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Dana Reed Bailey.

History of Minnehaha county, South Dakota. Containing an account of its settlements, growth, development and resources ... Synopsis of public records, biographical sketches .. online

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Reid; 5th ward, Georg-e W. Burnside, P. J. Morstad; 6th ward,
Joseph Sampson, Pred Kreiser; attorney, C. P. Bates; treasurer,
P. P. Boylan; auditor, P. L. Blackman; chief of police, W. H. Martin;
police justice, W. D. Stites; city justice, A. B. Wheelock; assessor,
E. Eng-leson; city eng-ineer, J. M. James; building- inspector, R. H.
Booth; street commissioner, E. M. Shotwell; chief fire department,
Jerry Carleton; health officer, A. H. Tufts.

1895. Mayor, Roy Williams; alderman, 1st w^ard, Anton Chris-
topherson, J. W. Craig-; 2d ward, W. D. Roberts, John T. Cog-an; 3d
ward, B. H. Lien, Daniel Scott; 4th w^ard, Thomas McKinnon, Sam-
uel Hurst; 5th ward, P. J. Morstad, Georg-e W. Burnside; 6th ward,
Pred Kreiser, Joseph Sampson; attorney, C, P. Bates; treasurer, P.
P. Boylan; auditor, P. L. Blackman; chief of police, W. H. Martin;
justice, W. D. Stites; city justice, A. B. Wheelock; assessor, Georg-e
Arneson; city eng-ineer, J. M. James; building- inspector, R. H.
Booth; street commissioner, B. M. Shotwell; chief fire department,
W. P. McKeever; health officer, A. H. Tufts.

1 896. Mayor, A . H. Stites; alderman, 1st ward, J. W. Craig-, W^
T. Doolittle; 2d ward, John Cog-an, G. H. Barry; 3d ward, Daniel
Scott, Theodore Pankow; 4th ward, Samuel Hurst, W. D. Roberts;
5th ward, Georg-e W. Burnside, P. J. Morstad; 6th ward, A. H. Kil-
roy, M. M. Plaskey; attorney, D. E. Powers; treasurer, P. P. Bov-
lan; auditor, P. iJ. Blackman, chief of police, Joseph K. Dickson;
police justice, O. A. Powler; city justice, A. B. Wheelock; assessor,
(t. H. Kiland; city eng-ineer, S. B. Howe; building- inspector, R. H.
Booth; street commissioner, G. W. Ward; chief fire department, W.
P. McKeever; health officer. Dr. Stephen Olney.

1897. Mayor, A. H. Stites; treasurer, John Olson; police justice,
O. A. Powler; citv justice, A. B. Wheelock; aldermen, 1st ward,
W. T. Doolittle, P. W. McKeever; 2d ward, G. H. Barry, H. T.
Parmley; 3d ward, Theodore Pankow, Dan Scott; 4th ward, S. H.
Hurst, W. D. Roberts; 5th ward, P. J. Morstad, G. W. Burnside;
6th ward, M. M. Plaskey, A. S. Kilroy; auditor, P. L. Blackman; at-
torney, D. E. Powers; assessor, G. H. Kiland; building- inspector, R.
H. Booth; chief of police, J. M. Dickson; chief of fire department, J.
N. Carpenter; engfineer, S. B. Howe; health officer, S. Olney; street
commissioner, G. W. Ward.

1898. Mayor, B. H. Lien; treasurer, John Olson; police justice,
O. A. Powler; citv justice, Cyrus Walts; aldermen, 1st ward, W. T.
Doolittle, P. W. McKeever; 2d ward, W. E. Willey, H. T. Parmley;
3d ward, Theodore Pankow, Dan Scott; 4th ward, S. H. Hurst, Alex
Reid; 5th ward, P. J. Morstad, G. W. Burnside; ()th ward, M. M.
Plaskey, A. S. Kilroy; auditor, L. M. Estabrook; attorney, D. J.
Conway; assessor, Roy Williams; building- inspector, R. H. Booth;

.chief of police, Pred Kreiser; chief of fire department, A. J. Carl-



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY. 321



son; engineer, S. B. Howe; health officer, H. W. Siihera, street com-
missioner, E. M. Shotwell.

