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Dana Reed Bailey.

History of Minnehaha county, South Dakota. Containing an account of its settlements, growth, development and resources ... Synopsis of public records, biographical sketches .. online

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Van Eps' 2d Addition, blocks 19-48. Platted by William Van Eps and Inez C. Van Eps.
Recorded May 14, 18S8, in book i of plats, on page 40.

Victoria Addition, blocks 50-63. Platted by Eugene Coughran, Minnie B. Coughran,
Cyrus Walts and Mary A. Walts. Recorded November 14, 1890, in book 3 of plats, on page 20.

Ward's J. A., Subdivision of lots 4 and 5 of block 16, Folsom's Addition, lots 1-4. Sub-
divided by Joseph A. Ward, and recorded August 14, 1888, in book i of plats, on page 44.

Waters' Subdivision of lots 21-24, block 27, Folsom's Addition, lots 1-4. Subdivided by
Jane Beardsley, and recorded May 28, 1889, in book i of plats, on page 21.

Wayne Heights Addition, blocks 1-16. Platted by Lydia E.Jackson and Joseph R. [ack-
son. Recorded June 22, 18S9, in book 2 of plats, on page 27.

West Lawn Addition, blocks I -2 1. Platted by Frank Forde and Melvin Grigsby. Re-
corded January 29, 18S9, in book 2 of plats, on page 5.

West Point Addition, lots 1-15. Platted by Emmett De Bell, and recorded April 16, 1888,
in book i of plats, on page 33.

West Park Addition, blocks 1-4. Platted by O. S. Swenson and R. J. Wells. Recorded
April 2, 1 888, in book i of plats, on page 36.

Weston's ist Addition, blocks 1-6. Platted by John N. Weston, and recorded August 30,
1888, in book i of plats, on page 46.

Waldron's Subdivision of block 20, Park Addition, lots 1-16. Subdivided by E. A. Wal
dron and D. W. Hogg. Recorded November 13, 1889, in book 3 of plats, on page 4.

Ward & Folsom's Addition, blocks 1-64. Platted by George W. Ward, and recorded No-
vember 23, 1889, in book 3 of plats, on page 6.

Ward's ist Addition, blocks 1-8. Platted by George W. Ward. Recorded April 2, 1891,
in book 3 of plats, on page 26.

Young's St;BDivisioN of block 11, Emerson's Addition, lots 1-18. Subdivided by Sutton E.
Young and Emma S. Young. Recorded June 2, 1888, in book i of plats, on page 43.



STATISTICS.

The following table of statistics has been prepared from the United States census reports from
i860 to 1890 inclusive, and from the census report for 1895 of Minnehaha county, taken in accord-
ance with the laws of South Dakota:

This table includes many things not strictly within the scope of a work of this kind, but in the
writer's opinion are of such general interest that their insertion is justified.

The first census taken in Dakota territory was in i860, when the population was 4,837.

1870 14,181

1880 -. 135.177

South Dakota, 1890 328,808

North Dakota, 1890 182,719

MINNEHAHA COUNTY.

Population of Minnehaha county, 1870 355

Population of Minnehaha county, i8So._ 8,251

Population of Minnehaha county, 1S90 21,879



142 HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



POPULATION OF SUBDIVISIONS OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY, 1890.

Benton, 408; Brandon, 507; Buffalo, 299; Burk, 452; Clear Like, 286; Dell Rapids, including the
city, 1,488; (in iSSo, the village of Dell Rapids had a population of 260, and in 1890, then a city, 993;)
Edison, 434; Grand Meadow, 336; Hartford, 535; Highland, 321; Humbolt, 324; Logan, 407;
Lyons, 514; Palisades, including Garretson, Palisade and Sherman villages, 707; (Garretson vil-
lage, 341); Red Rock, 294; Sioux Falls, including Sioux Falls city, 10,438; (Sioux Falls city in
1880, 2,164; in 1S9O' 1O1I77); Split Rock, including East Sioux Falls and Rowena villages, 1,136;
(East Sioux Falls, 577;Rowrena, 126); Sverdrup, 52S; Taopi, 398; Valley Springs, including Valley
Springs village, 661 ; (Valley Springs village in 1880, 96; in 1890, 308); Wall Lake, 425; Wayne,
287; Wellington, 335.

NATIVE AND FOREIGN BORN IN MINNEHAHA COUNTY.

