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PUBLIC LIBRARY

FORT WAYNE & ALLEN CO.. IND.



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY




3 1833 02570 0375



Gc 977.2 D26a 1921
Daughters of the Americar

Revolution. Indiana.
Annual conference of the

Indiana chapters ...



Twenty=first Annual Conference



OF THE



Ind'iana Chapters

DAUGHTERS OF
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION




INDIANAPOLIS

October II, 12, 13

1921



> ''



BY INVITATION OF
CAROLINE SCOTT HARRISON CHAPTER

GEN. ARTHUR ST. CLAIR CHAPTER
CORNELIA COLE FAIRBANKS CHAPTER






Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center



http://www.archive.org/details/annualconference1921daug



431689

^^ational Officers

Address-Memorial Continental Hall
Washin^on, D. C.

President General Mrs. George Majoiard Minor

Recording Secretary General Mrs. John Francis Yawger

Corresponding Secretary General Mrs. A. Marshall Elliott

Organizing Secertary General Mrs. G. Wallace W. Hanger

Treasurer General Mrs. Livingston L. Hunter

Registrar General Miss Emma T. Strider

Librarian General Mrs. Frank D. Ellison

Curator General Mrs. George W. White

Reporter General to the Smithsonian Institution

Miss Lillian M. Wilson

Honorary Vice President General from Indiana

Mrs. John N. Carey

State Officers

STATE REGENT
Mrs. Samuel Elliott Pericins 1011 N. Penna., Indianapolis

FIRST STATE VICE REGENT
Mrs. J. B. Crankshaw Fort Wayne

SECOND STATE VICE REGENT
Mrs. Charles W. Ross Crawfordsville

THIRD STATE VICE REGENT
Miss Mary W. Britton Vincennes

SECRETARY
Mrs. Henry C. Ketcham 2120 N. Penna., Indianapolis

STATE TREASURER
Mrs. Harriet V. Rigdon Wabash

STATE CHAPLAIN
Mrs. John Lee Dinwiddle Fowler

STATE REGISTRAR
Mrs. Theodore Craven 1433 Belief ountaine, St., Indianapolis

STATE LIBRARIAN
Mrs. Henry Wilson Delphi

STATE HISTORIAN
Mrs. Harvey Morris Salem

STATE AUDITOR
Mrs. W. H. Mathew Gary



State Regents



Indianapolis
Mrs. Chapin C. Foster 1892—1898

Indianapolis
Mrs. E. C. Atkins 1898 — 19000

Lafayette
Mrs. James M. Fowler 1900 — 1906

Madison
Mrs. William A. Guthrie 1906 — 1909

Fowler
Mrs. John Lee Dinwiddle 1909—1912

Fort Wayne
Mrs. Frances H. Robertson 1912 — 1915

Indianapolis
Mrs. Henry A. Beck 1915—1918

Huntington
Mrs. Frank Felter 1918—1921

Annual Conferences in Indiana

1. Indianapolis October 24,1921

2. LaFayette October 31, 1902

3. Fort Wayne November 14, 1903

4. Indianapolis November 9, 1904

5. New Albany and Jeffersonville October, 1905

6. Madison October 9, 1906

7. Bloomington October 8, 1907

8. Muncie October 13, 1908

9. Huntington October 12, 1909

10. Kokomo October 11, 1910

11. Indianapolis October 10, 1911

12. LaFayette _. October 8, 1912

13. Crawfordsville October 7, 1913

14. Fort Wayne October 13, 1914

15. Terre Haute October 19, 1915

16. Richmond October 24, 1916

17. Indianapolis November 7, 1917

18. Evansville (No Quorum) October 8, 1918

19. South Bend October 8, 1919

20. Vincennes October 12, 1920

21. Indianapolis October 11, 1921

22. Lafayette



Chapter Regents For Y**ar l92hJ922

AGNES PRUYN CHAPMAN
83 Mrs. W. B. Wallace, Leesburg Warsaw

ALEXANDER HAMILTON

69 Mrs. M. E. Crowell Franklin

ANN ROGERS CLARK
74 Mrs. Annie M. Hutchinson Jeffersonville

BLOOMINGTON
85 Mrs. E. C. Carpenter Bloomington

CALUMET
36 Mrs. Harvey H. Gilman East Chicago

CAPT. HARMON AUGHE
35 Mrs. R. N. Wallace Frankfort

CAROLINE SCOTT HARRISON
626 Mrs. E. H. Darrach, 1502 N. Meridian St. Indianapolis

