Daniel Kauffman.

Manual of Bible doctrines : setting forth the general principles of the plan of salvation, explaining the symbolical meaning and practical use of the ordinances instituted by Christ and his apostles, and pointing out specifically some of the restrictions which the New Testament Scriptures enjoined u online

. (page 1 of 16)
Online LibraryDaniel KauffmanManual of Bible doctrines : setting forth the general principles of the plan of salvation, explaining the symbolical meaning and practical use of the ordinances instituted by Christ and his apostles, and pointing out specifically some of the restrictions which the New Testament Scriptures enjoined u → online text (page 1 of 16)
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MAY 27 1919



Division



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MkY 27 1919
MANUAL OF '^Hosm^^

BIBLE DOCTRINES,

Setting Forth the

General Principles of the Plan of Salvation^

Explaining the

Symbolical Meaningf and Practical Use of the Ordi-
nances Instituted by Christ and His Apostles,

And Pointing out Specifically some of the

Restrictions which the New Testament Scriptures
Enjoin upon Believers.



— BY —

DANIEL KAUFFMAN.



**AU Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable
for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteous-
ness/' — 2 Tim, 3: Id.



ELKHART, INDIANA.

MENNONITE PUBLISHING CO.

1898.



TO OUR

NOBLE WORKERS

WHO,

IN THEIR RESPECTIVE FIELDS OF LABOR, HAVE NOT
SHUNNED TO DECLARE THE

WHOLE COUNSEL OF GOD.

THIS VOLUME IS

FRATERNALLY INSCRIBED.



'T-



•f



PREFACE.

In sending forth this little volume for the in-
struction and edification of whoever may choose to
read it, it is hoped that it will be received in the
same spirit in which it is given.

When I started out in the Christian service, I
tried to secure a book of this kind, and found, af-
ter diligent research, that it was not to be had.
Since then I have not ceased to recognize the need
of a work setting forth the doctrines taught in the
* 'Book of all books" with which Christians are most
vitally concerned. It is with the hope of partially
supplying this want, that this little volume ap-
pears.

Many readers will look for Bible subjects in.
which they may be very much interested and fail
to find them. To such I would say that we have
presented those Bible doctrines only which were
considered of greatest importance, dwelling more
particularly upon the doctrines peculiar to non-re-
sistant Christians.

I should never have undertaken this work had
I not felt that the doctrines herein presented are
founded upon the imperishable Rock, and should
have the widest possible circulation. What is good
for ourselves is good for others. Believing that a
Christian life, shaped according to the lines herein



4 BIBLE DOCTRINES.

presented, would accomplish the jDurpose of our
creation, and that they are the principles which our
Savior came to inculcate into the hearts of His peo-
ple, we should not fail to proclaim them boldly, and
prove our faith by our works.

This work was prepared with the hope thai
abler writers might, at some future time, prepare
a more extensive treatise on the doctrines herein
presented.

I desire to acknowledge my indebtedness for
valuable aid, to J. H. Hershey, who contributed
the greater part of the chapter on Baptism; to
J. S. Coifman for the thoughts on the Support of
the Ministry and the chapter on Sanctification; to
J. P. Funk and A. D. Wenger, who, with the last
named contributor, carefully examined the manu-
script, and furnished some of the best thoughts found
in the volume.

Grateful to our heavenly Father for His sus-
taining griice while this little volume was being
prepared, and trusting that the feeble effort may
bear its fruit in the field of Christian labor, this
work is submitted for tlie consideration of whoever
may be interested in its contents.

Daniel Kauffman.



CONTENTS.



INTRODUCTION.

The Plan of Salvation— General Bible Doctrines— Ordi-
nances and Restrictions — A Few Illustrations.



CHAPTER I.— THE CREATION.

fn the Beg-inning-— Glory of the Creation— Creation of

Lig^ht, the Earth, Heavenly Bodies, Veg-etation and

Lower Animals, Man — The End of Creation.



CHAPTER II.— THE FALL OP MAN.

Man in Paradise— The Deception— The Tree of Life-
Condition of Fallen Man.

CHAPTER IIL— SIN.

