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Dana Reed Bailey.

History of Minnehaha county, South Dakota. Containing an account of its settlements, growth, development and resources ... Synopsis of public records, biographical sketches .. online

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Online LibraryDana Reed BaileyHistory of Minnehaha county, South Dakota. Containing an account of its settlements, growth, development and resources ... Synopsis of public records, biographical sketches .. → online text (page 33 of 99)
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course at Yale; graduated at Geneva Medical College, and practiced
medicine in New York city; was a member of the Masonic order, and
was a politician of note, and held responsible positions of trust in
New York; came to Sioux Falls June 27, 1883, and purchased a farm
in section 13 in Sioux Falls township, and section 18 in Split Rock
township. He died February 28, 1891. His two sons, William G.,
and Levi D., are now residing- on the home-farm. They were en-
g-aged in the g-rain business several years. William has been a mem-
ber of the town board of supervisors of Sioux Falls township three
years, and Levi two years.

WiLLARD. William P., is a native of Medina county, Ohio, and
was born on the 7th day of May, 1842. He was raised on'his father's
farm, and received a common school education. When the war of
the rebellion broke out he promptly responded to the call for volun-
teers, and enlisted in the three months service in Co. K, 8th Ohio
Volunteer Infantry, and after serving- five months was discharged.
In Aug-ust, 1862, he re-enlisted, for three vears, in Co. B, 124 Ohio,



History of MiNNiiHAHA county. 511



.iiitl st-r\ctl to tlu' close ol tlu- w.'ir. At Chick.'iinauo"i he received a
slitj'ht wound in his ami from a splinter, and was at another time hit
by a bullet, which fortunately struck his beltplate. and thus saved
his life. After the war he returned to Ohio and lived there until
1865, when he moved to Des Moines county, Iowa, got married, and
eno-ag-ed in farming- until the fall of 1882. At that time he removed
to Dakota, and boug-ht a farm in Sioux Palls township, of Mrs. Clara
Lewis, but sold it the next ;^ear, and bougfht his present farm,
which comprises 160 acres in section 12, Sioux Falls township,
and section 7, Split Rock township. He resided on this farm until
1889, when he went to Escondido, California, and eng-agfed in raising-
orang-es and lemons for seven years, when business interests com-
pelled him to return to his farm in Minnehaha county, where he has
since resided, and has a g-ood farm. He has been clerk of the town
board of Sioux Falls township five years, is a careful painstaking
official, and an enterprising-, highly esteemed citizen.

WoERHLE, David, is a native of Germany, and was born August
21, 1846. He was in the military service four years and served in
the German and French war. In 1877 he emig-rated to the United
States, and in 1878 came to Sioux P^alls. He took up a homestead in
section 1, but sold it a few years ago. He is still eng-aged in farm-
ing, and is an industrious, good citizen.




Lone Rock.



This illiistralion is from a pholotJ^raph taken at an lailv date, llie rock was exactly eit?Iit
feet squaie, and wlien the water in the river was at its ordinary height, its top was about four
feet ahove the water. It was frequently visited by the early settlers of Sioux Falls. When
the ice went out during- the spring of iSSi it broke this rock fron; its fouiid.ition, and it fell into
a hole about twenty feet in depth, just below where it stood.



CITY OF SIOUX FALEiS,




<D, SI UX FALLS.



Sioux Palls was the first
place inhabited bv white men
in the valley of the Big- Sioux,
and in the hrst chapter of this
book a carefully prepared ac-
count of the most important
events in her history down to
1S75 appears. What was then
only a little villag-e is now the
most populous and important
citv in the state, and althoug-h
not without natural advan-
tag^es, this development and
g-rowth has been in the main
the result of the push and en-
terprise of her citizens. But
the history of the methods
adopted, and the means used,
are more in harmony with the purpose of this work than any g"en-
eralization we could possibly make; we will therefore proceed to pre-
sent a complete summary of her municipal affairs, public institutions,
industries, and other important matters, which as a whole indicate
the character and importance of every community, hoping- our read-
ers, with the aid of the illustrations, will find our treatment of the
subject interesting- and instructive.

THE INCORPORATION OF THE VILLAGE AND CITY OP

SIOUX PALLS, AND IMPORTANT MUNICIPAL

TRANSACTIONS.