Native born, in 1870, 200; 18S0, 5,502; 1890, 15,389; foreign born, 1870, 155; 1880, 2,749; 1890,

'"^ ' MALE AND FEMALE, NATIVE AND FOREIGN BORN.

The population of Dakota in i860 consisted of 2,797 males and 2,040 females; 1870, 8,878
males and 5,303 females; 1S80, 82,296 males and 52,881 females; 1890, South Dakota, 180,250 males
and 148,558 females. Native born in South Dakota in 1890, 127,415 males and 110,338 females;
foreign born, 52,835 males and 38,220 females; native white, native parents, 69,334 males and 57,-
898 females; native white, foreign parents, 57,349 males and 51,866 females; foreign white, 52,648
males and 38,195 females; of African descent, 541 ; blacks, 310; mulattoes, 164; quadroons, 44; oc-
toroons, 23; Chinese, 195; civilized Indians, 782.

Native born in Minnehaha county in 1890, 8,276 males and 7,113 females; foreign born, 3,808
males and 2,682 females; native white, native parents, 4,309 males and 3,600 females; native white,
foreign parents, 3,937 males and 3,484 females; foreign white, 3,805 males and 2,682 females; col-
ored, 33 males and 29 females.

The population of the city of Sioux Falls in 1890 consisted of 5,595 males and 4,582 females;
native born, 4,197 males and 3,567 females; foreign born, 1,398 males and 1,015 females; native
white, native parents, 2,664 males and 2,180 females; native white, foreign parents, 1,508 males
and 1,365 females; foreign white, 1,395 males and 1,015 females; colored, 44; Chinese 2; civilized
Indians, 4.

NATIONALITY, STATE AND COUNTY.

The foreign population in South Dakota in 1890, consisted of a total number of 91,055, di-
vided into nationalities as follows: Canada and Newfoundland, 9,493; Mexico, 19; Central America,
I ; South America, 10; Cuba and the West Indies, 15; England, 5,111 ; Scotland, 1,579; Wales, 695 ;
Great Britain (not specified), 2; Ireland, 4,774; Germany, 18,188; Austria, 675; Holland, 1,428; Bel-
gium, 183; Luxenburg, 128; Switzerland, 571 ; Sweden, 7,746; Norway, 19,257; Denmark, 4,369;
Russia, 12,398; Hungary, 321; Bohemia, 2,488; Poland, 276; France, 350; Italy, 369; Spain, 7; Port-
ugal, 11; Greece, i; Asia (not specified), 19; China, 202; India, 9; Africa, 5; Atlantic Islands, 6;
Australia, 38; Europe (not specified), 123; Pacific Islands, 203; Sandwich Islands, 3; Turkey, 2.
Born at sea, 79; other countries, i.

Minnehaha county, total, 6,490; Canada and Newfoundland, 40S; Ireland, 366; England, 441 ;
Scotland, 141 ; Wales, 52; Germany, 845; Holland, 7; Sweden, 1,017; Norway, 2,953; Denmark,
140; Russia, 21; Bohemia, 2; other countries, 91.

NATIVITY, AGE AND COLOR, MINNEHAHA COUNTY AND CITY OF
SIOUX FALLS IN 1890.

Native white in Minnehaha county, from 5 to 20 years of age: 3,093 males and 3,1 14 females;
foreign white, 555 males and 501 females. Native white males from 18 to 44 years of age, 3,396;
foreign, 2,484; total colored, 28. Native white males 21 years and over, 3,667; foreign, 3,396; total
colored, 29.

Native whites in the city of Sioux Falls from 5 to 20 3'ears of age: 1,239 males and 1,373 fe-
males; foreign white, 149 males and 190 females; total colored, 3 males and 6 females. Maleg
from 18 to 44 years of age: native white, 2,195; foreign white, 1,043; total colored, 24. Males 21
years and over: native white, 2,362; foreign white, 1,238; total colored, 25.



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY. 143



NUMBER OF DWELLINGS, FAMILIES, AVERAGE NUMBER OF PERSONS IN
EACH DWELLING IN DAKOTA, FROM 1S50 TO 1890— ALSO NUMBER OF
SAME IN MINNEHAHA COUNTY.