All have Sinned— Necessity of Regeneration— Allure-
ments of Sin— Results of Sin— Fearless Teaching-
Needed.



CHAPTER IV.— FAITH.

What Faith is— A Lesson from Childhood— The Secret of
Perfect Faith— Will Bear the Test— A Living- Faith
Essential to Christian Life— Faith and Works-
Faith a Matter of Growth.

CHAPTER v.— REPENTANCE.

What Repentance is— Necessity for Repentance— Sorrow
does not Constitute Repentance— Sorrow a Necessary
Adjunct of Repentance— What Repentance Does
—Who needs Repentance- Right Teaching-
Needed.



6 BIBLE DOCTRINES.

CHAPTER VI.— CONVERSION.

Siirnificance of Conversion— Kinds of Conversion— No

Chanjj^e, no Conversion— False Ideas of Conversion—

Evang-elical Conversion— Childlike Simplicity of

Converted Persons— Things to Consider.



CHAPTER VII.— REGENERATION.

I. The Work of Regeneration — Necessity of Regenera-
tion—The New Birth — Conditions of Regeneration-
Summary.

II. Evidences of Regeneration — Faith — Love — Obedience

— The Spirit of Christ — Summary.



CHAPTER VIII.— JUSTIFICATION.

What Justification Implies — Justified by Faith — This Doc-
trine Liable to be Abused — Faith and Works — No Jus-
tified Person a Sinner — It is God that Justifies —
The Christian's Duty — Questions Answered.



CHAPTER IX.— THE REDEMPTION OF MAN.

Fallen Man — Human Sacrifices of no Avail — The Heav-
enly Offering — The Coming of the Redeemer.



CHAPTER X.— THE MINISTRY.

Ministers a Necessity — Work of the Ministry — Qualifica-
tions — Ordination — Support of the Ministry — The
Gospel is Free — Minister's Self-Support — Support
by the Church — Charity for Needy Ministers
—The Minister not a Hireling— Christ
the Rewarder — Summary.



CHAPTER XI.— THE MEMBERS.

Relation of the Members to the Ministry— True Charity-
Should Members be less Pious than a Minister — Every
Member should be a Worker— Lines of Christian
Work — Temperance — Family Worship.



BIBLE DOCTRINES. 7

CHAPTER XII.— BAPTISlvi.

Discussions on the Subject— Kinds of Baptism— Spirit
Baptism— Objects of Water Baptism— Baptism to be
Observed as an Ordinance— Water Baptism not
Regeneration— Proper Subjects for Baptism-
Forms of Baptism— Meaning- of tlie Word
Baptism— Pouring- — Immersion — Testi-
mony of Historians — A Few More
Facts Concerning- Baptism — Eight
Recorded Instances of Baptism
— Does Washing Signify Im-
merse — One Action versus
Three.

CHAPTER XIII.— THE COMMUNION.

Importance of the Communion — The Jewish Passover—
The Passover Observed — A Figure Pointing Both
Ways— Christ Our Passover— Institution of the
Lord's Supper or Communion — Frequency and
Time of holding the Communion — Meaning
of the Communion — Close Communion —
Use of Council Meetings — Open Com-
munion — Personal Responsibility — Is
the Church Responsible when un-
worthy Members Commune — The
Full Meal, or Love Feast-Harmo-
ny of the Goepels with Regard
to this Passover Supper— Al-
leged Irregularities — Three
Witnesses — Full Meal
Condemned.

CHAPTER XIV.— FEET-WASHING.

A Command — Various Opinions — Feet-washing in the Old

Testament — Is Feet-washing an Ordinance — Place

where this Ceremony was Instituted — Comparing

Scriptures — Necessity for this Ordinance —

Objections to Ceremonial Feet-washing —

The Subject "Spiritualized."

CHAPTER XV.— WOMAN'S PRAYER-HEAD-
COVERING.

An Ordinance— Necessity for this Ordinance— What this
Covering Should Be— ^When this Covering should be
Worn — A Word to Those who would be Conten-
tious — Objections Answered.



6 BIBLE DOCTRINES.

CHAPTER XVI.— THE SALUTATION OF THE HOLY

KISS.