CHARLES CARROLL
42 Mrs. Louise Bonnell Delphi

CHRISTOPHER HARRISON
50 Mrs. F. P. Cauble Salem

CONNERSVILLE
56 Mrs. F. I. Barrows Connersville

CORNELIA COLE FAIRBANKS
54 Mrs. T. R. Kackley, 1321 N. Meridian St. Indianapolis

CRADLE OF LIBERTY
21 Mrs. Shirley McKinney Petersburg

DOROTHY Q.
100 Mrs. Charles W. Ross Crawfordsville

FORT HARRISON
104 Mrs. J. H. Weinstein Terre Haute

FOWLER
20 Mrs. F. M. O'Rear Fowler

FRANCES SLOCUM
32 Mrs. O. E. Ebbinghouse Wabash

FRANCIS VIGO
111 Mrs. C. N. Haskins Vincennes

GENERAL ARTHUR ST. CLAIR
47 Mrs. Harry Hammond, 1234 N. Alabama St. Indianapolis

GEN. DE LAFAYETTE
114 Mrs. G. I. Christie West Lafayette

GEN. FRANCIS MAHION

70 Mrs. Will Williams Marion

GEN. JAMES COX

80 Mrs. C. H. Wills Kokomo

GEN. JOHN GIBSON

41 Miss Mamie Archer Princton

GEN. VAN RENSSELAER
56 Miss N. Maud Daughtery Rensselaer



HOOSIER ELM
47 Miss Kate Luckett Corydon

HUNTINGTON
84 Mrs. G. W. Lawver Huntington

JOHN PAUL
84 Mrs. Richard Johnson Madison

JOHN WALLACE

44 Mrs. E. M. Hoover Bedford

KENTLAND

25 Mrs. Audrey Hess Kentland

KIKTHEWENUND

76 Mrs. H. C. Krannert Anderson

LONE TREE

45 Mrs. Eusebia Stimson Greensburg

MAJ. HUGH DINWIDDIE

30 Mrs. Ralph Wagner Knightstown

MANITOU
40 Mrs. M. C. Reiter Rochester

MARY MOTT GREEN

31 Mrs. C. E. Tatman Shelbyville

MARY PENROSE WAYNE
-94 Mrs. Edgar Mendenhall Fort Waynt

MISSISSINNEWA
.50 Mrs. Jessie Griest Portland

NATHANIEL PRENTICE

26 Mrs. Maria R. Caldwell Ligonier

NEW HARMONY
39 Miss Caroline C. Pelham _ New Harmony

OLD ACADEMY

32 Mrs. L. F. Builta Oxford

OLDE TOWNE

46 Mrs. E. C. W. Hillman Logansport

OUIBACHE
23 Mrs. E. Grace Earl Attica

PAUL REVERE
66 Mrs. W. K. Haymond Muncie

PIANKESHAW
52 Mrs. A. R. Hickey New Albany

POTTAWATOMIE
83 Mrs. E. D. Skeen Gary

RICHARD HENRY LEE
.32 Mrs. Mont Boord Covington

RICHMOND
54 Miss Flora Broaddus Richmond



RUSHVILLE
80 Mrs. B. C. Logan Rushville

SCHUYLER COLFAX

56 Mrs, E. P. Chapin South Bend

SPENCER
12 Mrs. N. McN. Field Spencer

TIPPECANOE RIVER

20 Mrs. Louise T. Fogle Bourbon

TWIN FORKS
12 Mrs. R. C. O'Byrne Brookville

VANDERBURG

57 Mrs. John H. Foster Evansville

VEEDERSBURG
Mrs. James A. Coats Veedersburg

WASHBURN
64 Mrs. H. M. Smith Greencastle

WHITE RIVER
26 Mrs. Richard Summers Washington

WILLIAMSON DONNALDSON

21 Mrs. Josephine T. Pruitt Edinburg

WILLIAM HART

Miss Lenore Bonhan Columbus

WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON

22 Mrs. E. D. Crumpacker Valparaiso

WILLIAMSON DUNN
17 Mrs. A. H. Young Hanover

WINCHESTER
43 Mrs. Minnie Willmore Winchester

WYTHOUGAN
59 Mrs. Z. M. Tanner Plymouth



Organizing Regents

Mrs. H. C. Rothart Huntingsburg

Mrs. Byron Gates Homer

Mrs. W. R. Cronin Hartford City

Mrs. F. W. Troutman Peru

Mrs. F. R. Whipple Rockville

Mrs. Tom Barker Danvilla

Miss Nellie Ewbank Guilford

Mrs. Elwood Lichtenberger Mt. Vernon



Chairmen of State Committees, 1921=1922

PATRIOTIC EDUCATION
Mrs. W. H. Mathew Gary

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Mrs. Henry A. Beck Indianapolis