Number of dwellings in Dakota in 1850, none; in 1S60, 1,361; in 1870, 3,231 ; 1880, 29,324;
1890, South Dakota, 68,894. Persons to a dwelling i860, 3.55; 1870, 4.39; 1880,4.61; 1890, South
Dakota, 4.77. Number of families in Dakota in 1850, none; i860, 1,241 ; 1870, 3,090; 1880, 31,202 ;
1S90, South Dakota, 72,250. Persons to a family, i860, 3.90; 1870, 4 59; 1880,4.33; 1890, South
Dakota, 4.68.

Number of dwellings in Minnehaha county in 1S90, 3,Soi ; number of families, 3,979; persons
to a dwelling, 5.76; persons to a family, 5.50.

Number of dwellings in the city of Sioux Falls in 1890, 1,690; number of families, 1,816; per-
sons to a dwelling, 6.02; persons to a family, 5.60.

Number of persons to a dwelling in South Dakota in 1890, in detail: i person, 6,759; 2 persons,
8,080; 3 persons, 10,120; 4 persons, 10,792; 5 persons, 9,733; 6 persons, 7,793; 7 persons, 5,819; 8
persons, 3,969; 9 persons, 2,508; 10 persons, 1,802; 11 to 15 persons, 1,233; 16 to 20 persons, 135;
21 persons and over, 130.

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT, SOUTH DAKOTA, 1S90.

Total number of pupils, 82,919; 43,517 males, 39,397 females and 5 colored females. Total
number of teachers, 4,692; 1,437 males and 3,255 females.

Pupils in the public schools, total, 77,943; males, 41,008; females, 36,932; and colored 3.
Teachers, total, 4,420; males, 1,294 ^"d females, 3,126.

Pupils in public schools additional to common schools, total, 1,228; males, 661 and females,
567. Teachers, total, 58; males, 39 and females, 19.

Pupils in private schools, total, 1,430; males, 663 and females, 767. Teachers, total, 133;
males, 48 and females, 85.

Pupils in parochial schools, total, 2,316; males, 1,185 ^^^ females, 1,131. Teachers, total. Si;
males, 56 and females, 25.

CHURCH ORGANIZATIONS IN SOUTH DAKOTA, 1S90.

Total number of organization, 1,589. Edifices, 774, with approximate seating capacity of
149,728; value of church property, $1,761,277; communicants or members, 85,490.

Adventists, 38 bodies; Regular Baptist (north), 83; Free Will Baptist, 5; other Baptist, 2;
Roman Catholic, 177; Congregationalists, 138; Disciples of Christ, 15; Dunkards, 4; Evangelical
Association, 74; Friends, 4; Latter-day Saints,4; Lutheran, 432; Mennonites, 16; Methodist Episco-
pal, 254; other Methodist, 52; Presbyterian, 134; Protestant Episcopal, 83; Reformed, 35; Salva-
tion Army, 2; United Brethren, 33; Unitarians, 2.

MORTALITY STATISTICS OF SOUTH DAKOTA, MINNEHAHA COUNTY AND
CITY OF SIOUX FALLS, IN 1890.

Number of deaths in South Dakota in 1890, 3,448. Native born, i,86S; foreign born, 733;
birthplace unknown, 92; colored, 754. Under five years of age: White, 1,001 ; colored, 309.

In Minnehaha county, total 86. Native born, 56; foreign born, 30. Under five years of age,
white, 30.

In City of Sioux Falls, total 68. Native born, 50, foreign born, 17, birthplace unknown, i.
Under five years of age, white, 30.

Causes of deaths in Minnehaha county and City of Sioux Falls: Scarlet fever, county 3, city
4; measles, city i ; diphtheria and croup, county 10, city 3; enteric fever, county 7, city 2; mala-
rial fever, county i; diarrheal diseases, county 11, city 5; cancer and tumors, county 2; consump-
tion, county 4, city 7; pneumonia, county 9, city 4; childbirth and puerperal diseases, county 3,
city I.

INFIRM PERSONS IN STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA AND COUNTY OF MIN-
NEHAHA IN 1890.

Insane, state 310, county 25; feeble-minded, state 285, county 18; deaf, state 332, county 23;
daaf and dumb, state 177, county 21; blind in one eye, state 506, county 30; blind in both eyes,
state 177, county 14.



144



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



PRISONERS, NATIVE AND FOREIGN BORN, IN SOUTH DAKOTA, 1890.

