D. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) Hurd.

History of Plymouth County, Massachusetts : with biographical sketches of many of its pioneers and prominent men (Volume 2) online

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He seems to have been a settler of enterprise, as he
was often called to fill offices, both in the church and
town. He died in 1673, leaving eight children, six
sons and two daughters, and, what seems singular
two sons of the same name, — John and " young son
John," and from the latter John Bryant Turner was
a descendant. He received his early education of
Mr. Eleazer Peaks, and fitted for college under the
tuition of Mr. Timothy Flint, of Cohasset, a brother
of Parson Flint ; but for some reason he never en-
tered college.



His early life was spent on his father's farm, occu-
pying a portion of Farm Neck and embracing the
farm and house-lot of Mr. Timothy Hatherly, who
might properly be called the father of Scituate.

In 1813 he married Hannah Nichols, of Cohasset,
and the constant cruising of the British fleet along
the coast at that time, and the frequent foraging
expeditions of their crews, rendered the early portion
of their married life somewhat uncomfortable. Fre-
quent meetings of the coast-guard were held at his
house for drill.

When quite a young man he was chosen moderator
at the town-meeting, and from that time till his death
was in constant public service. He was generally
known as " Squire Bry." He represented the dis-
trict for many years in the General Court, both in
the House and Senate.

As a leader in the Old Colony politics he was an
untiring worker, honest and firm in his couvietions
and unswerving in his determination to do right,
characteristics which won him a popular name through-
out the county. He was also one of the founders of
the anti-slavery party, and an earnest believer in aud
supporter of the cause of temperance, which was
then in its infancy.

In 1830 he was greatly surprised by the official
notification of his nomination on the Democratic-
Republican ticket as representative to the Twenty-
second Congress, and notwithstanding mauy were at
variance with his political views, his nomination was
unanimous.

But, unwilling to accept, he withdrew in favor of
John Quincy Adams, for whom he held a deep
respect and friendship.

In county affairs he was engaged for many years
as commissioner, in which capacity he, with his asso-
ciates, directed the construction of many public
works of considerable magnitude, among others the
locating of the first railroads. His military life
began in the coast-guard in the war of 1812, and
ended as colonel of the Second Infantry, from which
office he resigned, owing to pressure of other duties.
His religious views were of the Unitarian order, he
being a member of the First Church. His liberal
ideas, as shown by some of his writings, prove that
he must have been a diligent student of theology.
In all enterprises and progressive movements affecting
the good of the town he seems to have been the lead-
ing spirit. His sound judgment caused him to be
continually sought after by his townspeople in all
matters of arbitration, and in the various complica-
tions which arose he would cheerfully aid in untang-
ling them to the satisfaction of all, rich or poor. His




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HISTORY OF SCITUATE AND SOUTH SCITUATE.



443



private life seemed to be one of rare enjoyment.
Blessed as lie was with a genial disposition, the per-
plexities of life did not disturb him. Progressive in
all his ideas, he always spoke or wrote with a firmness
mingled with gentleness, and with profound respect
for the opinions and feelings of others. He died
Feb. 10, 1S49, in the height of his public career.



GEOUQE MINOT ALLEN.

George Minot Allen was born in Pembroke, Mass.,
Feb. 19, 1802. He was the oldest of ten children
of Rev. Morrill Allen. During bis minority he re-
mained at home, and was trained to farm labor, mean-
while acquiring such education as was given in the
common schools of the time.

In the winter of 1826 he taught school in Scitu-
ate, and the following winter in Duxbury.



In May, 1828, he was married to Hannah E.,
second daughter of Ensign Otis, Jr., of Scituate. Of
five children born to them, two daughters and one
son survive.

Soon after his marriage, he opened a store of gen-
eral merchandise in Scituate, and also engaged with
others in shipping business, having a number of mer-
chant vessels built and employed in commerce. In
Scituate, also, he employed much of his time and
strength on his farm, to which he retired from
business in 1854.

In politics, Mr. Allen was an ardent supporter of
the Whig party, and afterwards of the Union or Re-
publican party. In the year 1858 he was elected
representative to the General Court. In religious
faith he was a Unitarian, and for many years took an
active part in the interests of the society at Scituate.

During most of the active years of his life, Mr.
Allen served his town as a member in the principal
offices of trust. He died July 1, 1878.



HISTORY OF CARVER



CHAPTER I.

CIVIL HISTOUY.
Act op Incoki'Oration.

'• An Act for Incorporating the southerly Part of the Town of

Plympton, in the County of Plymouth, into a Town by the Name

of Carver.