CONSERVATION
Mrs. Chas. Bone Lafayette

LIQUIDATION AND ENDOWMENT
Mrs. Z. M. Tanner Plymouth

REVOLUTIONARY RELICS
Mrs. Richard Johnson Madison

MARKING HISTORIC SPOTS

Miss Mary Shirley, address, Hampton Court, Indianapolis, __ Kokomo

OLD TRAILS ROAD
Mrs. Paul Comstock Richmond

REAL DAUGHTERS
Mrs. E. C. W. Hillman Logansport

CORRECT USE OF THE FLAG

Mrs. W. B. Ridgeway Vincennes

MAGAZINE
Mrs. J. L. Morris Corydon

PUBLICITY

Mrs. Mindwell Crampton Wilson Delphi

LOCATING GRAVES OF REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS

Mrs. Harvey Morris Salem

RECIPROCITY
Mrs. N. J. Howe Delphi

VALLEY FORGE MEMORIAL
Mrs. J. B. Crankshaw, Mrs. C. W. Ross Miss Mary Britain

Each state chairman is a member of the national committee of
which she is state chairman.

You will find your National Chairman in leaflet issued to Regents
by the National Society.



Daughters of the American Revolution 9

MINUTES OF THE TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL CONFERENCE
INDIANA CHAPTERS ^

DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA, OCTOBER 11, 12, 13, 1921

THE SEVERIN HOTEL

The opening meeting of the twenty-first conference, Daughters
of the American Revolution in Indiana, was held at the Severin Hotel
at eight o'clock in the evening, October 11, 1921, the State Regent
presiding.

As a bugler sounded assembly, the procession headed by twenty
pages entered the rear of the room and marching to the front stood
while the State Regent and the honor guests passed to the stage.

Following the pages came our President General, Mrs. George
Maynard Minor and our State Regent, Mrs, Samuel Elliott Perkins,
Governor Warren T. McCray, Mrs. James M. Fowler, Past Histor-
ian General, Mrs. W. A. Guthrie, Past Vice-President General from
Indiana, the present State officers, and the past State officers.

The twenty-first State conference was pronounced in session by
the State Regent.

The invocation was pronounced by the State Chaplain, Mrs. John
Lee Dinwiddle.

Mrs. J. M. Fowler, Past Historian General led the Daughters in
the salute to the flag, which was followed by the singing of America.

Greetings and welcome were extended by Governor Warren T.
McCray.

In the absence of Mrs. John N. Carey, Honorary Vice-President
General from Indiana, the response was made by Mrs. Guthrie.

A telegram from Mrs. Carey was then read by Mrs. Chenowith
who came to the stage accompanied by two pages bearing a handsome
silken banner of the State of Indiana. The telegram contained greet-
ings and a word of presentation of the State banner to the Governor.

The State Regent introduced Mrs. Minor, President General, N.
S, D. A. R., who gave a most delightful and interesting address. She
told of her trip abroad this past summer, which she took that she
might officially present to the town of Tilloloy, in France the fountain
and waterworks system, which the Daughters of the American Revolu-
tion had had installed and which is the gift of the Daughters to the
village of Tilloloy.

Mrs. Minor sailed July 16, and went first to England. She saw
the point from which the Pilgrims sailed in 1620, and upon which the
American aviator landed in 1920 completing the first Atlantic cross-
ing by aeroplane.

While in London she, with her party, placed a wreath in the
name of the Daughters of the American Revolution on the unknown
British soldier's grave in Westminster Abbey.

Crossing to France, she visited the battle-fields. She was much
honored in being a special guest of M. and Mme. Jusserand at the
ceremonies for the American Legion at Metz.

The ceremony of presentation of the fountain and water-works,
at Tilloloy, took place in front of the fountain. Mrs. Minor told ir
detail of the program of the day.



