continued) ."^SS f^r'r Hi>fMT—rlMir..lie-— Military llr-|..ry— Fnnch ju. I

Land Di,trib.mon-D>™en,berment. '"''""' ""■-■'■''- If- lutiou-l.ist ..f .s,|die,H-\Var ..1

^ l.-lj— W.ir of th.- Heb.-lh.jii— .\it ot lu. ■.i(.o.,iiir,n— Town

CHAPTER XXXI. ! "rtice,-, etc.

BiLLERicA— iCoH(miterf) 34O CHAPTER XLVIII.

B.llericaiatheRevolntinn. LlSVOL^-^ Continued) t^o;

CHAPTER XXXII. j <^"ll>'S^<''™'luaf=-Plo-in:.„5-E.lMc.,M..unl-B,inK|.i.l«ces

DiLLKRic.\— (CoHdnuet/) 3II 1 CH U'TEK MAX

Kdnrjuioll. j

I Aylr rt3.j

CHAPTER XXXIII. 1 I,itro.l..Mion -T..|.mU.M'I'.v -Ku.ly liMhun Tube,- Bound-

liK.LEttrcA — tConlinued) 34Q ] anesof the r. mm.

ii.iig.ou8 History. I CHAPTER L.



CH.\PTER XXXIV.

BlLLKKUA — i Continued)

31iaci'Ihiiieuiis.



349



\YF.R — (Omtinued)
Kariy Sftttlerrf.



M-2



CHAPTER XXXV.

Ty.NGSBORoumi 357



CHAPTER XXXVI.



M'DBUi



CHAPTER XXXVII.
Waylano 413

CHAPTER XXXVIII.
Maynard 437

CHAPTER XXXIX.

STOMiHASl 46]

CHAPTER XL.
Groton .501

CHAPTER XLL

('<J^i->i - '> .570

.■Settlement— &rly History — Indian Tloiihles — Captain
Wlueler'H Narrative.

CHAPTER XLII.

Conci^Wi—i (.'nnlinued) 577



CHAPTEi; LI.

.A.YER — {G'/i07/lli;'/l (5,50

Highways— I'. ■ii|Hayr—niidr,M:_T.n el II — M,,|., :,i,.| Pl...^

CHAPTER LH.

.\yer — [Continued) 6.57

Canals— Ruilroadi—I'ustdilii e -Tidosrapb— Telepbunc.

CII.VI'TER LI[[.

.\yf.k — ( t'iin/iniic(/l ,jm

Schools— Library — Water uoiks.

CHAPTER LIV.
.\yek - (toH(i»iic(/) gp.5

Industries— .\ucieut Mills - Maiiufiuton-3 -Xoiiipaivr».

CHAPTER LV.

Ay'er — I Continued) ^70

Reugiois Societies: B.ipli3( — Unitarian — Catholic — 1 ..n
gregfttlolMilirt— .Methiidist.

CHAPTER LVI.

.A.VER — iConlinuetl) qj^

Fire and File * 'oiiipaiiies.



CHAPTER LVII.



Independence in i'hnn;h and .-state— Preparations for Ke».i- 1 .-Vyer — (Conlinutd)



lutioa — Journal of a British Spy,



6S4



New Town— Agit.ition for Sot-off— lucorjioration.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER LVIir. | CHAPTER LXXII.
Westford ''S9 ' Bedford— (Coiitiivteil) 828

Colonial Troubles— Botitoo Tea Party — Minute Heo — CoDCOHl



CHAPTER LIX.
Wakefield '1'

CHAPTER LX.

WiSCHESTER "■*''

Ci\il Htstury previuus to Itou.

CHAPTER LXI.
\Vl>"CHESTER — ( Conliitued) '-^b



EccIeBiastical History.

CHAPTER LXir.



BoXBOROliiU



CHAPTER LXI [I.



Reading



Tfi9



703



Fight— Women 8 Part— Battle of Banker Hill.

CHAPTER LXXJUI.

Bedford — {Continued) 831

Supplies for tha Amiy— Fiuancial Trouble*— Vote for GoTer-
nor under the CunstitutioD iu 1780.

CHAPTER LXXIV.

Bedford — (Continued) 834

Shays' Bebelllon and Subsequent Troubles — ClTll War— Bed-
ford's Honored Dead.

CHAPTER LXXV.

Bedford — i Coniinued) 836



CHAPTER LXIV



North READiyt;



808



Finaucial Troubles — ')ld Tenor and Lawful Money — Slavery
10 Bedford— Bill of Sale of a Negro Boy in 175«.