The twelfth session of the leg-islative assembly of the Territory
of Dakota passed an act incorporating- the villag-e of Sioux Palls.
The territory comprised 1,200 acres, including- all of section 16, and
a row of forty acre tracts on the east, south and west of the same
section. The charter was brief, but comprehensive. The g-overn-
ment of the corporation and the g-eneral manag-ement of its affairs
were vested in a president, who was ex officio a trustee, and four
trustees. The elections were held annually on the first Tuesday of
March, and the term of all the elective officers was for one year.

The first election was held on the third Tuesday of March, 1877.



314 ttlSTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



C. K. Howard was elected president of the hoard of trustees and
held this office four successive years. During- his administration a
liberal policy was pursued, and the growth of the villag-e, if not phe-
nomenal, was of such a character as to inspire the residents with
bright hopes of the future of Sioux Palls.

The act incorporating- the villag"e of Sioux Falls was amended in
1879, creating- the office of villag-e justice of the peace, and defining
his duties and jurisdiction.

Although prosperous under the villag-e org-anization, her citizens
in 1882 beg-an to realize that the charter pattern was too small and
restrictive, and public meeting-s were held for the purpose of taking-
measures to secure a city charter. The question was discussed,
and the sentiment of the people found to be strong-ly in favor of im-
mediate action, and a committee was appointed to draft a charter and
report to a meeting- of the citizens to take place in the future, so that
the wisdom of the whole villag-e mig-ht be broug-ht to bear upon its
construction.

It was at this juncture of aifairs that the writer became a resi-
dent of Sioux Falls, and had the pleasure of listening- to the report
of this committee, consisting- of L. S. Swezev and A. C. Phillips. .V
g-ood deal of interest was manifest at these meeting-s, and very few,
if any, of the provisions of the proposed charter escaped discussion.
When the charter had been completed by the committee and received
the sanction of the public in the form of a bill for enactment by the
territorial leg-islature then in session at Yankton, it was conveyed
there by a committee, and became a law on March 3, 1883.

By the provisions of this charter the city was divided into four
wards, and the annual city election fixed for the first Tuesday in
April. The elective officers were a mayor, two aldermen from each
ward, clerk, assessor, treasurer, police justice and city justice.
The offices of citv attorney, marshal, policeman, street commission-
er, health officer and board of health were created, to be filled by ap-
pointment by the mayor, and confirmed by the council. A board of
education was also established, consisting of two members from each
ward to have control of the public schools.

The first city election took place on the 3d day of April, 1883,
and it was the last one held at a sing-le polling- place. The contest
for mayor was spirited. There were three candidates in the field,
namely, Jacob Schaetzel, Jr., C. W. Hubbard and Dexter J. Knapp;
806 votes were cast, Schaetzel receiving- 414, Hubbard 376 and Knapp
16. By referring- to the list of city officials it will be seen that a
strong- council was elected, and for business capacity, the mayor and
aldermen who had in charg-e the aifairs of the city the first year of
its existence, has not been surpassed if equaled since then. The
city, of course, inherited the ()l:>lig'ations of the \illag-e as well as its
assets. The Daily Press, at the time Sioux Falls became a city,
published the following- statement of the debits and credits of the de-
funct village: "The financial condition of the villag-e at this time
shows that the amount of indebtedness on account of the g-eneral
fund was S22,20(); the village was bonded to the amount of S2<),000 for
aid in securing- the earlier completion of the St. Paul Railroad; the



HISTORY OP Minnehaha county. .U5



indebtedness on account of the board of education inchidint*- bonds
was S2(),80O, makino- a total inde])tedness of about S69,000, to be as-
sumed by the city. The total assets to be turned over to the city
niav be enumerated as follows: fire apparatus worth $7,000; real
estate in the way of lots, eng'ine and truck houses, prison, etc., $2,-
500; rio-ht of way and depot jj-rounds for the Milwaukee Railroad, S6,-
500; school property, including- thirty-two city lots, three brick
school houses and one frame, S33,000; for the S20,()00 railroad bonds
the villa<j-e was amply compensated, at but a small per cent of the
amount other communities have paid for similar enterprises, which
made the total assets S69,000, an exact balance for the indebtedness
it was called upon to assume."

It was during- the first year of the city gfovernment, that the
"telephone war" occurred, and a brief outline of the facts will dem-
onstrate that the administration was energfetic and efficient in pro-
tecting- the interests of the public.