Aggregate number of prisoners, 178. Parents native, 68; one parent foreign, 11; both par-
ents foreign, 57; one or both parents unknown, 3; foreign born, 44; nativity unknown, 4; negroes,
2; Chinese, none; Indians, 9. There were two female prisoners, one with one parent foreign, and
the other with both parents foreign. Of these prisoners, 97 were confined in the state peniten-
tiary; 72 in the county jails; military prisoners, 8; insane, i.

INDEBTEDNESS OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



The total debt of Minnehaha county in 1880 was $5,650; in
county, $114,420, municipal, $357,802, school district, $81,231.
capita, in 18S0, 68 cents; in 1890, $25.30.

CENSUS OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY



1890, $.553,453; divided into
Debt (less sinking fund) per

, 1895.



Benton township

Brandon township

Buffalo township

Burk township-

Clear Lake township

Dell Rapids township —

Edison township

Grand Meadow township

Hartford township

Humboldt township

Lyons township

Logan township

Highland township

Palisade township

Red Rock township

Siou.x Falls township

Split Rock township

Sverdrup township

Taopi township

Valley Springs township

Wall Lake township

Wayne township

Wellington township

Mapleton township

City of Sioux Falls

East Sioux Falls

South Sioux Falls

City of Dell Rapids

City of Garretson

Town of Valley Springs



Total
Popula-
tion.



421
526
314
465
246
470
479
381
648
366
564
358
357
329
308
255
446
610
435
307
409
259
322
338
8,991
156
85
937
398
273

20,455



Native
Born.



293
321
254
332
207
282
321
302
523
277

337
232
209

235
222
207
288
319
310



278
210
251

212

7,340
98
64
724
310
257

[5,215



Foreign
Born.



205

60
133

39
188
158

79
125

89
227
126
148

94
86

48
158
291
I25



131
49
71

126
,651



213
88
16

5,240



Male.



207
285
173
261
131
262
268
212

357
200
306
202
183
184
165
149
252
331
248
168
230
140
172
182

4,540
81

41
454
21S
139

io,7S7



Female.



204
J41
141
204
115
20S
21 1
169
291
166
258
'56
164
145
143
106
194

-79
187

139
179
119
I. SO
'.S6

4,451
75

•" 44
483
180

134
9,698



CHAPTER VI



RAILROAr>S AND MOTOR LINES.

Railroad Meetings — Worthington and Sioux Palls R. R.

Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul R. R. — Burlington, Cedar
Rapids and Northern R. R. — Illinois Central R. R. —

WiLLMAR AND SlOUX FaLLS R. R.— SoUTH StOUX PaLLS

Railroad and Rapid Transit — South Dakota

Rapid Transit and Railway Co. — Sioux Palls,

Yankton and Southwestern Railway —

Schedule of Distancp^s from Sioux

Falls to Railroad Stations in

this County and Other

Important Points —

Altitudes.

Early in the history of the settlement of Minnehaha county, her
enterprising- citizens, especially those residint^ at Sioux Falls, were
enjrag-ed in projects to obtain railroad connections with the outside
world.

The people of the little villag-e of Sioux Falls recog-nized the ad-
vantaf^es of its location and were filled with j>-reat expectations that
at some time in the near future a prosperous city would rapidly
spring- up on the banks of the Sioux. To hasten the time when this
should be accomplished, nothing- promised g-reater results than se-
curing- railroad connections.

On Monday evening-, Aug-ust 20, 1874, with only a few hours
notice, a larg-e assembly convened at Allen's hall in Sioux Falls to
consider the question of offering- some inducement for the building-
of a railroad into town. Rig-ht here, at the first railroad meeting-
ever held within the boundaries of Minnehaha county the people were
told that if Sioux Falls was ever to be anything- but a villag-e, railroad
facilities must be secured; and this statement has been made wdth
g-reat earnestness at every railroad meeting- held since then, when-
ever steps were being- taken to secure a new line of road. Meeting-s
of this character usually result in passing- a resolution at least, and
this meeting- resolved as follows: "That the town of Sioux Falls and
Minnehaha county will donate to the first railroad that is completed

10



146 HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



to this place fifty thousand dollars, provided said road reaches Sioux
Palls by the first day of November, 1870." From information re-
ceived in reference to this meetinof we know that some of those pres-
ent thou^-ht that November 1, 1876, was the latest day Sioux Palls
could o-et alontj- without a railroad, and others thou^-ht that it was as
early a date as the funds could be secured.

