Copyright
Dana Reed Bailey.

History of Minnehaha county, South Dakota. Containing an account of its settlements, growth, development and resources ... Synopsis of public records, biographical sketches .. online

. (page 76 of 99)
Online LibraryDana Reed BaileyHistory of Minnehaha county, South Dakota. Containing an account of its settlements, growth, development and resources ... Synopsis of public records, biographical sketches .. → online text (page 76 of 99)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


ton, where he still resides. He has a good farm and is a respected
citizen.




John Xelsux\.



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY. 831



MoEN, EsTEN E., was born in Norway Noveinl)er 2^\ 1857. He
emig-rated to this country with his father Esten E. Egg-en, and lived
with him in Minnesota and Dakota until he took up as a homestead
the east half of the northwest quarter of section 10, in Mapleton. He
is also the owner of the southeast quarter of the northeast quarter
of section 20, in the same town. He has held the ofllice of road super-
visor and has been school district treasurer ten years. He is a re-
spected citizen.

Myrick, Lucius O., is a native of Canada, and was born March
15, 1833. The following- year he came to the United States with his
parents, who located in Illinois. In 1873 he became a resident of
Minnehaha count}', securing- as a homestead 120 acres of section 26,
and 40 acres of section 25, in Mapleton, where he still resides and has
ag-ood farm. He enlisted in the First Wisconsin artillery, in the fall
of 1862, and was honorably discharg-ed in July, 1864. He has held
the office of clerk of the town board of Mapleton, and is a g-ood and
respected citizen.

Nelson, Iver, is a native of Norway, and was born August 6,
1835. He emig-rated to this country and lived in Wisconsin and Min-
nesota prior to his coming- to Minnehaha county in June, "1872. He
took up as a homestead the southeast quarter of section 7, in Maple-
ton, where he resides at the present time, and has a first-class farm,
with substantial buildings and improvements. At the death of his
father, Nels Iverson, which occurred a few years ago, he inherited
320 acres of land in sections 17 and 18 in the same town; he has also
purchased considerable land, and owns about 600 acres in all. He is
a prosperous farmer and a respected citizen. Has been town super-
visor and school director, and was postmaster of the Republican post
office a number of years.

Nelson, John, the pioneer farmer of Mapleton, was born in
Norway in 1839, and came to the United States in 1854. He resided
in Wisconsin and Minnesota until 1866, when he and his wife in com-
])anv with John Thompson and wife started out for Dakota, and ar-
rived in Minnehaha county June 29, of that year. He took up as a
homestead the southeast quarter of section 5 in Mapleton, and pre-
empted land in sections 17 and 20 in the same township. He has
many interesting incidents to relate of his pioneer days, and one ap-
pears in the chapter of reminiscences. He was postmaster of the
Republican post office eleven years, and resided on his farm in Ma-
pleton until a few years ago, when he removed to Arlington, King-s-
bury county, this state. Mr. Nelson is kind and obliging, and is an
enterprising and respected citizen.

O'Grady, John, was born in Ireland April 16, 1848, and emi-
grated to the United States in 1864. About the lOth day of June,
1866, he came to Sioux Falls with Company D, 22d U. S. Infantry.
:Mr. O'Gradv says that ''at that time the company was under the com-
mand of Colonel" Knox, and had been ordered to Sioux Falls to relieve
Company E., 6th Iowa Cavalry. There were then about twenty-five
or thirty cavalry men in Sioux Falls, and they left the same day the
infantry arrived. Dr. Nisley and Mr. Pratt, the hospital steward,