All Bible Doctrines Should be Studied— A Portion of God's

Word— Epistolatory Writin«rs are for All Christians

— Meaning- of this Ordinance — For Whose Sake —

When it Should be Observed— Abuses— The

Command Should be Heeded.



CHAPTER XVII.— ANOINTING WITH OIL.

Why Call this an Ordinance— The Oil of Grace— Divine
Healing — Purpose of Anointing.



CHAPTER XVIII.— MARRIAGE.

An Ordinance of God — What Constitutes Marriage —

Marriage Under the Old Testament Dispensation —

Marriage Under the New Testament Dispensation

— Concerning Divorce — Lawful Marriages —

The Christian Home — Thoughts for Young

People.



CHAPTER XIX.— NON-CONFORMITY TO THE WORLD.

What the Relation Implies — The Transformation — Views
of Inspired Writers — Teaching of James 1:27 — In-
temperance — Licentiousness — Business Transac-
tions — Politics — Unholy Conversation — World-
ly Amusements — Other Ways — Pride —
Worldly Adornments.



CHAPTER XX.— NON-RESISTANCE.

The Gosi)el of Christ the Gospel of Peace — The Apostolic
Church — Effect of the Gospel — Brotherly Love — War
the Work of Barbarians — Testimony of Warlike
Men— A Few Contradictions— Old and New Dis-
pensations—What would Become of a Non-
resistant Nation — Suppose — We never
Lose Our Individuality— We should Obey
God Rather than Man — Defenseless
Christians Should be Consistent —
Non-resistance a Principle not a
Policy— Practical Non-resistance.



BIBLE DOCTRINES. 9

CHAPTER XXI.— SWEARING OF OATHS.

All Oaths Forbidden— Reasons Why Christians Should

Not Swear— Profanity— "Wooden Oaths"— Swearing

in Court — No Compromise.

CHAPTER XXII.— GOING TO LAW.

Christian Forbearance: Not Resentment— How to Get

Out of a Difficulty— How to Avoid Law-suits— Brother

Going to Law with Brother — Summary.

CHAPTER XXIIL— SECRET SOCIETIES.

Their Merits Should be Considered— Contrary to the
Spirit of the Gospel— Applicants Led into Secret Or-
ders Blindly— Bound Away from Church and Fam-
ily with an Oath— Christ has No Place in the
Lodge-room— The Unequal Yoke— False
Charity— False Religion— Testimony
of an Ex-Mason— Concluding Re-
marks.

CHAPTER XXIV.— SANCTIFICATION.

What Sanctification Means— How Men are Sanctified—
W^hen Sanctification Takes Place— Results of Sanc-
tification— The Relation of Sanctification to Jus-
tification—Present Sanctification— Instanta-
neous Sanctification— Progressive Sancti-
fication— Not a Second Work of Grace.

CHAPTER XXV.— PRAYER.

Believing Prayer Secures God's Answer— Our Saviour's
Teaching on Prayer— The Apostles' Teaching— Ob-
ject of Prayer— God Answers Prayer— Short
Pravers— Secret Prayers— God's People a Pray-
ing People.

CONCLUSION.



INTRODUCTION,



"All Scripture is given by inspiration of God,
and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for
correction, for instruction in righteousness."
—2 Tim. 3:16.

THE PLAN OF SALVATION.

The plan of salvation implies:

1. A recognition of God as the Creator and
Preserver of all things.

2. That man, created perfect and in the image
of his Maker, through the transgressions of our
first parents, fell.

3. That man, in consequence of this fall, be-
came alienated from God.

4. That God and man became reconciled
through the shedding of the blood of our Lord
Jesus Christ.

5. That salvation is now offered as a free gift
to all them that accept the terms of the Gospel.

Man cannot save himself. It required a sacri-
fice which he is unable to make to effect a recon-
ciliation between God and man. It is idle for us to
think of saving ourselves by good works. After
we have done ail that we are commanded to do we
are still to count ourselves unprofitable servants
(Luke 17:10). Salvation is obtained by accepting



12 BIBLE DOCTRINES.

the terms of the Gospel when God bestows it upon
ns as a free gift in consequence of our faith. The
terms of the Gospel, or the conditions upon which
we may obtain salvation, are so clearly taught in
God's word that no sincere seeker of the truth
needs to err therein.