10 Twenty- first Annual Conference

Her visit in France ended with the placing upon the grave of the
unknown French soldier, buried under the Arc de Triomphe, a mem-
orial wreath in the name of the Daughters of the American Revolu-
tion.

Following Mrs. Minor's address, Miss Frieda Hughes, accom-
panied by Miss Lucy Hamilton, sang the Conneticut State Song, in
honor of the President General, whose home is in that State.

After the announcement of adjournment, an informal reception
was held, the Past Regents of the three Indianapolis chapters acting
as hostesses. WEDNESDAY, October 12.

The meeting, Wednesday morning was called to order by the
State Regent at 9:30. The session was opened with the Lord'^
Prayer, led by the State Chaplain, Mrs. Dinwiddle.

The roll of. chapters was called by the State Secretary, Mrs. H.
C. Ketcham, Thirty-four Chapter Regents responded, announcing an
attendance of ninety-five delegates and thirty visiting members. Eight
chapters :ndicated the presence of their delegates later in the morn-
ing. Total chapters represented in attendance, forty-two. Names of
chapters an.l number of delegates follows:

Alexander Hamilton 4 Lone Tree 2

Ann Rogers Clark 1 Mary Penrose Wajme 1

Bloomington 4 Mary Mott Green 2

Capt. Harmon Aughe 2 Maj. Hugh Dinwiddie 2

Caroline Scott Harrison 12 Mississinnewa 2

Charles Carroll 2 Manitou 1

Christopher Harrison 4 Olde Towne 2

Connersville 2 Old Academy 1

Cornelia Cole Fairbanks 4 Ouibache 2

Dorothy "Q" 4 Piankeshaw 4

Francis Vigo 4 Pottawatomie 4

Fort Harrison 3 Paul Revere 2

Gen. Van Rensselaer 2 Richmond 4

Gen. Arthur St. Clair 1 Richard Henry Lee 2

Gen. Francis Marion 3 Rushville 4

Gen. de Lafayette 4 Twin Forks 2

Gen. James Cox 2 Washburn 3

Huntington 4 William Donaldson 2

John Wallace 2 William Henry Harrison 1

John Paul 4 Williamson Dunn 1

Kik-tha-we-nund 3 Wythougan 2

The reports of the State officers, October, 1920, to April 1921, were
read.

Mrs. Frank Felter, State Regent.
This report will be found printed in full in the Proceedings of the
Thirtieth Continental Congress, page 361.

Mrs. J. B, Crankshaw, Treasurer

Bal. Brought For'd 1919-20 $ 364.01

t). A. R. Year Books 1.60

State Dues 1920-21 490.70

War Record Printing 5.00

State Dues 1921-22 19.05

Gen. Fund 136.60

$1,016.96



Daughters of the American Revolution 11

DISBURSEMENTS

Jaanquet Hall 10.00

Year Books 1918-20 280.00

State Sec'y 24,99

State Treas. 9.95

Reciprocity Chairman 7.75

Historian 44.75

Year Books 1920-21 230.00

State Sec'y. 12.00

Printing War Records 32.00

Tamassee from State Fund 300.00

$ 951.44
Total Receipts $1,016.96"

Total Disbursements 951.44

Balance $ 65.52

Respectfully submitted,

Margaret B. Crankshaw,

Treasurer.

Educational —

Schauffler Institute $ 55.00

International Institute 172.90

Hindman School 45.00

Tamassee 791.30

Tamassee from State Fund 300.00

Martha Berry School 130.00

Scholarship Fund — Indiana University 35.08

$J^529.28
Patriotic and Relief Work —

French War Orphans $ 70.00

Near East Fund 3,020.00

Wm. Henry Harrison Home 20.00

Christmas Dinner — International School 5.00

Liberty Loans 107.00



$3,222.00
Three National Causes —

Manual Monument painting $1,334.90

Indiana Room $ 126.70

For Curtains 28.50

Balance transferred to General Fund $ 98.20

Mrs. S. E. Perkins, Auditor

The books of the Treasurer from April 1920 to April 1921, were
examined, all bills, vouches and checks compared and found to be
correct.

S. E. H. Perkins,

Auditor.



12 Twe7ity-first Annual Conference

Mrs. Theodore Craven, Registrar

My report, though short, covers a vast amount of work, many
letters written and hours spent in the public library, all of which I
have enjoyed, being fully repaid in securing new and interesting data
and making many warm friends thru my correspondence. Seventy
members have been admitted and fifteen papers pending. I have not
worked on supplemental papers as these papers do not add to our
membership, and I must keep my time for this work all of which
reepresents a correspondence of 300 letters.