CHAPTER LXXVI.

BedfiiRD — I Continued) 838

Puhtic Charity — How Dispenseit— Town Farm for the Pour.



CHAPTER LXV.



Sll I



Bedford

The P:.rent Towni( - EHily lir.tut- aiiil S^ttl^iiicnt.,— The T»i>
Brothers — Dlsiharge of lu'li.in l hiiiiis— i;.<i ii-.n^— linui-
IKfriitiuii.

CHAPTKi; LXVI.

BEDFORD — (Cojilinwid)

X^nie -Uouu.l.iries— Beilcvnlrmi.— l!.i"i'l»— i'ii-.! M'-jmi -
Uou'^e and .Miiii-t»r— Chiirche., F.Tiiifd— T.iM-.i— ."'■in- "Id
Fniinli*'-; ami Sites.

CHAPTER LXV 11.

BEPFiiRn— l,Cb'i/i"':r('' ...

Ri'l.iiioii of First rhuMii ■nl r..uii— |ii»iiii»sk.h -I l;->.
Nichohiii B.jiv»»— Kiint Brll- Miuielry f \>\ . Xulh.iiii. 1
bheliii.iD dnd Rev. JoM-ph Pen uli.

(Jil.APTER LXV II I.

Beufobp — {ConliiivaU

Tim I'leriiy of New Kus:l»iiil— Itcv. Sauninl Meariis- Pace
.lud H.irtw^ll Fim.l— Will .d \iinn Pa^e— New Miiliii-j-
IIoU6e — SiiigiDS-J" hool— .'^.ibl'iiiU-?^' Iiool.

CHAPTER LXIX.

Bedford —(Ci^nttnued) 82L

S-parali'in hnw-ren Clmn li -ml r'ovii 1 iiiMnnu.l'on^n'ca-
tioiwl -oci.-ty iirsunized— Their ll.m.H;..r W..i/.hip— W,,rk
of I'liilariJU Chun h aud Firil I'.u :h— Death of llev.
:^amuel .-lenrn!=— .^teatii-.' [le^ctiidaiit-s- 1 huriih cl Christ.

i^HAPTER LXX.

Bedford— ( 'ijn(i«»e'') ^-'^



CHAPTER LXXVIL

Bedford — (Continued) 839

Burial-Grounds.

I CHAPTER LXXVIII.

I Bedford — (Continued) 840

Highways- Bridges and lUilroads.

^1„ I CHAPTER LXXrX.

j Bkdford — [Continued) 844

I jitai;c-llout«f»— Foat-Oflice — PystOiMier— Industries— Residen-

tial Town— luventiona.



i CHAPTER LXXX.
>!.* Bedford — (Coniinued)



846



8-::o



SrhouU and Libraries.

CH.VI'TER L.\'\t.

Bedford— I,' '■'"''""'''l ...

Indian Tn'ublefe-ludiii.hiiil ,s. rvir. — KxiK-in-iKe of Mary
I.une— 5la-twell Family— F«!ni.h NeutraUi- FreutU aud
Indian Wars.



8-J7



MiriiigJ— Likes— Ponds— Public-Houses— Bedford Springs.

CHAPTER LXXXL

I'.KDFORD — (Contintifd) 847

Fire-EnKine — Enforcement of Law— Drink Custom — Wltch-
. raft— Bounty for Crows, elc.

CH.\PTER LXXXII.

Bedford — ^Continued) 849

Profanity and Drunkenness Puniahed hy Law — Titblogiiien
aud their Duties— Minor Offl-Ters -English Rigbt.

CHAPTER LXXXIir.
BtDFORD — (Coatiaued) 850

Noted 0\'Ca6lon8.

CHAPTER LXXXIV.
Bedford — (Conlin'Uii) 851

Topi>grapbical and Miscellaueuuth

CHAPTER LXXXV.
Bedford — (Cnniintird) 853

Early Method of Collecfiug Taxes— Souin Early Oustoou and . .' <■■ ■
IniprovemcDts. .,.*., t

CHAPTER T.XXX VT i '

Littleton ^^t''^



CITIES AND TOWNS.



CHAPTER I.
LO WELL}

HY CHARLES C. CHASE.
KARLY HISTORY.

The spot on which the city of Lowell now stands
is not without hi.storic interest. Where now stretch
its busy streets, resounding with the innumerable
voices of industries, there once stood the thickly-
gathered wigwams of the red man of the forest, or
the humble anil scattered homes of the early English
settlers. Ever since tlie race began this spot has had
its peculiar attraction as the liabitation of man. It
was never a solitude. The echoes of human voices
have ever mingled with the soun<l of its water-falls.

