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To seize or shoot the pilot mine.
Kate.

O! God! * *

But that you've made me umpire of your duty,
At this the outset of your rash design,
I would persuade you to forego its madness.

Pennington.

But since my comrades are embarked can I
Forego, when they already are foregone?
236



Kate.

No! No! your honor bids you forward now!
I, who had challenged you to save my father,
Through risk most manifest to you of peril,
Will not lay my embargo on the path
That honor, which is more than life, points out.
No! I will on to New York by myself,
And now, good night! time calls me hence to act;
You've given proof of love of love, I may.

Pennington.

The May of that sweet promise makes my life
A garden full of roses in its Spring!
God bless and keep you, Lady! but one kiss?
I would return and borrow it again,
And then restore with double use, until
The principal was quadrupled
Good night! [Exit Pennington.]

[Kate sits musing.]

\Re-enter Latrobe]
Well, you have interviewed this boy what now?

Kate.

All now my purposes demand is known;
At Middle-Bass, an Erie-bosomed isle
You know it Bland, disguised as I have told you,
Would intercept the 'Island Fay/ a boat
Which plies from Sandusky to Detroit and back!
His object is not plain, save naval war;
It matters not; you must arrest and take
Him to New York, and save Roland McDonald!
And that being done, my father's daughter will
Endeavor to requite you as she may.

Latrobe.

This looks like business; what is the day?
You made quite sure of that?

237



Kate.

'Tis Saturday

At Middle-Bass upon the eastern side
The accustomed landing of the 'Island Fay/
As she goes south from Sandusky.

Latrobe.
I have it. [Writes in his memorandum-book.]

Kate.

And now farewell ! I must to New York early,
And there await the issue of your plans.
Remember, Bland is to be captured harmless,
And so delivered in New York.
Good night ! [Exit Kate.]

Latrobe [alone.]

That woman is the prettiest thing in nature!
She is a morning-star ! 'Twas such a one came so
near salting down old Davy, the Jew, for good and
all ! If she was to play for my soul, she would win,
unless the devil should play against her; then it
would be who should and who should not, between
the Old Boy and the Young Maid!

But enough of her business is business! Let
me see:
[ Takes out his memoranda, and reads.]

'For that notorious guerrilla chief, Carter Bland,
alias Captain Bland, FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS.'

That will do write after that 'bagged.'

'For any rebel or traitor, harboring in Canada,
who has conspired to make raids into the United
States, or aided and encouraged the same, ONE
THOUSAND DOLLARS.'

That will do, for the balance of them ; in particu-
lar, for my young rooster, Pennington, with his
cock-a-doodle-doo, high-cockalorum quirks and
quiddities. Damn the fellow, how I played it off
on him ! One thousand dollars apiece about what
they would sell a likely nigger for. Think of me
238



selling them at market price ! Egad ! going ! going !
gone! for one thousand dollars! Who'll take the
next at the same figure? They are worth more to
hang then anything else ! Ha ! ha !

[Exit.]



ACT IV

SCENE I. Headquarters Department of the East,
New York City. Present: The Commandant;
Captain Van Dyke, his adjutant-general; Dennis
Mahon, Esq.; Pompey; Doctor Froisart; Guards-
men, etc.

Commandant.

Pompey! bring in the prisoner! Doctor Froisart,
you are arrested, by virtue of martial law which
has been declared in this city, for not paying the
bill of this small dealer, Mr. Thomas Brown; and
lawyer Mahon here, represents said shopkeeper
Brown; now, have either of you any witness?

Mahon.

My client has but one, and he is a man in the
Tombs, one Roland McDonald, who was present
when this Frenchman acknowledged he owed us
a bill, but said he could not tell how much it
amounted to.

Commandant.
And you desire?

Mahon.

We wish McDonald sent for.
Commandant.
Where is my orderly? Pompey!

Pompey.
Here me, Boss! Here me!

Commandant.