Prom this time on, the people never let the railroad question
rest, and all sorts of projects and schemes were devised to ^et a
railroad; and the town was exceedino-ly fortunate in having- among- its
earlv settlers some of the most energ-etic, enterprising- and capable
men that ever settled in a new country.

On the 2d dav of November, 1875, a larg-e and enthusiastic crowd
of people g-athered at Allen's hall to consider an offer that had been
made to the people of Minnehaha countv bv the Sioux City and Pem-
bina railroad company to build a railroad to Sioux Palls and have it
in operation by the 1st day of November, 1876, upon the condition
that Minnehaha county would raise 8100,000 in aid of the project.

Resolutions were passed to the effect that the interest of Minne-
haha county demanded a railroad, and that the citizens would do all
in their power to aid any company to build a road to Sioux Palls; also
that immediate steps be taken to org-anize a local company, sur\'e\' a
route, open stock books and solicit subscriptions along- the line of
survey. A committee was appointed to institute the necessary ])ro-
ceeding-s to this end, consisting- of M. L. Wood, K. A. Sherman, J(v
seph Rol)erts, Newton Clark, R. P. Fettig-rew, J. 1). Cameron and
Melvin (irig-sb}'. The committee met the day following, and after
rr\ifwin<^- the situation it was decided " to organize a railroad com-
pan\ to be known as the Sioux Palls Railroad Company," having- for
its object the building'- of a railroad, with one of its termini at Yank-
ton and the other at a point on the eastern boundary of Dakota in the
town of Valley Springs. M. Grig-sby was appointed to draft the
articles of incorporation, and on November 10, the org'anization was
perfected. The companv consisted of M. Grig-sbv, E. A. Sherman,
R. P. Pettig-rew, A. P. Shaw, Joseph Roberts, M. L. Wood and J. D.
Cameron, who at once caused a survey to be made of the line.

Another railroad meeting- of the citizens of Minnehaha county
was held in Sioux Palls on the 22d day of January, 1876, and althoug-h
the expression was unanimous in favor of aiding- any railroad com-
pany in building- into Sioux Palls, still, the g-eneral opinion was that
S50,000 would be as much as the county could afford to donate. Dur-
ing the month of March, 1876, the Worthing-ton and Sioux Palls railroad
company was org-anized at St. Paul, with the view of making- a con-
nection with the road to be built by the Sioux Palls company, and
this company proceeded to build a railroad from Worthing-ton in the
direction of Sioux Palls, completing- its line to Luverne during- the
fall of 1877.

At a citizen's meeting- held September 5, 1877, in Sioux Palls,
some of the officials of the Sioux City and St. Paul and St. Paul and
Sioux City Railroad company made the following- proposition: "If
the citizens of Minnehaha county will vote us aid to the amount of
S25,000, and the villap-e of Sioux Palls will vote us an additional



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY. 147



amount of S10,()l)(), we will build and e([uip a railroad to Sioux Falls
on or before October 1, 1878." On the 28th day of September, 1877,
Horace Thompson of St. Paul, president of the Worthint^'ton and
Sioux Falls Railroad Co., addressed a letter to the commissioners
of Minnehaha county, proposing- to build that line of road into Sioux
P^alls by the first day of October, 1878, if certain conditions contained
in the letter were complied with. He required that the County of
Minnehaha should raise S25,000 in aid of the road, and said in this
communication that he made this proposition with the expectation
that Sioux Falls would raise an additional sum of S1(),()00, and that
the company controlling- the charter to the Minnesota line would turn
over to the Worthing-ton and Sioux Falls company its charters, sur-
veys, rig-ht of way, deeds, or releases of the whole line, including-
land at terminus in Sioux Falls for depot and side tracks, free from
all expense. This communication was received by the countv^ board
on October 1, and on that day the board decided to submit to the
election of the county the question of bonding- the county in the sum
of S25,O0() in aid of the road, as proposed, the bonds to run twenty
\ ears, with interest at ten per cent., and not to be issued by the
board until Sioux Falls had raised S10,U00 for the same purpose. The
(juestion was submitted at the g-eneral election in November, and re-
sulted adversely to the issuance of the bonds, the vote standing- 3i>4
fur, and 4*)2 ciiy-(iiusl.