" Be it enacted by the Senute and Ifouee of Jlepreaentativc* in
General Court aimembled and by the authority of the same, That
the lands hereafter described, to wit : Beginning at the west lino
of the town ot* Kingston, thenco running west so as to strike tho
head of Anesnapet Brook so called ; thence continuing the same
course to tho line of the town of Middleborough, it being the
dividing line between the north and south precincts in the said
town of Plyuipton ; thence on the line of the said town of Mid-
dleborough till it comes to the line of the town of Waroham ;
thenco on the line of the said town of Wareham till it comes to
tho line of the town of Plymouth; thence on the line of the
said town of Plymouth till it cornea to the line of the town of
Kingston aforesaid; thence on the said Kingston line to the
first mentioned bound, with all the inhabitants dwelling on the
lauds above described, bo and they aro hereby incorporated into
a town by the name of Carver; and the said town is hereby
invested with all the powers, privileges, and immunities to
which towns within this Commonwealth are or may bo entitled,
agreeable to the Constitution and Laws of this Commonwealth.

"Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the
inhabitants of the said town of Cauvku shall pay all the arrears
of taxes which have been assessed upon them and their pro-
portionable part of the tax granted in March last, together with
their proportion of all debts that are now due from the said
town of Plyinpton, and shall support any poor person or persons
of that part of Plympton which is now Carver, and shall not
have obtained a legal settlement elsewhere (when they may
become chargeable), and such poor person or persons may be
returned to the town of Carver, in tho same way and manner
that paupers may by law be returned to tho town or district to
which they bclung.

" Be it further enacted, That tho inhabitants of the said town
of Carver shall bo entitled to receive their proportion of all
debts and monies duo to tho said town of Plympton, and also
their proportionablo part of all laboratory stores and common
and undivided lands belonging to the said town of Plympton,
agreeably to tho last Htato tax assessed upon the said town.

" And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That
Ephraim Spooner, Esq., be and ho is hereby ompowercd to issue
[lift warrant directed to some principal luhabitant, requiring
him to warn and give notice to the inhabitants of tho said town
of Carver to assemble and meet at some suitable place in tho
said town, as soon as conveniently may bo, to chooso all such
444



officers as towns are required to choose at their annual town-
meetings in the months of March or April annually."

This act passed June 9, 1790.

The First Town-Meeting 1 and other Public Acts.
— Pursuant to the authority granted by and the direc-
tions embraced in the foregoiug act of incorporation,
the legal voters of the town of Carver were duly no-
tified to assemble and meet together on Mouday, the
5th day of July, 1790, and beiug thus met the exer-
cises were commenced by a prayer of llev. Jolm How-
land, pastor of what had been the Second Congrega-
tional Church in Plymptou, but now First Church of
Carver. Then proceeded to the choice of town officers,
with results as follows: Francis Shurtleff, Esq., mod-
erator ; Capt. Nehemiah Cobb, town clerk ; Deacon
Thomas Savery, Capt. William Atwood, and Samuel
Lucas, Jr., selectmen; Benjamin White, Samuel Lucas,
Jr., and Barnabas Cobb, assessors ; Francis Sliurtluff,
Esq., treasurer ; Jonathan Tilson and Caleb Atwood,
constables and tax collectors; Timothy Cobb, tithing-
man. The moderator, town clerk, and selectmen were
choseu a committee to settle with the town of Plymp-
ton. Voted to allow collectors eight pence per pouud
for collecting the town taxes. Nathaniel Atwood was
made grand-juryman, and James Vaughn agreed with
to support a town pauper for Is. -Id. per week.

In 1791 six surveyors of highways were elected;
Consider Chase and Samuel Lucas, Jr., chosen sur-
veyors of leather; Joseph Vaughan, Isaac Cushman,
and Abijah Lucas made a committee to take care of
the fish called alewives ; Meletiah Cobb and Joseph
Hansom elected hog-reeves, and a vote passed that
swine may run at large, being yoked and ringed ac-
cording to law ; also voted to pay from the town
treasury eight pence for the head of each crow
brought to the selectmen before the 1st of June.
Voted also to instruct the selectmen to lay out a road
from the head of John Atwood's lane to Rochester
road, and from the line of iliddleboro' to Ebenezer
Blossom's, and from Lakenham road by David Ran-
som's aud Edward Stephens', and so on to Deacon
Dunham's, always provided that the owners of laud



HISTORY OF CARVER.