[Writes on a slip of paper.] Here, take this to the
240



Tombs, and bring me straightway one Roland
McDonald, a prisoner, under strict guard.

Pompey.

All right, Gin'l! But s'posin' he won't come
what I gwine to do den? Humph!

Commandant.
Shoot him down on the spot!

Pompey.

All right, Gin'l ! awduhs is awduhs to dis chile !
All honah to de Gin'l, as it was now, is in de
beginnin,' and shall be heretofor'! amen! [Exit.]

Commandant.

Now, 'squire Legal-cap, open your case. But
first of all, let this Frenchman take the iron-clad
oath, and swear also to answer such questions as
shall be propounded to him. Swear him there,
Adjutant! [Captain Van Dyke swears Froisart on
the Army Regulations.] Now proceed, Adjutant,
to read the charges and specifications of the bill
of the plaintiff, verbatim, etliteratim, et punctuatim,
nothing extenuating, and setting down naught in
malice !

Capt. Van Dyke.
[Reads.]

Dr. Frogsheart to Thomas Brown, Dr.
Tor daughter Julery $5.00.'

Dr. Froisart.

I sail say I haf not got one daughter Julery!
She sail not be name dat! By gar, 'tis sweendle
for me to haf a daughter, Julery! Swear me
across one Bible two Bible and I swear my
daughter sail not be name dat ! 'Tis a meestake !
'tis sweendle! By gar, I sail not haf a daughter
name dat !

Commandant.

What you say is reasonable; and what answer you
for your client, squire Two-and-two-make-five?
241



Mahon.

I beg leave, General, to suggest that my client
is no scholar, and what he meant to write was
simply this:

Tor daughter, jewelry $5.00

Commandant.

What your client meant to write is not the ques-
tion; he has in fact, charged this man for a daugh-
ter, Julery, whom he does not own, and therefore I
decide to reject that item. Proceed, Adjutant,
with the next.

Capt. Van Dyke.
[Reads.]
'To fingerring for daughter 50 cts.

Commandant.
Well, old Bourbon, how say you?

Dr. Froisart.

Mon Dieu! 'tis a lie! he sail not finger for my
daughter! I sail not for dat pay him! Yes I
vill pay him exstraw for dat vid my sword ! I vill
stab him and keel him !

Commandant.
Lawyer Briefless, what have you to plead?

Mahon.

Only this, General, that there is a slight mistake
in the collocation of letters. The item is correctly
thus: 'To finger ring, for daughter, 50 cts.,' a cor-
rect and just charge.

Commandant.

Quite reasonable, Squire, if it were written as
you suggest; but it is written sic, and we cannot
change the record. I confess that your client is
not extravagant in this charge, but considering
that virtue is its own reward, I forbid this French-
man to kill him, and call them even. Proceed,
Adjutant, with the next item.



242



Capt. Van Dyke.
[Reads.]

'To one pound of salt per-simmon 10 cts.*

Dr. Froisart.

How is dat persimmon? I am positeef I never
eat one persimmon in my whole life ! Am I dam-
full to buy one persimmon for ten cent? I vill not
pay! By gar, he sail keep his salt persimmon,
and I vill not pay!

Commandant.

I must say that a salt persimmon is to me a new
species; what have you to say in defence of such a
charge, my legal Fiction?

Mahon.

If it were not useless, I might suggest that this
poor tradesman, in his simplicity, has intended to
charge '1 pound of salt, per Simon* the latter in-
dividual being, as I am informed, the son of the
defendant, who actually got the salt.

Commandant.

Very good, indeed! ha! ha! I wish it were so
written for your sake. Proceed, Captain.

Capt. Van Dyke
'To odor per self of whiskey 50 cts.'

Commandant.

My venerable medical Gaul, how say you
guilty or not guilty?

Dr. Froisart.