In March, 1882, a telephone company was org-anized with a cap-
ital of S10,000. About September 25, the same year, the instruments
arrived in the city, and the McKinney and Scoug-al bank g-ot the first
one. About the first day of July, 1883, the property of this company
was transferred to the Erie Teleg-raph & Telephone Co., a corpora-
tion org-anized in the State of New York — and from this time the tel-
ephone business beg-an to thrive. To transact the business, poles
had been erected on Phillips avenue, and the company claimed the
rig-ht to erect them on any and all the streets and avenues in the city.
The city authorities decided that the erection of poles and the
string'ing- of wires on the principal business streets of the citv was a
]Hiblic nuisance, and on the Oth day of October, 1883, so declared by
ordinance, and prohibited the companv from erecting- poles on Phil-
lips and Main avenues, and g-ave the company ten days to remove
those already erected. The company disreg-arded the provisions of
the ordinance, and on November 3, the mayor, upheld by the city
council, caused the poles to be cut down and removed. The companv
employed Winsor & Swezey of Sioux Palls and Gamble Bros, of
Yankton, and on November 24, a suit was broug-ht ag-ainst the cit\'
for ten thousand dollars damagfes. On December 18, the plaintiff
obtained an injunction from Judg-e Edg-erton, one of the supreme
court judges of the territory (there being- no judg-e in this district at
that time), restraining- the city, its officers, ag-ents and servants,
"from destroying-, removing- or interfering- with the telephone lines,
poles, fixtures and wnres of the plaintiff, and from obstructing-, pre-
venting- or interfering- with the company, its ag-ents and servants, in
restoring-, repairing-, erecting- and extending- its lines, poles, fixtures
and wires, as mav be necessary in repairing", operating- and maintain-
ing- its telephone exchang-e in the said City of Sioux Falls." This
order, as will be seen, permitted the company to erect poles and
establish telephone lines, notwithstanding" the ordinance of the citv,
and almost seemed to decide the merits of the case in advance of the
issues formed. On December 20, the defendant demurred to plain-
tiff's complaint. On December 22, the defendant moved to dissohe
the injunction of December 18, and obtained an order from Judg-e



316 HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



Edg-erton, staying- the operation of the injunction, while the motion
to dissolve was pending-. Bartlett Tripp was employed to assist A.
Prizzell, who was at this time city attorney. The motion was heard
before Jiidg-e Edg-erton and taken under advisement, and on Pebru-
arv 4, 1884, the motion to dissolve was denied, and the order staying-
the operation of the injunction vacated. This order was served on
the city attorney on February 9, and published in the Daily Press
the next morning-. The parties were on a "war footing-" agfain, and
the city authorities were more determined than ever that no poles
should be erected nor wires strung- on Phillips and Main avenues by
the company. The city council was called tog-ether on Pebruary 11,
and as it was one of the notable sessions of this body, the proceed-
ings are recorded here: "Present, the mavor, Jacob Schaetzel, Jr.,
Aldermen Porter P. Peck, N. E. Phillips, Georg-e A. Knott, M.
Grig-sby,P. L. Boyce and True Dennis. M. Grig-sby moved that the
city marshal be instructed to enforce the teleg-raph and telephone
ordinance under any and all circumstances." This motion, after
striking- out the declaration of war, was carried. Nothing- further
occurred until Pebruary 18, when the company commenced dig-g-ing-
a hole for a telephone pole near the corner of Phillips avenue and
Tenth street. John Reynolds, Prank Dockery and Peter McCar-
rier were eng-ag-ed in the work, when City Marshal C. T. Jeffers ap-
peared on the scene and arrested them all under an old villag-e ordi-
nance, making- it unlawful "to dig- and remove earth in the streets."
Their defense was that they were dig-g-ing- a hole for a telephone
pole, but Judg-e Hawkins disregarded Judg-e Edg-erton's injunction,
and lined them three dollars each, and costs, and that they stand
committed until the fine and costs were paid. They appealed to the
district court. About March 20, Judge Palmer, who had recently
been appointed associate justice of the supreme court, signed an or-
der requiring- Jacob Schaetzel, Jr., C. T. Jeffers, R. C. Hawkins, M.
Grigsby and Porter P. Peck to show cause on April 1, at the court
house in Sioux Palls, why they should not be judged guilty of con-
tempt and punished for disobeying- the injunction of Judg-e Edge r ton.
By agreement the hearing- was postponed a few days, when it was
heard before Judg-e Palmer. A. Prizzell, Bartlett Tripp and Capt.
Start of Wisconsin appeared in behalf of the city, and Winsor &
Sw^ezey and John Gamble in support of the contempt proceedings.
It was a hearing that aroused a good deal of interest, and was ably
and exhaustively conducted on both sides. The only paper that was
ever filed in this case after this, is only four lines in leng-th, from
which it appears that the case was settled, and as the writer settled
the case he feels authorized to say that less than twentv-five dollars
disposed of the whole matter, and the poles of the company were
never erected on Phillips and Main avenues.