832 HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



who had been with the cavalry company, remained. A commissary
buildino- was constructed by our company just below where the west
end of the Eig-hth street bridg-e is now located, and a building for of-
ficers quarters was erected where E. J. Daniels' store now is. An
addition to the sutler's store in the block southeast of the Cataract
hotel was also built, and a guardhouse north and west of the bar-
racks near Seventh street. There was a large log house north of
the barracks, with only a wag-on road between the two buildings. It
was about thirty feet square and built of heavy logs, with a dirt roof;
there was no floor, except overhead, which was made of Cottonwood
boards, intended as a last resort from which to shoot in case of at-
tack. This building, which had been erected before our company
arrived, was used bv us as an armory. In 1868 Colonel Knox went
to Philadelphia, and Captain John Duffy succeeded him in command.
In April, 1869, I was discharged, my term of enlistment having ex-
pired. During the summer of 1869 the company left for Fort Ran-
dall." Soon after, when the military reservation was opened for
settlers, Mr. O'Grady secured 120 acres of land in section 20 in Ma-
pleton, to which he has since added 120 acres, located on each of the
banks of the Sioux river, which divides his farm into nearly two
equal parts. He has been an industrious man, and is a good citizen.

Olson, Jonas, one of the pioneers of Mapleton township, was
born in Norway February 8, 1845; came to the United States in 1867,
and located in this county in 1868, where he has since resided. He
secured a pre-emption and a homestead when he first came here, the
former of which he sold, the latter he still retains, comprising the
southeast quarter of section 9, in the town of Mapleton. He has a
splendid farm with good buildings and improvements, one barn alone
costing about S2,000. He has added to his land by purchase so that
now he owns about 400 acres, and is well-to-do. He has always taken
an active interest in the welfare of his town, has held the office of
town treasurer several years, and since 1893, has been one of the
supervisors of the town board. He is highly esteemed as a neighbor
and citizen.

Peterson, Robert, was born at Merager, in the province of
Trondhjem, Norway, on the 11th day of December, 1822. Emigrated
to the United States with his family in 1858, and settled in Goodhue
county, Minnesota, and engaged in farming for ten years. In Sep-
tember, 1868, came to Dakota, and located about nine miles up the
river from Sioux Falls, which at that time was a military post.
The first winter they lived with John Nelson, a nephew of Mrs.
Peterson, who had a cabin about tw^o miles farther north. The fol-
lowing year Mr. Peterson commenced building a log house which is
shown in accompanying illustration, on the northwest quarter of sec-
tion 17, in Mapleton, which was then within the boundaries of the
military reservation. He had not more than done so, when one day
he was called upon by a squad of soldiers, who fired their guns in
order to frighten the sturdy poineer, and threatened him with arrest
if he did not immediately vacate. But John Nelson happened to be
there, and remonstrated saving thev were not to be so easilv fright-




Robert Peterson,




Robert Peterson's Log House.



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY. 835



ened away, and Mr. Peterson decided to remain. The soldiers then
arrested Mr. Peterson, broug-ht him to Sioux Palls, and kept him in
the o-uardhouse over nigdit. The next day Mr, Nelson went to see
the colonel, and showed the following- letter from Cong-ressman Spink,
written at Yankton June 19, 1869: "John Nelson, Esq. Dear Friend:
The Adjutant General of the United States, in replv to inquiries,
informs me that the Commissioner of the General tyand Office had
been notified by the War Department, on the 9th day of June, that
the military reservation at Sioux Falls had been abandoned. This,
of course, opens up the land to settlement. Please inform the peo-
ple of your vicinity. Your friend, S. L. Spink." This had the effect
of immediately releasing- Mr. Peterson. The colonel, however, made
a long- report of the occurrence, which was forwarded to the proper
authorities. Mr. Peterson secured the east half of the northeast
quarter of section 18, and the west half of the northwest quarter of
section 17, as a pre-emption, and later took up a homestead compris-
ing- the east half of the northwest quarter, and the west half of the
northeast quarter of section 17, in Mapleton, and afterwards boug-ht
160 acres in section 18. He resided on his farm until his death,
which occurred on the 29th day of August, 1887, survived by his wife,
two sons and a daugfhter. Mr. Peterson was one of those sturdy set-
tlers, who in honesty of purpose, and perseverance and endurance in
hardship will never be surpassed.