Vat is dat now, General odor of viskee? Do he
charge me to smell viskee? Do I pay him feefty
cent to make me smell viskee? Vat is dat dam
nonsense? I sail have coast for dat smell viskee !
Monsieur General, excuse me, but sail not he give
me coast, ven I do not smell, and he charge me?

Commandant.

Not so fast, my Gothic Bolus, for you do smell
of whiskey, most viciously, and I incline to for-

243



bid you to dispute this item by a legal estoppel of
my nose what say you, old Double-pleader?

Mahon.

If the item is allowed, I need add nothing, al-
though, otherwise, I was about to remark, that
in his ignorance, my client has written odor, for
order !

Capt. Van Dyke.
The next charge is [Reads.]

'Some odor per son 50 cts.'

Commandant.
Norman relic of antiquity, what of this charge?

Dr. Froisart.

Some oder person ! Have I to pay for oder per-
son? How can I lif, if he charge me oder person?
How is dat dam sweendle for oder person to charge
on me! No sare! I sail not pay him dat!

Commandant.

Not reasonable, we will admit ! How say you,
old Damnum-absque?

Mahon.

I am instructed to state, (all useless though it
be,) that the charge is intended to be 'same
order, per son,' and to say that this man's
son sent such an order also, as is here correctly
charged.

Commandanf

My antique Medicin, you are in bad odor, cer-
tain, but not poison, or I should have been dead
long ago! Counsellor Pie-poudre, what further
say you?

Mahon.

All that I can say is in vain, otherwise, I could in
an instant show your highness that my most un-
fortunate client's charges against the defendant



244



are just, which charges, though just, have been
cruelly distorted by bad spelling.

Commandant.

It matters not; we are not in your client's shoes;
if he writes ass, we must read ass, and call him ass
[Re-enter Pompey} How now, swarthy Roman?
Where is the witness we sent you for?

Pompey.

He aint no mo', sah! He done cease! He gone to
dat burnin', whence no dribbler can't squench him !

Commandant.

Is Roland McDonald dead? Is that what you
mean? What was the matter with him?

Pompey.

Nuffin at all, sah ! he jist wound heself out at de
small end, and naturally ceased kind o' expired
like!

Commandant.

Poor devil I'm glad he's gone he would have
given us trouble. And now Pompey clear these
headquarters I have other fish to fry. That
Frenchman owes $1.00 of this bill, which he will
pay over to you as costs for arresting him !

[Exeunt omnes.]

SCENE II. Same place, one hour later. Present :
Commandant, Sandford, Van Dyke, Guard Mas-
ter.

Commandant.

Sandford! Be sure you justify my order to the
public eye ! Say that it has been countermanded,
but the people do endorse it ! That publicists, with
their old musty rules, are far behind the civiliza-
tion of the age. Let the city echo my defence as
against the countermand. I wish you to influence
the public mind against these arch-traitors, and
their Copper-head sympathizers. Strike on the
245



anvil of the public heart, until you heat it. Keep
Saint Albans fresh in public memory!

Sandford.

I have prepared an article I think will please you.
It is in reply to the Copperhead press, in their
attempts to make a hero of this rebel guerrilla, just
captured this notorious Captain Bland.

Commandant.

Let him be hanged, with a thousand pounds to
his heels ! I would rather lose this right arm than
he should escape. His execution will test the ques-
tion between the Administration and me.

Sandford.

I have said as much in this article. The press will
take its tone generally, I think, from my leader.

Commandant.

Let him be hanged, I say ! Let him be hanged,
the ruffian.

Capt. Van Dyke.
And yet it is said, he is a Christian gentleman.

Commandant.

A Christian fiddle-stick ! a plague on such Christ-
ianity ! I have no patience with your rebel Christ-
ians! I tell you, Sandford, I had rather lose my
commission than omit this chance to make an is-
sue in the hanging of this rebel pirate, Bland! Is
it not time for the Commission to report? Adju-
tant, what have you o'clock?

Capt. Van Dyke.