GENERAL BIBLE DOCTRINES.

Belief in God means believing in His Son, in the
Spirit, and in His word. Acceptance of the truth
of God's word makes us obedient followers of our
Lord Jesus Christ in all things.

In the work of salvation, there are a number of
general Bible doctrines or Gospel principles that
primarily aifect all believers. Among these may
be named repentance, faith, regeneration, conver-
sion, justification, sanctification, etc. When we
accept our Savior, God works such a change in us
that we will then lead pious, holy lives. We no
longer w^ork for the interests of self, but for the
glory of God.

ORDINANCES AND RESTRICTIONS.

God, who is infinite in wisdom, knowing the
proneness of man to wander away from the truth,
has seen fit to throw about him certain restrictions,
which, if heeded, will aid in keeping him away
from the power of temptation. He has also given
a number of ordinances which are designed as sym-
bols or memorials of important Christian principles,
which should ever be kept alive within ourselves,
and before the eyes of the world.

Every properly enlightened child of God will
esteem these ordinances and restrictions as a God-



TNTRODUCTION. I'i

send, and consider it a privilege to observe them.
The ordinances are as follows:

1. Baptism.

a. The initiatory rite which inducts into the

visible church. (Matt. 1^8:19).

b. A symbol of the baptism of the Spirit.

(Acts 1:5; 1 Cor. 12:18).

c. An act of obedience to fulfill all righteous-

ness. (Matt. 3:15).

d. The answer of a good conscience toward God.

(1 Peter 3:21).

2. The Communion.

a. The symbols of the broken body and the shed

blood of Christ. (Luke 22:19, 20; 1 Cor.
11:2(3).

b. The fellowship of the members of the body

of Christ. (1 Cor. 10:16).

3. Feet -Washing.

The symbol of humility, showing the equal-
ity of believers in Christ. (John 13: 11-7.)

4. Woman's Prayer-Head-Covering.

The symbol to show tho r ' '^'on between
man and woman in the Lord. (1 Cor.
11:1-16.)

5. Salutation of the Holy Kiss.

The symbol of love. (Rom. 16:16; 1 Peter
5:14).

6. Anointing with Oil.

The symbol of grace in the restoration of
the sick. (Jas. 5:14, 15).



14 BIBLE DOCTRINES.

7. Marriage.

The formula is a symbol of the real mar-
riage. The ordinance is for the mainte-
nance and purity of the human family.
(Mark 10:2-12).
The restrictions noticed are as follows:

1. Not to conform to the world. (Rom. 12:2).

2. Not to take the life of our fellow-men, or to use

carnal weapons for defense. (Mark 10:19:
Matt. 5:44; Eph. 6:11-17; 2 Cor. 10:4).

3. Not to swear oaths. (Matt. 5:33-37; Jas. 5:12).

4. Not to hold membership in secret societies.

(John 18:20; Matt. 5:15, 16; 2 Cor. 6:16.)

5. Not to go to law. (Matt. 5:40; 1 Cor. 6:1-8).
Concerning these ordinances and restrictions,

we can voice the sentiments of the evangelist John
when he says, "His commandments are not griev-
ous. " Their use may be brought out by
A Few Illustrations.

1. A mother holds up a bottle before her chil-
dren and says, * 'Children, I want to call your at-
tention to what there is in this bottle. We are told
that it has an agreeable taste, but it is poison.
Now don't you touch this bottle. If you do you
may all be poisoned from its effects." If those
children are wise, they will feel grateful to their
mother for this wholesome advice. Had it not been
for this advice, they might have been poisoned.
As it is, they know how to be careful.

We proceed to draw the comparison. There
are many things in this world which, if indulged in,
would be poisonous to the soul. God has graciously



INTRODUCTION. 15

warned us against these things in His word. In-
stead of feeling that our liberties are taken away
from us, or finding fault with a church that insists
on heeding these restrictions, let us gratefully ac-
cept them, and praise God for having shown us
how to keep away from the paths of sin.