The .^[errimack and Concord iiivcrs unite within
the limits of the city, and there are water-falls on
each of these .-itreams within a mile of their junc-
tion. The Hsli which sw.irmed about these falls had
from time immemorial attracted the Indian, .-md the
vast water-power which they aH'ordcd allured tlie
enterprising white man to the favored spot. The
two rivers have each an honored name in history.

What civilized man first discovered the Merrimack
is an interesting but unsettled question. De Monts,
Champlain and (Captain .John Smith each has his
claim to the honor. Doubtless, Champlain, the at-
tendant and the i)ilot of the French admiral, De
Monts, made the Hrst historic mention of the river;
for, in 11)04, in writing to France re.'tpecting the
transactions of the expedition of De Monts on the '
banks of the St. Lawrence, he says : " The Indians [
tell us of a beautiful river far to the south, which '
they call the Merrimac." .\gain, in the following !
seascm, when, on the night of July 15tb, the bark of
De .Monta had sailed from the Isle of Shoals to Cape
Ann. Champlain was sent to the shore by his com-
mander to observe five or six Indians who had in a
canoe come near the .admiral's bark. To each of
these Indians Champlain gave a knife and some bis-

1 III preparing tliede pafces, the viiliiuble hjetunes ut Lowell, by Rev.
Dr. Hfliry \. titled, Cliarle^ I'owley, LL. D., au«i Alfred GilniAO, Esq., ■
have l)L'en freely coiisulled, aud to these gelltlcliien tlio writer tenders
hla dilK'ere thiinks.



cuit, " which caused them to dance again better than
before." When he asked for information regarding
the coast, the Indians " with a crayon described a
river which we had passed, which contained shoals
and was very long." This river, without doubt, was
the Merrimack. On the 17th of July De Monts en-
tered a bay and discovered the mouth of another
river, which was evidently the Charles River.

It should here be remarked that some writers have
believed that the river whose mouth waa discovered
on the 17th of July was the Merrimack ; but the
fact that Champlain, on the KJth, while at Cape
Ann, was informed by the Indians that De Monts
had in the previous night passed unobserved a river
which was very long and had shoals, forbids the sup-
position that the river, whose mouth waa discovered
on the next day, whilesailing south from Cape Ann,
could be the Merrimack. Who was the first discov-
erer of the Merrimack, therefore, still remains in
doubt. Champlain clearly marks the identity of Cape
.\nn by mentioning the three islands near its point.

.\round the falls of these streams were the favorite
(Ishing-grounds of the Pawtucket tribe of Indians.'
Here in the spring-time, from all the region round,
they gathered to secure their annual supply of fish.
Here they reared their wigwams and lighted their
council-firea. Here, for the time at least, the In-
dian had his home. His women and children were
with him. On the plains, where the young of our
city celebrate their athletic gtimes, the sons and
daughters of the forest engaged in their rude and
simple sports. On (he waters, where now our pleas-
ure-boats gaily sail, the Indian once paddled his
light canoe.

The Pawtucket tribe was one of the largest and
most powerful of the Indian tribes. Gookin, a writer
of the highest authority in Indian history, informs us
that before the desolations of the great plague in
1617 the tribe numbered 3000 souls. Its domain ex-
tended over all the State of New Hampshire and
parts of Maine and Massachusetts. Little, however,
is known of their history before the coming among
them of the Rev. John Eliot, the great apostle to the



- Wamesits is the name giveo to the Indiaiu near Concord Blr«r, bui i
the Pawtucketa and Wamraiu belonged to ttae aune tilbe.



HISTORY OF MIDDLESEX COUNTY, MASSACHTTSETTS.



Indians, about sixteen years after the landing of the
Pilgrims at Plymouth.

This devoted Christian missionary, now forty-three
years of age, had been educated at the University of
Cambridge, England, and had subsequently, in the
new world, been settled, with the title of " teacher,"
over the church in Roxbury. By his labors some of
the Indiana of the vicinity had professed their faith
in Christ, and were known by the name of Christian
or Praying Indians. With some of these Praying In-
dians to aid him in his missionary work, Eliot vis-
ited, in 1647, the red men of the Pawtucket tribe on
the banks of the Merrimack and Concord. Passacona-
way, the Indian chief, with his sons, fled at their ap-
proach. Some of his men, however, remained and
listened to the message of the devoted apostle. In
the following year Eliot, upon a second visit, gained
the ear of the chief, who declared bis purpose
in future to " pray to God." In 1653, upon the peti-
tion of Eliot, the Legislature of Massachusetts granted
to the Pawtucket Indians the land lying about the
Pawtucket and Wamesit Falls. The tract thus
granted contained about 2500 acres. Gookin informs
us that every year in the beginning of May the
apostle Eliot " came to this fishing-place of the In-
dians to spread the net of the gospel to fish for their
souls."