The vigor of the administration of city affairs under Mayor
Schaetzel, stamped the city as being- alive to her interests, and since
that time the city officials have, as a whole, been active and vigorous
in doing everything that the growth and development of the city de-
manded. Bonding the city for the building- of railroads, the grading
and paving of streets, and such other matters as come before city



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



councils in youn^ and rapidly trro\vin^»- municipalities have been up
for action before the city councils of Sioux Falls, and at all times and
under all circumstances have been cared for in such manner as to
meet the approval of the citizens g-enerally. Of course, matters have
come before the council from time to time upon which there has been
g-reat diversity of opinion amon<>- its members, and occasionally com-
binations have been formed and projects carried throuofh, especially
in reference to the appointment of the minor city officials, without
much reg-ard to the minority.

One thing- can be truthfully said of all the mayors of the city,
they have been representative men. They have all been business
men, vigorous and enterprising in their own affairs, and anxious for
the prosperity of the city. And w^hile they have all been men in
which the positive element largely predominated, still every one of
them has had sufficient elasticity in his make-up to enable him to
stretch a point for the welfare of the city in his administration.

What the citv has done in its leg-islative and administrative
capacity, will more appropriately appear in connection with special
topics considered elsewhere.

VILLAGE OFFICERS.

The first annual election of officers in the village of Sioux Falls
took place the third Tuesday in March, 1877, when the following
officers were elected:

1877. President, C. K. Howard; trustees, J. L. Phillips,
Wm. Van Eps, E. A. Sherman, Henry Callender; clerk, C. O.
Natesta; treasurer, Georg-e B. Sammons.

1878. President, C. K. Howard; trustees, J. L. Phillips,
E. A. Sherman, N. E. Phillips, Henry Callender; clerk, C. O.
Natesta: treasurer, H. L. Hollister.

1879. President, C. K. Howard; trustees, J. L. Phillips,
C. H. Vincent, J. B. Watson, T. T. Cochran; clerk, E. W. Caldwell;
treasurer, H. L. Hollister.

1880. President, C. K. Howard; trustees, L. T. Dunning,
C. P. Weston, T. T. Cochran, Andrew Petterson; clerk, W. H. Holt;
treasurer, H. L. Hollister.

1881. President, L. T. Dunning-; trustees, J. B. Watson, W. E.
Willey, F. Kunerth, Andrew Petterson; clerk, W. H. Holt; treas-
urer, H. L. Hollister.

1882. President, T. T. Cochran; trustees, Wm. Van Eps,
C. W. Hubbard, W. E. Willey, H. Gilbert; clerk, W. Holt; treas-
urer, E. E. Sage.

Jacob Schaetzel, Jr., was president from July 24, 1882, when he
was elected to fill vacancy caused by the death 'of T. T. Cochran,
who died on the 20th day of June, 1882.

CITY OFFICERS.

1883. Mayor, Jacob Schaetzel, Jr., 2 years; aldermen, 1st
ward, P. P. Peck, 2 years, N. E. Phillips, 1 year; 2d ward, G. A.
Knott, 2 years, W. E. Willey, 1 year (Mr. Willey removing- from the
ward Otto Heynsohn was appointed to fill vacancy January 12, 1884;;



318 HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



3d ward, M. Grig-sby, 2 years, P. L. Boyce, 1 year; 4th ward. True
Dennis, 2 years, J. B. Watson, 1 year; clerk, W. H. Holt; treasurer,
E. E. Sage; assessor, P. S. Emerson; police justice, R. C. Hawkins;
city justice, L, D. Henry; attorney, A. Prizzell; marshal, C. T.
Jeffers; street commissioner, L. C. Winslow.