2. A man owns a tract of land which he wishes
to pasture. He builds a fence around it to keep
his stock on the place. The stock does not live
from the fence, but from the pasture; yet the fence
is just as necessary as the pasture; for, were it not
for the fence, the stock might stray away. These
ordinances and restrictions serve as a fence to keep
us on the green pasture of God's eternal word.
They are not essential to salvation, yet they are a
necessary part of the Lord's Gospel, and must be
faithfully observed. God, in all His ways, has
shown His superior wisdom. Let us reverently
heed His teachings



CHAPTER I.— THE CTREATION.



"In the bej^'hininj'' God created the heavea
and the earth.'' Gen. 1: 1.

"In the beginning' was the Word, and the
Word was with God, and the Word was God.

The same was in the beginning" with God.

All things were made by him, and without
him was not anything made that was made.

In him was life, and the life was the light of
men." Jno. 1: 1-4.

IN THE BEGINNING.

Here, in simple language, is recorded the storv
of the Creation. W^hile men have written volumes
and failed, God, through His servants, has written
a few words and given us the whole story. While
men have taxed their brains, and given profuse and
elaborate explanations as to what constitutes God,
the insx)ired writer gives us an idea of His charac-
ter in one simple sentence, "In the beginning was
the Word, and the Word was with God, and the
Word was God. "

"In the beginning. " Who can comprehend the
expression! Withdraw yourself from the things
of time and sense, and go back to the beginning.
Imagine, if you can, the great, empty void, in
wliich was to spring forth into exist^^nce this glori-
ous Universe of ours, nor time, nor space, nor mat-
ter, nor laws of Nature — nothing — absolutely noth-



THE CTIEATION. 17

ing — not even the mass of floating chaos, which
has given rise to so much speculation — nothing but
God and His Eternal Word to call into existence the
things now visiDie and invisible to the human
eye. Here was the beginning.

GLORY OF THE CREATION.

It pleased God, in His own wisdom, to call forth
matter, out of which all things were formed. So
admirable was His w^ork, that men have not ceased
to adore Him and sing His praises.

More than thirty-four centuries ago, David in
an exulting mood sang, "The heavens declare the
glory of God, and the firmament sheweth his hand-
iwork." What man who has noticed the starry
heavens, and watched the movements of the heav-
enly bodies, and who has the least worship in his
soul, can fail to voice the sentiments thus ex-
pressed. Astronomers have gazed for hours,
through their mighty telescopes, and watched with
ra^Dturous delight the majestic movements of the
heavenly bodies, as they were sweeping along in
their orbits through the immeasurable regions of
space. As the beauties of the starry heavens are
open to the view of all mankind, let all the children
of men unite with the psalmist in singing, "The
heavens declare the glory of God. "

CREATION OF LIGHT, THE EARTH, PLANETS, VEG-
ETATION, AND LOWER ANIMALS.

This Universe was not created without a pur-
pose. God said, " Let there be light, " and there
was light. The light was divided from the dark-



18 BIBLE DOCTRINES.

ness, the firmament from the earth, the dry land
from the waters. God continued to prepare this
earth for the habitation of man. The earth brought
forth grass and herbs yielding seed. Trees, fishes,
fowls of the air, beasts of the field, and all manner
of creeping things were called into existence. The
sun, moon, and stars were formed to give us light.

MAN.

Now comes the crowning work of God's crea-
tion. He had made many wonderful things, but
He had not yet created anything that resembled
Him in any way, that could worship Him intelli-
gently, or that was worthy to live with Him through
eternity. After all things were ready, He said,
**Let us make man in our own image, after our
likeness, and let him have dominion over the fish
of the sea, the fowls of the air, and over the cat-
tle, and over all the earth, and every creeping thing
that creepeth on the earth. "

Man is a compound being. He has many qual-
ities in common with the lower animals, while in
spirit, he has the image of his Maker. His phys-
ical structure is similar to that of the lower ani-
mals, and, like them, he is subject to pain, sickness,
and death. When his animal passions have full
sway, he sinks to a level with the lowest brutes.
But while he resembles the lower animals in physi-
cal structure and carnal passions, he is also endowed
with a mind that enables him to rule the world. A
mind that has the power, in one single moment, oi
penetrating the starry heavens, the next, sinking
deep down into the bowels of mother earth; at one



THE CREATION. 19

moment, interesting itself with the groveling things
of time and sense; the next, casting itself heaven-
ward and communing with our Maker. With all,
he is the possessor of a soul that refuses to go down
into the dust with the tenement of clay that has
provided for it a temporary home; but, at the. point
of dissolution, takes its flight to the great God from
whom it came.