445



through which these proposed new roads would pass
should io each and every instance make a free gift to
the town of the land those roads would occupy.
Voted, that the support of the poor be set up at auc-
tion and disposed of to the lowest bidder.

1792. Voted to pay Robert Waterman two pounds
and eleven shillings to build a pound for the impound-
ing of cattle, and also voted that for the future one-
third of the town-meetings should be held in the
South meeting-house. Voted, that the pound shall
be built near the ceutre of the town, and not long
after Joseph Vaughan was chosen pound-keeper.

In 1795, voted, that Maj. Nehemiah Cobb dispose
of the town's part of the old paper money in the
treasury of Plympton as best he can, and raise eight
pounds nine shillings for the committee of settlement
with Plympton, twenty pounds to pay Plympton,
and twelve shillings to Samuel Lucas for services as
treasurer.

1798. Chose Isaac Cushman, Lieut. Caleb Atwood,
and Lieut. Joseph Shaw inspectors of alewives in
Weweantic River, and voted that hogs should not run
at large.

1800. Voted to appropriate four hundred dollars
for the repairs of the public highways, and to pay
each man for a day's work on the road three shillings
and sixpence, and also the same for a yoke of oxen,
and each cart and plow to be allowed one shilling.
Asaph Bisbee chosen inspector of nails. Voted swine
may run at large, being ringed and yoked, and voted
not to act on the article in the warrant concerning the
support of the gospel by a town tax.

1801. The town elected a committee, consisting of
seven persons, to act concerning the settlement of a
colleague with Rev. John Howland, and voted that
both swine and cattle might run at large.

1805. The town chose a committee consisting of
Deacon Thomas Savory, Capt. Abijah Lucas, John
Maxim, Capt. Nathaniel Sherman, and Capt. William
Atwood, to hire a minister to preach six months, one-
half at the North and the other half at the South
meeting-houses alternately. Also voted to appropriate
two hundred dollars for the support of the gospel the
present year, and a short time after voted to settle
Rev. Lothrop Thompson, at a salary of four hundred
dollars per year.

1S09. Voted that one-half the town-meetings shall
be held in the South meeting-house, and that the town
pay a bounty for killing birds, viz. : crows, crow black-
birds, red-wings, aud blue-jays, and soon after red-
birds were added.

1813. Services at town-meeting commenced with
prayer.



1816. Chose a committee to hire a minister.

1819. On the question, Shall Halifax be made the
shire of the county ? the vote stood one in favor to one
hundred and forty-seven against.

1824. Voted to instruct the selectmen to use their
influence and exertions to suppress the evil of intem-
perance in this town.

1827. Chose a committee to enforce the laws re-
specting Tovernors and retailers of spiritous liquors.

1829. Voted to recommend to all persons who may
be called upon to officiate at funerals to abstain en-
tirely from the use of spiritous liquors on such occa-
sions.

1832. Voted that the selectmen post up the names
of all such persons who misspend their time and
property by the excessive use of intoxicating liquors.

1833. Voted to hold the town-meeting in the Centre
meeting-house.

1837. Voted to receive this town's proportion of
surplus revenue moneys, and that the selectmen be
authorized to receive the same and give bond accord-
ing to law ; also that it be put on interest, and the
income be appropriated to the support of schools in
addition to the present appropriation. This was after-
ward reconsidered, and a vote passed to appropriate
the income to town expenses.

Also, Resolved, That the inhabitants of the town
of Carver reject and disapprove of the action of the
members of the last Legislature in passing an act for
each member to receive two dollars and fifty ceuts per
day.

Also, Resolved, To instruct the member from Car-
ver to use his influence to the end that each member
shall receive as a compensation but two dollars per
day.

1843. Voted to disapprove of any one selling
ardent spirits in or around the meeting-house on town-
meeting day.

1844. Voted not to choose tithingmen.

These several acts of the inhabitants of the town are
not cited because deemed to be of the greatest impor-
tance of all during these periods found noticed upon
the public records, but those best calculated to show
the advances of thought, progress of opinions, and con-
clusions of the body politic at the several dates when
passed, as it is no less proverbial than practically true
that the movements of loose straws show which way
the wind is blowing, and so do events somewhat
trivial not unfrequeutly reveal the existence of great
and important causes.

TOWN CLERKS.



1790-91. Maj. Nehemiah Cobb.
1791-93. Samuel Lucas, Jr.



1793-99. Maj. Neheuiiah Cobb.
1799-18U2. Barnabas Cobb.



446



HISTORY OF PLYMOUTH COUNTY.