After this defeat, the pro])osition made by the Worthington and
Sioux Falls company was modified, and a ])roposition was sul)mitted
to the peo])le of Sioux Falls, offering- to build a road into Sioux Falls
before the 1st day of November, 1878, provided they would raise S20,-
000 in aid of the road, and comply with the conditions first proposed
in reference to the rig-ht of way and depot g-rounds. The citizens of
Sioux Falls by this time were determined that the road being- built west
from Worthing-ton and then completed and in operation to Luverne,,
should be extended with the g-reatest possible dispatch to Sioux!
Falls. Fifty-two citizens of Sioux Falls petitioned the board of
trustees of the villag-e to submit the question of bonding- the villag-e
for this purpose, in the sum of S20,000, to the electors of the villag-e,
and a meeting- of the villag-e council was called for December 15, to
consider the propriety of so doing-.

When the meeting- convened. President Howard and Trustees
Sherman, VanEps and Phillips were present. Trustee Callender ab-
sent. A motion was made to grant the request of the petitioners,
which received an unanimous vote, and the election was called for
January 15, 1878. The result of this election was 102 votes for and
three ag-aiust bonding-.

At a special meeting- of the village board held ]March 20, 1878,
the bonds voted by the corporation were sig-ned by C. K. Howard,
])resident, and C. O. Natesta, clerk, and put into the hands of the
villag-e treasurer to be turned over to the Sioux Falls Railroad com-
pany at the proper time. The bonds having- been issued, the Sioux
Falls company was merg-ed into the Worthing-ton and Sioux Falls
Railroad company, and the extension of its line secured.

Sioux Falls was now sure of a railroad, and her people watched



148



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



the approach of the iron rail with g-reat pleasure, and ever\' issue of
the local newspapers announced the prog-ress that was being- made.
It reached Valley Springs the first of June, and on Monday, the 4th
dav of June, the company opened its office at that place for business.
Brandon, the next station, was reached on the 15th day of July, al-
thouo-h considerable g-rading- had been done on the line west of that
place, (^n Thursday, Aug-ust 1, 1878, the first train with passeng-ers
in charge of Peter Becker, conductor, reached Sioux Falls between
twelve and 1 o'clock in the afternoon, to be accurate, 12:40. A few
g-entlemen from Sioux Palls met this train at Brandon and decorated
the engfine with flag-s and streamers, and when the train reached its
destination it was g-reeted by a band of music, led by T. H. Brown,
and the cheers and shouts of a larg-e assemblag-e of people.




Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Passenger Depot.



It is easy to imag'ine something' of the feeling' pervading' the peo-
ple on this occasion, after haying so long- and so diligvntly labored
for railroad facilities to find at last the work had been accomplished,
and their ears could hear the whistle of a locomotive, and their eyes
see a train of cars in Sioux Falls.

The writer was in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, on the 11th day of
September, 1870, when the first railroad train came into that city.
It was a great day, and the people for miles around decided to make



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY, 149



the most of it. Thousands of people were in attendance, and when
the train approached bands of music phiyed, cannons boomed, and
the crowd set up a mig-hty shout. A few rods from the depot a laro-e,
well-dressed woman sat in a two-seated carriao-e with a driver in
front, and the spirited horses attached to her carriao-e became
frijrhtened and commenced to run, when she shouted "let them run,
let them run, I have been in the west sixteen years, and this is the
lii'st time I ha\e seen the cars."

The first passeng-er fare established to St. Paul was S*).75, to
Sioux City via Worthino-ton, St). 20. Freight rates to St. Paul were
as follows:

Pirst-class .-.. - SI. 00 per hundred pounds

Second-class 90 per hundred pounds

Third-class - 70 per hundred pounds

b^ourth-class (»0 per hundred pounds

Lumber ..- . S()0 per car

Wheat 30 cents per bushel

Trains from St. Paul arrived at 11:45 A. M., and departed at 1:15
P. M. Durinjjf August and September following-, the company erected
depot building-s, eng-ine house, and an elevator with a capacitv of
()0,00() bushels.

The Worthing-ton and Sioux Palls line was extended to Salem
in McCook county during- the fall of 1879, and was eventuallv ab-
sorbed by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railroad
Company.

THE CHICACtO, MILWAUKEE AND ST. PAUL RAILROAD.



Online LibraryDana Reed BaileyHistory of Minnehaha county, South Dakota. Containing an account of its settlements, growth, development and resources ... Synopsis of public records, biographical sketches .. → online text (page 15 of 99)