It is just ten the hour for the Commission to
report progress.

Commandant.

Dispatch an orderly to inquire whether they are
ready to report?

Capt. Van Dyke.

They have saved us the necessity. I see the guard
approaching with the prisoner the commission
246



can not be far in rear. [Enter Bland, chained and
guarded; guardsmen salute the Commandant.]

Commandant.
Why do the Court delay are they not coming?

1st Guardsman.

They are here now I left thim behint yonder,
at the door. [Enter the Judge Advocate and the
Commission, who take their seats, General Crawford
presiding.]

Commandant.

Has your honorable Commission arrived at any
conclusion as to the guilt of the prisoner?

General Crawford.

The Judge Advocate has our finding, which
awaits your approval. I differed from the major-
ity, but yield to their decision.

Commandant.

The majority in free governments should govern.
We will dispense with the reading of your finding;
let the substance be announced, and if it be to hang
this rebel for his wicked raid, I will approve, other-
wise he should be tried over.

Judge Advocate.

The Commission find the prisoner guilty of all
the charges and specifications, and sentence him to
be hanged by the neck until dead, at such time
and place as the General Commanding the Depart-
ment may direct, a majority of the members con-
curring.

Commandant.

The finding is correct I do approve it. Write
'approved' there, Captain, and hereafter I will
sign, and fix an early day for the hanging. [Enter
Orderly Pompey.]

1st Guardsman. [Aside to his companions.]
Now by the saintly soul of St. Patrick, look at
the damned nagur lad there ! how fine he is !
247



2d Guardsman.

I wish I was here alone wid him all sociable by
mesilf divil a fine feather I'd lave upon the top
of him, at all, at all.

1st Guardsman.
Wud ye pull the wool over his eyes?

2d Guardsman.

Yis and that I wud ! Could I find a footing for
me hand about the twist of his hair, divil a drop
of wool wud he have more of it left!

3d Guardsman.
Dom the nagurs I niver loiked them!

2d Guardsman.

Mind now the strutting of him ! Had I the chance,
I'd make the substance of his shadow so small, the
appearance of it wud be invisible to the eye of
is own mither and be damned till her.

Pompey.

Ginul, dars a female lady at de do* to see you
and dese gentlemen.

Commandant.

We cannot be interrupted now is she white or
colored?

Pompey.

She's plain, sah plain ; and she wants to see you
and dese missionaries.

Commandant.
She is a beggar ! tell her to be gone.

Pompey.

I did ax her dat; but she norate so f ast, it 'pear
like I can't qualify her.

General Crawford.

Possibly it is the mother, or some relative of the
prisoner?

Commandant.

What does she say? Can you not explain your-
self, you stupid ass?

248



Pompey.

She rectify her words so far apart, I can't tell
what she prophecy ! She is too fractional for dis
chile! Good Gorramity! Here she comes now!
She done busted thew de guard!

[Enter Kate McDonald, followed by the guard.]
Kate McDonald.

Then thrust me through with your bayonet ! I
will not be stopped I have been put upon in this
way too often ! I have lost by it my father who
was all the world to me ! As nature is my judge,
I will see these men if men they be, before they
commit more murder! I will call down the im-
precations of all good men on them !

General Crawford.
Poor woman! she is insane.

1st Commissioner.
How strangely beautiful she is.

Kate McDonald.

Sir Commandant, and Judges of this Court!
I hope you will excuse a woman's mode
Of bringing proofs abruptly thus before you;
I have but lately lost a father dead
In prison murdered if you will permit
For though you found him guilty, he was guiltless
And will appear so at the bar of heaven
Most innocent of every imputation
Against him charged before your high tribunal !
I could have testified to this myself,
But as today, so then, I was barred out,
And thrust aside, and hither sent and thither,
And put off with your urgence to affairs,
Until for want of evidence, sheerly,
My father was condemned and died in prison.
Therefore it is that I come hither now,
And break through forms and precedents of law,
To speak in unjudicial phrase, the truth,
And vouch my utterance by unwritten proofs.
240



I have a friend arraigned before you now

Commandant.
You are a crazy woman, are you not?