1809. Mayor, B. H. Lien; treasurer, John Olson; police justice,
O. A. Fowler; citv justice, Cvrus Walts; alderman, 1st ward, W. T,
Doolittle, R. E. Woodworth; 2d ward, W. E. Willev, Mark Bridoe;
3d w^ard, Theodore Pankow, D. C. Ricker; 4th ward, S. H. Hurst,
Alex Reid; 5th ward, P. J. Morstad, G. W. Burnside; 6th ward, M.
M. Flaske\% Ira Soule; auditor, L. M. Estabrook; attorney. D. J.
Conw^ay; assessor, Roy Williams; buildin<>- inspector, R. H. Booth;
chief of police, Fred Kreiser; chief of lire department, James M.
Tatman; eng-ineer, S. B. Howe; health officer, H. W. Subera; street
commissioner, E. M. Shotw^ell.

SCHOOLS.

Strang-e as it may seem, no steps w^ere taken in the Sioux Falls
district to secure the benefit of the school law% and no active meas-
ures w^ere taken to organize the district until the spring- of 1873,
nearly two years after the division of the county into school districts
had been made. At that time, the necessity of a public school hav-
ing' forced itself upon the communit3^ a petition w^as circulated
among" the citizens asking- for the org-anization of a school board.

Prior to this time four terms of school had been taug-ht in Sioux
Falls township. During- the winter of 1871-2, a Mr. Leonard taug-ht
school in a sod shant}' near where the brewery now stands. About
the first of September, 1872. Mrs. E. H. Darrow^ commenced a select
school in the barracks, and taught three months, and the following-
winter she taught a term of school in a log house northeast of the
city on what is known as the David Reynold's place. During the
winter of 1872-3, Miss Clara Ledyard (now Mrs. Lewis) taught school
in the barracks.

On the 14th dav of April, 1873, Albion Thorne, superintendent
of public instruction, issued an order to Edwin Sharpe, "a house-
holder in district No. 1," to post notices in said district of the first
school meeting to be held April 29, 1873, at 7 o'clock p. m., in the
room used for school purposes in Sioux Falls. At this meeting the
first school officers of the town of Sioux Falls were elected as follows:
A. Gale, director; R. F. Pettigrew, clerk; D. S. Goodyear, treasurer.

A special meeting of the voters of the district was called May
12, 1873, in the school room at Sioux Falls, and on motion of Mr.
Grigsby it was ordered that a tax of one per cent should be levied for
the purpose of building a school house. A motion was then made by
Mr. Bippus that a tax of one per cent be voted to purchase school
furniture and for other purposes, which was also carried. A com-
mittee of five, consisting of the following named persons was ap-
pointed bv the chair to select suitable grounds for a school house:
J. Bippus, R. Booth, M. Grigsby, H. J. Whipple and R. F. Petti-
g-rew. The meeting then adjourned to May 25, at which time Mr.
Bippus, chairman of the committee, stated that he had no definite
report to make and asked for more time, whereupon the committee
was continued for one week.

June 2, having met pursuant to adjournment, Mr. Bippus re-



322 HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



ported that Mr. A. Gale would sell lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, block 2 of
Gale's addition to Sioux Falls for two hundred and fifty dollars, and
that J. L. Phillips would sell lots 3, 4, 5, 14, 15 and 16, block 7 for
two hundred and fifty dollars. The report of the committee was ac-
cepted and the district board was instructed to contract for the lots
mentioned in the report. On motion of R. H. Booth, the tax voted at
a previous meeting- was rescinded, and on motion of Mr. Pettig-rew a
tax of one per cent for building- a school house was voted. A public
school was now supposed to be a thing of the near future, but the
people were doomed to disappointment. The treasurer had doubts
in regard to his authority to collect the tax, and before these doubts
were satisfied the warrant had expired by limitation. There being-
consequently no money and no way of raising it at that time, the idea
of a public school was for a time abandoned.