Peterson, Peter R., a son of Robert Peterson, was born in
(joodhue county, Minnesota, July 8, 1861. He came with his parents
to this county in the fall of 1868, and when the settlement was larg-e
enoug-h to have a school he received his education there. He worked
on his father's farm and g-rew up with the country. At the time of
his father's death he took charg-e of the home farm in section 17,
where he still resides with his mother. He is well-to-do, is a g-ood
farmer, energ-etic and enterprising-, and is a respected citizen.

Peterson, Iver R., a brother of Peter R. Peterson, was born
in Goodhue county, Minnesota, March 21, 1867, but came with his
parents to this county the following- year, where he received his edu-
cation, and worked on his father's farm. At the death of his father,
in 1887, he inherited 106 acres of land in section 18 in Mapleton,
where he is now eng-ag-ed in farming-, and has a good farm. He is a
g-ood citizen.

Renner, Leonard, is a prosperous farmer residing- in Maple-
ton township, where he bought and now owns about 960 acres of
land in sections 8, 9, 15, 16, 17 and 22. He has a comfortable and
attractive residence, and good outbuildings and barns for stock and
machinery. He was born in Germany June 9, 1840, emigrated to the
United States in 1848, lived in New York two years and in Wiscon-
sin from 1850 to 1878, when he removed to Dakota and has been a
well-known resident of this county ever since. He has been assessor
and a member of the town board of Mapleton for several years. Dur-
ing the war of the rebellion he served in Battery B, 1st Illinojs Lig-jit
Artillery, and was a noncommissioned officer two years. The C
M. & Sf. Paul Railroad Company has recently established a stati(Mi,



836 HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



called Renner, on his farm. Mr. Renner is an enterprisinjj- and
hiofhly esteemed citizen.

Seager, Richard M., was born in Virg-il, Cortland county, New
York, July 31, 1860. His early years were spent on a farm and in
attending- the public schools. He completed his education at Dryden,
New York, and was g-raduated from the Dryden academy. He com-
menced teaching- school when sixteen years of ag-e and was thus em-
ployed for two years. His next business was farming- in Iowa; then
he spent a short time in Minnesota and from there went to work upon
the famous Dwig-ht farm in North Dakota; then drifted into Montana
and was at Miles City when the Northern Pacific railroad first
reached that place. He then went back to New York and was em-
])loyed for three years in woolen mills, and in 1887 came from there
to this county, where he has since been engag-ed in farming- in Map-
leton. He is clerk of school district No. 17, and has been town clerk
of Mapleton since 1891. He is a g-ood neig-hbor and hig-hly respected
citizen.

Tabor, Holmes, was born in Greenwich, Washing-ton countv.
New York, March 7, 1837. At the ag-e of eleven years he removed to
Living-ston county. New York, where he received a g-ood education.
Prom there removed to Detroit. Michig-an, where he taugfht school
ten years, and was school inspector the same leng-th of time. Was
in the postal service for ten years, and held the office of justice of
the peace four years where he resided, and also the office of super-
visor. He resided for about three years in Kansas and Nevada. In
1885 came to this county, and settled in Mapleton, where he eng-agfed
in farming- in sections 30 and 31. While a resident of Mapleton he
was one of the supervisors of the town board for two years. A few
years ag-o he removed to the city of Sioux Palls and more recently to
Kansas City where he now resides. He is a well informed man, and
always took an active part in public matters, and he would feel that
his record was not complete if it. failed to state that he was always a
zealous Republican.



BENTON TOA^NSHIP.

(102-50)

The township of Benton is one of the finest townships in the
county. It is convenient!}' located for business purposes, has a rich,
])ro(luctive soil, with very little waste land and is dotted over with
not only comfortable farm residences, but several of them indicate
that the owners have succeeded in a short time in securing- for them-
selves and families more than a mere competence. The northeast-
ern portion of the township is settled principally by people of Nor-
weofian descent, and they have some very fine farms. The north-
western portion of the township has several families of Swedish
descent, and here too industry and thrift have changed the raw prai-
rie into profitable farms. Owing- to its proximity to Sioux Palls it
was settled quite early. Lars Olson Ulvilden took up a homestead
in 1870, in section 12, and from this time the land was rapidly taken
up b\' actual settlers. The township lines were surveyed by Wm.
J. Neeley in July, 1859, and the subdivision of the township was
made by Carl C. P. Meyer in September, 1864, and contains 22,976.40
acres of land. At the time of its subdivision there were several
small streams of water running- throug-h the township, which for the
past few years have been dry the g-reater portion of the time. Skunk
creek flows throug-h the southwestern portion, and the Willow creek
throug-h the centre of the township, branching- out east and west,
affording- channels for the escape of surplus water during- heavy
rains, and also marking- the places where in former years running-
water was the rule and not the exception.

Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church. — This church was or-
g-anized in Benton on the 14th day of Augfust, 1873, with thirteen
charter members. Prom that time services were held with more or
less regularity until a very neat and commodious church building-
was erected in 1887, on the southeast corner of section 28, at a cost
of SI, 200, which was dedicated on Sunday, September 4, of that year.
A g-ood many ministers have acted as pastors of this church since its
org-anization. The first one was the Rev. Pielder, but during- the
past few years the Reverends Redfield, Jenkins, Brown and Pawell
have had charge. In connection with the church there is a prosper-
ous Sunday school numbering- about forty scholars, and also an Ep-
worth League with a membership of twenty-three.



838



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.




Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Church.



Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Church. — This church \vas
organized May 4, 1878, with a membership of twenty-six. A church
building was erected in 1885, on the southeast quarter of section 5 in
Benton, at a cost of $2,000, which was paid for by the members of the
church. It is commodious and well furnished, and in August, 1894,
a new bell was placed in the church tower. The first pastor of the
church was the Rev. J. H. Randahl, who was succeeded by the Rev.
G. A. Ekeberg, and he in turn was succeeded bv the Rev\ J.
Pranzen. Services are held every other Sunday. There is a pros-
perous Sunday school in connection w^ith the church, with about
thirty scholars, also a Ladies' Aid society.

Good Templars.— The Bethel Lodge No. 303 of the I. O. G. T.,
was organized in Benton during the spring of 1893, with about four-
teen charter members. The present membership (1895) is thirty-
two, and the Lodge is in a prosperous condition, with a very large
attendance at its meetings, which are held every Monday evening at
the Bethel church.

New Hope Creamery.— In the spring of 1895, a creamery was
built on the southwest quarter of section two, in Benton township.
Prank H. Ployd was the moving spirit in the enterprise. It com-
menced doing business the 1st day of June, 1895, but on the 22d day
of August, following, it was destroyed by fire. The next year Mr.
Ployd and the farmers living in the vicinity rebuilt it, although it
did not commence doing business until January, 1897. During the
summer following, Mr. Ployd suddenly took his"^ departure from the
state, and it became necessary to reorganize the companv. On the
24th day of September, 1897, "articles were filed bv D. O. Crooks, T.
E. Safer and P. M. Peterson, for the incorporation of the



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY. 830



New Hope Co-operative Creamery Company, with a capital
stock of $5,000. It is well equipped for the business, and is receiv-
ing- on an averag-e 18,000 pounds of milk a week. This creamery en-
joys the distinction of being- awarded a premium at the National
Creamery Buttermakers meeting- held in Sioux Palls in Januar\-,
ISOO. The butter manufactured at this creamery is shii)ped to New
York, where it bring-s a g-ilt-edged price, (ieorg-e Crooks, a son of
\V. A. Crooks, has had charg-e of the creamery during- the past year.

BENTON TOWNSHIP BOARD.

The first meeting- of the board was held at the house of Sever
Wilkinson, January 3, 1881. The lirst town officers were: Super-
visors, Wm. Alg-uire chairman, N. B. Nelson, H. H. Moore; clerk,
Sever Wilkinson; assessor, Knut Iverson. At this meeting- the town
was divided into four road districts. June 13, the board authorized
Wm. Alg-uire to purchase two road scrapers. At the July meeting-
S106 was appropriated b}' the board for building- bridg-es across
Skunk and Spring- creeks.