Again, let us join with the psalmist in sending
this confession to the throne of God: "I will
praise thee; for I am fearfully and wonderfully
made; marvelous are thy works."

If the glory of man is transcendent, his respon-
sibility is wondrously great. Man was placed here
in dominion over all the earth. As God's steward,
he is to use his stewardship to the glory of his
Maker. Increase of power in this life means an in-
crease of responsibility. Should man shirk his
duty — should he, instead of using his powers and
his possessions to glorify his Maker, selfishly use
them to gratify his own carnal desires — the teach-
ing of the word is that he will be forever banished
from the presence of God.

THE END OF CREATION.

Thus was man created in the image of his Ma-
ker. ' ' Thus the heavens and the earth were fin-
ished, and all the host of them. God saw every-
thing that he had made, and behold it was very
good. " The earth had been prepared for the habi-
tation of man. Our first parents were placed in
the Garden of Eden, where all necessary provisions
were made for their comfort, and where they had



20 BIBLE DOCTRINES.

the blessed privilege of enjoying the companion-
ship of God. It was here in this earthly, blissful
paradise, that we find them at the beginning of the
second chapter of human life.






CHAPTER 11. —THE FALL OF MAN.



'*By one man's disobedience, many were
made sinners. Rom. 5:19.

MAN IN PARADISE.

If ever there was a time when human beings
had special reasons to feel grateful to their Maker,
it was when our first parents were enjoying the
richness of God's grace in the Garden of Eden.

The sunshine of God's love was resting upon
them. They were without spot and without stain;
without sorrow and without pain. Everything for
which heart could wish was at their disposal. We
have reasons to believe that beautiful landscapes,
picturesque scenery, fine, silvery streams, a pure
atmosphere, the birds of Paradise, and all manner of
trees that were beautiful to behold and good for
food, were there to cheer their gladdened hearts
and supply their natural wants. Free from the
plagues of life, there was nothing to vex the soul
and make the heart sad. To make their glory per-
fect, the cheering presence of God was with them.
A heaven on earth! How unbounded must have
been their joy!

THE DECEPTION.

Among the trees of the garden was the Tree of
Life, the fruit of which was to insure perpetual
life (Gen. 3:22); and the Tree of the Knowledge of



22 BIBLE DOCTRINES.

Good and Evil, of which it was said, ''In the day
that thou eatest thereof, thou shalt surely die."
They might eat of the fruit of all the other kinds
of trees; but the fruit of this tree was to remain
untouched. Things moved well for a time. But
one day the serpent approached Eve and said,
' ' Yea, hath God said, ye shall not eat of every tree
of the garden? " Eve replied, "We may eat of the
fruit of the trees of the garden. But of the fruit
of the tree which is in the midst of the garden,
God hath said. Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall
ye touch it, lest ye die. " A conversation was all
the serpent wanted. He had made a start. He saw
that Eve was inclined to listen to his story, and he
proceeded with his work of deception. Eve had
made a mistake; she was soon to commit a trans-
gression. Her mistake was to listen to his story;
her transgression was to believe him. God's word
is yea and amen forever, and we should never lis-
ten to the idea that there is a possibility of His be-
ing mistaken in anything. That would throw away
the idea that He is infallible. Here is where the
free-thinkers make their mistake. To be a free-
thinker one must admit that God's word may be


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Online LibraryDaniel KauffmanManual of Bible doctrines : setting forth the general principles of the plan of salvation, explaining the symbolical meaning and practical use of the ordinances instituted by Christ and his apostles, and pointing out specifically some of the restrictions which the New Testament Scriptures enjoined u → online text (page 1 of 16)