1884. Mayor, Jacob Schaetzel, Jr.; aldermen, 1st ward, P. P.
Peck, N. E. Phillips; 2d ward, Georg-e A. Knott, C. S. Bowen; 3d
ward, M. Grigsby, John P. Norton; 4th ward, True Dennis, H M.
Stearns; clerk, W. H. Holt; treasurer, E. E. Sag-e; assessor, P. S.
Emerson; police justice, R. C. Hawkins; city justice, L. D. Henry;
attorney, A. Prizzell; marshal, C. T. Jeffers; street commissioner.
L. C. Winslow. C. S. Bowen died in Pebruary, 1885. Otto Heynson
was appointed March 24, to fill vacancy, but did not qualify, and
Charles L. Norton was appointed April 14, 1885.

1885. Mayor, H. W. Ross; aldermen, 1st ward, N. E. Phil-
lips, M. Bridg-e; 2d ward, A. G. Seney, C. L. Norton; 3d ward, J. P.
Norton, R. G. Parmley; 4th w^ard, H.'M. Stearns, A. P. Shaw; clerk,
W. H. Holt; treasurer, P. P. Peck; assessor, P. S. Emerson; city
justice, L. D. Henry; attorney, D. R. Bailey; marshal, C. T. Jeffers;
street commissioner, L. C. Winslow; health officer, S. Olney, M. D.
November 10, 1885, A. P. Shaw resigned as alderman and John O.
Meara was appointed to fill the vacancy.

1886. Mayor, H. W. Ross; aldermen, 1st ward, M. Bridge, P.
W. Taylor; 2d ward, A. G. Seney, W. E. Willey; 3d ward, R. G.
Parmley, John P. Norton; 4th ward, John O. Meara, W. E. Austin;
clerk, W. H. Holt; treasurer, George B. Sammons; assessor, M. A.
Stickney; police justice, R. C. Hawkins; city justice, L. D, Henry;
attorney, D. R. Bailey; marshal, George W. Burnside; street com-
missioner, O. A. Hawdey; health officer, S. Olney, M. D. March 18,
1887, John P. Norton resigned as alderman. November 10, 1886, L.
D. Henry resigned as city justice and M. A. Stickney was appointed
to fill vacancy.

1887. Mayor, John P. Norton; aldermen, 1st ward, Mark
Bridge, P. W. Taylor; 2d ward, W. E. Willey, George W. Lear; 3d
ward, C. G. Coats, J. G. Strahon; 4th ward, W. E. Austin, Samuel
Hurst; clerk, W. H. Holt; treasurer, George B. Sammons; assessor,
H. M. Avery; police justice, R. C. Hawkins; city justice, M. A.
Stickney; attorney, D. R. Bailey; marshal, G. W. Burnside; health
officer, J. C. Morgan, M. D.; street commissioner, O. A. Hawley.

1888. Mayor, John P. Norton; aldermen, 1st ward, Mark
Bridge, P. S. Emerson; 2d ward, Geo. W. Lear, W. E. Willey; 3d
ward, C. G. Coats, J. G. Strahon; 4th ward, W. E. Austin, Sam
Hurst; clerk, W. H. Holt; treasurer, Geo. B. Sammons; assessor,
Wm. Beckler; police justice, R. C. Hawkins; city justice, M. A.
Stickney; attorney, D. R. Bailey; marshal, A. J. Mills; street com-
missioner, John Plemming; health officer, J. C. Morgan, M. D.
March 19, 1889, an election was held to determine whether Sioux
Palls should be incorporated under chapter 73 of the general laws of
Dakota. The result of this election was 503 votes for and 209
airai)isl, and a resolution was passed- declaring the city incorporated
under the o-eneral law.



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY. 319



1889. Mayor, W. E. Willey; aldermen, 1st ward, Mark Bridge,
E. J. Mannix; 2d ward, Fred Kreiser, Geo. A. Knott; 3d ward,
C. G. Coats, J. G. Strahon; 4th ward. J. B. Watson, Thomas Mc-
Kinnon; attorney, A. Frizzell; auditor, W. H. Holt; treasurer, Geo.
B. Sammons; chief of police, John Donahoe; police justice, R. C.
Hawkins; citv justice, M. A. Stickney; street commissioner, Joseph
Sampson; assessors, Wm. Beckler, W. E. Austin, J. H. Voorhees;
health officer, S. Olney.