On the 6th of September, 1873, A. Gale, chairman and director
of the board, called another school meeting and a new board was
elected as follows: A. Gale, director; H. J. Whipple, treasurer and
C. W. McDonald, secretary. The tax voted at the last meeting was
rescinded, and a tax of one-half of one per cent for building- a school
house and one-quarter of one per cent for teachers' wag-es and fur-
nishing the school house was voted, and the district officers were in-
structed to collect such tax as soon as possible. The board was also
authorized to rent a room suitable for a school room, and to employ a
female teacher for three months during the ensuing- fall. It was
also voted to have six months' additional school during the next school
year. The board was instructed to advertise for plans and specifi-
cations for a school house, the cost not to exceed one thousand dol-
lars, and in order to carry out these instructions was authorized to
borrow money as it might deem proper, not to exceed one thousand
dollars.

The newly elected board fully realizing- the difficulties to be en-
countered, and determining to fulfil their duties faithfully, met on
the Monday following their election and pledged themselves, each to
the other, that every possible effort should be made to organize and
continue a public school in Sioux Falls. That this pledg-e was
sacredly kept the results of their efforts will show, and the pride
with which this result was reported by the clerk to the district at
the expiration of the year is surely pardonable, the more especially
as it is not, as the clerk naively remarks "for electioneering- pur-
poses."

In accordance with instructions, notices were posted to the
effect that the board would receive sealed proposals for the erection
of a school house in Sioux Falls until Saturday evening September
13, 1873. The district was canvassed and the total number of chil-
dren between the ages of five and twenty-one was found to be 136
— 76 males and 60 females. On September 13, the board met to open
bids for building- a school house, and the clerk was instructed to
enter into a contract with J. F. Burg-er for the erection of a school
building-. Miss Clara Ledyard was employed as teacher for three
months at thirty dollars per month. She taug-ht in Libbey's hall,
which was located on the east side of Main avenue, between Seventh
and Eighth streets.



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY. 323



September 15, the board met and the clerk reported that Mr.
Burger would not enter into a contract to build the school house, and
it was decided to advertise for new bids.

September 16, they met ag-ain in the oftice of Petti(*-rew & Ori(»-sbv
and a number of assessments were made' and added to the list. The
official bond of H. J. Whipple as district treasurer with C. K. Howard
as surety in the sum of three thousand dollars was presented and
approved.

September 29, the board held another meeting-, at which the new
bids for the school building- were opened. Edwin Sharp's bid for
nine hundred and eig-hty-iive dollars was the lowest, and being- within
the limit of the instructions to the board, a contract with Mr. Sharpe
was entered into.

Having- thus secured the building- of a school house, the atten-
tion of the board was now directed to the collection of the tax voted.
On the 25th day of September, a warrant for the collection, tog-ether
with the tax list, was placed in the hands of the treasurer. On the
3d day of November, this warrant was returned to the clerk, with
the receipt of the county treasurer, showing- that nine hundred
thirty-four dollars and eig-hty-five cents remained unpaid. And now
difficulties were encountered and questions raised. The collection of
the tax was resisted by some of the tax payers and a petition for an
injunction was presented to Judg-e Shannon, asking- the court to re-
strain further proceeding-s in its collection. The petition was not
g-ranted, and the tax was finally collected. On the 14th day of Novem-
ber, 1873, a title bond was obtained from A. Gale and wife, running-
to the school board and its successors in office, for block No. 2 in
Gale's Sioux Palls. A contract was made with the Eureka Mfg-. Co.
of Rock Palls, 111., for furniture for the school house amounting- to
three hundred forty-four dollars and fifty cents. On the 5th day of
December, 1873, the school house was finished and turned over to
the district, to the satisfaction of all concerned.