1882. Supervisors, H. H. Moore chairman, N. B. Nelson, J. C.
Eldridg-e; clerk, S. Helg-eson; treasurer, Wm. Alg-uire. May 8, the
board apportioned S150 received from the county bridg-e fund, for
l)uilding- and repairing- bridg-es.

1883. Supervisors, J. C. Eldridg-e chairman, J. P. Johnson, K.
H. Darrow; clerk, S. Helg-eson; treasurer, Knut Iverson; assessor,
Wm, Alg-uire; justice, W. A. Crooks.

1884. Supervisors, J. C. Eldridg-e chairman, J. P. Johnson, E.
C. Erebel; clerk, S. Helg-eson; treasurer, Knut Iverson.

1885. Supervisors, J. C. Eldridg-e chairman, J. P. Johnson, P.
C. Prebel; clerk, S. Helg-eson; assessor, Wm, Alg-uire; treasurer,
Thomas Stapleton, who reported at the end of the fiscal year in Peb-
ruarv, 1886, that he had collected during- the year S780.50, and paid
out S276.06.

1880. Supervisors, P. C. Prebel chairman, J. C. Eldridg-e, C.
Christianson; clerk, Sever Wilkinson; treasurer, Thomas-Stapleton;
assessor, W. A. Crooks.

1887. Supervisors, J. C. Eldridg-e chairman, J. P, Johnson,
C. Christianson; clerk, S.Wilkinson; treasurer, K. Iverson; assessor,
W, A. Crooks; justices, K. Iverson, P. D. Wilson; constables, W.
Crippin, August Johnson. The board met March V), and appointed
Thomas Stapleton treasurer, Alexander Mitchell justice and E H.
Darrow constable, to fill vacancies occasioned by the persons elected
to these offices having- failed to qualify. April 30, the board entered
into an ag-reement with the town board of Mapleton "that Mapleton
should care for the south 2}4 miles of hig-hway between the two
townships, and Benton for the north Syz miles for ever." Anagfreement
was also entered into with the town board of Hartford for the divi-
sion of the hig-hway between the townships.

1888, Supervisors, J. C. Eldridg-e chairman, J. P, Johnson,
P, C, Prebel; clerk, Sever Wilkinson; treasurer, Thomas Stapleton;
assessor, W. A. Crooks. January 28, 1889, fourteen freeholders
presented a petition to the board to have the township resurveyed.



840 HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY.



and the board ordered that the matter be referred to a vote of the
electors at the annual town meeting in March following-.

1889. Supervisors, P. C. Frebel chairman, J.P.Johnson, L. A.
Newkirk; clerk, Henry Alg-uire; treasurer, Thomas Stapleton; asses-
sor, P. D. Wilson; justices, Wm. Alg-uire, G. Rathburn; constables,
Daniel Poster, E. H. Darrow. The vote on the resurvey question
was 44 /or and 11 ag-ainst. July 31, P. C. Prebel reported that he
had eng-ag'ed "a surve3'or and assistants to establish section lines
and locate and establish hig-hways." August 23, at a town meeting-
it was declared by a vote of 18 to 5, "that all corners be established
in the resurvey." September 2, the bill of E. H. Van Antwerp for
surveying the township amounting to S407, was allowed. At a special
town meeting- held September 16, a resolution was passed instruct-
ing the road overseers "to take possession of the newly established
highways by ploughing a furrow two rods from the centre on each
side of such line." At a special meeting- held October 1, the ques-
tion of establishing all the corners in the resurvey was again sub-
mitted to the vote of the electors, and resulted in 65 for and none
against. Por this work Mr. Van Antwerp subsequently presented
a bill to the town board for $145, which was allowed October 21, at
$135.

1890. Supervisors, P. C. Prebel chairman, J. P. Johnson,
L. A. Newkirk; clerk, Henry Alguire; treasurer, Thomas Stapleton;
assessor, P. D. Wilson. A resolution was passed fixing the compen-
sation of oilicers as follows: Supervisors and clerk $2 per day, asses-
sor $3 per day, and the treasurer four per cent of all money paid
into the treasury. Pebruary 24, 1891, the treasurer reported having-
received $543.43, which had been paid out, and that there were out-
standing town orders in the sum of $267.29, but that the unpaid taxes
when collected would be sufficient to pay this indebtedness.