Julia I. Craven,

State Registrar.
Mrs. H. C. Sheridan, Historian

As an organization, we stand pledged to patriotic and historio
endeavors of every description. Next to Godliness comes Patriotism.
Patriotism is a spiritual quality. It can not be seen, it must be felt
and lived. It must be made a part of the individual life of the com-
munity, of the Nation.

The history of a community is dependent upon its people tor
preservation. If the people respect and reverence the pioneers of
the locality, their doings will be preserved.

One of the favorable signs of the times is the spirit of co-opera-
tion among organizations and societies of a historical character.

We are waking up to the value of our early history and realiz-
ing we have passively submitted to the destruction of many cherished
buildings and localities.

Last year our State Conference was held in Vincennes, a locality
teeming with interesting buildings and spots, our eyes were opened to
the rich field for historical research.

One of the most laudable things accomplished by the Daughters
of the American Revolution in this State, is the purchase and re-
storation of the William Henry Harrison house, by the Francis Vigo
Chapter of Vincennes. It required years of strenuous effort on the
part, a legal battle and an educational campaign along historical
lines, but they did it, and now it stands as a monument to their
efforts.

Another favorable sign is the movement to acquire historic sites
for State Parks. Almost universally the Daughters of the American
Revolution are active in this movement. The Lincoln Highway i^
another method of keeping before the people the historic places. The
people of southern Indiana are petitioning Governor McCray to re-
route the proposed State highway from Evansville to French Lick so
that it will pass through Lincoln City, through the old Thomas Lin-
coln farm, past the home site of the Lincolns, past the grave of
Lincoln's mother, and all the other Lincoln land marks. Can we not
add our sanction to this request?

The Mary Penrose Wayne Chapter will take a prominent part in
the unveiling of the General Lawton Monument in Fort Wayne on
October 22nd.

Logansport is the home of the Old Towne Chapter and many
thrilling adventures and deadly battles are recorded. Decatur County
has located the graves of twenty-two Revolutionary Soldiers. This
is the home of the famous Lone Tree Chapter.

A recent Relic Exhibit put on by the Frankfort Morning Times
called forth the favorable comment of the officers of the State His-'



Daughter's of the American Revolution 13

torical Society, and resulted in their asking the Daughters of the
American Revolution to sponsor a movement to organize a Histori-
cal Society in Frankfort, the Regent of the Capt. Harmon Aughe
Chapter, Mrs. R. N. Wallace, calling and presiding at the prelimi-
nary meetings.

The members of the Captain Harmon Aughe Chapter were also
asked to conduct the style show in one of the store windows and the
exhibit of beautiful and quaint gowns, hats, etc, was much admired
and discussed. The Daughters of the American Revolution had one
large space allotted to them for their own relics. Many beautiful old
pieces of furniture, odd bits of copper, pewter, etc., were in this win-
dow, together with a doll over one hundred years old, and, of course,
Capt. Aughe's saddle bags. The interest shown in this exhibit made it
evident that a great many people still retain and value these relics of
a bygone time, and they are educational as well as highly interesting.

One of our accomplishments must not be overlooked, and that is
the completion of our War Service Records. They were presented
by our Regent, Mrs. Felter, at the Continental Congress last April.
I have the two State volumes with me and I shall be glad to have you
examine them. They may be found in the State Library at any
time.

And now, in conclusion I want you to knov/ that my four years
as your Historian has done much for me. It has brought me into
closer touch with the entire organization, Chapter, State and National.
It has been educational and enlightening. Being closely identified
with the working body of the organization I realize the devoted, un-
selfish service of its corps of officers, and I know that we are broad-
ening and enlarging our activities and that our organization is being
recognized, not only in our own Country but throughout the world
as an unequaled patriotic and historical society.

Margaret V. Sheridan,

State Historian.

Mrs. Henry Wilson, Librarian

The first year's work of a state librarian is time devoted more
or less to getting acquainted with the duties of the office, learning
what kind of books are wanted, where to find them and what pro-
cedure to take to make them a part of Continental Memorial Hall Li-
brary. I am indebted for inspiration to carry on the work, to Mrs.
Fowler, our former Librarian General, and to Mrs. Frank Ellison,
present Librarian General, who held a meeting for instruction to
state librarians in Washington last April, which it was my privelege
to attend. Mrs. Ellison expressed a desire for certain publications
of the Indiana Historical Society. I announced this request through
our publicity columns and almost at once, Miss Lucy Elliott of the
Historical Commission responded that they would gladly send all of
the publications of the Society, to Memorial Hall Library. The
Gold Star Honor Roll of the state was also sent through the kindness
of the Commission. The Life of General Francis Marion was the
gift of the Reciprocity Chairman, Mrs. Howe.