Kate McDonald.

No, not insane, though I have had enough
To dry the fount of tears, and thus turn on
The brain an unextinguished flame of grief,
Sufficient to have warped the level mind.
I am well known unto your staff here present,
The daughter of poor, dead Roland McDonald.
If this be to the purpose of this trial,

[Exhibits a letter.]

Let it with your Commander's signature,
Be counted rational, though I that vouch it,
Should be supposed bereft of will or reason !

General Crawford.
Let the Judge Advocate report the contents.

Judge Advocate.

This is a note signed by the Commandant,
Relating to the capture of this Bland,
Which seems to bear a pledge conditional.

Commandant.

My Generals ! I thought that your commission
Had tried this man, and had defined his sentence
Which now lies here proposed for my approval !
If there be aught to urge for him anew,
Should it not be addressed to me?

General Crawford.

Let our
Judge Advocate consider that.

Judge Advocate.

The point

Is clear: the case has gone beyond our judgment;
All further pleas are pleas for clemency,
And only to the approving officer,
Or to the President, should be addressed.

250



General Crawford.

Might not the Court hear further evidence,
Before the Gen'ral has approved our finding?

Commandant [Signing his name.]
I do approve so there's an end of that;
But since this woman makes a new defence,
And shows a letter with my name attached,
I do invite the Court to stay and hear
This late appeal made now for clemency,
That when it is rejected, as I shall,
They may report me squarely to the world :
And now woman, what is your prayer based on?
This letter you produce, ascribed to me?

Kate McDonald.

My plea is that you do contract herein,
Over the sanction of your signature,
Should I betray to you O ! Heaven I
Would spare myself before the prisoner
Let but the Judges read, or hear it read.

Commandant.

Suppose this letter to be genuine,
Which it is not material to deny,
You are, through mercy, as 'tis argued here,
Invited to redeem your father's life
By giving such advices of this man,
Your friend, as should conduce to his arrest;
You were to write by the return of mail,
And note your acceptation of the terms;
Now do you claim that you so wrote to us,
Or that you led to his arrest?

Kate McDonald.

I do!

Commandant.

Why then we thank you, and I will release
Your father, in fulfilment of this letter,
It matters not by whom it was written.

251



Kate McDonald.

Will you

Release my father then? Not you but Nature,
Who to reverse your sentence hath released him !
Roland McDonald will plead no more to Court,
Or general, or president, or prince,
Or potentate of earth; you did your worst.
'Twas you imprisoned; Nature entered bail.

Commandant.

'Twas Heaven's will, therefore, and I am quit;
What more do you desire or could demand?

Kate McDonald.

Not having, then, the price you offered me,
You should restore me where I was before
You made your offer, and release my friend
You should forthwith set him at liberty.

[Points to Bland.\

Commandant.
And is this all the plea you have to offer?

Kate McDonald.

Nay, hear me further; is it not written here
In all events his life should be secure?
Is not this pledged and doubly pledged by you !
O ! then I do beseech you keep your word !

Commandant.

Where is the proof that you conduced to this?
Where is the proof you wrote as here required?
Or did accept the terms proposed by letter,
Within the time prescribed?

Kate McDonald.

Judges! I am

A woman, unaccustomed to debate
Or set in order what I have to say;
If I omitted it, I should have said,
What now, before high heaven above, I swear;
I wrote in answer, by return of mail,
And sealed the terms accorded by his own,
252



And then since I must speak to save his life,
I did obtain from a young boy, his friend,
One Pennington, their contemplated scheme
Of naval warfare on the Northern lakes;
I did lay bare their whole conspiracy
To one who, for my sake, and sympathy,
Encharged himself to give due information
To your authorities, through which they have
Secured the capture of himself and men;
All this I swear, and can substantiate,
By oath of him to whom I gave the proofs,
Had I but time to find and summon him ;
His name Latrobe his residence, New York;
I feel assured that he will seek me out,
And therefore ask but time to summon him.