1891. Supervisors, Sever Helgeson chairman, L. A. Newkirk,
August A. Johnson; clerk, Henry Alguire; treasurer, Thomas Stap-
leton; assessor, W. A. Crooks; justices, P. C. Prebel, Sever Wilkin-
son; constables, D. O. Crooks, John Kickland. At a special meeting
of the board July 27, it was decided that all noxious weeds should be
destroyed within the township on or before August 20, as provided
by the statute. At the end of the fiscal vear the treasurer reported
that he had on hand $467.76.

1892. Supervisors, L. A. Newkirk chairman, J. P. Johnson,
D. O. Crooks; clerk, Henry Alguire; treasurer, Thomas Stapleton;
assessor, S. Wilkinson; justices, Wm. Jackson and C. Christianson;
constables, John Person and John Kickland.

1893. Supervisors, L. A. Newkirk chairman, J. P. Johnson,
D. O. Crooks; clerk, Henry Alguire; treasurer, Thomas Stapleton;
assessor, W. A. Crooks; justice, S. Wilkinson. A resolution was
passed requiring "that the noxious weed law be enforced."

1894. Supervisors, L. A. Newkirk chairman, J. P. Johnson,
D. O. Crooks; clerk, Henry Alguire; treasurer, Thomas Stapleton;
assessor, H. Tidemann.



HISTORY OF MINNEHAHA COUNTY. 841



1895. Supervisors, L. A. Newkirk chairman, J. P. Johnson,
D. O. Crooks; clerk, Henry Alg-uire; treasurer, Thomas Sta])let()n;
assessor. Sever Wilkinson.

1896. Same officers as in 1895.

1897. Supervisors, Sever Wilkinson chairman, 1). ( ). Croolcs,
Carl Johnson; clerk, Henry Alg-uire; treasurer, Thomas StapK'ton;
assessor, D. E. Alg-uire.

1898. Supervisors, Sever Wilkinson chairman, I). (). Crooks,
Carl Johnson; clerk, Henry Alg-uire; treasurer, Thomas Sta])leton;
assessor, P. D. Wilson.

1899. Supervisors, J. P. Johnson chairman, Carl Johnson,
Nels Pearson; clerk, Henry Alguire; treasurer, Thomas Stapleton;
assessor, W. A. Crooks; justice, Theodore Kickland.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

Aldrich, Lorenze, was born in Oswego, New York, in 1828;
lived there and in Michig-an and Iowa until 1873, when he came to Da-
kota and located in this county on his present farm, which comprises
the northeast quarter of section 10 in Benton. He was postmaster
of New Hope post office several years, but resigned in 187*). He is a
g-ood neighbor and a respected citizen.

Alguire, Henry, is a native of Grant county, Wisconsin, and
was born February 20, 1868. In 1873 his parents removed to this
county and settled in Benton, where the subject of this sketch has
since resided upon the old homestead, which comprises the north-
west quarter of section 35. He has held the office of town clerk sev-
eral years, and is an enterprising and respected citizen.

Anderson Nels, a native of Sweden, was born December 1,
1848. He emigrated to the United States in 1871, lived in New
Jersey and Pennsylvania five years and came to Dakota in the spring
of 1876. He then filed a homestead upon 80 acres of section 6 and SO
acres of section 5, in Benton, where he resided until his death, which
occurred October 27, 1894, survived by wife and nine children.

Baker, Andrew A., was born in Norway, June 19, 1831. He
emigrated to the United State's in the spring of 1865 and located in
Wisconsin; removed from there to Iowa, and settled in Minnehaha
county in the fall of 1874. He took up as a tree claim the northwest



Online LibraryDana Reed BaileyHistory of Minnehaha county, South Dakota. Containing an account of its settlements, growth, development and resources ... Synopsis of public records, biographical sketches .. → online text (page 76 of 99)