1.SH2-11. Ephraiui Pratt.
1811-14, Stephen Shurtleff.
1814-30. Samuel Shaw.
1330-42. Isaac Vaughn.
1642-46. David Pratt.
1840-59. Thomas Vaughn.



1859-05. Ansel B. Maxim.
1365-67. Thos.M. Southworth.
1307-70. William Hammond.
1370-72. Nelson Barrows.
1872-79. PelegMcFarlin.
1379. Albert T.ShurtletT.



SELECTMEN.

179ft. — Deacon Thomas Savory, Cupt. William Atwood, Samuel
Lucas.

1791. — Deacon Thomas Savory, Cupt. William Atwood, Benja-
min Shurtleff.

17U2. — Deacuo Thomas Savory, Capt. William Atwood, Benja-
min Shurtleff.

1 7<j;;. — Bartlctt Murdoch, Jr., Capt. John Sherman, and Samuel
Lucas.

1794. — Bartlett Murdock, Jr., Capt. John Sherman, Benjamin
Shurtleff.

1795. — Capt. Nathaniel Sherman, Samuel Lucas, Benjamin
Shurtleff.

1796. — Capt. Nathaniel Sherman, Samuel Lucas, Benjamin
Shurtleff.

1797. — Capt. Nathaniel Sherman, Capt. William Atwood, Capt.
Benjamin Ward.

179S. — Capt. Nathaniel Sherman, Samuel Lucas, Capt. Benja-
min Ward.

1799. — Nehemiah Cobb, Esq., Ensign Abijah Lucas, Benjamin
Shurtleff.

1S00. — Nehemiah Cobb, Esq., Ensign Abijah Lucas, Benjamin
Shurtleff.

1S01. — Benjamin White, Ensign Abijah Lucas, Benjamin Shurt-
leff.

1302. — Benjamin White, Lieut. Abijah Lucas, Benjamin Shurt-
leff.

1803. — Capt. William Atwood, Capt. Abijah Lucas, Edward
Stevens.

1S04 . — Capt. William Atwood, Capt. Abijah Lucas, Edward
Stephens.

1805. — Capt. Gideon Shurtleff, Capt. Abijah Lucas, and Capt.
Elisba Murdock.

1S06. — Benjamin Ellis, Capt. Abijah Lucas, Thomas Hammond.

ISO". — Ensign Benjamin Ellis, Capt. Abijah Lucas, Thomas
Hammond.

1308. — James Vaughn, Capt. Abijah Lucas, Peleg Savory.

1309. — Capt. Nathaniel Sherman, Capt. Abijah Lucas, Ensign
Caleb Atwood.

XS10. — Capt. Gideon Shurtleff, James Vaughn, Ensign Caleb
Atwood.

1311. — Capt. Gideon Shurtleff, James Vaughn, Cornelius Dun-
ham.

1812. — Capt. Gideon Shurtleff, Maj. Benjamin Ellis, Hezekiah
Cole.

1S13. — Capt. Gideon Shurtleff, Jesse Murdock, Hezekiah Cole.

1314. — Capt. Gideon Shurtleff, Jesse Murdock, Hezekiah Cole.

1S15. — Capt. Gideon Shurtleff, Jesse Murdock, Hezekiah Cole.

1S16. — Capt. Bartlett Murdock, James Vaughn, Jonathan At-
wood.

1817. — James Vaughn, Thomas Cobb, Jonathan Atwood.

1313. — Jesse Murdock, Hezekiah Cole, Asaph Atwood.

1S19. — Jesse Murdock, Thomas Cobb, Asaph Atwood.

1820. — Hcwit McFarlin, Thomas Cobb, Asaph Atwood.

1821, — Hcwit McFarlin, Thomas Cobb, Asaph Atwood.

1822. — Maj. Benjamin Ward, Thomas Cobb, Asaph Atwood.

1823. — Lieut. -Col. Benjamin Ward, Thomas Cobb, Asaph At-
wood.



1824. — Lieut. -Col. Benjamin Ward, Thomas Cobb, Capt. Joseph
Shaw.

1825. — Lieut.-Col. Benjamin Ward, Thomas Cobb, C.ipt. Joseph
Shaw.

1826. — Col. Benjamin Ward, Thomas Cobb, John Savory, Esq.

1327. — Lewis Pratt, Thomas Cobb, John Savory, Esq.

1828. — Lewis Pratt, Capt. Samuel Shaw, John Savory, Esq.

1829. — Lewis Pratt, Capt. Samuel Shaw, Joseph Barrows.