The Librarian General has made the request this month for five
books from Indiana. These books which she desires are:

History of St. Joseph County, in two volumes, by F. E. Howard;
Indiana Miscellany, by W. C. Smith ; Henry County, Past and Present
by Elwood, Centennial Celebration of United Presbyterian church.



14 Twenty-first Annual Conference

Princeton, Ind., by G. H. Stormont; History of Town of Remington,
by J. H. Royalty.

I hope most sincerely that chapters will offer to procure these
books for the Memorial Continental Hall Library. For Indiana
MUST respond to this request.

The question is asked, what kinds of books are desired? The
answer is State, Town, and County histories are needed, baptism and
marriage records, histories of old churches and cemeteries, family
histories and genealogies. These, if not in book form, may be type-
written, always giving authority for same. These books, gifts, either
from authors, Chapter members, or Chapters — it is expected that all
books are gifts — are to be sent directly to Memorial Continental Hall
Library, Washington, D. C. At the same time sending for record,
name of book, author, date of publishment, name of contributor, and
date of sending to Washington, to the State Librarian.

With your efficient assistance the Indiana Society should send
a large number of valuable contributions to the Library during the
year. • ^.^

Respectfully submitted,
Mindwell Crampton Wilson.

The new state officers were invited to offer suggestions for thq
coming year's work.

Announcement was made of a meeting of the Harrison House
Committee for 1:15 on the mezzanine.

The State Regent Makes the Following Suggestions.

As the State Conference as a body decided to continue the gift
to Tamassee School in honor of the Gold Star Men of the D. A. R.
this seems our first task this year. There are at least fifteen men on
our record; this means fifteen hundred dollars. Of this amount about
$600 has been paid to date. Several chapters have paid their full
quota. Can you not raise this money through some kind of an enter-
tainment — a card party, a relic exhibit, a moving picture play, a Col-
onial Ball — are suggestions. The sum should be complete by April 1,
1922. Make this your major endeavor for the year as your State
work.

The Philipine Scholarship Fund still lacks several thousand dol-
lars. When completed this fund will support a Phillipino girl in
this country for education in Medicine or Nursing. She pledges her-
self to give three years after graduation to teaching native girls;
Your State Regent suggests that five cents per capita be given for
this object.

Indiana is especially interested in the Caroline Scott Harrison
Dormitory, at Oxford, Ohio. Mrs. Harrison was not only our first
President General, but spent her married life in Indiana. She was
considered an Indiana woman during her residence in the White
House as the wife of President Harrison. Can we not give gener-
ously that this gift may be accomplished.

A special committee has been appointed to plan the Indiana
decoration on the ceiling of the Washington Memorial at Valley
Forge. It is hoped other patriotic organizations will join with us
in this accomplishment.

The three requests made by the National Society last year have
not been completed. It is urged by the National Board that all Chap-



Daughters of the Avierican Revolution 15

ters who have not sent their quota, try earnestly to accomplish this at
once.

The State Regent suggests that no member forget she is first a
member of the National Society, and her first allegiance must be
there.

We all give generously for Americanization, for Education, for
Conservation. We urge that the small amount asked for by our
National Board shall be diverted from the usual channel that it may
accomplish its purpose through the National Society of the Daugh-
ters of the American Revolution.

Susan E. H. Perkins,

estate Regent.

Our President General talked for a few minutes on the national
aspect and national obligations of the chapters.

Reports from the following chapters were heard: Bloomington^
Wythougan, and Caroline Scott Harrison.

Announcement was made of a lunch for Regents and Alternates
representing Regents, at twelve o'clock at L. S. Ayres tearoom.

The meeting adjourned until one-thirty.

Afternoon session was called to order by the State Regent. Our
honor guests at this session, with Mrs. Minor, were, Mrs. Guernsey,
Honorary President General; Miss Jean W. Coltrane, Historian Gen-
eral; Mrs. Anthony Wayne Cook, Vice-President General, from Penn-


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