On the 12th of December, 1873, Miss Ledyard made a report to
the board of the first public school in Sioux Brails. The total number
of pupils enrolled was 74 — 44 boys and 30 g-irls. The averag^e daily
attendance was 40. The enforced collection of the tax in 1873,
caused a feeling-, which resulted in a petition being- presented to the
countv asking- for the formation of other districts, and on the 6th
day of January, 1874, sections 1, 2,^11, 12, 13 and 14, were set off as a
part of district No. 16, and section 15 tog-ether with that portion of
sections 9, 10 and 22, lying- on the rig-ht bank of the Big- Sioux river,
were desig-nated as district No. 25. A petition was presented to the
clerk asking- that H. J. Whipple be employed to teach the next term
of school. Mr. Whipple was therefore eng-ag-ed, the term beg-inning-
January 12, 1874, and continuing- twelve weeks. The total number
of pupils during- this term was 81, the daily averag-e attendance 58.
On the 28th of April another term beg-an, Miss Mary H. Corey being-
employed as teacher. Total number of pupils 66, averag-e daily at-
tendance 44. On the 4th of July this term ended and with it the first
year of public school in Sioux Palls.

At the next annual school meeting- September 5th, 1874, the
treasurer submitted the following- report:



324 HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



Amount received from countv treasurer — S 426.36

Amount collected on special school tax 1,588.46

Total amount received - - S2,014.82

Amount paid out on order of district clerk and director SI, 864.55

Balance on hand September 5, 1874 - 150.27

Total $2,014.82

The members of the board were re-elected for the ensuing- year
and instructed to provide for nine months of school to beg-in Septem-
ber 7th, 1874, and Miss M. H. Corey was eng-ag-ed at a salary of forty
dollars per month. By November, 1874, the number of children in
the district had increased to such an extent, that an additional
schoolroom and teacher were found necessary and the proposition of
the trustees of the M. E. Church for the use of their room and stove
at nine dollars per month was accepted, and Miss Clara Ledyard
was employed at a salary of thirty-five dollars per month. She was
g-iven the primary department and had 47 scholars, and Miss Corey
had a total of 62.

At the annual meeting- in 1875 Artemus Gale was elected
director, C. W. McDonald clerk and Cyrus Walts treasurer. The
M. E. Church building- was ag-ain rented for the primary school.
This department was taug-ht by Miss Clara Ledyard the entire year,
the hig-her department bv Miss Corey during- the fall and winter
terms, and by Miss E. F. Cowdrey during- the spring- term. During-
this year the board paid to Artemas Gale and to Dr J. L. Phillips,
the full amount due, including- interest on the lots contracted for in
June, 1873, and the deeds were placed on record.

At the annual meetings in 1876, T. H. Brown was elected director,
the other officers holding- over. The teachers employed were New-
ton Clark and Miss L. C. Bryan, at a salary of fifty and thirty dollars
per month, respectively. The winter term was closed on account of
an epidemic of scarlet fever in a very virulent form. A bell was
placed in position and blanks were provided for weekly reports, the
combined influences of which produced a beneficial effect on the
punctuality and attendance of the pupils as shown by a comparison
of the reports.

At the session of the leg-islature in 1877, the school law was so
amended as to make the election of officers come in the spring-, and
in accordance with this amendment, the next annual meeting- was
held April 3, 1877. T. H. Brown was elected director for one year,
C. W. McDonald clerk for two years and Cyrus Walts treasurer for
two years. Mr. L. D. Henry and Miss L. C. Bryan were the teach-
ers employed. The crowded condition of the school, caused by the
increased and increasing- population, led to a special meeting- of the
district November 10, 1870. As the result of this meeting-, the
Phillips hall was rented for four months at twenty dollars per month,
and Mr. Henrv was transferred from the school house to the hall, the
intermediate department was placed in charg-e of Miss Bryan, and
Miss S. Wag-ner was employed to teach in the primary department.