1830. — Capt. Benjamin Ransom, Jonathan Atwood, Joseph
Barrows.

1831. — Capt. Benjamin Ransom, David Pratt, Capt. Joseph
Shaw.

1832. — Levi Sherman, David Pratt, Cupt. Joseph Shaw.

1833. — Levi Sherman, David Pratt, Capt. Joseph Shaw.

1834. — Levi Sherman, David Pratt, Dr. William Barrows.

1825. — John Bent (2d), Joseph Barrows, Dr. William Barrows.

1836.— John Bent (2d), Joseph Barrows, Timothy Cobb.

1837. — Daniel Shaw, Joseph Barrows, Timothy Cobb.

1838. — Daniel Shaw, Thomas Hammond, Benjamin Ransom.

1339. — Capt. Benjamin Ransom, Thomas Hammond, Henry
Sherman.

1840. — Charles Rider, Timothy Cobb, Henry Sherman.

1841.— Charles Rider, Timothy Cobb, David Pratt.

1842. — Charles Rider, Timothy Cobb, Charles Barrows.

1843. — William S. Savory, John Savory, Charles Barrows.

1844.— William S. Savory, Eliub Ward, Charles Barrows.

1845. — Joseph Barrows, Henry Sherman, Daniel Shaw.

1846. — Joseph Barrows, Willium Barrows, Daniel Shaw.

1347. — Samuel A. Shurtleff, Timothy Cobb, Daniel Shaw.

1848. — Samuel A. Shurtleff, Timothy Cobb, Daniel Shaw.

1849.— Thomas Southworth, Timothy Cobb, Daniel Shaw.

1850. — Thomas Southworth, Timothy Cobb, Daniel Shaw.

1851. — Thomas Southworth, Duniel Shaw, Thomas Cobb.

1852. — Joseph Barrows, Thomas Vaughn, Frederick Cobb.

1853. — Joseph Barrows, Thomas Vaughn, Frederick Cobb.

1854. — Joseph Barrows, Thomas Vaughn, Frederick Cobb.

1855. — Thomas Southworth, Thomas Vaughn, Horatio A.
Lucas.

1856. — Thomas Southworth, Thomas Vaughu, Stillman Ward.

1857. — Thomas Southworth, Thomas Vaughn, Stillman Ward.

1858. — Thomas Southworth, Thomas Vaughn, Benj. Ransom.

1859. — Freeman G. Tillson, Alvin PerkiiiH, Benjamin Ransom.

1860. — Thomas B. Griffcth, Alvin Perkins, Benjamin Ransom.

1861. — Thomas B. Griffeth, Alvin Perkins, Horatio A. Lucas.
1862.— Thomas B. Griffeth, Thomas Vaughn, Alvin Perkins.
1863. — .Joseph Barrows, Thomas Vaughn, Alvin Perkins.
1864. — Andrew Griffeth, Thomas Vaughn, Alvin Perkins.
1865. — Andrew Griffeth, Thomas Vaughn, Frederick Cobb.
1866. — Andrew Griffeth, Thomas Vaughn, Frederick Cobb.
1867. — Andrew Griffeth, Thomas Vaughn, Frederick Cobb.
1868. — Andrew Griffeth, Alvin Perkins, Frederick Cobb.
1369.— Andrew Griffeth, Alvin Perkins, Frederick Cobb.
1870. — Andrew Griffeth, Alvin Perkins, E. S. Lucas.
1871.— Andrew Griffcth, Alvin Perkins, E. S. Lucas.
1872. — Andrew Griffeth, Alvin Perkins, Horatio A. Lucas.
1873. — Andrew Griffcth, Alvin Perkins, Horatio A. Lucas.
1374. — Andrew Griffeth, Alvin Perkins, Horatio A. Lucas.
1875. — Andrew Griffeth, Horatio A. Lucas, Ebenezer D. Shaw.
1876. — Andrew Griffeth, Horatio A. Lucas, Ebenezer D. Shaw.
1877. — Andrew Griffeth, Horatio A. Lucas, Ebenezer D. Shaw.
1878. — Andrew Griffeth, Horatio A. Lucas, Ebeuczer D. Shaw.
1379. — Gustavus Atwood, Horatio A. Lucas, Frederick Cobb.
1880. — Gustavus Atwood, Horatio A. Lucas, Frederick Cobb.
1881. — Gustavus Atwood, Horatio A. Lucas, Frederick Cobb.
1382. — Andrew Griffeth, Nelson Sherman, Albert T. Shurtleff.
1883. — Andrew Griffeth, Nelson Sherman, Albert T. Shurtleff.