1890. Mavor, Porter P. Peck; Aldermen, 1st ward, W. G.
McKennon, F. L. Blackman; 2d ward, W. W. Brookings, Thomas
Scanlan; 3d ward, C. G. Coats, J. S. Lewis; 4th ward, Thomas
McKinnon, Alex Reid; attorney, C. L. Brookway; auditor, W. H.
Holt; treasurer, Geo. B. Sammons; chief of police, A. B. Wheelock;
police justice, R. C. Hawkins; city justice, M. A.^ Stickney; assessor,
E. G. Wrig-ht; eng-ineer, D. C. Rice; street commissioner, R. J.
Huston; health officer, S. A. Brown, M. D.

March 2, 1891, the city was by ordinance re-districted into six
wards.

1891. Mavor, Porter P. Peck; Aldermen, 1st ward, W. G.
McKennon, F~ L. Blackman; 2d ward, S. E. Blauvelt, Thomas
Scanlan; 3d ward, C. G. Coats, J. J. Murry; 4th ward, Alex Reid,
Thomas McKinnon; 5th ward, J. S. Lewis, G. W. Burnside; 6th
ward, J. B. Fearon, D. L. McKinney; attorney, C. L. Brockway;
auditor, W. H. Holt; treasurer, Geo. B. Sammons; chief of police,
A. B. Wheelock; police justice, R. C. Hawkins; city justice, M. A.
Stickney; assessor, C. S. Carr; eng-ineer, D. C. Rice; street commis-
sioner, J. Sampson; building- inspector, C. F. Martin; health officer,
S. A. Brown.

1892. Mayor, Porter P. Peck; Aldermen, 1st ward, Mark
Bridgfe, F. L. Blackman; 2d ward, S. E. Blauvelt, Thomas Scanlan;
3d ward, J. J. Murry, E. M. Shotwell; 4th ward, Thomas McKin-
non, Alexander Reid^; 5th ward, G. W. Burnside, J. A. Ward; 6th
ward, D. L. McKinney, J. B. Fearon; attorney, D. E. Powers; treas-
urer, P. P. Boy Ian; auditor, Roy Williams; chief of police, W. H.
Martin; police justice, R. C. Hawkins; city justice, A. B. Wheelock;
assessors, A. J. Taber, Jonah Jones; eng-ineer, D. C. Rice; building-
inspector, C. F. Martin; street commissioner, J. Sampson; chief of
fire department, Jerry Carleton; health officer, J. C. Morg-an.

Joseph Sampson's term of office as street commissioner expired,
and John T. Summers was appointed November 19, to fill vancancy.
Frank L. Blackman, by moving- out of the ward, vacated his office as
alderman on Februarv 17, 1893.

1893. Mayor, Porter P. Peck; aldermen, 1st ward, Mark
Bridg-e, J. W. Craig-; 2d ward, Thomas Scanlon, John T. Cog-an; 3d
ward, E. W. Shotwell, John Murry; 4th ward, Thomas McKinnon,
Alex. Reid; 5th ward, Joseph A. Ward, Geo. W. Burnside; 6th ward,
D. L. McKinney, Joseph Sampson; attorney, D. E. Powers, who
resig-ned about September 20, and John H."^Gates was appointed;
treasurer, P. P. Boylan; auditor, Roy Williams; chief of police, W.
H. Martin, for a few months, when Joseph Dickson was appointed;
police justice, R. C, Hawkins; city justice, A. B. Wheelock; assessor.



320 HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



A. J. Taber; citv enjLrineer, S. B. Howe; building- inspector, C. F.
Martin; street commissioner, Ira Soule; chief lire department, Jerry
Carleton; health officer, J. C. Morg-an.

1894. Mayor, Roy Williams; aldermen, 1st ward, J. W. Craig-,
Anton Christopherson; 2d ward, John T. Cog-an, W. D. Roberts; 3d
ward, John Murry, B. H. Lien; 4th ward, Thomas McKinnon, Alex.



Online LibraryDana Reed BaileyHistory of Minnehaha county, South Dakota. Containing an account of its settlements, growth, development and resources ... Synopsis of public records, biographical sketches .. → online text (page 33 of 99)