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



325



At the annual meeting- in 1878, T. H. Brown was elected director
for the ensuing- three years. The question of providing- a suitable
school building- for the increasing-needsof the district was discussed,
and after several meeting-s had been held, a ])uilding- committee was
selected, consisting- of T. H. Brown, C. W. McDonald, Cyrus Walts,
J. B. Young- and N. E. Phillips. This committee was instructed to
proceed with the erection of a building- and after due deliberation
the plans were drawn bv C. A. Wilbur of Dubuque, for a frame,
lirick veneered building- sixty feet square, two stories and basement,
with stair wavs and entrances outside each floor to be divided in
the center lioth wavs, making eight school rooms, the rooms on each
floor to be connected bv an octagonal room in the center of the build-
ing. The contract was let to John D. Cameron and the work was
(lone in the fall of 187S and the spring- of 187*). This is the building
now called the Irving school.




iKviNCr School BriT.i)iX(



District No. 25 held its first meeting- on Noveml)er 28, 1874, in
the office of Amos F. Shaw. J. F. Webber was elected director,
A. F. Shaw treasurer, and O. P. Weston clerk, and it was voted that
there should be three months school during- the ensuing winter. For
\arious reasons, the first term of school did not beg-in until May 31,
1875, ending- Aug'ust 2<), 1875. Miss AUie L. Storey was the teacher
emploved at a salary of twenty-five dollars per month. The total
number of pupils enrolled during- the term was 0—4 being- tlie^averag-e
daily attendance. At the annual meeting- in the fall of 1875, H. W.
Lewis was elected director, O. P. Weston clerk and A. F. Shaw
treasurer. During- the ensuing- vear no school was taught, the pupils



326 HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY,



from this district attending- school in district No. 1, their tuition
being- paid by district No. 25. At the annual meeting- in 1876, H. W.
Lewis was elected director for three years. No school was taug-ht
the following- winter, the pupils attending- school in district No. 1 as
before.

At the annual meeting- in the spring- of 1877, the officers of the
previous year were re-elected and it was voted to g-o ahead and build
a school house as soon as possible, and three lots were purchased
from A. F. Shaw for a site. During- the ensuing- summer a term of
school was taug-ht by Miss Alice Morrison. The total number of
pupils enrolled was 15. Averag-e daily attendance, 11.

In July a special meeting- was called and E. M. Harthorn was
elected director to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Mr. Lyewis.
At the annual meeting- in the spring- of 1878, M. A. Stickney was
elected director. A term of school was taug-ht during- the following-
summer by Miss Inda Bryan and one in the fall by Miss Cora Cham-
berlain.

On January 16, 1879, a meeting- was held for the purpose of pro-
testing- ag-ainst the consolidation of districts No. 25 and No. 1, and
resolutions to that effect were passed and sent to the leg-islature.
This was the last meeting- of district No. 25.

At the leg-islative session in 1879, the independent school district
of Sioux Palls was incorporated, embracing- the corporate limits of
the villag-e of Sioux Palls. A board of education was appointed com-
posed of the following- g-entlemen: Edwin Sharpe, Cyrus Walts,
A. P. Shaw, O. P. Weston, E. A. Sherman, B. P. Campbell, N. E.
Phillips and T. H. Brown.

On the 11th of March, 1879, the board of education held its first
meeting- and from that date, school districts 1 and 25 ceased to exist.
At this meeting- T. H. Brown was elected president and N. E. Phil-
lips secretary. T. H. Brown, Cyrus Walts, N. E. Phillips and
L. D. Henry were appointed a committee for the examination of
teachers. L. D. Henry was employed as principal at a salary of
seventy-five dollars per month, and Misses Louise C. Bryan, Cora
E. Chamberlain and Sarah Wagner as assistants. Mrs. Annie Rob-
erts was employed for the primary school, which was located on the
east side of the river, in the school house built by the old district
No. 25. The salary of the lady teachers was fixed at thirty-five dol-
lars per month and the term of school beg-an March 24, ending- June
20, 1879.

April 1, 1879, N. E. Phillips resig-ned the office of secretary and
E. O. Kimberly was appointed to fill the vacancy at a salary of one
hundred dollars per year. May 14, 1879, Mr. Kimberly resig-ned
and Chas. M. Morse was elected to the office of secretary. Aug-ust
5, T. H. Brown resigned his position as a member of the board
and John Bippus was appointed to fill the vacancy.