Passaconaway, whose usual home was at Penna-
cook (now Cuncord, N. H.), ruled over a wide do-
main, extending from the Merrimack to the Piscat-
aqua. As a powwow and sorcerer he had a wide-
spread fame. It was thought that he " could make a
green leaf grow in the winter, the trees to dance
and water to burn." He lived to a great age. Gookin
says that he "saw him alive at Pawtucket when he
was about 100 years old.' In a speech which the
aged chieftain made to his tribe before his death, are
the following words : " I am now going the way of all
flesh, and not likely to see you ever meet together anv
more. I will now leave this word of counsel with
you, that you may take heed how you quarrel with
the English." He is supposed to have died about
1661.

Wannalancet, his son, now more than forty years
of age, became his successor. He respected the dying
advice of his father. He was a lover of peace, a man
of gentle nature. Too often the unsparing vengeance
of the white men, aroused to frenzy by the perfidy
and cruelty of other Indians, fell upon the head of
the innocent Wannalancet. But he refused to retali-
ate. His memory is recalled by every generous
heart with sentiments of honor mingled with pity.

The home of Wannalancet was on the banks ofthe
Merrimack, at Litchfield, N. H., about twenty miles
north of Lowell. In 1669 he came down the Merri-
mack, and, as a defence against the hostile Mohawks,
erected a fort upon the hill in Lowell which was
from this circumstance denominated Fort Hill. This
hill is now the property of the city of Lowell, which



' has generously adorned its grounds and n^^de it the
most beautiful of our public parks.

Lender the gentle Wannalancet the fortunes of his
tribe rapidly waned. Lawless white men seized upon
his lands. .\t length he fell into the hands of
enemies. Though set at liberty, he refused to return
to his home. In 1677, when about fifty-eight years of
age, he was visited by Indians from the north, who,
' as Eliot declared, " urged him partly by persuasion
i and partly by force to accompany them to their coun-
I try." The unfortunate and di.iheartened chief finally
t consented, and with a band of about fifty followers,
which embraced all but two of his once powerful
tribe, he departed to the wilds of Canada. As a tribe,
I the Pawtuckets long since perished from the earth.
Their name and their sad memory remain. An igno-
rant and indolent race, almost utterly destitute of
1 every art and comfort of civilized life, subi-isting upon
1 the coarsest food, and wasted both by pestilence and
i war, they melted away before the advancing ranks of
I the more enterprising and aggressive settlers from the
'< Old World. Few traces are now left, in our city, of
their habitation. An occasional Indian arrow head,
or other rude implement, dug up while laying the
foundations of some modern .structure, a few traces
of the old trench which once separated their lands
from those of the white man, remind us that we live
on historic ground. The familiar words " Pawtucket,"
" Wamesit," " Passaconaway," " Wannalancet," and
others, which the people of Lowell are fond of em-
I ploying in giving names to the streets and the vari-
ous institutions and enterprises of the city, attest the
I pride and pleasure with which we recognize the his-
toric fact that on the soil where our city now stands
there " once lived and loved another race of beings,'
I in whose fate we take a poetic interest, and whose

memory we do not wish to .see blotted out forever.
j Let ua also briefly notice the white men who, in
j early days, dwelt upon this favorite spot. In 1652
; about twenty of the inhabitants of Woburn and Con-
cord, Mass., petitioned the General Court to be al-
lowed to examine a tract of land lying on the west
side of the Concord River with the view of forming a
new settlement, and their petition was granted. They
found the land " a comfortable place to accommodate
God's people." The General Court gave them a tract
of land originally about six miles square, bounded on
one side by the Concord River beginning at its junc-
tion with the Merrimack. About the same time the
grant, already referred to, giving to the Pawtuckettribe
of Indians a tract of laud lying about the falls in the
Merrimack, was made upon the petition of the apostle
Eliot.