HISTORY OF CARVER.



447



The following is a list of the names of those gentle-
uieu who from time to time have represented the town
of Carver iD the House of Representatives of the
Massachusetts State Legislature, together with the
dates at which those sessions of the Legislature com-
menced. It will be observed that for quite a loug
term of time after Carver was incorporated as a town
it was not usual to send a representative every year,
and hence the numerous omissions in enumerating
dates that herein appear:

REPRESENTATIVES.

ISuO. l_'a|it. Nathaniel Sher- 1339. Joseph Barrows,

num. ! 1840. Joseph Barrows.

1310. C;ipt. Benjamin Ellis. ! 1841. Timothy Cobb, Es< t .

1611. Cupt. Benjamin Ellis. i 1S42. Henry Sherman, Esq.
1S16. Maj. Beujamin Ellis. 1S43. John Savary, Esq.

1320. Maj. Benjamin Ellis. i 1844. John Savary, Esq.

1822. Maj. Benjamin Ellis. I 1S45. William S. Savary, Esq.

1327. John Savary, Esq. j 1347. Hon. Jesse Murdock.

1323. John Savary, Esq. . 1848. Timothy Cobb, Esq.

1529. Hon. Benjamin Ellis. 1351. Matthias Ellis.

1530. Hon. Benjamin Ellis. 1352. Capt. Matthias Ellis.
1331. Lewis Pratt. 1353. Capt. Matthias Ellis.

1832. Thomas Cobb, Esq. j 1354. George P. Bowers.

1833. Benjamin Ransom. 1S55. James B. Tillson, Esq.
1S34. Jesse Murdock, Jr. , 1S58. Rufus C. Freeman.
1335. Jesse Murdock, Jr. I 1867. Elisha M. Dunham.
183S. Je=se Murdock. | 1881. Peleg McFarlin.

The town of Carver has several times had the
honor to furnish one of the members of the State
Senate. The names of Carver gentlemen who served
in the State Senate, together with the dates at which
the sessions commeuced, were as follows :

SENATE.
Maj. Benjuniin Ellis, May, 1S25, and January, 1832.
Jesse Murdock, January, 1844, and January, 1845.
Lieut.-Col. Matthias Ellis, January, 1854.
Peleg McFarlin, January, 1882 and 1883.

MEMBER OF THE GOVERNOR'S COUNCIL.
Jesse Murdock, from January, 1847, to January, 1849.

The members of Constitutional Conventions, with

the dates at which each convention commenced its

scssiou, have been as follows :

Maj. Beujamin Ellis, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 1820.
Joseph Barrows, Esq., Wednesday, May 4, 1853.

COUNTY COMMISSIONER.
Thomas Southworth, Jr.

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE."

Dates of First Appointment.

Francis Shurtleff. April 1<5, 1790.

Nehemiah Cobb Feb. 5, 1795.

Benjamin Ellis 1308.

John Savary Feb. 17, 1824.

Samuel Shaw Feb. 7, 1837.



Dates of First Appoiutmcut.

Thomas Cobb Feb. 7, 1337.

Lewis Pratt Feb. 13, 1838.

Timothy Cobb May 22, 1841.

Henry Sherman Jan. 4, 1842.

WilliamS. Savary Jan. 4, 1842.

William Barrows March 14, 1843.

Jesse Murdock Feb. 1. 1347.

James Cole Dec. 2, 1851.

Joseph Barrows May 3, 1353.

Thomas Southworth April 20, 1S55.

James B. Tillson April 2B, 1355.

Tbuuiaa Vaughan April 7, lSliS.

Benjamin Ransom Nov. 15, 1S73.

John Bent Oct. 10, 1375.

George P. Bowers Jan. 24, 1879.

Albert T. Savary April 11, 1879.

Post-Offices and Postmasters in Carver. — The
first or earliest post-office in the town of Carver was
established in or about the year 1811, with John
Shaw as postmaster, who was succeeded in that posi-
tion in or about 1813 by James Ellis, and an appa-
rently well-authenticated tradition says that for a
time Mr. William Ainsworth Coombs, late of Lake-
ville deceased, but then, as he used to relate, " a
barefooted boy on horseback," supplied the Carver
post-office both from toward Middleboro' and to-



Online LibraryD. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) HurdHistory of Plymouth County, Massachusetts : with biographical sketches of many of its pioneers and prominent men (Volume 2) → online text (page 99 of 118)