It was deemed necessary to employ two additional teachers for
the term commencing September 1, 1879, and on August 23, an ex-
amination was held in the high school building. The same teachers
were retained in the high school building as had been employed
during the previous spring, and the same salaries paid. September



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY. 327



13, 1879, Chas. M. Morse resig-ned and Prank L. Boyce was elected
secretary of the board. The teachers for the winter term of 1879-80
were Professor L. D. Henry, Misses Mina L. Fletcher, L. C. Bryan,
Maud V. Rouse, Cora E. Chamberlain, Sarah Wag-ner and Nellie
Blanchard.

After the March election in 1880, the board of education was
made up of the following- named persons: John Bippus, Cvrus
Walts, A. F. Shaw, B. F. Campbell, N. E. Phillips, E. O. Kimberly,
W. R. Bourne and Edwin Sharpe.

John Bippus was elected president. The same teachers were
retained for the spring- term of school. July 20, N. E. Phillips re-
sig-ned as member of the board and T. H. Brown was appointed to fill
the vacancy. The teachers for the ensuing* school year were: J. B.
Hawley, principal, at a salary of nine hundred dollars per year; Mrs.
C. Everett, Misses L.C.Bryan, Cora Chamberlain, Nellie Blanchard,
Ada Allison and Helen J. MacPherson, at a salary of three hundred
and fifty dollars per year. Mr. Bourne having- resig-ned as a member
of the board, E. A. Sherman was appointed to fill the vacancy.

At a meeting- held February 12, 1881, it was ordered that the
schools be closed on account of the scarcity of fuel. This was the
winter of the g*reat fall of snow the details of which will be found
elsewhere. The schools remained closed until the second day of
May, when they were opened for a term of eig-ht weeks.

In 1881, the following- persons composed the board of education:
T. H. Brown, E. O. Kimberly, E. A. Sherman, Edwin Sharpe, C. L.
Norton, Cyrus Walts, W. H." Nelson and O. P. Weston. Mr. Sher-
man was elected president of the board and Frank L. Boyce secre-
tary. The teachers for the ensuing- year were: S. E. Young- prin-
cipal, Misses Mary Bissett, C. A. Parker, Carrie Thompson, Nellie
Blanchard, T. M. Rice and Mrs. Everett for the hig-h school, and
Miss L. C. Kinney for the east side school. In December Miss
Thompson resig-ned and Miss Josephine McCormack was selected to
fill the vacancy in the school. In February, 1882, it was found neces-
sary to divide room No. 1, and Miss Ellen A. Fairbank was employed
in the new room. A committee of three was appointed to look up
school house sites, one in Gale's addition and one in Bennett's
Brooking-s' or McClelland's addition. The election in 1882 made no
chang-e in the members of the board and the officers of the board of
the previous year were re-elected. Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 15, 16, 17 and 18,
and the north half of lots 5 and 14, in block 10, West Sioux Falls,
were purchased of Edward Watson for nine hundred dollars, and
nine lots on the east side were purchased of the Dakota Improve-
ment Company for four hundred and fifty dollars. T. C. Marson
was awarded the contract to build two school houses, four rooms in
each, two on each floor, buildings to be frame with brick veneering-.
These building-s were erected in the summer of 1882, and were
opened for school purposes at the beg-inning- of the winter term,
January, 1883, and are now known as the Hawthorne and Whittier
schools. S. E. Young- was superintendent of schools during- the
school year of 1882.

March 31, 1883, F. L. Boyce resig-ned the office of secretary of



328 HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



the board and was succeeded bvT. A. Robinson. The board for the
ensuing year, consisting- of O. B. Weston, W. H. Nelson, C. L. Nor-
ton, A.'C. Phillips, Albert Reynolds, H. W. Ross, R. G. Parmley
and L. D. Henry, met June 11, 1883, for the election of officers with
the following- result: President W. H. Nelson, secretary T. A.
Robinson. The salary of the principal, S. E. Young-, was fixed at
one hundred and twenty dollars per month; that of all teachers hav-
ing- taug-ht one year or more in the city schools, four hundred dollars
per year; all others, three hundred and fifty dollars per year, except



Online LibraryDana Reed BaileyHistory of Minnehaha county, South Dakota. Containing an account of its settlements, growth, development and resources ... Synopsis of public records, biographical sketches .. → online text (page 34 of 99)