Commandant.

Judges and officers! that this frail woman
Was overtured in interest of our service
To make betrayal of her paramour

Kate McDonald.

My paramour! A lie! pardon! pardon!
But if I had no other word this side
Of wide eternity, it is most false!

Commandant.

No matter you do understand of course
She would deny at all events, her friend,
The prisoner, whom you have just condemned,
Were now the safety of her father questioned,
I would suspend, and hold myself not bound,
But justified to take the proofs she asks;
But he has died; the issue as to him
Needs no more ventilation; as to Bland,
She has no interest in him ; and in
Most ample refutation of her claim,
A faithful officer employed by us
In secret service of the Government,
Has made a full report of how this capture

253



Was brought about; suffice it that he makes
No mention of this woman, but relates
How he himself, by vigilance, achieved
The knowledge that this rebel, in disguise,
Was plotting wicked raids from Canada,
And so he followed him, and thwarting all
His plans at Middle-Bass, as you have heard ,
Made prize and capture of himself and band.
That officer has just received the high
Reward we offered for the government,
In all, receiving twice ten thousand dollars;
His pregnant silence as to any aid
From her disproves this woman's evidence,
And therefore I decide upon the case.
Your sentence is approved !

General Crawford.

Might it not be

As well to send for this detective, that
He may confront this woman and refute her?

Kate McDonald.

O ! there's a judge of probity in truth !
I thank you sir ! O ! let them send for him,
And give me but one day to seek and find
The friend I need to prove the case I state !

Commandant.

I do not see necessity to send,
But yet as he is near, I will consent,
Where is my orderly ? Pompey !

Pompey.
Here me!

[Enter Latrobe.]

Commandant.

Ah! Welcome sir! you're in demand;
Know you this woman?

Latrobe.

Not I! I never saw her!



254



Kate McDonald.
Why do you jest thus in a case so grave?

Latrobe.

I have had wide experience of men,
And can detect by signs you would o'erlook
The health or aberration of the mind.
This woman has a bee in her bonnet
I never saw her face before 'pon honor
I never did!

Kate McDonald.
You do deny my knowledge?
O! monster! villain! satire on our race
Now do I know that hell's a fiction mere,
Or it would gape and swallow you at once !
Did I not read you the Commander's note,
And plan with you the capture of these men?
Did not you see me write reply to him?
Is not your name Latrobe?
Latrobe.

Poor girl! Poor thing!

Kate McDonald.

Judges ! I see it all. I'm not insane !
This man was false and I discovered not,
He is foresworn; now let your Commandant
Produce my letter written in reply,
From Canada, to him.

General Crawford.

The Adjutant

Might answer her: Was there a letter, such
As she describes, received?

Commandant.

I think there was none.
But if there were, 'tis nothing to the point.

General Crawford.

Except, that having thus far gone in this,
'Twere better possibly to show her letter,
If such exist if not, we end the matter.

255



1st Commissioner.

I do not wish to be detained with this;
I am quite satisfied.

Capt. Van Dyke.

My clerk has found it
It is responsive to the one she shows,
And notes acceptance of the terms proposed
To save her father.

Latrobe.

What date does it bear?
Let me examine it Tis well put up!

[Inspects the letter.]
She's not so crazy as I did suppose !
Its date is three days later than his capture;
'Tis clever I like sharp practice ! ha ! ha !

Capt. Van Dyke.

'Tis as she states ; our record shows the capture
Was made the twentieth; delivery here
Entered the twenty-second; and its date
The twenty -third.

Kate McDonald.

I do remember now

'Twas written four days earlier than its date.
Alas! my folly! I can establish it.

General Crawford.


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