On the River Chelmer, in the County of Essex, in
England, there was a village called Chelmsford (Chel-
mer's ford), a name which seems to have been dear
to the little band of men to whom we have just re-
ferred ; for they give the name of Chelmsford to the
new settlement. This little colony of Englishmen in



LOWELL.



a few years receive an important addition to their
numbers and their wealth by the accession of a large
part of the members of the church in \Venham,Ma88.,
with their pastor, the Rev. John Fiske. The colony
consisted of men of the most devout religious char-
acter. So careful were they that no irreligious person
should come among them that no one was admitted
to citizenship except by "a major vote at public
town-meeting." Lands and accommodations were,
however, gratuitously offered to mechanics and artif-
icers who would set up their trades in the town.
The sound of innumerable looms and spindles, which
now is heard in everj- part of this (Sty, was not heard
her^for the tirst time when our great manufactories
were built, for, in l<i56, more than 230 years ago, at
the Jlay meeting of the town of Chelmsford, thirty
acres of land were granted to William How if he
would set up his trade of weaving and perform the
town's work. Similar urt'ers encouraged the erection
of a saw-mill anil a corn-mill, it being e.Kpressly
stipulated in case of the latter that a "sufficient mill
and miller" should he employed. Truly the far-see-
ing and wealthy men of Boston, who established the
great manufactories of our city, were not the first to
recognize the value of the work of the loom and spin-
dle, and to foster and encourage the manufacturing
interests of our country.

But the history of the town of (Chelmsford is not
the history of fvowcll; for the territory of the city
embraces only that part of the town known as East
(,'helmsford. Of the town of Chelmsford we need
onlv -^ay that from its earliest days its staid and pious
inhabitants, devoted mainly to the peaceful pursuits
of agriculture, have transinitte<l to their posterity an
honorable mime. The patriotic zeal with which they
espoused their country's cause in the days of the
Revolution, and their brave and generous participa-
tion in the datigers and expenses of the war, make a
historic record of which their posterity may well be
proud.

But of Kaat Chelmsford, which, in its early days,
was the name by which th^ site of our city was called,
let us brieHy apeak. At the beginning of the present
century this village contained forty-five or fifty
houses. The natural advant.-iges of the place — its t
water- falls anil its fertile meadows — attracted not only ]
the farmer, but the mechanic and artisan. There is !
on record a description of the village as it was nearly l
one hundred yearn ago. As one came down on the j
side of the Merrimack from Middlesex Village and I
past Pawtucket Falls, he passed successively the resi- I
dences of Silas Hoar, Amos Whitney, Archibald j
A[cFarlin, Captain John Ford, Captain Phineas |
Whiting (where now stands the splendid residence of \
Frederick .A.yer), Asahel Stearns, Jonathan Fiske,
Mr. Livingston (in a house once used as Captain
Whiting's store), and Joseph Chambers, a cooper.
Then came, near the siteof the Lowell Hospital, a red i
school-house, from whose windows the pupils, when



tired of their books, looked down upon the water-
falls and the huge rocks of the river.' Near the foot
of the falls lived Benjamin Melvin. Near by stood
the saw-mill and grist-mill of Nathan Tyler— mills
which, in 1810, were swept away by the ice in a win-
ter freshet. Mr. Hall, a blacksmith, lived on the site
1 of the Ladd and Whitney monument. Josiah Fletch-
er lived near the site of the John Street Congrega-
I tional Church. Crossing the Concord River, we come
to the "Old Joe Brown House,'' a two-story house
still standing conspicuously on East Merrimack
Street, in the open space just east of the Prescott
boarding-houses. Next, on the spot now occupied
by St. John's Hospital, was the " Old Yellow House,"
once a well known hotel and subsequently the resi-
dence of Judge Livermore.

This historic house has been moved back from the
street, but still is used as an appendage of the hos-
pital. On the site of the American Honse was an inn
kept by Joseph Warren. Nathan Ames and John
Fisher did a large business as blacksmiths near the
paper and batting-mill on Lawrence Street. " Mr.
Ames " (as Z. E. StOne, Esq., from whom I obtain
these facts, informs us) " was the father of the well-
known Springfield sword manufacturers of the same
name." Near the junction of Central and Thorndike
Streets were the houses of Johnson Davis, Moses
Hale and Ephraim Osgood. On the old Boston road
lived Sprague Livingston, and on a cross-road leading
to Middlesex Village Robert and Samuel Pierce.
Levi Fletcher lived between Chelmsford and Liberty
Streets, near the old pound. Near Gates' tannery
■itood a school-house. In this vicinity was the house
of John Gload and Samuel Marshall. On the Chelms-
ford road, as one goes towards the city poor-farm, was
the house of Isaac Chamberlain, on whose site was
supposed to be the house of John Chamberlain, whose



Online LibraryD. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) HurdHistory of Middlesex County, Massachusetts : with biographical sketches of many of its pioneers and prominent men (Volume 2) → online text (page 1 of 220)